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Wednesday, 22 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 9:55am
Story Read Reddit from the Linux terminal Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 9:47am
Story What you need to know about System76's open source firmware project Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 9:43am
Story Schedule Jobs in Linux With ‘at’ Command itsfoss 21/01/2020 - 8:37am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 7:02am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 7:00am
Story Devices: Piksey Atto, Seeed Studio and Nexcom Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 6:57am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 6:50am
Story Python Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 6:42am
Story Syncthing: Open Source P2P File Syncing Tool Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2020 - 6:36am

Android Leftovers

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Android

Programming: GNU, Git, Perl, Python and Django

Filed under
Development
  • Experimental Support For C++20 Coroutines Has Landed In GCC 10

    As of this morning experimental support for C++20 coroutines has been merged into the GCC 10 compiler!

    Coroutines allow a function to have its execution stopped/suspended and then to be resumed later. Coroutines is one of the big features of C++20. Sample syntax and more details on C++ coroutines can be found at cppreference.com.

    Coroutines support for GCC has been under development for months and now as a late addition to GCC 10 is the experimental implementation.

  • GNU Binutils 2.34 Branched - Bringing With It "debuginfod" HTTP Server Support

    With GNU Binutils 2.34 comes debuginfod support, which is the HTTP server catching our eye while the debuginfod server is distributed as part of the latest elfutils package. This isn't for a general purpose web server thankfully but is an HTTP server for distributing ELF/DWARF debugging information and source code. With debuginfod enabled, Binutils' readelf and objdump utilities can query the HTTP server(s) for debug files that cannot otherwise be found. Enabling this option requires building Binutils using --with-debuginfod.

  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.5.3

    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.

  • Steve Kemp: Announce: github2mr

    myrepos is an excellent tool for applying git operations to multiple repositories, and I use it extensively.

    I've written several scripts to dump remote repository-lists into a suitable configuration format, and hopefully I've done that for the last time.

  • Term::ANSIColor 5.01

    This is the module included in Perl core that provides support for ANSI color escape sequences.

    This release adds support for the NO_COLOR environment variable (thanks, Andrea Telatin) and fixes an error in the example of uncolor() in the documentation (thanks, Joe Smith). It also documents that color aliases are expanded during alias definition, so while you can define an alias in terms of another alias, they don't remain linked during future changes.

  • Python 3.7.5 : Django security issues - part 001.

    Django like any website development and framework implementation requires security settings and configurations.
    Today I will present some aspects of this topic and then I will come back with other information.

  • How to display flash messages in Django templates

    Sometimes we need to show the one-time notification, also known as the flash messages in our Django application. For this Django provides the messages framework. We are going to use the same here.

    To show flash messages in the Django application, we will extend our previous project Hello World in Django 2.2. Clone the git repository, check out the master branch and set up the project on your local machine by following the instructions in the README file.

KDE: Videos, Plasma and Itinerary

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KDE
  • So you want to make a KDE video...

    KDE is running a competition in search of the next great promotional video for KDE's Plasma desktop and KDE's applications.

    The prizes are two fantastic TUXEDO computers, one per category, which will undoubtedly boost your film rendering capacity. There are also 12 goodie packages for runner-ups, and who doesn't need more Linux shirts, caps and stickers?

    Although we have already received some interesting entries, we feel it may be time to help video artists out there with ideas from the judges themselves.

    Below, Julian Schraner, Ivana Isadora Devčić, and Paul Brown from the Promo team and Farid Abdelnour from the Kdenlive team give their views on what a KDE promotional video should look like, where to find resources, and which pitfalls may hurt your film if you fall for them.

  • Learning about our users

    In a product like Plasma, knowing the kind of things our existing users care about and use sheds light on what needs polishing or improving. At the moment, the input we have is either the one from the loudest most involved people or outright bug reports, which lead to a confirmation bias.

    What do our users like about Plasma? On which hardware do people use Plasma? Are we testing Plasma on the same kind of hardware Plasma is being used for?

    Some time ago, Volker Krause started up the KUserFeedback framework with two main features. First, allowing to send information about application’s usage depending on certain users’ preferences and include mechanisms to ask users for feedback explicitly. This has been deployed into several products already, like GammaRay and Qt Creator, but we never adopted it in KDE software.

    The first step has been to allow our users to tune how much information Plasma products should be telling KDE about the systems they run on.

  • [KDE] Itinerary extraction in Nextcloud Hub

    Nextcloud announced their latest release and among the many new features is itinerary extraction from emails. That’s using KDE’s extraction engine, the same that powers similar features in KMail as well.

Windows 7 Support Ended. Here’s You Should Do.

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Linux

After a decade of service, Windows 7 finally retired, leaving millions of PC worldwide exposed to security vulnerabilities and hackers.
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Debian: Stremio in Sparky Linux, Looking at Debian 10, and Package Usage Stats

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Debian
  • Stremio

    There is a new tool available for Sparkers: Stremio

    What is Stremio?

    Stremio is a one-stop hub for video content aggregation. Discover, organize and watch video from all kind of sources on any device that you own.
    Movies, TV shows, series, live television or web channels like YouTube and Twitch.tv – you can find all this on Stremio.

  • Debian 10, the clean install

    Events have ended my upgrade procrastination. Last week my hard drive started having many errors. Fortunately it lasted long enough for me to copy all of its contents to my USB backup drive. (My /home/brad directory is automatically backed up daily, but I also have separate partitions for downloaded files, PDFs, Linux CD images, and archived photos from my digital camera...and those only get backed up now and then.) Then a quick trip to the store for a new SATA hard drive.

    I suppose I could have copied my old root partition over to the new drive. But I've been running 32-bit Debian 8 ("Jessie"), which is now two versions behind. And I've been noticing more and more applications that I want to run are only being distributed for 64-bit Linux. So I decided to do a clean install of 64-bit Debian 10 ("Buster"), with my preferred MATE desktop (now a standard option with Debian).

  • gnu Linux Debian – top 1000 packages by install – popularity contest

    remember: only the installs are counted where the user said yes during setup to: „do you want to participate in popularity contest?“ (guess that many Linux users are privacy sensitive and a lot of them probably say „no“)

What is Kanban and How to use Kanban in Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

in 1997, directly after University, I started as an IT specialist and have been working in this area ever since in different roles. During these more than 20 years of being part of and later also leading IT related projects, our teams were using several methods and supporting software to plan our projects in the best possible way. Not all were equally successful. Currently our teams are working in a Scrum approach which is part of the Agile methodology. To support this way of working we use among others a Kanban board to plan and monitor our work. Kanban is nothing new but seems extremely popular at the moment. It is not only a great approach for large and complex projects, but also on a smaller scale for your study and your personal projects. In this article, which will be a part of a series on productivity apps, I want to explain three topics: What is Kanban, Why should you use Kanban to be more productive and What are the best Kanban apps for Linux.

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Red Hat: Kernel and dnf-automatic

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Shows Off Their vDPA Kernel Patches For Better Ethernet Within VMs

    Red Hat engineers have been developing virtual data path acceleration (vDPA) as a standard data plane that is more flexible than VirtIO full hardware offloading. The goal is providing wire-speed Ethernet interfaces to virtual machines in an open manner.

    This patch series was sent out on Thursday by Red Hat's Jason Wang. This implements the vDPA bus for the Linux kernel as well as providing a vDPA device simulator and supporting vDPA-based transport within VirtIO.

  • What is the latest kernel release for my version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux?

    I read an interesting question on the Red Hat Learning Community forums recently. What is the latest kernel version for my version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)? In this post we'll see how you can find out.

    Some users, trying to be helpful, gave a specific version of the kernel package. Unfortunately, that might only be valid at the time of writing. A better approach would be to understand where to get that information about the latest kernel version for a given version of RHEL.

    When Red Hat releases a major or minor update to RHEL, they ship it with a specific branch of the kernel version. This page in the customer portal shows the kernel version "branch" associated with a release of RHEL (e.g. RHEL7.6).

  • dnf-automatic – Install Security Updates Automatically in CentOS 8

    Security updates play a crucial role in safeguarding your Linux system against cyber-attacks and breaches which can have a devastating effect on your critical files, databases and other resources on your system.

    You can manually apply security patches on your CentOS 8 system, but it is much easier as a system administrator to configure automatic updates. This will give you the confidence that your system will be periodically checking for any security patches or updates and applying them.

Devices: PCB, OpenCV/RasPi and NVIDIA Jetson Nano

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • A beginner tries PCB assembly

    I wrote last year about my experience with making my first PCB using JLCPCB. I’ve now got 5 of the boards in production around my house, and another couple assembled on my desk for testing. I also did a much simpler board to mount a GPS module on my MapleBoard - basically just with a suitable DIP connector and mount point for the GPS module. At that point I ended up having to pay for shipping; not being in a hurry I went for the cheapest option which mean the total process took 2 weeks from order until it arrived. Still not bad for under $8!

    Just before Christmas I discovered that JLCPCB had expanded their SMT assembly option to beyond the Chinese market, and were offering coupons off (but even without that had much, much lower assembly/setup fees than anywhere else I’d seen). Despite being part of LCSC the parts library can be a bit limited (partly it seems there’s nothing complex to assemble such as connectors), with a set of “basic” components without setup fee and then “extended” options which have a $3 setup fee (because they’re not permanently loaded, AIUI).

  • Digitizing a analog water meter

    Sadly, my meter is really dirt under the glass and i couldn’t manage to clean it. This will cause problems down the road.

    The initial idea was easy, add a webcam on top of the meter and read the number on the upper half it. But I soon realized that the project won’t be that simple. The number shows only the use of 1m^3 (1000 liters), this means that I would have a change only every couple of days, which is useless and boring. So, I had to read the analog gauges, which show the fraction in 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 m^3. This discovery blocked me, and I was like “this is way to complicated”.

    I have no idea how I found or what reminded me of OpenCV, but that was the solution. OpenCV is an awesome tool for computer vision, it has many features like Facial recognition, Gesture recognition … and also shape recognition. What’s a analog gauge? It’s just a circle with an triangular arrow indicating the value.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit-B01 Gets an Extra Camera Connector

    Launched in March 2019, NVIDIA Jetson Nano developer kit offered an AI development platform for an affordable $99.

today's howtos

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HowTos

XMPP - Fun with Clients

Filed under
Software

As I already wrote in my last blog post there's much development in XMPP, not only on the server side, but also on the client side. It's surely not exaggerated to say that Conversations on Android is the de-facto standard client-wise. So, if you have an Android phone, that's the client you want to try&use. As I don't have Android, I can't comment on it. The situation on Linux is good as well: there are such clients as Gajim, which is an old player in the "market" and is available on other platforms as well, but there is with Dino a new/modern client as well that you may want to try out.

The situation for macOS and iOS users are not that good as for Windows, Linux or Android users. But in the end all clients have their pro and cons... I'll try to summarize a few clients on Linux, macOS and iOS...

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Linux disk resizing on Chromebooks pushed back to Chrome OS 81

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OS
Linux

The good news is that plans have been in the works since March of last year to allow you to reclaim some of that space by shrinking or resizing the Linux storage. The bad news is that after being pushed back twice since the feature is being put off again; this time until Chrome OS 81.
You’d think this would be a relatively simple thing to implement but in reality, it’s not. That’s because the Chrome OS filesystem has evolved in the past year and due to expected support for a particular file type for older Linux kernels never worked out.
I’d rather the Chromium team take their time for a well designed and implemented solution so as not to break any functionality. Plus there’s the challenge of having enough free storage to restore a container backup.

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Enterprise Insights: Red Hat And The Public Cloud

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Red Hat
Server

Open source projects are the epicenter of technology innovation today. Docker and Kubernetes are revolutionizing cloud-native computing, along with data-focused projects like Mongo and Redis and many others. Even as open source projects drive innovation, however, sponsoring companies face a growing existential threat from hyper-scale cloud providers.

Red Hat is the recognized leader in enterprise open source support. It's a successful public company with a track record of growth, so it was somewhat puzzling to understand why the Red Hat board decided to sell to IBM this past year.

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Pumpkin SBCs feature new MediaTek SoCs and mainline Linux/Android SDK

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Android
Linux

MediaTek has launched two “Pumpkin i300 EVK” SBCs with a quad -A35 MediaTek i300 and unveiled a Pumpkin i500 EVK based on the octa-core -A73/-A53 i500. The SBCs feature a BayLibre-developed, MediaTek Rich IoT SDK v20.0 with Yocto and Android 10.

At CES last week, MediaTek teased an OLogic built Pumpkin i500 EVK AI Vision SBC built around its powerful octa-core Cortex-A73 and -A53 MediaTek i500. Due in February, the SBC will join two recently launched Pumpkin i300 EVK SBCs built around different variations of the quad-core, Cortex-A35 based MediaTek i300 (MT8362) SoC.

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Open source: A matter of license and lock-in

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Red Hat
OSS

Recently, a few bits of newsworthy information hit the open source landscape. Separately, these pieces of news were not that glaring, but when you put them together something a bit more ominous comes into focus--something I never would have thought to be an issue within the open source community.

Before I get into this, I want to preface this by saying I am not usually one to cry foul, wolf, or squirrel! I prefer to let those pundits who make a living at gleaning the important bits out of the big bowl of alphabet soup and draw their own conclusions. But this time, I think it's important I chime in.

Yes, at this very moment I am donning my tin foil hat. Why? Because I think it's necessary. And with me sporting that shiny chapeau, understand every word you are about to read is conjecture.

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Also: Why Did Red Hat Drop Its Support for Docker's Runtime Engine?

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • JavaScript destructuring like Python kwargs with defaults

    I'm sure it's been blogged about a buncha times before but, I couldn't find it, and I had to search too hard to find an example of this.

  • Create the input text box with tkinter

    In the previous post, I have written a python program to create the database, earning table as well as input the first row of data into the earning table. In this chapter, I will create a simple UI to accept the user’s input so we do not need to hardcoded the values into the SQL query. I will leave the SQL commit code to the next chapter, we will only create a simple input’s UI in this chapter first.

    A description box and the earning box of the Earning Input user interface
    As you can see I will create the above simple UI with tkinter which can then be further upgraded in the future to include more stuff.

  • Start using 2FA and API tokens on PyPI

    To increase the security of PyPI downloads, we have added two-factor authentication (2FA) as a login security option, and API tokens for uploading packages. This is thanks to a grant from the Open Technology Fund, coordinated by the Packaging Working Group of the Python Software Foundation.

    If you maintain or own a project on the Python Package Index, you should start using these features. Click "help" on PyPI for instructions. (These features are also available on Test PyPI.)

  • How to Build RESTful APIs with Python and Flask

    For some time now I have been working with Python but I just got to try out Flask recently, so I felt it would be nice to write about it. In this aritcle I'll discuss about Flask and how you can use it to build RESTfull APIs.

    Flask is a Python-based microframework that enables you to quickly build web applications; the “micro” in microframework simply means Flask aims to keep the core simple but extensible.

  • Reading Binary Data with Python

    When you deal with external binary data in Python, there are a couple of ways to get that data into a data structure. You can use the ctypes module to define the data structure or you can use the struct python module.

    You will see both methods used when you explore tool repositories on the web. This article shows you how to use each one to read an IPv4 header off the network. It’s up to you to decide which method you prefer; either way will work fine.

50 Useful and Productive cURL Command in Linux

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Linux

The cURL utility is a simple yet powerful command-line tool for transferring files to/from remote locations. Its full form stands for ‘Client URL’. It has cemented its position as one of the best tools for remote data transfer over the internet. cURL offers a robust collection of commands that enable many advanced functionalities. Additionally, most curl command in Linux works exceptionally well for headless agents and/or automated scripts. To help you get started with cURL, our editors have compiled this thoughtfully curated introductory guide. Although it’s meant as a starting point for beginning Linux users, seasoned users can use it as a reference guide.

The cURL utility supports a wide variety of protocols and features. We’ve outlined the essential commands with appropriate examples and suggest readers try them interactively for gaining first-hand experience on them. As with any Linux tool, your expertise with cURL will only grow when you continue to use it in everyday life.

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E-con ships 5MP cam for Nano Dev Kit, which gets rev’d with second CSI link

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Linux

E-Con has launched a $69, 5-megapixel “e-CAM50_CUNANO” camera for the Jetson Nano Dev Kit with a MIPI-CSI2 interface and Linux driver. Meanwhile, Nvidia launched a revised “B01” version of the kit with a second CSI connector and support for the Xavier NX.

E-Con Systems has followed its 3.4-megapixel e-CAM30_CUNANO camera for the Jetson Nano Dev Kit with a 5-megapixel model. Like the 3.4MP model, the e-CAM50_CUNANO uses a MIPI-CSI2 interface, but is built around OnSemi’s 1/2.5″ AR0521, a 2.2µm pixel CMOS image sensor with integrated ISP.

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Wine development 5.0-rc6

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.0-rc6 is now available.
    
    Barring any last minute issue, this is expected to be the last
    release candidate before the final 5.0.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Bug fixes only, we are in code freeze.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.0/wine-5.0-rc6.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.0/wine-5.0-rc6.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.0-RC6 Released With Another 21 Fixes

    We'll likely see the Wine 5.0 stable release next week or the following week, but for now Wine 5.0-RC6 is available as the newest weekly release candidate.

    Given the code freeze that's been in place for over the past month, there are no new features but only bug fixes at this stage. Wine 5.0-RC6 ships with 21 known bug fixes in total.

    Some of the fixes in Wine 5.0-RC6 are for Brothers In Arms - Hell's Highway, Tomb Raider, The Witcher Enhanced Edition, Serious Sam Classic, and other games. There are also fixes for applications like 7-Zip, Acrobat Reader, and Pale Moon.

  • The sixth Release Candidate for Wine 5.0 is out now

    The Wine team have released a sixth and perhaps final Release Candidate for the upcoming stable release of Wine 5.0. What's going to be one of the biggest releases ever, with some truly massive feature improvements since Wine 4.0 back in January last year.

    Going by how many Release Candidates they've done before (7 for 4.0 and 6 for 3.0 and 6 for 2.0), the final stable Wine 5.0 release could well be next week.

    For this sixth Release Candidate of Wine 5.0, they noted 21 bug fixes. As always, some might have been fixed in older versions that have been retested recently. From the recent fixes you should see a better experience with The Witcher Enhanced Edition, Dark Messiah of Might and Magic, Serious Sam Classic, Far Cry 5 and probably more too.

7 things I learned from starting an open source project

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OSS

I'm currently involved—heavily involved—in Enarx, an open source (of course!) project to support running sensitive workloads on untrusted hosts. I've had involvement in various open source projects over the years, but this is the first for which I'm one of the founders. We're at the stage now where we've got a fair amount of code, quite a lot of documentation, a logo, and (important!) stickers. The project will hopefully be included in a Linux Foundation group—the Confidential Computing Consortium—so things are going very well indeed.

I thought it might be useful to reflect on some of the things we did to get things going. To be clear, Enarx is a particular type of project, one that we believe has commercial and enterprise applications. It's also not mature yet, and we'll have hurdles and challenges along the way. What's more, the route we've taken won't be right for all projects, but hopefully, there's enough here to give a few pointers to other projects or people considering starting one up.

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today's howtos

GameMode 1.5

  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release. GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works? To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care. Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects. In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries. In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments. One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.