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Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story 5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail adriantry 27/04/2009 - 10:27am
Story Audacity: The Versatile Audio Tool for Everyone adriantry 12/05/2009 - 10:03am
Forum topic Dialup dilemma afs 05/06/2008 - 5:40pm
Blog entry Distribution Release: EnGarde Secure Linux 3.0.21 akramshaikh 08/10/2008 - 7:55am
Blog entry 25 Cool & Beautiful Linux Wallpapers akramshaikh 31/08/2009 - 6:50pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Story Top 10 Addictive games on Linux alieneyes 06/03/2010 - 5:07pm
Blog entry “Can’t locate module” Error in Linux and Data Loss allen 06/10/2008 - 4:52am
Blog entry “No such file or directory” Error in Linux allen 15/10/2008 - 4:47am
Blog entry ‘attempt to access beyond end of device’ Linux Error allen 27/03/2009 - 6:45am

Qt and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Qt Contributors’ Summit 2018 wrap-up

    Qt Contributors’ Summit 2018 is over. Two days of presentations and a lot of discussions during presentations, talk of Qt over coffee and lunch and in restaurants in the evening.

  • Qt 6.0 Might Be Coming After Qt 5.14, Could Depend Upon C++17

    Since last year there has been more talk and early planning around the eventual Qt 6.0 milestone. It's looking now like Qt 6.0 might happen after Qt 5.14, or likely in 2020.

    Last year there were developer discussions about starting Qt6 work after Qt 5.11, which was released at the end of May. Previous discussions of Qt6 have entailed QIODevice support, a Qt Quick scene graph, improved accessibility, and a Vulkan back-end for Qt Quick.

  • Qt For Python 5.11 Released As The First Official Build

    The past few months The Qt Company has been overhauled PySide2 as Qt For Python, a big improvement to the Python bindings to the Qt tool-kit. Out today is Qt For Python 5.11 as the first official release under the new branding.

  • Qt for Python 5.11 released

    As the version tag implies, it is based on Qt 5.11 and therefore the first release that supports the Qt 5 series. At large the project will follow the general Qt release schedule and versions. Although this is still a Technical Preview we will support the release with the usual support pattern (except the compatibility one). Unfortunately, earlier versions of Qt than 5.11 are not supported. It is available for open source and commercial Qt for Application Development users. Note that there is only one package for commercial and open source users. We hope we can receive plenty of feedback on what works and what does not. We want to patch early and often.

  • Python 3.7 Release Candidate Arrives, Final Expected At The End Of June

    Python 3.7.0 RC1 is available today as the last step prior to issuing this next feature release of Python 3 at month's end.

    The Python 3.7.0 release candidate was issued today along with the Python 3.6.6 RC1. The current plan is to release both of these new Python versions on 27 June unless some blocker bugs come about that would delay the release.

  • Python 3.7.0rc1

    This release, 3.7.0rc1, is the final planned release preview. Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2018-06-27, the scheduled release date for 3.7.0, no code changes are planned between this release candidate and the final release.

Debian and Devuan Leftovers

Filed under
OS
  • Debian Policy call for participation -- June 2018

    I’d like to push a substantive release of Policy but I’m waiting for DDs to review and second patches in the following bugs. I’d be grateful for your involvement!

    If a bug already has two seconds, or three seconds if the proposer of the patch is not a DD, please consider reviewing one of the others, instead, unless you have a particular interest in the topic of the bug.

  • Microsoft fixed the Open R Debian package

    Thanks Microsoft for the quick fix, it is good news that those playing with Open R will not be left with a hosed system.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with Debian - Week 4

    After working on designs and getting my hands dirty with KIVY for the first 3 weeks, I became comfortable with my development environment and was able to deliver features within a couple of days with UI, tests, and documentation. In this blog, I explain how I converted all my Designs into Code and what I've learned along the way.

  • Debian variant offers safe homeland for systemd haters

    The Devuan project has released a v2.0 ASCII version of its Devuan fork of Debian that replaces the systemd init with OpenRC, and let’s you load other inits of your choice. The release supports several major Linux hacker boards.

    The Devuan project was announced in 2014 as a Debian fork for those who prefer other init systems to Red Hat’s systemd. Since then, systemd has seen even greater adoption in Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, which last year replaced its Upstart init in favor of systemd as part of its retreat from its Unity8/Mir desktop and convergence initiative. Yet Devuan has persisted, and has now released a more mature, Devuan v2.0 ASCII version of its systemd-free Debian distro.

Graphics: Wayland, Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) by Intel Inside Linux, and VFIO Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Wayland's Weston 5.0 Moved Up To An August Release

    Following the recent discussions of moving Wayland's Weston compositor to a 4-month release schedule and possibly doing away with time-based Wayland releases itself, Weston 5.0 will now be coming out in August.

    Feature development on Weston is as busy as ever while Wayland (libwayland) is quite mature and not seeing too much churn. Upstream Wayland developers now appear to be in agreement to carrying out the next Weston release at least on a four-month release cycle.

  • Librem 5 progress report #14

    On the nuts and bolts level, our phone shell (phosh) has seen several usability improvements mostly around the lockscreen. One important change is that the lockscreen unlocking has been switched to PAM to better handle the PIN to lock the device. There have also been some additions to the code to better handle multiple outputs (screens). Also, Libhandy is our “handy” UI library for developing GTK+ apps. There has been a recent addition of an arrows widget (HdyArrows) to indicate swiping direction which will be very useful to many applications, especially the lockscreen. Additionally, libhandy has seen some bug fixes and a slight rework of the keyboard handling support. Since graphics are important, we have added Etnaviv support to weston-simple-dmabuf (a Wayland client to test Linux DMA-BUF protocol implementations). We also extended it’s NV12 format support. It’s being used over here to test wlroot’s linux-dmabuf implementation which we wrote a couple of weeks ago. We’d like to especially thank the wlroots and Weston projects for their code reviews, recommendations, and support.

  • Librem 5 Continues Working On Its Wayland Software Stack, Testing Vibration Motors, Chargers

    Purism has published their latest progress report on the Librem 5 privacy-minded Linux-powered smartphone that they still hope to begin shipping next January.

  • Intel Developers Working On HDCP Content Protection Protocol For Wayland [Ed: This is basically “Linux Vista”. First Web DRM (EME). Now LF sells out as well.]

    With Intel's DRM kernel driver now supporting HDCP for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection with work done by Intel and Google developers, there is now work underway for allowing HDCP to work in a Wayland-based environment.

    As with the work done on the Direct Rendering Manager side, these Wayland patches aren't enforcing any restrictions on users by itself but is simply making the support available should any applications come along that wish to enforce HDCP usage on the Linux desktop.

  • VFIO Adds Sample Mediated Device Display Drivers

    The VFIO framework that allows exposing direct device access to user-space in a secure, IOMMU-protected fashion is gaining some new sample drivers in Linux 4.18.

Linux 4.18 Development Progress

Filed under
Linux

Openwashing and Microsoft EEE Methods

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Linux Foundation: Microsoft Entryism, Open Network Automation Platform

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Session Agenda Announced for The Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit North America [Ed: Another "Linux" event has been infiltrated by Microsoft. So while Microsoft is blackmailing Linux users and bribes officials to dump GNU/Linux it's now "part of us".]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the schedule of sessions and speakers for Open Source Summit North America, taking place August 29-31 in Vancouver, BC, including expanded pre-event lighting talks, workshops and tutorials on August 28.

  • Open Source and Standards Organizations Collaborate to Enable Digital Transformation

    TM Forum Catalyst projects showcased during the recent Digital Transformation World event in Nice France have highlighted the value of combining open source with open standards and contributed valuable improvements to The Linux Foundation’s Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Beijing Release, availability of which was announced on the 12th June.

  • Linux Foundation seeking ONAP rollout boost

    The Linux Foundation unveiled the second software release of its Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project, which it said delivers improvements in terms of scalability and ease of deployment.

    ONAP Beijing also includes enhancements covering security and performance in real-world deployments, new training for Virtual Network Functions (VNF) developers and backing for operators commencing rollouts.

    Mazin Gilbert, chair of ONAP’s Technical Steering Committee and VP of Advanced Technology at AT&T Labs, said in a statement the upgrades are another step toward “establishing ONAP as the de facto standard for automation”.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited, Chromebooks' GNU/Linux Experience Improves

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Living the Linux Laptop Lifestyle Revisited

    One Cause at a Time revisits the advantages - and experiences - working with a Linux-powered laptop...

  • Chromebooks with Linux can run Windows apps but it’s not easy

    It really seems that Chrome OS is being groomed to be the one OS that runs them all. Well almost all. In addition to its native Chrome-based platform, it now supports Android through Google Play Store and, just recently, Linux. Because of those two, it is also possible to run Windows programs to some extent. CodeWeavers, which develops software for running Windows programs on Mac and Linux, has just shown what could be a better way to run those same programs on a Chromebook.

  • Upcoming Chrome OS Files ‘refresh’ highlights Android, Linux files w/ redesigned navigation

    Earlier this month, Google began testing a way to surface files created by Android apps in the Chrome OS Files application. Given upcoming Linux support, the company is now planning a broader “Navigation UI Refresh” for how users view and manage files in Chrome OS.

    This “Refresh” — currently targeted for Chrome OS 69 — is centered on the navigation drawer of the Files app. At the moment, this list of folders is cluttered and becoming increasingly so in light of Android apps and soon Linux software generating user-created files, like PDFs, images, and more.

  • Chromebook Files app getting revamped to better organize Android and Linux apps

    Chrome OS has got a ton of love from Google lately. We’re seeing the OS gain native support for Linux apps starting with the Google Pixelbook and the Samsung Chromebook Plus, and possibly the upcoming Acer Chromebook 13 and Acer Chromebook Spin 13. The interface is also receiving touch optimizations for tablets and detachables like the HP Chromebook X2 and Acer Chromebook Tab 10. Then there’s the Google Material Theme revamp that’s in testing. Now, it seems that the Chromebook Files app will be getting some major structural changes to help users keep track of all their Downloads, Google Drive files, Android apps, Linux apps, and more.

  • Chrome OS Getting Better Organization For Linux/Android Apps

    Chrome OS is getting better organization for Linux and Android apps in the near future by way of an improvement to the Files app on Chromebooks. The improvement is coming via some changes to the app that Google is currently in the process of working on and eventually implementing so that it can push the changes out to users. The rework of sorts will see a new file tree show up in the app labeled as “my files,” under which users will be able to see Linux Files and Linux Drive under their own sub-menu that is separate from the Android apps.

Mozilla: WebVR and Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • WITHIN creates distribution platform using WebVR

    Virtual Reality (VR) content has arrived on the web, with help from the WebVR API. It’s a huge inflection point for a medium that has struggled for decades to reach a wide audience. Now, anyone with access to an internet-enabled computer or smartphone can enjoy VR experiences, no headset required. A good place to start? WITHIN’s freshly launched VR website.

    From gamers to filmmakers, VR is the bleeding edge of self-expression for the next generation. It gives content creators the opportunity to tell stories in new ways, using audience participation, parallel narratives, and social interaction in ever-changing virtual spaces. With its immersive, 360-degree audio and visuals, VR has outsized power to activate our emotions and to put us in the center of the action.

    WITHIN is at the forefront of this shift toward interactive filmmaking and storytelling. The company was one of the first to launch a VR distribution platform that showcases best-in-class VR content with high production values.

  • This Week in Rust 238
  • What do you think are the most interesting/exciting projects using Rust?

    Jonathan Turner suggested I write up the responses as a blog post, and here we are.

FreeBSD Lands Support For pNFS

Filed under
BSD

For FreeBSD 12.0-CURRENT in development there is now kernel support for pNFS while the user-space components are landing soon for this Parallel NFS support.

Present since the NFS v4.1 protocol in 2010 has been the ability to provide scalable, parallel access to files across multiple servers via the pNFS extension. Since yesterday's FreeBSD SVN code, the pNFS kernel-side support has been merged for their NFS v4.1 server.

Read more

Canonical on So-called 'Private Cloud'

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • 451 Research benchmarks public and private infrastructure cost

    451 Research’s latest report, ‘Busting the myth of private cloud economics ’, found that Canonical’s managed private OpenStack offering, BootStack, delivers private cloud with a TCO that matches public clouds. For multi-cloud operations, enterprise can benefit from a cost effective infrastructure by combining competitive public cloud services with Canonical’s managed private OpenStack cloud on-premise.

  • Private Cloud May Be the Best Bet: Report

    News flash: Private cloud economics can offer more cost efficiency than public cloud pricing structures.

    Private (or on-premises) cloud solutions can be more cost-effective than public cloud options, according to "Busting the Myths of Private Cloud Economics," a report 451 Research and Canonical released Wednesday. That conclusion counters the notion that public cloud platforms traditionally are more cost-efficient than private infrastructures.

    Half of the enterprise IT decision-makers who participated in the study identified cost as the No. 1 pain point associated with the public cloud. Forty percent mentioned cost-savings as a key driver of cloud migration.

    "We understand that people are looking for more cost-effective infrastructure. This was not necessarily news to us," said Mark Baker, program director at Canonical.

How Red Hat Linux is helping reclaim the fastest supercomputer title for the US

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

All the world's fastest supercomputers now run Linux, so it's no surprise that the US Department of Energy's Summit supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratories runs Linux. Specifically, it runs Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Of course, Summit's 200-petaflop speed -- that's 200 quadrillion (peta-) floating point operations per second (flops) -- comes largely from its hardware. How fast is that? By comparison, China's Sunway TaihuLight, the official fastest supercomputer in the world, according to November 2017's Top 500 list, has a speed of 93.01 petaflops.

Read more

Top 5 games you can play on your favorite Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

I’ve never really been into gaming, that is, the shoot-em-up type of gaming, but in the early days of Linux, even just a few years ago, most default installations of desktop Linux came with a bunch of games installed. They were mostly card games and some simple strategy games, but they were enough to satisfy the casual gamer. Not sure why, but that practice seems to have gone the way of the dodo.

So if you want to play those same games that used to come preinstalled on practically every desktop Linux distribution just a few years back, you’ll need to install them yourself. That’s not such a big problem since they’re still available in the default repositories. What if you want more than just simple card and strategy games? No problem there too, because there are some very advanced strategy and first-person shooter games that you can install and play on Linux.

Read more

FSF: International Day Against DRM, New Interns and Friday Free Software Directory IRC Meetup

Filed under
GNU

Red Hat Responds to New Speculative Execution Vulnerability, Patches Coming Soon

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Red Hat is the top open-source software company known for their Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) operating system, and they're always quick to address newly discovered security vulnerabilities that not only affect its enterprise-ready operating system but the entire Open Source and Free Software community.

Many modern microprocessors leverage the "lazy restore" function for floating point state (FPU), which is used when needed for improving the overall performance of the system when saving and restoring the state of apps in the internal memory when switching from one application to another.

Read more

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Install Mesa 18.1.1 to Improve Their Linux Gaming

Filed under
Ubuntu

Implementing OpenGL 3.1 with ARB_compatibility on RadeonSI, r600, NV50, NVC0, Softpipe, LLVMpipe, and SVGA graphics drivers, the Mesa 18.1 graphics stack series debuted on May 18, 2018, with support for new OpenGL extensions, including GL_EXT_semaphore, GL_EXT_semaphore_fd, GL_ARB_bindless_texture, and GL_ARB_transform_feedback_overflow_query.

Additionally, it adds support for the GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch and GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch_non_coherent extension for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver, support for the GL_KHR_blend_equation_advanced extension for the RadeonSI graphics driver, and enables disk shader cache support for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver by default.

Read more

Winepak and Game on GNU/Linux Using Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • winepak, a project to get Windows games packaged with Wine & Flatpak for an easy Linux installation

    winepak [Official Site] is another interesting Wine-related project. One that aims to package up an assortment of Windows-only games that work in Wine using the power of Flatpak packages.

    I'm not going to get into the politics of Snap vs Flatpak, mostly because I don't care for the arguments surrounding it and end-users shouldn't care as long as they work and work well.

    Much like today's previous post about Track Mania Nations Forever having an easy to use Snap package, winepak seems to aim a bit higher and offer a repository of games. The advantage of using such packages (Snaps or Flatpaks), is that it should come with everything you need to get the Windows game running on Linux, without having to mess around with configurations. It's a new project though, so there's likely a fair amount of kinks to work out.

  • Want to play Track Mania Nations Forever on Linux using Wine? There's a snap for that

    I actually played one of the Track Mania games years ago before being a Linux user and I had a serious amount of fun with it, so things brings back some good memories.

    I'm not often one to advocate the use of Wine, but taking into account that it's free, old and likely never to be ported to Linux, making use of Wine for a game that works so well seems like a perfect fit. Having it all configured for you with a single package like this, certainly makes it a lot easier too.

RK3399 SBC has 9-36V DC and optional 4G, WiFi, serial, and HDMI-in modules

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

ICNexus’ “SBC3100” SBC runs Ubuntu or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB RAM and 16GB flash plus HDMI 2.0, DP, eDP, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 9-36V power, optional WiFi/BT, and a mini-PCIe slot with optional 3G or 4G.

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ SBC3100 joins a growing list of SBCs that feature, the hhigh-end Rockchip RK3399 SoC, and like most, it taps the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. Unlike most we’ve seen, however, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

Read more

Fun With Microsoft

Filed under
Security
  • Intelligence agency National Cyber Security Centre is working with Dixons Carphone on huge data breach

    The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), part of GCHQ, said today it is working with Dixons Carphone on mitigation measures, after the retailer said it was investigating a data breach involving 5.9m payment cards and 1.2m personal data records.

    The company announced earlier on that there was an attempt to compromise 5.9m cards in one of the processing systems of Currys PC World and Dixons Travel stores.

  • Spy agency investigates Dixons Carphone bank card data breach
  • Want to Break Into a Locked Windows 10 Device? Ask Cortana (CVE-2018-8140)
  • Cortana Flaw Lets Hackers Access Data, Reset Password On Locked Windows 10 PCs

    Security researchers have found a critical flaw in Windows 10 where Cortana can be manipulated into executing Powershell commands on locked devices.

    Attackers can misuse this vulnerability to retrieve confidential data, reset the password, log into a device, and even execute codes from above the lock screen. The only sense of satisfaction is that it requires physical access to the device.

  • Windows 10 Cumulative Update KB4284835 Might Be Failing to Install as Well

    Windows 10 April 2018 Update has received a new cumulative update as part of this month’s Patch Tuesday cycle, and although it seemed to install correctly at first, it looks like some users are now hitting issues with this new release.
    Windows 10 cumulative update KB4284835 brings several important fixes and it resolves a bug causing the April 2018 Update to fail with a black screen on a number of systems.

    Microsoft says it’s aware of just one known issue in this cumulative update, but as it turns out, KB4284835 fails to install in some cases, eventually causing an infinite loop where the update is listed as successfully installed, only to be re-offered again after every boot.

    There are several posts on reddit pointing to such an issue, and for the time being, no workaround appears to be available. Manually installing the update does not correct this behavior.

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More in Tux Machines

“Respects Your Freedom” (RYF) and Purism's Librem 5

  • Purism's Librem 5 To Rely On Secondary Processor For Binary Blobs
    With not being able to deliver a 100% fully free software / libre system, the Librem 5 smartphone will rely upon a secondary processor for dealing with the necessary binary blobs for hardware initialization to keep them out of touch from the U-Boot boot-loader and Linux kernel. The first road-block in their effort to make the Librem 5 smartphone as open as possible is the DDR PHY with firmware blobs needed for the DDR4 memory training process at boot time. With it not being realistic for them to rewrite the firmware blob to do the DDR4 PHY training, they are planning to punt the binary-only blobs out to a secondary processor. In doing so, they can also apply for an exclusion with the Free Software Foundation for still having a device that "Respects Your Freedom" while still having necessary binary blobs at play.
  • Solving the first FSF RYF hurdle for the Librem 5
    While investigating using the i.MX 8 for the Librem 5 phone we found an issue that would have been problematic for us to obtain the Free Software Foundation’s “Respects Your Freedom” (RYF) hardware endorsement...

Red Hat: Education, Automation, RHEL 6.10 and More

  • Red Hat, Lord Wandsworth College and University of Surrey collaborate
    Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, has announced its collaboration with Lord Wandsworth College (LWC), an independent school for girls and boys aged 11 to 18, and the University of Surrey, a public research university specialising in science, engineering, medicine and business, on the Open Schools Coding Competition, designed to inspire the next generation of coders and software developers. In so doing, the competition hopes to contribute to building the UK’s digital talent pool. The competition is now in its second year, with 10 schools and approximately 100 students in the UK taking part. The competition aims to engage children ahead of making their subject choices for GCSE, so is open to Key Stage 3 students. It challenges teams of students to use any free visual programming environment to create a gaming app that will help a charity of their choice. The competition enables participants to apply the basic principles of open source software development and open collaboration to solve a real world problem in a fun and competitive environment, with the opportunity to win a prize for their team and recognition for their school. In choosing a charitable cause, each student can gain a sense of how they can use digital skills to make their own contribution to addressing societal challenges and how open source technology and methodology can drive positive change in the world.
  • Red Hat Unveils Next-Generation Process Automation Offering
  • Red Hat Drives Mission-Critical Stability with Latest Update to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
  • Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)
    If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)
  • RedHat stock falls after Raymond James downgrade

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds and Windows 'Fun'

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #164
  • PyRoMineIoT cryptojacker uses NSA exploit to spread
    Larry Trowell, principal consultant with Synopsys Software Integrity Group, said the government shares some of the blame for the NSA exploit. "It's in every country's interest to develop systems enabling offensive and defensive strategies to protect individuals and national services," Trowell wrote via email. "There is no fault in that. If the NSA does have some blame to share in this situation, it is for allowing secrets to be exfiltrated -- not in developing them." Jett said although the NSA exploit was stolen, "they didn't create the vulnerabilities that allow for the malware to exploit devices." "As such, you can't hold them responsible for the malware that has emerged from the EternalRomance exploit. Vendors whose products are vulnerable to EternalRomance are responsible for resolving the exploit problem," Jett wrote. "Additionally, it has been more than a year since the NSA exploits were released, and vendors have created patches. It becomes incumbent on the users to make sure they are properly patching their software and reducing the threat surface for these exploits."
  • Can Hackers Crack the Ivory Towers?
    While both researchers agreed that their colleagues would gain from incorporating hackers' discoveries into their own work, they diverged when diagnosing the source of the gulf between the two camps and, to a degree, even on the extent of the rift.
  • 6-Year-Old Malware Injects Ads, Takes Screenshots On Windows 10
    A sneaky and persistent malware has surfaced which spams Windows 10 PCs with ads and takes screenshots to eventually send it to the attackers. Security researchers at Bitdefender found this malware named Zacinlo which first appeared in 2012. About 90% of Zacinlo’s victims are from the US running Microsoft Windows 10. There are other victims too from Western Europe, China, and India with a small fraction running Windows 7 or 8.

25th Anniversary for FreeBSD

  • 25th Anniversary for FreeBSD
    On June 19, 1993 the name FreeBSD was officially agreed on and has been used ever since. Find out more about how to celebrate this important day with us.
  • June 19 Has Been Declared National FreeBSD Day, Happy 25th Anniversary FreeBSD!
    The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce today that June 19 has been declared National FreeBSD Day to celebrate the project's official name 25th anniversary. Exactly 25 years ago on this day, on June 19, 1993, David Greenman sent an email to one of the mailing lists available at that point in time to suggest "FreeBSD" as the name for the Unix-like operating system used by billions of people all over the world, which continues to have a positive impact on us every single day.