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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DragonFly BSD 4.8 Released with EFI & eMMC Support, Improved Kernel Performance Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 10:58pm
Story Lesser known but still handy Linux commands Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:13pm
Story FreeRTOS-based remote I/O module links to IBM Bluemix and Watson IoT Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 7:11pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 4:23pm
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 4:19pm
Story Linux Action Show ends after 10-year run Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 3:56pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 3:53pm
Story Samsung Z4 gets WiFi Certified with Tizen 3.0 onboard, Launching soon Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 3:40pm
Story Linux 4.10.6 Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 3:34pm
Story Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 3:28pm

AMDGPU Vega Patches and AMD Open-Sources Code

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • More AMDGPU Vega Patches Published

    Less than one week after AMDGPU DRM Vega support was published along with the other Vega enablement patches for the Linux driver stack, more Direct Rendering Manager patches are being shot out today.

  • AMD have announced 'Anvil', an MIT-licensed wrapper library for Vulkan

    AMD are continuing their open source push with 'Anvil' a new MIT-licenses wrapper library for Vulkan. It's aim is to reduce the time developers spend to get a working Vulkan application.

  • AMD Open-Sources Vulkan "Anvil"

    While waiting for AMD to open-source their Vulkan Linux driver, we have a new AMD open-source Vulkan project to look at: Anvil.

    Anvil is a project out of AMD's GPUOpen division and aims to be a wrapper library for Vulkan to make it easier to bring-up new Vulkan applications/games. Anvil provides C++ Vulkan wrappers similar to other open-source Vulkan projects while also adding in some extra features.

More Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • RPG Maker MV Update Brings Support for Linux

    Coinciding with their confirmation that the RPG Maker series has sold over 1,000,000 copies in western markets, western publisher Degica have announced that a new update for their latest piece of game development software – RPG Maker MV – now comes with support for Linux operating systems.

  • The Away Team, a sci-fi interactive fiction game, now available on Linux

    The Away Team, a sci-fi text-based adventure game by Underflow Studios, has officially been released on Linux. The minimum requirements according to the game's Steam page mention "Hannah Montana Linux", so it's a safe bet that no matter what you've got under the hood, it'll be plenty to run this interactive fiction game.

    The Away Team puts you in the role of an AI piloting Earth's final interstellar spaceship, leading your small human crew in search of a new home. Along the way, you'll navigate your way across multiple dynamically-generated space sector maps as you track down the crews that have journeyed into the unknown before your own. Each journey is unique.

  • Guns N' Boxes plans Linux support, testers requested

    Guns N' Boxes [Steam, Official Site] a game that promised a Linux version during the Greenlight campaign is now looking to put it out after many months waiting. They've asked for willing testers to help out.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • How worried should your organisation be about cyber espionage - and what can you do about it?

    Computerworld UK speaks with Jarno Niemela, senior security researcher at F-Secure.

  • Inverse Law of CVEs

    I've started a project to put the CVE data into Elasticsearch and see if there is anything clever we can learn about it. Ever if there isn't anything overly clever, it's fun to do. And I get to make pretty graphs, which everyone likes to look at.

  • eBay Asks Users to Downgrade Security

    The company wanted me to switch from using a hardware key fob when logging into eBay to receiving a one-time code sent via text message. I found it remarkable that eBay, which at one time was well ahead of most e-commerce companies in providing more robust online authentication options, is now essentially trying to downgrade my login experience to a less-secure option.

  • Practical basics of reproducible builds
  • License Agreements and Changes Are Coming

    The OpenSSL license is rather unique and idiosyncratic. It reflects views from when its predecessor, SSLeay, started twenty years ago. As a further complication, the original authors were hired by RSA in 1998, and the code forked into two versions: OpenSSL and RSA BSAFE SSL-C. (See Wikipedia for discussion.) I don’t want get into any specific details, and I certainly don’t know them all.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Microsoft Harvesting and Selling Personal Data

Filed under
Microsoft

Review: The $229 Moto G5 Plus stands as the king of budget Android (for now)

Filed under
Android
Reviews

We’ve documented the decline of Motorola under Lenovo extensively. We still liked the phones, which had probably been developed mostly under Google’s ownership anyway, but in 2015 we started to see slower updates and shorter support lifecycles. Last year was when the wheels really started to come off. Not only did the company mostly ruin its flagship phone by swapping the inexpensive and competent Moto X for the expensive and weird Moto Z, but Lenovo issued several contradictory statements about software updates that made it unclear whether the Z or the fourth-generation Moto G would be receiving regular updates at all.

Read more

ELKDAT Tool Released To Ease Linux Kernel Development & Testing

Filed under
Development
Linux

ELKDAT is a new Linux kernel project to provide an easy kernel development and testing tool.

ELKDAT is capable of automatically setting up the Linux kernel source repository and a VM for development and testing. With a single command it can build/install/boot any custom kernel build, run a given set of tests on the kernel, tests all the patches in a patch-set, and have automated bisecting using the virtual machine.

Read more

Microsoft Hates Linux: Got Caught, Pretended Just an Accident

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Early Look at Ubuntu 17.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Trying Out Unity 8 + Mir On Ubuntu 17.04

    With Ubuntu 17.04, Unity 7 with the X.Org Server remains the default desktop environment, but Unity 8 and Mir can be found on the default ISO and it's just a matter of logging out and into the experimental Unity 8 session. It's really easy to try out for those interested. For my tests today I was using an Intel Xeon box with a Radeon RX 470 graphics card atop Ubuntu 17.04's default Mesa packages and kernel. Overall it was an interesting experience and while a lot of bugs remain, the Unity 8 experience was much better than the last time I tried it a few months ago and is almost up to being usable for a daily Linux desktop.

  • The Ubuntu 17.04 Beta Is Now Available to Download
  • They’re Here: Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 2 Flavours Available to Download
  • Ubuntu Linux 17.04 'Zesty Zapus' Final Beta now available for download in multiple DE flavors

    When someone is interested in trying a Linux-based desktop operating system for the first time, they often choose Ubuntu. This is a smart choice, as it is easy to use, well supported, and quite beautiful. Even if you don't like the Unity desktop environment, there are several other DEs, or flavors, from which to choose -- GNOME, KDE, and Xfce to name a few.

    Today, the Final Beta of Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus' becomes available for download. While it is never a good idea to run pre-release software on production machines, Canonical is claiming that it should be largely bug free at this point. In other words, if you understand the risks, it should be fairly safe. Home users aside, this is a good opportunity for administrators to conduct testing prior to the official release next month.

Games for GNU/Linux and CrossOver

Filed under
Gaming

San Francisco Open Source Voting System Project Continues On

Filed under
OSS

At the February 15 Elections Commission meeting, the Elections Commission voted unanimously to ask the Mayor's Office to allocate $4 million towards initial development of the open source voting project for the 2018-19 fiscal year (from Aug. 2018 - July 2019). This would go towards initial development once the planning phase is complete.

Read more

Detailed change log for deepin 15.4 RC

Filed under
GNU
Linux

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users.

After public test of deepin 15.4 Beta, we have received a lot of suggestions and feedback, we adopted part of them and fixed a lot of problems.

Read more

GNOME 3.24: New Linux desktop is fast, responsive

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews

I’ve been a fan of the work of the GNOME team for quite some time. They put together one heck of an excellent Linux desktop environment.

But of late, I’ve found myself gravitating towards some of the more lightweight environments. MATE (which is a forked version of GNOME 2) and xmonad. I like my systems to be light on resource usage and highly responsive—those are two absolutely critical things for the way I use my computers.

With this week’s release of GNOME 3.24, I decided to jump back into the world of modern GNOME desktops and kick the tires again. In order to give it the best possible shot, I did a clean install of openSUSE Tumbleweed (the rolling release version of openSUSE) and then installed GNOME 3.24 on top of it. (Side note: 3.24 was not yet available in the default repositories when I wrote this article, but it should be shortly.)

Read more

Also: Applying to Outreachy and GSoC for Fedora and GNOME

OpenSuse Leap Reinforces Linux Faith

Filed under
Reviews

Leap is a solid performer. I had no trouble installing it on MBR and EFI systems. Secure Boot tends to be buggy with some configurations, but it was incident-free with this installation.

The bootloader handles multiboot with other Linux distributions or Windows fairly trouble-free. Installation is routine, thanks to the graphical format used.

Only 64-bit versions are available for x86 computers, which limits access to legacy hardware in the 32-bit machines. ARM ports are available if you can track them down through the project's wiki.

Read more

Modular, open source robotics kit lets you build your own 3D printer

Filed under
OSS

Plugg.ee Labs’s Cortex-M3 based “JuicyBoard” robotics kit is designed for building stepper motor controlled devices like 3D printers or CNC routers.

The JuicyBoard has surpassed its modest funding goals on Crowd Supply, providing a modular, open source development kit for stepper motor oriented devices such as 3D printers and CNC routers. Built around an NXP LPC1769 Cortex-M3 MCU, the kits are available starting at $179, with shipments due June 15.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Final Beta Is Out with MATE 1.18, Drops 32-bit PowerPC Support

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is informing Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the Final Beta release of the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, due for release on April 13, 2017.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta Released

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?

    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance.

    In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."

  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide

    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.

  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Security and Bugs

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software

    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.

  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors

    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw.

    Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors.

    And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.