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Saturday, 22 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 10:35pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 10:12pm
Story Linux Foundation:Blockchain and ONF/ONOS Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 10:11pm
Story Phoronix Graphics News Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 10:09pm
Story NethServer 7 RC1 Replaces Snort with Suricata, Adds Deep Packet Inspection Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 10:07pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 9:55pm
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 9:54pm
Story RaspEX Project Now Lets You Run Ubuntu 16.10 on Raspberry Pi 3 and 2, with LXDE Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 9:43pm
Story Nasdaq Selects Drupal 8 Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 9:42pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2016 - 9:16pm

First openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidate Adds KDE Plasma 5.8.1, GNOME Updates

Just a few minutes ago, openSUSE Project, through Douglas DeMaio, proudly announced the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) version of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system.

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Also: OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidate Published

Leftovers: Software

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  • MKVToolNix 9.5.0 "Quiet Fire" MKV Split and Merge Tool Now Available to Download

    MKVToolNix developer and maintainer Moritz Bunkus had the great pleasure of announcing the other day the availability for download of the MKVToolNix 9.5.0 stable update.

    MKVToolNix is currently the best open-source tool you can use for manipulating MKV (Matroska) files, which are have become in the past few years that standard of multimedia containers, allowing users to add video, audio, and subtitle tracks into a single file. Dubbed Quiet Fire, MKVToolNix 9.5.0 is now the most advanced version, bringing various improvements to the mkvmerge component, and GUI enhancements.

  • Docker 1.12.2 App Container Engine Brings Swarm Mode and Networking Improvements

    After being in development for the past two months, the second point release of the major Docker 1.12 open source and cross-platform application container engine has been published.

    During its two-month development cycle, Docker 1.12.2 received a total of three Release Candidate (RC) builds, which brought numerous networking and runtime improvements, as well as multiple enhancements to the Swarm Mode feature introduced in the Docker 1.12 release.

    Besides the networking, runtime, and Swarm Mode changes, which you can view in detail if you read the changelog attached at the end of the article, Docker 1.12.2 adds stability improvements for the Docker Client under the new macOS Sierra 10.12 operating system from Apple.

  • gettz 0.0.2

    Release 0.0.2 of gettz is now on CRAN.

  • pgpcontrol 2.5

    pgpcontrol is the collection of the original signing and verification scripts that David Lawrence wrote (in Perl) for verification of Usenet control messages. I took over maintenance of it, with a few other things, but haven't really done much with it. It would benefit a lot from an overhaul of both the documentation and the code, and turning it into a more normal Perl module and supporting scripts.

  • Shotwell 0.24.1 Linux Image Viewer and Organizer Improves the Piwigo Uploader

    The Shotwell open-source image viewer and organizer has been updated recently to version 0.24.1 for the GNOME 3.22.1 desktop environment, bringing various improvements and bug fixes, as well as updated translations.

    According to the internal changelog, which we've attached at the end of the article for your reading pleasure, Shotwell 0.24.1 is here to improve the Piwigo uploader, which should now longer crash and allow the creation of albums. Deprecated CSS style code has been removed, and the focus handling should work correctly when in full-screen mode.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Clear Linux Now Riding On Linux 4.8.1, Ships AVX2-Optimized Python

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Intel's Clear Linux open-source operating system continues advancing as one of the less heard of but highly performant rolling-release distributions for servers, cloud, containers, and other applications.

Clear Linux Highlights #4 was published today to make known some of the latest improvements. Some of the recent packaging changes include landing GNOME 3.22 components, adding Wayland 1.12, introducing Apache Maven, and updates to various existing packages. Some of the notable updates are using Linux 4.8.1, systemd 231, Vim 8.0, Emacs 25.1, and Node.js 6.8.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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  • New Tool Lets You Easily Install the Ubuntu Touch OS on Your Mobile Devices

    Softpedia was just informed by Marius Quabeck from about a new tool that lets users super easily install the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on their devices.

    The tool is developed by Marius Quabeck himself and is called magic-device-tool. The first stable version, magic-device-tool 1.0, is now available to everyone and promises to offer a simple and easy-to-use batch tool for installing Canonical's Ubuntu Touch mobile OS, as well as Android, Cyanogenmod, or Phoenix OS.

    In other words, you'll be able to replace your mobile operating system on your device with any of the following: the latest Ubuntu Touch release, Cyanogenmod - with or without the GAPPS (Google Apps) package, the factory Android image, as well as Phoenix OS. Please note that you'll only be able to run one of these OSes on your mobile devices.

  • Canonical Brings Ubuntu OpenStack, Ceph to ARM Servers

    Telco and enterprise customers are looking for an alternative source of silicon beyond Intel for data center silicon, Canonical officials say.
    ARM officials took a step forward in their effort to build the software ecosystem around its efforts in the data center when Canonical said that its Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph offerings are now commercially available on servers powered by ARM's 64-bit chip architecture.

  • Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Storage now available on ARM v8-A

    Unified solution will benefit majority of public cloud services, Canonical explained

    Canonical and ARM have announced a strategic partnership, making Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Storage now available on ARM v8-A-based enterprise solutions.

    Working together with Ubuntu certified System on Chip (SoC) partners, ODMs and OEMs, the two companies will ensure the equipment used by customers, such as servers, storage and networking products can be used with Ubuntu Advantage.

    “We have seen our Telecom and Enterprise customers start to radically depart from traditional server design to innovative platform architectures for scale-out compute and storage. In partnering with ARM we bring more innovation and platform choice to the marketplace,” Mark Baker, product manager of OpenStack at Canonical said.

  • Canonical gives Ubuntu Linux 17.04 the name 'Zesty Zapus' (jumping mouse)

    Linux distributions and silly names go together like peanut butter and jelly. For whatever reason, the maintainers of these operating systems seem to enjoy having fun with what they call them -- some argue it is childish. Even Google -- a billion dollar company -- uses sugary dessert names for the Linux-based Android operating system.

    One of the most well-known Linux distributions to use funny names is Ubuntu. It famously uses the convention of an adjective and a lesser-known animal, each starting with the same letter. The letter is chosen sequentially by alphabet. For example, Ubuntu 16.10 uses the letter "Y" -- "Yakkety Yak". The next version of the operating system will use the letter "Z". While many folks hoped for "Zebra", that would be too obvious. Instead, Canonical has chosen "Zesty Zapus". Don't know what a zapus is? Neither did I. It is apparently a type of jumping mouse. The selection was not made at random, however, as the company has an explanation for the decision.

  • Upcoming Zesty Zapus, Bodhi 4 Beta 3

    Mark Shuttleworth today blogged of the "metaphorical" naming of the release has reached the end of the alphabet with 17.04's Zesty Zapus. Apparently, a zapus is "a genus of North American jumping mice," thanks to Wikipedia, and is the only living mammal to have 18 teeth. The genus includes three distinct subspecies and has inhabited Earth since the Pliocene. They have long tails, long back feet, yellowish-brown backs and white bellies. Zesty means "having an agreeably pungent taste," according to the collective dictionary databases of KDict.

  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 - quick screenshot tour

    Ubuntu MATE became an officially supported family member not so long ago. Linux notes from DarkDuck have already published a review of Ubuntu MATE 16.04.

What the history of open source teaches us about strategic advantage

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The free software movement started like many other movements: A group of bright, spirited people felt controlled by a greater power and rose up and took matters into their own hands.

It's not that different from the American Revolution. The colonists were tired of being controlled by Great Britain, so they declared their independence and started building their own system of government and military, and creating their own cultures. The revolutionaries' methods were disorganized and improvised, but they ultimately proved to be effective. Same goes for the software revolutionaries.

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France renews its two free software support contracts

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The French administration in charge of the public procurement, and DINSIC (the state agency in charge of the IT ) have renewed the two contracts for free software support services. Both contracts were awarded to the French free software services provider Linagora.

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Why enterprises are now opting for open source software

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Red Hat

In March this year, Red Hat became the world’s first open source software (OSS) solutions company to cross $2 billion in revenue. The term open source implies ‘free’ access to software which developers can modify. Not many thought Red Hat would be successful when the company was founded in 1993. However, it has proved its naysayers wrong with a $14.78 billion market cap (as on September 30), $600 million revenue in Q2 FY17 and entry into the Forbes list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 for the fourth time. Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat’s president and CEO, and Rajesh Rege, its India MD, tell Forbes India why enterprises are now opting for open source software.

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12 Top Open Source Data Analytics Apps

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For many large enterprises, open source big data analytics have become an integral part of daily business. According to a 2016 New Vantage Partners survey of executives at Fortune 1000 companies, 62.5 percent of enterprises are now running at least one big data tool or application in production. That's nearly double the number who said the same thing in 2013. And only 5.4 percent of those surveyed had no big data plans.

When it comes to big data analytics, open source software is the rule rather than the exception. Several of the leading tools enterprises are using are managed by the Apache Foundation, and many of the commercial tools are based at least in part on these open source solutions.

In this slideshow, we're featuring twelve of the top open source data analytics solutions. Some of them offer a complete end-to-end platform for big data analytics while others must be combined with other technologies. All of them are suitable for enterprise use and are among the leading tools for data analysis.

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The answer to Internet of Things madness? Open source, of course!

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"Open is always going to win," states Ed Hemphill, CEO of WigWag, a company that hopes to make sense of the ever-expanding and ever-more-complex Internet of Things market.

WigWag is named after the traditional flags used by the US military's Signal Corps to communicate messages. Hemphill and his cofounder Travis McCollum both served in the Signal Corps before starting up their company in Austin, Texas.

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Best Linux Intranet Solutions

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There's a lot of benefits to having your local communications within the confines of your office Intranet. When it comes to keeping content and communications local, there are a number of decent Linux Intranet friendly solutions to serve content to those on your network.

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RPi Compute Module 3 revealed, tapped for NEC signage

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On Oct. 10, NEC Display Solutions Europe announced it would produce a series of digital signage display computers equipped with the upcoming Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3, which runs Linux on the same quad-core Cortex-A53 SoC as the Raspberry Pi 3. On Oct. 14, Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading, made his own announcement of the displays, adding some more details, and today, the datasheet for the Compute Module 3 leaked online.

Long story short: the Compute Module 3 is pin compatible with the original, but will be available in 4GB eMMC and SD-only models. There’s no pricing or close-up photo, but the module will ship by the end of the year.

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GNOME Builder 3.22.1 Adds Support for Sysprof Visualizers, Polishes the UI

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Now that the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment got its first point release, some of the applications distributed as part of the GNOME Stack are getting updated to the 3.22.1 milestone.

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PBS Launches Android Tablet for Kids

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A sub-$100 Android tablet is hitting Best Buy stores in November, and its 16GB of flash storage will be prefilled with so much content you probably won't have room to add your own.

But it's not all adware, as you might expect for such a cheap device. Instead, the more than 25 games and 120 video clips are educational resources from PBS Kids. Dubbed the "Playtime Pad," the $80 tablet is a partnership between PBS and California budget electronics maker Ematic.

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Linux Kernel 4.8 and KDE Plasma 5.8.1 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed Users

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openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger informed the Tumbleweed community about the latest goodies that landed in the stable software repositories of the rolling release operating system during the past week.

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CentOS Linux Vagrant Boxes Gets September's Updates and XFS File System Support

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CentOS maintainer Karanbir Singh announced the availability of updated Vagrant Box images for the CentOS Linux 7 and CentOS Linux 6 operating systems for the month of September 2016.

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today's leftovers

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Linux and Linux Foundation: JS Foundation, Modern Take on Tux

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Leftovers: Software

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  • Find Files Faster with FSearch, an ‘Everything Search Engine’ for Linux

    FSearch is a promising new file search utility for the Linux desktop, inspired by the Everything Search Engine tool for Windows.

  • Released OpenStack Newton, Moving OpenStack packages to upstream Gerrit CI/CD

    OpenStack Newton was released on the Thursday 6th of October. I was able to upload nearly all of it before the week-end, though there was a bit of hick-ups still, as I forgot to upload python-fixtures 3.0.0 to unstable, and only realized it thanks to some bug reports. As this is a build time dependency, it didn’t disrupt Sid users too much, but 38 packages wouldn’t build without it. Thanks to Santiago Vila for pointing at the issue here.

    As of writing, a lot of the Newton packages didn’t migrate to Testing yet. It’s been migrating in a very messy way. I’d love to improve this process, but I’m not sure how, if not filling RC bugs against 250 packages (which would be painful to do), so they would migrate at once.

  • Rcpp now used by 800 CRAN packages

    A moment ago, Rcpp hit another milestone: 800 packages on CRAN now depend on it (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo declarations). The graph is on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage over time.

    The easiest way to compute this is to use the reverse_dependencies_with_maintainers() function from a helper scripts file on CRAN. This still gets one or false positives of packages declaring a dependency but not actually containing C++ code and the like. There is also a helper function revdep() in the devtools package but it includes Suggests: which does not firmly imply usage, and hence inflates the count. I have always opted for a tighter count with corrections.

  • opensourced

    All the authors agreed to a GPLv2+ licensing, so now it's time for to meet the world. It does about the simplest thing you can imagine: ssh to the server and use GNU tar to tar down every filesystem that has the “dump” bit set in fstab. Every 30 days, it does a full backup; otherwise, it does an incremental backup using GNU tar's incremental mode (which makes sure you will also get information about file deletes). It doesn't do inter-file diffs (so if you have huge files that change only a little bit every day, you'll get blowup), and you can't do single-file restores without basically scanning through all the files; tar isn't random-access. So it doesn't do much fancy, but it works, and it sends you a nice little email every day so you can know your backup went well. (There's also a less frequently used mode where the backed-up server encrypts the backup using GnuPG, so you don't even need to trust the backup server.) It really takes fifteen minutes to set up, so now there's no excuse. Smile

  • Skype’s WebRTC Linux app remains in alpha, but it now has video calling [Ed: Video calling worked fine in Skype for GNU/Linux before Microsoft bought and then RUINED it. Stop revisionism.]

Wayland Live CD

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  • Wayland Live CD release

    I have pushed out new ISO files for the Wayland Live CD project, named after my favorite celebrity (Rebecca Black).

  • Debian Testing Wayland Live CD Updated With Latest Support

    The Live CD Linux distribution focused on showcasing the potential of Wayland across different desktops, toolkits, and applications is out with a new ISO release.

    Developer and Phoronix reader "Nerdopolis" has announced the latest version of his RebeccaBlackOS that packages up the latest Wayland/Weston code and other software supporting Wayland. He announced, "I have pushed out new ISO files for the Wayland Live CD project, named after my favorite celebrity (Rebecca Black). I wanted to time the release to celebrate the release of her new song The Great Divide, but I had some issues I previously had to resolve This might be the last set of ISOs I announce here. I will post newer ISOs/commits, but probably won't announce to the Wayland mailing list."

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.8.4

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.4 kernel. And yeah, sorry about the quicker releases, I'll be away tomorrow and as they seem to have passed all of the normal testing, I figured it would be better to get them out earlier instead of later. And I like releasing stuff on this date every year... All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git:// linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal git web browser: Read more Also: Linux 4.7.10 Linux 4.4.27

New Releases: Budgie, Solus, SalentOS, and Slackel

  • Open-Source Budgie Desktop Sees New Release
    The pet parakeet of the Linux world, Budgie has a new release available for download. in this post we lookout what's new and tell you how you can get it.
  • Solus Linux Making Performance Gains With Its BLAS Configuration
    - Those making use of the promising Solus Linux distribution will soon find their BLAS-based workloads are faster. Solus developer Peter O'Connor tweeted this week that he's found some issues with the BLAS linking on the distribution and he's made fixes for Solus. He also mentioned that he uncovered these BLAS issues by using our Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software.
  • SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0 released!
    With great pleasure the team announces the release of SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0.
  • Slackel "Live kde" 4.14.21
    This release is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, while the 64-bit iso supports booting on UEFI systems. The 64-bit iso images support booting on UEFI systems. The 32-bit iso images support both i686 PAE SMP and i486, non-PAE capable systems. Iso images are isohybrid.

Security News

  • Free tool protects PCs from master boot record attacks [Ed: UEFI has repeatedly been found to be both a detriment to security and enabler of Microsoft lock-in]
    Cisco's Talos team has developed an open-source tool that can protect the master boot record of Windows computers from modification by ransomware and other malicious attacks. The tool, called MBRFilter, functions as a signed system driver and puts the disk's sector 0 into a read-only state. It is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows versions and its source code has been published on GitHub. The master boot record (MBR) consists of executable code that's stored in the first sector (sector 0) of a hard disk drive and launches the operating system's boot loader. The MBR also contains information about the disk's partitions and their file systems. Since the MBR code is executed before the OS itself, it can be abused by malware programs to increase their persistence and gain a head start before antivirus programs. Malware programs that infect the MBR to hide from antivirus programs have historically been known as bootkits -- boot-level rootkits. Microsoft attempted to solve the bootkit problem by implementing cryptographic verification of the bootloader in Windows 8 and later. This feature is known as Secure Boot and is based on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) -- the modern BIOS.
  • DDOS Attack On Internet Infrastructure
    I hope somebody's paying attention. There's been another big DDOS attack, this time against the infrastructure of the Internet. It began at 7:10 a.m. EDT today against Dyn, a major DNS host, and was brought under control at 9:36 a.m. According to Gizmodo, which was the first to report the story, at least 40 sites were made unreachable to users on the US East Coast. Many of the sites affected are among the most trafficed on the web, and included CNN, Twitter, PayPal, Pinterest and Reddit to name a few. The developer community was also touched, as GitHub was also made unreachable. This event comes on the heels of a record breaking 620 Gbps DDOS attack about a month ago that brought down security expert Brian Krebs' website, KrebsonSecurity. In that attack, Krebs determined the attack had been launched by botnets that primarily utilized compromised IoT devices, and was seen by some as ushering in a new era of Internet security woes.
  • This Is Why Half the Internet Shut Down Today [Update: It’s Getting Worse]
    Twitter, Spotify and Reddit, and a huge swath of other websites were down or screwed up this morning. This was happening as hackers unleashed a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the servers of Dyn, a major DNS host. It’s probably safe to assume that the two situations are related.
  • Major DNS provider Dyn hit with DDoS attack
    Attacks against DNS provider Dyn continued into Friday afternoon. Shortly before noon, the company said it began "monitoring and mitigating a DDoS attack" against its Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure. The attack may also have impacted Managed DNS advanced service "with possible delays in monitoring."
  • What We Know About Friday’s Massive East Coast Internet Outage
    Friday morning is prime time for some casual news reading, tweeting, and general Internet browsing, but you may have had some trouble accessing your usual sites and services this morning and throughout the day, from Spotify and Reddit to the New York Times and even good ol’ For that, you can thank a distributed denial of service attack (DDoS) that took down a big chunk of the Internet for most of the Eastern seaboard. This morning’s attack started around 7 am ET and was aimed at Dyn, an Internet infrastructure company headquartered in New Hampshire. That first bout was resolved after about two hours; a second attack began just before noon. Dyn reported a third wave of attacks a little after 4 pm ET. In all cases, traffic to Dyn’s Internet directory servers throughout the US—primarily on the East Coast but later on the opposite end of the country as well—was stopped by a flood of malicious requests from tens of millions of IP addresses disrupting the system. Late in the day, Dyn described the events as a “very sophisticated and complex attack.” Still ongoing, the situation is a definite reminder of the fragility of the web, and the power of the forces that aim to disrupt it.
  • Either IoT will be secure or the internet will be crippled forever
    First things first a disclaimer. I neither like nor trust the National Security Agency (NSA). I believe them to be mainly engaged in economic spying for the corporate American empire. Glenn Greenwald has clearly proven that in his book No Place to Hide. At the NSA, profit and power come first and I have no fucking clue as to how high they prioritize national security. Having said that, the NSA should hack the Internet of (insecure) Things (IoT) to death. I know Homeland Security and the FBI are investigating where the DDoS of doomsday proportions is coming from and the commentariat is already screaming RUSSIA! But it is really no secret what is enabling this clusterfuck. It’s the Mirai botnet. If you buy a “smart camera” from the Chinese company Hangzhou XiongMai Technologies and do not change the default password, it will be part of a botnet five minutes after you connect it to the internet. We were promised a future where we would have flying cars but we’re living in a future where camera’s, light-bulbs, doorbells and fridges can get you in serious trouble because your home appliances are breaking the law.
  • IoT at the Network Edge
    Fog computing, also known as fog networking, is a decentralized computing infrastructure. Computing resources and application services are distributed in logical, efficient places at any points along the connection from the data source (endpoint) to the cloud. The concept is to process data locally and then use the network for communicating with other resources for further processing and analysis. Data could be sent to a data center or a cloud service. A worthwhile reference published by Cisco is the white paper, "Fog Computing and the Internet of Things: Extend the Cloud to Where the Things Are."
  • Canonical now offers live kernel patching for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users
    Canonical has announced its ‘Livepatch Service’ which any user can enable on their current installations to eliminate the need for rebooting their machine after installing an update for the Linux kernel. With the release of Linux 4.0, users have been able to update their kernel packages without rebooting, however, Ubuntu will be the first distribution to offer this feature for free.
  • ​The Dirty Cow Linux bug: A silly name for a serious problem
    Dirty Cow is a silly name, but it's a serious Linux kernel problem. According to the Red Hat bug report, "a race condition was found in the way the Linux kernel's memory subsystem handled the copy-on-write (COW) breakage of private read-only memory mappings. An unprivileged local user could use this flaw to gain write access to otherwise read-only memory mappings and thus increase their privileges on the system."
  • Ancient Privilege Escalation Bug Haunts Linux
  • October 21, 2016 Is Dirty COW a serious concern for Linux?
  • There is a Dirty Cow in Linux
  • Red Hat Discovers Dirty COW Archaic Linux Kernel Flaw Exploited In The Wild
  • Linux kernel bug being exploited in the wild
  • Update Linux now: Critical privilege escalation security flaw gives hackers full root access
  • Linux kernel bug: DirtyCOW “easyroot” hole and what you need to know
  • 'Most serious' Linux privilege-escalation bug ever discovered
  • New 'Dirty Cow' vulnerability threatens Linux systems
  • Serious Dirty Cow Linux Vulnerability Under Attack
  • Easy-to-exploit rooting flaw puts Linux PCs at risk
  • Linux just patched a vulnerability it's had for 9 years
  • Dirty COW Linux vulnerability has existed for nine years
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found After Nine Years
  • FakeFile Trojan Opens Backdoors on Linux Computers, Except openSUSE
    Malware authors are taking aim at Linux computers, more precisely desktops and not servers, with a new trojan named FakeFile, currently distributed in live attacks. Russian antivirus vendor Dr.Web discovered this new trojan in October. The company's malware analysts say the trojan is spread in the form of an archived PDF, Microsoft Office, or OpenOffice file.

today's howtos