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Monday, 16 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Slackware 10.1 srlinuxx 8 27/03/2005 - 4:37am
Story sex bots srlinuxx 2 28/03/2005 - 7:02am
Story 'Game theft' led to fatal attack srlinuxx 1 31/03/2005 - 11:21pm
Story Cannabis: Too much, too young? srlinuxx 2 31/03/2005 - 11:33pm
Blog entry gentoo's april fools srlinuxx 1 01/04/2005 - 4:35pm
Page Real April 1st Screenshot srlinuxx 01/04/2005 - 5:38pm
Spring Forward srlinuxx 03/04/2005 - 6:14am
Story Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican srlinuxx 1 03/04/2005 - 7:27am
Blog entry New Logo srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 7:07am
Story NoGravity Linux Game Port srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 2:08pm

Red Hat News, Mostly APAC

Filed under
Red Hat

Minimum GCC Version Likely to Jump from 3.2 to 4.8

Filed under
Development
GNU

The question of the earliest GCC compiler version to support for building the Linux kernel comes up periodically. The ideal would be for Linux to compile under all GCC versions, because you never know what kind of system someone is running. Maybe their company's security team has to approve all software upgrades for their highly sensitive devices, and GCC is low on that list. Maybe they need to save as much space as possible, and recent versions of GCC are too big. There are all sorts of reasons why someone might be stuck with old software. But, they may need the latest Linux kernel because it's the foundation of their entire product, so they're stuck trying to compile it with an old compiler.

However, Linux can't really support every single GCC version. Sometimes the GCC people and the kernel people have disagreed on the manner in which GCC should produce code. Sometimes this means that the kernel really doesn't compile well on a particular version of GCC. So, there are the occasional project wars emerging from those conflicts. The GCC people will say the compiler is doing the best thing possible, and the kernel people will say the compiler is messing up their code. Sometimes the GCC people change the behavior in a later release, but that still leaves a particular GCC version that makes bad Linux code.

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Best Bug Bounty Programs On Internet

Filed under
Linux

​The software revolution brought many opportunities for programmers. The modern software industry is not just limited to development. The developed software or service might have backdoors or glitches. These can cause vulnerabilities that hackers use to their benefit by exploiting such services.

Read<br />
more

We shall call him Mini-U – Ubuntu reveals tiny cloudy server

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has released a new cut of Ubuntu it recommends for use in the cloud and containers.

“Minimal Ubuntu” is based on either Ubuntu 16.04 LTS or 18.04 LTS. A Docker image of the latter weighs in at 29 megabytes. Images of the OS for the cloud are said to be “less than 50% the size of the standard Ubuntu server image, and boot up to 40% faster.” We think that makes them around 400MB.

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Building hearing aids with a Linux-based open hardware board

Filed under
Linux

Since Opensource.com first published the story of the GNU/Linux hearing aid research platform in 2010, there has been an explosion in the availability of miniature system boards, including the original BeagleBone in 2011 and the Raspberry Pi in 2012. These ARM processor devices built from cellphone chips differ from the embedded system reference boards of the past—not only by being far less expensive and more widely available—but also because they are powerful enough to run familiar GNU/Linux distributions and desktop applications.

What took a laptop to accomplish in 2010 can now be achieved with a pocket-sized board costing a fraction as much. Because a hearing aid does not need a screen and a small ARM board's power consumption is far less than a typical laptop's, field trials can potentially run all day. Additionally, the system's lower weight is easier for the end user to wear.

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5 open source racing and flying games for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games often are not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

So, can someone who uses only free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely to ever rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Shippable's Software

    What's interesting is that Shippable isn't targeting developers for the Internet of Things or smartphones, ARM's typical base, but is betting that the reduced instruction set architecture is on its way to having a big impact in data centers.

  • Cloud Computing in HPC Surges [Ed: No, it doesn't. They just came up with this buzzword. These are still just servers.]

    According to the two leading analyst firms covering the high performance computing market, the use of the cloud for HPC workloads is looking a lot more attractive to users these days.

  • Clear Linux Now Supports Kata Containers

    At the end of last year the Intel Clear Linux project's Clear Containers initiative morphed into OpenStack's Kata Containers. Clear Linux now supports the resulting Kata Containers.

    Clear Containers had been the Intel / Clear Linux project focused on providing performant Linux containers as well as greater security through Intel VT-d and other engineering improvements. Kata Containers took that foundation and has evolved it under the stewardship of OpenStack and participation from many different organizations.

  • Episode 31 | This Week in Linux

    Linux Mint 19 “Tara” was Released. Elementary releases a Developer Preview for their new version called “Juno”. Kdenlive issues a request to the community for beta testing of the next generation of Kdenlive. We do a follow up on the EU’s Copyright Reform Directive, this time it’s good news, at least for now. We discuss the SUSE acquisition by EQT. Ubuntu Studio created a cool guide to Audio Production on Linux. Later in the show we look at what is coming for Xubuntu 18.10 and also the latest release from Redcore Linux. All that and much more.

  • Arch Linux at FrOSCon

    Yet another shoutout for FrOSCon, which will be held 25th and 26th of August. Arch Linux will have a devroom with talks so far about Linux Pro Audio and our general Infrastructure / Reproducible build.

  • Dolphin-Emu under openSUSE Leap 42.3

    A day after I formally announced my game console emulator repository, the Dolphin Emulator guys decided to merge a patch that makes Qt 5.9 mandatory. That means Dolphin is no longer compatible with openSUSE Leap 42.3 which comes with Qt 5.6.

    I take pride in myself for having a high-quality product, even if it’s just free video game stuff. Therefore my plan is this instead of simply disabling 42.3 and calling it a day:

    I’ll pick the last commit before that patch and build that Dolphin revision. Then I’ll disable the 42.3 target and build the most recent version for the other distributions. That way the last 42.3-compatible binaries stay on the download server until I remove the 42.3 target entirely which will be either when Leap 15.1 gets released or maybe even earlier.

GUADEC 2018 Report, GNOME Foundation Is Hiring

Filed under
GNOME
  • GUADEC 2018

    I’m feeling extremely grateful for the shot in the arm GUADEC provides by way of old friends, new friends, expert advice, enthusiasm, time-worn wisdom, and so many reminders of why we do this.

    I use FreeCAD for freelance work, and build the development version from git periodically. There is a copr nightly build for recent versions of Fedora, but not for Rawhide. The first person to whom I related this experience, David King, said the software would be ideal for the Flatpak treatment. Since then I’ve been getting a tutorial on building the YAML manifest, and after four days of hard work (thanks Dave!), it’s on the very brink of completion.

  • The GNOME Foundation Is Hiring

    Since its inception in 1997 by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero, who were university students at the time, GNOME has become one of the largest open source projects. It is best known for its desktop, which is a key part of the most popular GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, Debian, SuSE and Fedora. The project also has a long history of producing critical pieces of software infrastructure: common parts of countless open source systems and its software is found in televisions, e-book readers, in-vehicle infotainment systems, medical devices and much more.

    GNOME has also been a key player in the social evolution of the free software community. By founding the Outreach Program for Women (OPW), GNOME pioneered a program to help make its community more gender diverse. That program expanded its scope to encourage more types of diversity and has been adopted by many other open source projects and has evolved into the larger Outreachy program = run outside of GNOME.

Linux Foundation: Xen 4.11 and Hyperledger Global Forum

Filed under
Linux
  • Xen 4.11 Improves Server Virtualization with PVH

    The open source Xen Project, which is hosted as a Linux Foundation effort, issued its first major release of 2018 on July 10.

    The Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11 release comes after months of development, and follows the 4.10 update that became available at the end of 2017. Xen 4.10 included some initial support for PVH (Paravirtualization Hardware), which has been further extended in the 4.11 update.

  • ​Re-engineering Xen: The important open-source hypervisor gets remodeled

    Xen is open-source royalty. This hypervisor, which runs and manages virtual machines (VMs), powers some of the largest clouds. You know their names: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Tencent, Alibaba Cloud, Oracle Cloud, and IBM SoftLayer. It's also the foundation for VM products from Citrix, Huawei, Inspur, and Oracle. But, with the release of its latest edition, Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11, there are major changes under the hood.

  • Xen 4.11 debuts new ‘PVH’ guest type, for the sake of security

    The Xen Project has released version 4.11 of its hypervisor.

    As we reported last week, it’s more than a month late, but the projects leaders thinks it is worth the wait because this release delivers on an ambition to “create a cleaner architecture for core technology, less code and a smaller computing base for security and performance.”

    A big part of delivering on that is increased use of PVH – a type of virtualization that Xen reckons blends the best of paravirtualization (PV) and Hardware Virtual Machines (HVM). PV virtualizes hardware so a guest can offer kit not found on its host, but doesn’t use virtualization extensions in silicon. HVM can use those extensions and therefore offers each VM isolated emulated hardware.

  • Last Chance to Speak at Hyperledger Global Forum | Deadline is This Friday

    Hyperledger Global Forum is the premier event showcasing the real uses of distributed ledger technologies for businesses and how these innovative technologies run live in production networks today. Hyperledger Global Forum unites the industry’s most respected thought leaders, domain experts, and key maintainers behind popular frameworks and tools like Hyperledger Fabric, Sawtooth, Indy, Iroha, Composer, Explorer, and more.

Software: Topgrade, iWant, QEMU, WikiToLearn

Filed under
Software
  • Topgrade - Command Line Tool to Upgrade All Packages on Linux

    In this guide, we're going to explore an interesting tool that aims at making updates of everything installed on your system as easy as just running one command. This software is topgrade, it detects the tools you use on your system and run appropriate package manager to update packages.

    On RHEL family Linux distributions like CentOS, topgrade will execute the yum upgradecommand, this is dnf upgrade for Fedora. On Debian family, the equivalent command executed by topgrade to ensure everything is up to date is apt update && apt dist-upgrade. On Arch Linux, it will use run yay or fall back to pacman if yay is not installed.

  • iWant – The Decentralized Peer To Peer File Sharing Commandline Application

    A while ago, we have written a guide about two file sharing utilities named transfer.sh, a free web service that allows you to share files over Internet easily and quickly, and PSiTransfer ,  a simple open source self-hosted file sharing solution. Today, we will see yet another file sharing utility called “iWant”. It is a free and open source CLI-based decentralized peer to peer file sharing application.

  • QEMU 3.0 Is Being Prepared For Release In August

    The march to QEMU 3.0 is now underway following discussions at the end of last year for jumping to the v3.0 milestone after the long-running v2.x series. The first release candidate is now available and marks a hard feature freeze for the QEMU 3.0 milestone.

    QEMU 3.0-RC0 was just tagged, which marks the first release candidate and hard feature freeze -- the soft feature freeze had begun last week.

  • WikiToLearn web app course editor almost done

    Hi, it’s a bit of time that I didn’t write a blog post and many things on WikiToLearn ecosystem happened. Course editor mode is almost finished: now you can add, remove and edit chapter on a course, with new revamped Dialog and Modal components for confirming and editing views. You can see it below in action.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat targets regional system integrators through program launch

    Red Hat has launched an Asia Pacific (APAC) program targeted at helping system integrators (SIs) build and modernise applications for the cloud.

    The new initiative is designed to allow partners to deliver new services at a lower cost and accelerate development for faster return on investment.

    Specifically, the Red Hat OpenShift Practice Builder Program has been designed to do just that, using the vendor's container application platform, Openshift, and a portfolio of enterprise-class application and integration middleware software products, JBoss Middleware.

  • Virtualize your OpenStack control plane with Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

    With the release of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 (Queens) we’ve added support to Red Hat OpenStack Platform director to deploy the overcloud controllers as virtual machines in a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This allows you to have your controllers, along with other supporting services such as Red Hat Satellite, Red Hat CloudForms, Red Hat Ansible Tower, DNS servers, monitoring servers, and of course, the undercloud node (which hosts director), all within a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This can reduce the physical server footprint of your architecture and provide an extra layer of availability.

    Please note: this is not using Red Hat Virtualization as an OpenStack hypervisor (i.e. the compute service, which is already nicely done with nova via libvirt and KVM) nor is this about hosting the OpenStack control plane on OpenStack compute nodes.

  • ORock Technologies Achieves FedRAMP Moderate Authorization for ORockCloud

    As a Red Hat Premier Certified Cloud and Service Provider (CCSP), ORock Technologies architected ORockCloud as a "pure-play" Red Hat cloud that incorporates a suite of Red Hat's open source solutions for enhanced flexibility, security features and control. These include: Red Hat Enterprise Linux; Red Hat OpenStack Platform; Red Hat Virtualization; Red Hat Ceph Storage; Red Hat CloudForms; Red Hat Ansible Tower; Red Hat Satellite; and associated cloud APIs.

  • Will Investors Step Up in Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) and Chubb Limited (CB)?
  • Here’s What To Do With Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), EQT Corporation (EQT)

Debian, Ubuntu and Kubuntu: Development, Infographic and KDE Plasma 5.12.6

Filed under
KDE
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian LTS work, June 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and worked 12 hours, so I have carried 3 hours over to July. Since Debian 7 "wheezy" LTS ended at the end of May, I prepared for Debian 8 "jessie" to enter LTS status.

    I prepared a stable update of Linux 3.16, sent it out for review, and then released it. I rebased jessie's linux package on this, but didn't yet upload it.

  • Graphical environments in the world of IoT

    The IoT promises to bring about a revolution in the way we interact with devices around us. While many IoT devices will be hidden away, from sensors that measure manufacturing tolerances in a factory to hubs that control lighting around the home, there are a class of devices that need to provide some sort of graphical output or display to the user. Some examples include digital signage, interactive kiosks, automotive in-car entertainment gateways, smart meters, and the plethora of display screens seen on everything from washing machines to smart thermostats. All of these examples need some way to output graphics to a screen display but in an embedded environment that is not always easy.

    Linux is one of the most popular OS choices for manufacturers and solution providers to use in IoT devices and with it there are a few options available for graphical environments. From custom software to drive the display, through direct frame buffer access with toolkits such as QT, to a full X windowing server. All of these options have their pros and cons and often it is a trade-off between custom software and off-the-shelf components to speed up development. Custom software takes time and requires developers to continue to maintain a code base for the lifetime of the device, while using a graphical toolkit such as QT requires less code but comes with commercial licencing. The open source X windowing server is a popular choice but, being over 30 years old, has some shortcomings. It has been well documented that the design of X windows, although revolutionary at the time, has some security risks especially around application isolation and privilege escalation which has led to efforts to replace it by redesigning the graphical server from the ground up. One such effort is Mir.

  • Canonical releases new infographic to show how Ubuntu Linux 'connects everything'

    To highlight the ubiquitous nature of Ubuntu in particular, Canonical today releases an all-new infographic showing how this distribution "connects everything." I urge you to give it a look, as it will open your eyes to just how important Ubuntu -- and Linux overall -- really is. Apparently, this is an update to a previous infographic released in 2016, refreshed for 2018 following the release of Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver.

  • This Infographic Reveals the Sheer Scale of Ubuntu’s Success

    Ever wondered just how widely used Ubuntu is? Well, wonder no more! Canonical has put together a new infographic to highlight the scale and success Ubuntu has achieved across an enviable assortment of computing sectors. And it’s compelling stuff.

  • Infographic: Ubuntu Linux Is Used by Millions Worldwide and Connects Everything

    Canonical has shared with us today a new infographic that shows how their Ubuntu Linux operating system is being used all over the world by big-name companies the offer their services to millions of consumers.

    More than two years ago, when Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was released, Canonical put together an infographic to show the world how many people use Ubuntu and on which devices. With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) out the door this year, they did it again and published a brand-new infographic to show the world that Ubuntu and Linux are everywhere.

  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Update to the KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS Desktop

    The Kubuntu team announced today the immediate availability of the latest KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS desktop environment for the Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series.

    Released on April 26, 2018, Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system is supported for three years with software and security updates, which means that is ships with the long-term supported version of the KDE Plasma desktop environment, KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Mozilla and Chrome: Lockbox, New Site for Thunderbird and SeaMonkey Add-ons and More

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla Announces Firefox Lockbox, a Face ID-Compatible Password Manager for iOS

    After it made sure Firefox is one of the most popular web browsers on the desktop, Mozilla continues their quest to conquer the mobile world with new and innovative apps.

    Today, Mozilla announced that it had developed two new apps for Apple's iOS and Google's Android mobile operating systems, Firefox Lockbox for iOS and Notes by Firefox for Android. The two apps are currently available for testing through the company's Mobile Test Pilot Experiments initiative.

    The Firefox Lockbox for iOS promises to be a password manager that you can take anywhere, so you won't have to reset your new passwords when you forget them. While the app can sync passwords across devices, it's only compatible with passwords save through the Firefox web browser via a Firefox Sync account.

  • New Site for Thunderbird and SeaMonkey Add-ons

    When Firefox Quantum (version 57) launched in November 2017, it exclusively supported add-ons built using WebExtensions APIs. addons.mozilla.org (AMO) has followed a parallel development path to Firefox and will soon only support WebExtensions-based add-ons.

    As Thunderbird and SeaMonkey do not plan to fully switch over to the WebExtensions API in the near future, the Thunderbird Council has agreed to host and manage a new site for Thunderbird and SeaMonkey add-ons. This new site, addons.thunderbird.net, will go live in July 2018.

    Starting on July 12th, all add-ons that support Thunderbird and SeaMonkey will be automatically ported to addons.thunderbird.net. The update URLs of these add-ons will be redirected from AMO to the new site and all users will continue to receive automatic updates. Developer accounts will also be ported and developers will be able to log in and manage their listings on the new site.

  • A Vision for Engineering Workflow at Mozilla (Part Three)

    This is the last post in a three-part series on A Vision for Engineering Workflow at Mozilla.

  • Why Isn't Debugging Treated As A First-Class Activity?

    One thing developers spend a lot of time on is completely absent from both of these lists: debugging! Gitlab doesn't even list anything debugging-related in its missing features. Why isn't debugging treated as worthy of attention? I genuinely don't know — I'd like to hear your theories!

    One of my theories is that debugging is ignored because people working on these systems aren't aware of anything they could do to improve it. "If there's no solution, there's no problem." With Pernosco we need to raise awareness that progress is possible and therefore debugging does demand investment. Not only is progress possible, but debugging solutions can deeply integrate into the increasingly cloud-based development workflows described above.

  • Bug futures: business models

    Recent question about futures markets on software bugs: what's the business model?

    As far as I can tell, there are several available models, just as there are multiple kinds of companies that can participate in any securities or commodities market.

  • Are You a Fan of Google Chrome’s New Look?

    Perhaps it’s just me, but I don’t think the look of Google Chrome has altered all that much since it blinked into life in 2009.

    But that will shortly change.

    Rumour has it that Google plans to debut a new-look Google Chrome ahead of the browser’s 10th birthday in September.

    And if you’re a spoiler fan, the new look is already available for testing.

    Now, we’re not talking a revamp based on the old ‘boxy’ Material Design here. Oh no. The visual rejig Is based on the rounder, softer and more tactile Material Design 2 (on full display in Android P and arriving piecemeal to the Chrome OS desktop).

Security: SELinux, Dirk Hohndel, Gentoo, Arch Linux AUR Package Repository

Filed under
Security
  • Lukas Vrabec: Why do you see DAC_OVERRIDE SELinux denials?
  • With So Many Eyeballs, Is Open Source Security Better? [Ed: Ask a FOSS company. Not VMware. VMware puts back doors in its proprietary software blobs.]

    Back in 1999, Eric Raymond coined the term "Linus' Law," which stipulates that given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.

    Linus' Law, named in honor of Linux creator Linus Torvalds, has for nearly two decades been used by some as a doctrine to explain why open source software should have better security. In recent years, open source projects and code have experienced multiple security issues, but does that mean Linus' Law isn't valid?

    According to Dirk Hohndel, VP and Chief Open Source Officer at VMware, Linus' Law still works, but there are larger software development issues that impact both open source as well as closed source code that are of equal or greater importance.

  • The aftermath of the Gentoo GitHub hack [Ed: What a bad choice of password leads to.]

    Late last month (June 28), the Gentoo GitHub repository was attacked after someone gained control of an admin account. All access to the repositories was soon removed from Gentoo developers. Repository and page content were altered. But within 10 minutes of the attacker gaining access, someone noticed something was going on, 7 minutes later a report was sent, and within 70 minutes the attack was over. Legitimate Gentoo developers were shut out for 5 days while the dust settled and repairs and analysis were completed.

  • New Variant of Spectre Security Flaw Discovered: Speculative Buffer Overflows

    Security researchers Vladimir Kiriansky (MIT) and Carl Waldspurger (Carl Waldspurger Consulting) have published a paper to disclose a new variant of the infamous Spectre security vulnerability, which creates speculative buffer overflows.

    In their paper, the two security researchers explain the attacks and defenses for the new Spectre variant they discover, which they call Spectre1.1 (CVE-2018-3693), a new variant of the first Spectre security vulnerability unearthed earlier this year and later discovered to have multiple other variants.

    The new Spectre flaw leverages speculative stores to create speculative buffer overflows. Similar to the classic buffer overflow security flaws, the new Spectre vulnerability is also known as "Bounds Check Bypass Store" or BCBS to distinguish it from the original speculative execution attack.

  • AT&T acquires open-source threat intelligence firm

    As AT&T continues down its network virtualization efforts using the open-source Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP), the operator has acquired cybersecurity firm AlienVault, which uses open-source software to provide what the companies call “threat intelligence.” Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed; AT&T expects the deal to close in Q3 this year.

  • Malware Found in Arch Linux AUR Package Repository

    Malware has been discovered in at least three Arch Linux packages available on AUR (Arch User Repository), the official Arch Linux repository of user-submitted packages.

    The malicious code has been removed thanks to the quick intervention of the AUR team.

  • Amateur bid to add code to Arch Linux packages found and squashed

Linux module and dev board showcase Arm/FPGA Stratix 10 SX

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Reflex CES has launched a “COMXpressSX Stratix 10” Basic Type 7 module that runs Linux on Intel’s Stratix 10 SX SoC and offers 56GB DDR4, 32GB eMMC, and 32x PCIe. An optional PCIe carrier supplies 10GbE, GbE, SATA, and more.

Paris-based Reflex CES, which sells a variety on FPGA-based PCIe boards and development kits, last year released a Linux-driven, 95 x 86mm Arria 10 SoC SoM based on Intel PSG’s FPGA- and dual Cortex-A9 enabled Arria 10 SoC. Now it has returned with a COM Express Basic Type 7 module and development kit that runs Linux on Intel PSG’s more powerful, 14nm fabricated Stratix 10 SX SoC. The COMXpressSX Stratix 10 supports high performance computing & analytics, acceleration, intelligent vision, and video processing applications.

Read more

Also: Intel Core based EPIC SBC targets retail applications

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More in Tux Machines

How to enable developer mode on a Chrome OS tablet (and install Linux using Crouton)

Google’s Chrome OS is designed to be a relatively secure, simple operating system that’s easy to use and hard to mess up. But you can run stable channel, beta channel, or dev channel software on any Chromebook depending on whether you want the safest experience or buggy, bleeding-edge features. There’s also an option called Developer Mode, which is different from the dev channel. It allows you to access files and settings that are normally protected and use a command shell to explore the system. It’s designed for developers and advanced users only, since it increases the chances that you’ll break your Chromebook. But enabling Developer Mode is also a prerequisite for using one my favorite Chrome OS hacks: a tool called Crouton that allows you to install Ubuntu or another GNU/Linux distribution and run it alongside Chrome OS. Read more

Red Hat News and Press

Belated Thoughts on van Rossum’s Departure

  • Is BDFL a death sentence?
    A few days ago, Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language and Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) of the project, announced his intention to step away. Below is a portion of his message, although the entire email is not terribly long and worth taking the time to read if you’re interested in the circumstances leading to van Rossum’s departure.
  • Thoughts on Guido retiring as BDFL of Python
    I've been programming in Python for almost 20 years on a myriad of open source projects, tools for personal use, and work. I helped out with several PyCon US conferences and attended several others. I met a lot of amazing people who have influenced me as a person and as a programmer. I started PyVideo in March 2012. At a PyCon US after that (maybe 2015?), I found myself in an elevator with Guido and somehow we got to talking about PyVideo and he asked point-blank, "Why work on that?" I tried to explain what I was trying to do with it: create an index of conference videos across video sites, improve the meta-data, transcriptions, subtitles, feeds, etc. I remember he patiently listened to me and then said something along the lines of how it was a good thing to work on. I really appreciated that moment of validation. I think about it periodically. It was one of the reasons Sheila and I worked hard to transition PyVideo to a new group after we were burned out.

Catfish 1.4.6 Released

  • Catfish 1.4.6 Released, Now an Xfce Project
    It’s a great day for fans of the fast and powerful Catfish search utility. With the 1.4.6 release, Catfish now officially joins the Xfce family. Additionally, there’s been some nice improvements to the thumbnailer and a large number of bugs have been squashed.
  • Catfish Search Utility Joins The Xfce Project
    The Catfish search utility now officially lives under the Xfce umbrella. Catfish is a GTK3-based and Python 3.x written program for searching for files on the system. Catfish has long been common to Xfce desktop systems and complementary to the Thunar file manager. The Catfish 1.4.6 release was made this weekend and with this version has now officially become part of the Xfce project.