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Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 8:52am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 8:52am
Story Debian-Based Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" Gets First Test Build, Ships GNOME 3.22 Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 8:28am
Story Open source where possible in Polish Gdańsk Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 8:26am
Story Fedora 26 Linux to Retire the Synaptics Driver for a Better Touchpad Experience Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 8:15am
Story Meet Remix IO, All-in-One Android 7 Nougat-Powered PC, TV Box & Gaming Console Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 8:13am
Story Top 8 Linux Distributions Of 2016 Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 8:11am
Story Red Hat's Software Collections 2.3 and Developer Toolset 6 Suites Enter Beta Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 12:14am
Story Linux users urged to protect against 'Dirty COW' security flaw Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 12:12am
Story Leslie Zhai Talks 20 Years of KDE in China Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2016 - 12:06am

Solus 1.2.1 Officially Released, First MATE Edition Now Available for Download

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Today, October 19, 2016, Softpedia was informed by the Solus Project about the official release and general availability of the long-anticipated Solus 1.2.1 release, along with the first Solus MATE Edition.

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How Apache Kafka is powering a real-time data revolution

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There are several things to think about while building a company, but the ones that are particularly critical for building a successful company based on an open source technology are evangelism, community influence, the business model, and having the pragmatism to balance investment across these areas. Open source technology greatly simplifies the adoption problem for a new technology and empowers developers to use the technology that is right for building products. Essentially, the developer is the new buyer.

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Disney has its own Open Source Program

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Open-source developers can work with Disney itself with its new Open Source Program. The program acts as a place where developers can collaborate with other Disney enthusiasts, implementing the open-source libraries and platforms that Disney uses in the development of some of its animations.

Like other large non-technology-related companies, Disney is joining the realm of open-source software as a way to become more open toward developers in general. On its page, the company is hosting open-source projects used by Disney animators and developers. They were also used in film series like Sony’s Hotel Transylvania, Warner Bros.’ Harry Potter movies, Disney’s Toy Story, and Pixar shorts.

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Canonical Brings Its Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Offerings to 64-bit ARM Servers

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Canonical informs Softpedia about their latest collaboration with ARM, the industry's leading supplier of microprocessor technology, to bring the company's OpenStack and Ceph offerings to 64-bit ARM-based servers.

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KDevelop 5.0.2 Open-Source IDE Adds Many UI Improvements, 32-bit Windows Build

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The open-source, cross-platform and free integrated development environment (IDE) software KDevelop has been updated the other day, October 17, 2016, to version 5.0.2.

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Ubuntu 16.10 targets hybrid cloud deployments, supports Unity 8 development

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Canonical, developer of Ubuntu, a distribution of Linux, released a new version of its software that targets hybrid cloud deployments. Ubuntu is often mentioned as one of the top 3 distributions of Linux when shipments are considered, depending upon which research firm one cites.

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Solus Enables OpenGL 4.5 for Intel Broadwell, MATE Edition Coming Along Nicely

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It's been a great week for users of the unique and independent Solus operating system, and while you're waiting impatiently for the Solus 1.2.1 release, we'd like to tell you a little bit about what landed in Solus during the past week.

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KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop Launches January 31, 2017, Next LTS Arrives August 2018

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After announcing earlier today, October 18, 2016, the release of the second maintenance update to the KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, KDE published the release schedule for the upcoming major versions of the project.

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Refracta 8.0 - Devuan on a stick

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There are probably some people living in the world today who still haven't heard of systemd, though I doubt that any of them read DistroWatch. More digital ink has been spilled debating the topic of init systems than any other in techie history. There is probably nothing I can say about systemd that hasn't already been said, and no argument either for or against it that hasn't been repeated ad nauseum. So I won't waste this review seeking converts for The Cause™. I don't expect the issue to be finally settled until the Sun swells up to become a red giant and evaporates the Earth.

Geeks determined to resist the systemd juggernaut have several options. For me, the most interesting project is Devuan, a fork of Debian. I will say by way of disclosure that I have downloaded Devuan, installed it, used it for months, and like it. However, it does have a few flaws - the installer in particular needs some more work. The first beta forces you to do a network install that - depending on your Internet connection speed - can take an hour or more. This has defeated curious newbies who decide to give up long before the first boot-up prompt appeared.

It was my search for a quick and easy way to get Devuan up and running that led me to Refracta, a unique distro that fills a niche that has long been neglected. Refracta's existence predates the systemd wars - it was originally based on Debian 5.0, otherwise known as "Lenny." But when Debian 8.0 "Jessie" went full systemd, Refracta moved to the Devuan camp.

Refracta's chief selling point is this: it's a live image that can be quickly installed, customized, and re-installed back to live media again. So basically you can roll your own live CD, configured for your hardware and tweaked to suit your personal tastes. It is currently my favorite distro, and I'd recommend it to any Linux geek who has had a little bit of experience. A total Linux newbie might feel more comfortable with a distro that mimics Windows' point-and-click friendliness, but once you've got the basics down, Refracta is easy to get used to.

It's also worth mentioning that even without being installed, a Refracta live CD or USB stick makes an excellent diagnostic and rescue tool. It contains quite a few command line utilities that aren't in a default Devuan or Debian installation, including gddrescue, testdisk, smartmontools, hdparm, lm-sensors, iftop, and iptraf. I have personally used testdisk to recover data from a crashed hard drive.

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Linux Foundation and Linux

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  • Surprise release candidate of Linux 4.9 kernel has element from Project Ara

    I suppose I should introduce myself. I’m Private 78523 Benjamin Carly Rae Jepsen-Calico-Smith. I’m not very important to the platoon. I’m new, you see, but all the other cats have gone to the Furball and Bucket and said I have to stay here. And Commander Torvalds has been on the line with special instructions.

    Basically, he’s closed the kernel window for RC1 of Linux 4.9 early. And the Colonel is asleep. I bet he’s going to make it my fault.

    The Commander said: "I usually do the releases on a Sunday afternoon, but occasionally cut the merge window short by a day just to keep people on their toes, and make sure people learn not to send in last-minute pull requests. No gaming the merge window to the last day. This is one such release.”

  • Kernel 4.9 merge window highlights

    The 4.8 kernel was released on October 2nd. This also marked the start of the merge window for the 4.9 kernel. The merge window is the time period when kernel subsystem maintainers send their pull requests for new features to be included in the 4.9 kernel. Here are a few features pulled into the 4.9 kernel that might be of interest for Fedora users.

  • Linux 4.9 Kernel Tacks On Over 200k Lines Of Code

    With all the new features in Linux 4.9, obviously Tux put on a bit of weight this kernel cycle... Here's some numbers.

    In yesterday's Linux 4.9 feature overview I failed to mention the latest code stats for this exciting kernel update that's introducing Greybus, boasts experimental GCN 1.0 AMDGPU support, supports 29 new ARM machines, and much more.

  • The Linux Foundation Moves to Unite the JavaScript Ecosystem

Security News

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  • Tuesday's security updates
  • Critical flaws found in open-source encryption software VeraCrypt [Ed: TrueCrypt was never really FOSS]

    A new security audit has found critical vulnerabilities in VeraCrypt, an open-source, full-disk encryption program that's the direct successor of the widely popular, but now defunct, TrueCrypt.

    Users are encouraged to upgrade to VeraCrypt 1.19, which was released Monday and includes patches for most of the flaws. Some issues remain unpatched because fixing them requires complex changes to the code and in some cases would break backward compatibility with TrueCrypt.

    However, the impact of most of those issues can be avoided by following the safe practices mentioned in the VeraCrypt user documentation when setting up encrypted containers and using the software.

  • Veracode: open source is creating 'systematic risks' across companies and industries [Ed: this company routinely smears FOSS]

    SECURITY FIRM VERACODE has released a damning report into open source and third-party software components and warned that, for example, almost all Java applications are blighted with at least one problem.

  • Why is Java so insecure? Buggy open source components take the blame

    Open-source and Java components used in applications remain a weak spot for the enterprise, according to a new analysis.

    Java applications in particular are posing a challenge, with 97 percent of these applications containing a component with at least one known vulnerability, according to a new report from code-analysis security vendor Veracode.

  • Parrot Security 3.2 “CyberSloop” Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Available For Download

    Earlier this year, I prepared a list of the top operating systems used for ethical hacking purposes. In that list, Parrot Security OS ranked at #2. It’s developed by Frozenbox Network and released under the GNU/GPL v3 license. A couple of days ago, Parrot Security 3.2 ethical hacking Linux distro arrived. The new version of this popular operating system is codenamed CyberSloop and it’s based on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 Stretch.

    Parrot Security 3.1 version arrived long back in July. Compared to that, the new version has taken a while due to some buggy packages in the Debian Testing repository that Parrot Security team had to fix themselves. In particular, the bug being discussed here is the latest GTK updates that broke the MATE interface.

  • Linux-run IoT devices under attack by NyaDrop [Ed: Devices with open ports and identical passwords across the board are not secure; not “Linux” issue]

    Internet of Things (IoT) devices running on the open-source Linux OS are under attack from NyaDrop.

    The attack loads malware on IoT devices lacking appropriate security after brute forcing default login credentials, according to a report by David Bisson for Graham Cluley Security News. The code achieves this by parsing its list of archived usernames and passwords. Once authenticated, NyaDrop is installed. The lightweight binary then loads other malware onto the infected device.

Android Leftovers

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Ubuntu 16.10: Yakkety Yak... Unity 8's not wack

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Canonical's Ubuntu 16.10, codenamed "Yakkety Yak", is nowhere near as chunky an update as 16.04 LTS was earlier this year. But that doesn't mean there's nothing new. In fact, the firm's second release of the year has quite a few fresh features to hold users over until the bright and shiny future of Unity 8 and Mir arrive some time next year.

Nevertheless, it's very odd to have what feels like a smaller update arrive with Ubuntu's October release, which typically is the more experimental release with tons of new features being tested. This time around that's not really the case. In what's become a familiar refrain for Ubuntu, most of the work is happening with the still-not-quite-there Unity 8.

Ubuntu 16.10 marks the seventh time Unity 8 has not been ready for prime time. While Unity 8 appears to be progressing - judging by developer updates and playing with pre-release versions - it is, at this point, in danger of joining Duke Nukem Forever on the great vaporware list in the sky. Still, take heart Ubuntu fans, just as Duke Nukem Forever did eventually see the light of day, it seems very likely that Unity 8 and Mir will in fact be released eventually. Perhaps even as early as 17.04. Also, I have a bridge for sale, if anyone is interested.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Unity 8 Preview In Ubuntu 16.10

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Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak has just been released with quite a few number of new stuff and a first preview of Unity 8 desktop environment. Unity could be installed in Ubuntu 16.04 but it comes with 16.10 pre-installed. Unity 8 has been in development since 2013 and anyone who has seen or used Ubuntu phone will quickly notice the similarities and some major differences.

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Parted Magic 2016_10_18 Disk Partitioning Live CD Released with over 800 Updates

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Today, October 18, 2016, Parted Magic LLC announced the release and general availability of a new, updated version of their once free Parted Magic disk partitioning Live CD.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Tor Project Releases Tor (The Onion Router) with New Security Fixes

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Tor Project informed the Tor (The Onion Router) community about the immediate availability of the Tor stable update, which adds a few important security fixes to keep your Tor installation reliable at all times.

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Ubuntu 16.10 Desktop Gaming Benchmarks: Unity, GNOME, Xfce, LXDE, KDE, Openbox, MATE

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As usual when there's a new Ubuntu Linux, the requests come in for running OpenGL graphics/game benchmarks under the different desktop options. For some Ubuntu 16.10 on Intel Mesa graphics tests are results for GNOME Shell, Xfce, LXDE, KDE Plasma, Openbox, MATE, and Unity running atop X.Org.

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Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration. Read more Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

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