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Monday, 11 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Canonical/Ubuntu: Snaps, Kubernetes, LTS, SmartDNS and Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Snaps & automatic updates prove popular with email client, Mailspring

    In the latest interview with a snap developer, we spoke to Ben Gotow who is the lead maintainer of Mailspring, a free, modern email client for Linux, Windows, and macOS. Originally started and open-sourced by Nylas in California, Ben took on the project earlier this year after Nylas changed course and stopped development. Mailspring has more than 10k active users on Linux, and will offer the snap as the preferred install method beginning from this week.

  • Canonical and Rancher Labs announce joint Kubernetes Cloud Native Platform offering

    Canonical, in partnership with Rancher Labs today announce a turn-key application delivery platform built on Ubuntu, Kubernetes, and Rancher 2.0.

    The new Cloud Native Platform will make it easy for users to deploy, manage, and operate containers on Kubernetes through a single workflow management portal from dev-and-test to production environments. Users leverage a rich application catalog of docker containers and helm charts, streamlining deployments and increasing developer velocity.  

    Built on Canonical’s distribution of Kubernetes and Rancher 2.0, the Cloud Native Platform will simplify enterprise usage of Kubernetes with seamless user management, access control and cluster administration.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 – New Features, Release Date & More

    We’ve all been waiting for it – the new LTS release of Ubuntu – 18.04. Learn more about new features, the release dates, and more.

  • Using SmartDNS and VPN on Ubuntu

    Last month I wrote about the awesomeness of SmartDNS‘s DNS and VPN services. A lot has happened  since then in the political arena. Not least of which is the fact that we have a new President; something that was unthinkable when I wrote the piece.

  • You can win cool prizes just for trying System76's Ubuntu-based 'Pop!_OS' Linux distro!

    There is this stereotype that Linux is not conducive to creativity, and I want you to know it is totally false. True, some photographers, videographers, and other types of artists may opt for a Mac or Windows machine, but they can be just as creative with open source and Linux. Not to mention, if you are a maker, engineer, or other type of creator, Linux is probably your best option.

Tizen and Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Intel's Clear Containers Leads To OpenStack Kata Containers

    Kata Containers is the latest tech in the container space and is an effort hosted by the OpenStack Foundation in conjunction with many participating organizations. The underlying tech for Kata Containers originated from the Intel / Clear Linux Clear Containers project.

    Clear Containers has been around since 2015 and like the Clear Linux distribution has been about delivering a performant Linux containers experience. But it's not been just about raw speed but also security, to which Clear Containers beefed up their security by supporting Intel VT virtualization.

  • Monsanto and Boundless Collaborate for Open Source GIS Contributions
  • Facebook Open Source Initiative Supported by Tieto Expertise and Services
  • DragonFly 5.0.2 released

    DragonFly version 5 has been released, including the first bootable release of HAMMER2. Version 5.0.2, the current version, came out 2017/12/04.

  • DragonFlyBSD Now Supports Up To 64TB Of RAM

    DragonFlyBSD now supports up to 64TB of physical memory.

    Up to now DragonFlyBSD has supported up to about 32TB of physical memory but as of today that's been bumped to now support up to 64TB.

  • IRNAS researchers 3D print ear-shaped vasculature using open source Vitaprint 3D bioprinter

    Researchers from the Symbiolab at the Institute IRNAS in Slovenia have marked a step forwards in their 3D bioprinting research. Using the Institute IRNAS’ open source Vitaprint bioprinter platform, the team has demonstrated its ability to bioprint “freeform perfusable vessel systems in biocompatible hydrogels.”

  • JDRF Initiative Aims to Speed Development of ‘Open Source’ Artificial Pancreas Systems

    For those watching from the outside, who have heard about the benefits that open-protocol closed-loop systems provide but feel intimidated by the technological skill that’s now required, JDRF’s involvement gives hope that these advances will become more mainstream. As Finan says, “Through observing where the community has gone over the past few years, it’s become unignorable that there’s value out there to be harnessed and to be spread out so more patients can use it. So we’re just trying to figure out a way that we can do that safely and with the most efficacy.”

  • Western Digital Transitions to RISC-V Open-Source Architecture for Big Data, IoT

    RiSC-V, the open-source computer core architecture, will be getting a big push from Western Digital in the coming years as the company has pledged to transitioning its own consumption of processors to RISC-V. According to the company Western Digital ships over one billion cores per year, and plans to double that number. And if all goes according to plan, they will all be based on RISC-V.

Programming: Lua, Qt 3D, C++

Filed under
Development
  • easy gopher-lua bridge
  • Increasing the number of lights in Qt 3D

    While it is possible to draw scenes with almost unlimited numbers of lights using deferred rendering in Qt 3D, the default materials in Qt 3D Extras have been limited to eight lights because they are tied to forward rendering. Although we apply a few tricks that allow you to define more than eight lights in the scene, we only select the eight closest lights when rendering.

  • Qt Company offers 3D interface authoring system

    Emanating from its development bases in Helsinki, Finland and Santa Clara, California, Qt explains that its latest product is a 3D design and development tool for major industrial use cases.

  • C++17 Final Standard Is Now Official

    Earlier this year in May, we told you that C++17 standard is now feature complete and expected to ship soon. Well, if you’ve been waiting for the same, that time has finally arrived as the official standard has been published on ISO.org.

Security: Management Engine (ME) and WebGoat

Filed under
Security
  • ​Computer vendors start disabling Intel Management Engine

    Hidden inside your Intel-based computer is a mystery program called Management Engine (ME). It, along with Trusted Execution Engine (TXE) and Server Platform Services (SPS), can be used to remotely manage your computer. We know little about Intel ME, except it's based on the Minix operating system and, oh yes, ME is very insecure. Because of this, three computers vendors -- Linux-specific OEMs System76 and Purism and top-tier PC builder Dell -- have decided to offer computers with disabled ME.

    These ME security holes impact millions of computers. ME supports Intel's Active Management Technology (AMT). This is a powerful tool that allows admins to remotely run computers, even when the device is not booted. Let me repeat that: If your PC has power, even if it's not running, it can be attacked. If an attacker successfully exploits these holes, the attacker can run malware that's totally invisible to the operating system.

  • Get These Laptops With Intel ME Chip Disabled From Dell, System76, And Purism

    Intel ME chip which recently became popular is giving sleepless nights to the security community and PC users around the world.

    Why? Because the vulnerabilities in the Management Engine chip, running a closed source variant of MINIX OS, can allow attackers to take complete control of a system without the users noticing.

  • WebGoat Teaches You To Fix Web Application Flaws In Real-time

    Good day, web developers! Today, we are going to discuss about a super useful application that teaches you web application security lessons. Say hello to WebGoat, a deliberately insecure web application developed by OWASP, with the intention of teaching how to fix common web application flaws in real-time with hands-on exercises. This application can be quite useful for those who wants to learn about application security and penetration testing techniques.

    A word of caution: WebGoat is PURELY FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE. It turns your system extremely vulnerable to attackers. So, I insist you to use it in a virtual machine in your local area network. Don’t connect your testing machine to Internet. If you are using it in a production environment either intentionally or unknowingly, your company will definitely fire you. You have been warned!

CoreOS Tectonic 1.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • CoreOS Tectonic 1.8 makes it easy to plug external services into Kubernetes

    CoreOS announced Tectonic 1.8, its latest update of the popular Kubernetes container orchestration tool. It features a new open services catalog that enables DevOps personnel to plug in external services into Kubernetes with ease.

    As Rob Szumski, Tectonic product manager at CoreOS pointed out in a company blog post announcing the new version, public clouds offer lots of benefits around ease of use, but they can end up locking you in, in some cases to a proprietary set of tools.

    This is precisely what the new Open Cloud Services catalog is designed to resolve. Instead of using those proprietary tools, you get more open choices and that should make it easier to move between clouds or a hybrid environment.

  • CoreOS adds open-source infrastructure services to its Tectonic Kubernetes platform

    Software container company CoreOS Inc. is updating its popular Tectonic platform, adding a number of open-source services that serve as alternatives to proprietary infrastructure components from public cloud companies.

    CoreOS’s Tectonic platform is essentially an enterprise-grade version of the Kubernetes container orchestration tool, which is used to manage clusters of software containers, which in turn allow applications to run on any computer platform. The company also offers the Container Linux operating system, and the Quay container registry service, which together serve as an alternative to the better-known container infrastructure offered by Docker Inc.

You Can Now Have a Single ISO Image with the Essential Ubuntu 17.10 Flavors

Filed under
Ubuntu

Meet Linux AIO Ubuntu 17.10, a unique and bootable ISO image that contains 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the official, untouched Ubuntu 17.10, Kubuntu 17.10, Xubuntu 17.10, Lubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu MATE 17.10, and Ubuntu Budgie 17.10 releases. The ISO also contains a memory test tool and a hardware detection utility.

If you're wondering what you can do with the Linux AIO Ubuntu 17.10 ISO image, let us tell you that it might come in handy when you want to showcase several Ubuntu flavors to your customers before they decide which want they want to install on their computers. This way, you'll only carry a single USB stick with you, not six.

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Free and Proprietary Software: FAI.me, Aptdaemon, Justmd, TeamViewer, Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
  • FAI.me build server improvements

    Only one week ago, I've announced the FAI.me build service for creating your own installation images.

  • Aptdaemon

    I am glad to announce aptdaemon: It is a DBus controlled and PolicyKit using package management daemon build on python-apt.

    If the above description reminds you of PackageKit you won't be completely wrong. Aptdaemon reuses some design concepts and code from PackageKit. As the author of the PackageKit apt backend I run into some policy problems: PackageKit only allows non-interactive actions. So there is no support for debconf, CDROMs and configuration conflict handling. Nevertheless thanks to Richard Hughes for his efforts on making package management less of a pain.

  • Justmd – A Lightweight Cross-Platform Markdown Editor

    We have written on a couple of Markdown editors so far but not on this one, and I don’t think you have heard about it yet because it is pretty much a new project so read on.

    Justmd is a simple, lightweight, cross-platform, and electron-based application with a focus on creating and managing smart documents. Its best features include its live preview mode which comes along with synchronized scrolling as well as smart copying and pasting of images, words and HTML.

  • TeamViewer 13 Now Available For Linux As A Native 64-bit Port

    -
    The latest version of the TeamViewer remote control / desktop sharing / web conferencing software is now available for Linux with a number of improvements.

    TeamViewer 13 is now available for Linux, currently in preview form. Besides the iOS screen sharing with remote support, better file transfer abilities, and other key improvements, there are also a number of Linux-specific improvements too.

    This Linux build of TeamViewer 13 is now "native" for Linux in that it no longer depends upon Wine. TeamViewer 13 for Linux is also now a native 64-bit package without requiring 32-bit dependencies. Additionally, TeamViewer for Linux is now available in DEB and RPM package form.

  • Vivaldi Browser Now Available For Raspberry Pi And ARM Based Linux Hardware

    Raspberry Pi enthusiasts and those of you using ARM based Linux devices, may be interested to know that Vivaldi has this week released an experimental build of the Vivaldi browser which is now available to download for Linux on ARM devices, including the awesome Pi mini PC. In addition to the Windows, macOS and Linux (x86/x86-64), operating systems. The Vivaldi browser is now available for a range of ARM based Linux devices and is now supported by the Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 systems as well as CubieBoard, ASUS Tinker Board and more. Jon von Tetzchner, CEO at Vivaldi Technologies explains :

  • Vivaldi Web Browser Now Available For Linux ARM / Raspberry Pi

    Are you still using the Vivaldi web browser? If so, you can now use it on ARM devices like the Raspberry Pi.

    Vivaldi certainly hasn't been generating the attention these days like it did when it was first released last year to much fanfare by former Opera users and developers. This Blink-powered browser is now available for Linux on ARM as the project's latest news.

Games: Geneshift, Corpse Party, Stellaris, OpenMW

Filed under
Gaming

Events: LISA, Khmer Translation Sprint, Peru, Cubaconf, HackMIT

Filed under
OSS
  • LISA17 Event Report

    LISA is the annual vendor-neutral meeting place for the wider system administration community. The LISA17 program will address the overlap and differences between traditional and modern IT operations and engineering, and offers a highly curated program around three topics: architecture, culture, and engineering.

  • Khmer Translation Sprint Round 2

    After two years it was really time to organize another sprint to move on in Fedoras translation to khmer. I started to organize it back in September. Normally enought time to get it done, but like often here the communication chain was broken and I didnt hear back from the event place if we can do it. So I did hear as I did ask on which date we might delay it. So now the last things had to be organized in very short time. With the consequence also have to have only a short time to make marketing for the event. But the result was not that bad, we have in Cambodia anyway the problem that for a lot of people the Saturday is a normal working day. Especially students, who have during week a normal job, going on Saturday to university. Like Kuylim Tith, he could join us for translation only on sunday. But then he translated like two years ago, a lot.

  • Extraordinary Session 3.x for the #PeruRumboGSoC2018
  • Talking at Cubaconf 2017 in Havanna, Cuba

    My first talk was on PrivacyScore.org, a Web scanner for privacy and security issues. As I’ve indicated, the conference was a bit messily organised. The person before me was talking into my slot and then there was no cable to hook my laptop up with the projector. We ended up transferring my presentation to a different machine (via pen drives instead of some fancy distributed local p2p network) in order for me to give my presentation. And then I needed to rush through my content, because we were pressed for going for lunch in time. Gnah. But I think a few people were still able to grasp the concepts and make it useful for them. My argument was that Web pages load much faster if you don’t have to load as many trackers and other external content. Also, these people don’t get updates in time, so they might rather want to visit Web sites which generally seem to care about their security. I was actually approached by a guy running StreetNet, the local DIY Internet. His idea is to run PrivacyScore against their network to see what is going on and to improve some aspects. Exciting.

  • Fedora returns to HackMIT 2017

    Every year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) hosts an annual hackathon, HackMIT, for students around the world. Students gathered again for HackMIT 2017 on the weekend of September 16-17, 2017. During the weekend, students form teams with other students and work on projects to compete in various categories. Participants often release their projects under open source licenses at the end of the hackathon.

    The Fedora Project participated as a sponsor for the second year in a row. Justin W. Flory and Mike DePaulo attended as Fedora Ambassadors to represent the project and the community.

OSS: Education, Bitnami, Nudi, Orange/OCast, LXD, 'DevOps' Buzzword

Filed under
OSS
  • 3 ways university classrooms can be more open

    Institutions of higher education stress the importance of student autonomy in academic exploration—yet the typical configuration of university courses does not take full advantage of students' potential to become actors in their education, rather than just receivers of it. To realize this potential and make university learning more inclusive of—and meaningful for—students, professors could learn a lesson from open organizations.

  • Bitnami Launches Open Source In-Cluster Kubernetes App Environment

    Packaged server application provider Bitnami released Kubeapps, an open source and free application deployment environment that allows enterprises to discover, launch, and manage pre-packaged Kubernetes-ready applications and developer tools from within their Kubernetes cluster.

    Bitnami has contributed to previous Kubernetes projects including Helm, a Kubernetes package manager; Monocular, a search and discovery front-end for Helm Chart repositories; and Kubeless, a configuring application that runs on Kubernetes. The new product builds on these contributions and provides a simple method of deploying applications in a Kubernetes environment.

  • Nudi 6.0 to be open source

    To bridge the gap between latest technology and Nudi, Kannada Ganaka Parishat (KGP) will release Nudi 6.0 as an open source software, making the source code public for the first time.

  • Orange announces the Open Source release of its OCast software technology

    OCast is a software technology that allows you to use a smartphone to play videos on devices including TV set-top boxes, TV Sticks or TVs and control playback of the video (pause, fast forward and rewind, for example). Beyond video, OCast can also play and control slideshows, playlists and web apps.

  • Orange makes OCast TV software open source
  • LXD Weekly Status #26

    Focus this week has been on infiniband support and more clustering related work with a number of bugfixes, cleanups and refactoring on the side.

    We’ve been doing some small tweaks and bugfixes on the LXD snap based on user feedback as more and more users are migrating to it. We’re also getting ready to push LXD 2.0.11 to a lot of our users, fixing a lot of bugs in the process and bringing some small usability tweaks too.

    The FOSDEM CFP is now closed and we’re reviewing the 45 proposals we received and carefully checking how we can fit those in the schedule. We expect to send notifications to potential speakers by the end of the week.

  • DevOps: Is It More Than Just A Name?

    The title of DevOps Engineer has consistently been gaining momentum for over five years. From the outside, it appeared it might be a corporate preference to call an individual a DevOps engineer as opposed to a System Administrator. It was thought they were virtually one and the same. As time has progressed, the nuances that differentiate the two have become apparent.

    DevOps's existence is primarily the result of the cloud. Being able to automate a lot of the tasks done by a traditional System Administrator, the evolution of the DevOps role took shape. The previously known System Administrator was now being asked to collaborate with software development and product management to ensure efficiency in the process of releasing software.

Security: Blockchains, Disabling Intel ME, Windows, and Mac OS

Filed under
Security
  • Blockchains Are Poised to End the Password Era

    The massive password heists keeping coming, and one thing is certain: the way we prove our identities online is in need of a major upgrade. A growing chorus of technologists and entrepreneurs is convinced that the key to revolutionizing digital identity can be found in the same technology that runs cryptocurrencies.

  • Three Laptop Makers Are Disabling Intel ME

    For years now, security experts warned that Intel’s Management Engine (ME) is at risk of being exploited; ME allows administrators to remotely access a computer and is present within every Intel processor since 2008. Finally – after staying quiet during the period of concern – Intel last month admitted that ME is vulnerable to exploitation. As a result, PC makers are making moves to protect users from said vulnerability. Indeed, Dell, Purism, and Linux PC vendor System76 are all disabling Intel ME on their laptops.

  • Microsoft Breaks Down Windows Update on Windows 7, PCs Hit with Error 80248015

    A number of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 systems are experiencing a Windows Update error that prevents them from checking for updates for an unclear reason.

    Posts on the company’s Community forums seem to indicate that the bug first appeared on December 3 and it’s a server-side issue, which means that users might not have anything to do to have this fixed. Instead, Microsoft has remained tight-lipped on the actual cause of the bug, despite the growing number of posts on the said Community thread.

    Checking for updates on the impacted systems fails with error “Windows could not search for new updates,” with some saying that an additional message reading “Windows Update cannot currently check for updates because the service is not running. You may need to restart your computer,” when they click the “Get help with this error” option in Windows Update.

  • Apple’s macOS 10.13.1 Update Brings Back Critical Root Vulnerability

Programming: Haskell in 2017 and C++17

Filed under
Development
  • Reflecting on Haskell in 2017

    Alas, another year has come and gone. It feels like just yesterday I was writing the last reflection blog post on my flight back to Boston for Christmas. I’ve spent most of the last year traveling and working in Europe, meeting a lot of new Haskellers and putting a lot of faces to names.

    Haskell has had a great year and 2017 was defined by vast quantities of new code, including 14,000 new Haskell projects on Github . The amount of writing this year was voluminous and my list of interesting work is eight times as large as last year. At least seven new companies came into existence and many existing firms unexpectedly dropped large open source Haskell projects into the public sphere. Driven by a lot of software catastrophes, the intersection of security, software correctness and formal methods have been become quite an active area of investment and research across both industry and academia. It’s really never been an easier and more exciting time to be programming professionally in the world’s most advanced (yet usable) statically typed language.

    Per what I guess is now a tradition, I will write my end of year retrospective on my highlights of what happened in the Haskell scene in retrospect.

  • C++17 Is Now Official

    The final standard of C++17 (formerly known as "C++1z") is now official.

    The final standard of C++17 has been published as ISO/IEC 14882:2017 and has been published on ISO.org.

    C++17 introduces a number of new language features, support for UTF-8 character literals, inline variables, fold expressions, and more. On the C++ standard library side is parallel versions of the STL algorithms, a file-system library derived from Boost, and other additions.

Project ZeroPhone: the ambitious DIY Raspberry Pi phone

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The growth of open hardware is undeniable and we’ve had high-profile smartphone projects appearing such as Purism’s security- and privacy-focused Librem 5 smartphone.

The ZeroPhone project led by Arsenijs Picugins is no less ambitious but much less expensive. As we started this interview we noted, with some irony, his apologies for the intermittent mobile connection as he’s taking a break away from his home city of Riga to enjoy the countryside of neighbouring Lithuania.

While you’ll be able to make calls and send SMS with Picugin’s ZeroPhone, it isn’t as cutting edge as Purism’s smartphone. Instead, it sits firmly in the middle of the makery and hacking spirit that powers the big budget open hardware projects.

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Mozilla: Tor Browser Features and STT

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Quietly Adds Features From Tor Browser to Firefox

    In 2017, the developers at Mozilla have quietly added several features to Firefox that originated from the Tor Project’s Tor Browser. The new features come from the Tor Uplift project, which helps Mozilla integrate patches to Firefox that are used in the Tor Browser. The Tor Uplift project patches to Firefox help increase privacy and security, and the project has been helping improve Firefox since last year.

    Around 95% of the code in the Tor Browser itself comes from Mozilla, as it is based on Mozilla’s Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR). Mozilla, which earlier this month released Firefox version 57, known as Firefox Quantum, has most recently included a feature from the Tor Browser known as First Party Isolation.

  • Mozilla talks up speech-to-text application platform

    Mozilla is on a mission… and it’s a mission designed to ‘empower’ software application developers with tools to help create more STT apps.

    STT you say?

    Yes, that would be speech-to-text applications.

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

Slackware and New Upcoming Software Releases (Qt and darktable)

Filed under
Software
Slack
  • Welcome slackware.nl
  • VLC 2.2.8

    Last week, Robby Workman alerted me to a new release of the VLC media player by the VideoLAN team. I must confess that I had stopped following the development of my (yes, still) favorite media player. Looking a bit more closely, not only have they released version 2.2.8 without informing the world on their homepage (where they are still offering downloads for the now deprecated 2.2.6) but there’s now also a git repository called “vlc-3.0-git” and even a “vlc-4.0-dev” which seems to have been split off the 3.0 branch. I assume this is an indication – finally – that there is life beyond vlc-2.2.x and a 3.0 release is actually a possibility.

  • Qt 5.10.0 RC3 out

    We have released Qt 5.10.0 RC3 today. Delta to RC2 as an attachment.

  • Qt 5.10 RC3 Released, Qt 5.10 Now Expected This Week

    Mesa 17.3 isn't the only thing running behind schedule but also out today is Qt 5.10-RC3 after this tool-kit release failed to ship last month.

    Last week marked a late 5.10 release candidate but The Qt Company expressed hope in still shipping Qt 5.10.0 on 30 November.

  • darktable 2.4.0rc0 released

    we're proud to announce the first release candidate for the upcoming 2.4 series of darktable, 2.4.0rc0!

    the github release is here: https://github.com/darktable-org/darktable/releases/tag/release-2.4.0rc0.

    as always, please don't use the autogenerated tarball provided by github, but only our tar.xz.

  • darktable 2.4 RAW Image Editor Promises Support for Fujifilm's Compressed RAFs

    The developers of the darktable open-source and cross-platform RAW image editing software for GNU/Linux and macOS operating systems kicked off the development of the next major release, darktable 2.4.

    The biggest new features of the upcoming darktable 2.4 release is support for Microsoft Windows operating systems. That's right, you can now finally install darktable on Windows OSes, though some features are still missing, such as printing support, and there are a few limitations like the need for special drivers for tethering support.

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KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu, Krita, GNOME Development

  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Could Switch to Breeze-Dark Plasma Theme by Default, Test Now
    The latest daily build live ISO images that landed earlier today for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) apparently uses the Breeze-Dark Plasma theme for the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment by default. However, we've been told that it's currently an experiment to get the pulse of the community. "Users running [Kubuntu] 18.04 development version who have not deliberately opted to use Breeze/Breeze-Light in their System Settings will also see the change after upgrading packages," said the devs. "Users can easily revert back to the Breeze/Breeze-Light Plasma themes by changing this in System Settings."
  • Interview with Rytelier
    The amount of convenience is very high compared to other programs. The amount of “this one should be designed in a better way, it annoys me” things is the smallest of all the programs I use, and if something is broken, then most of these functions are announced to improve in 4.0.
  • Grow your skills with GNOME
    For the past 3 years I’ve been working very hard because I fulfill a number of these roles for Builder. It’s exhausting and unsustainable. It contributes to burnout and hostile communication by putting too much responsibility on too few people’s shoulders.
  • GTK4, GNOME's Wayland Support & Vulkan Renderer Topped GNOME In 2017
  • A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support
    It's been four months since the release of GIMP 2.9.6 and while GIMP 2.9 developments are sadly not too frequent, the next GIMP 2.9.8 release is preparing a host of changes. Of excitement to those trying to use GIMP in a Wayland-based Linux desktop environment, GIMP's color picker has just picked up support for working on KDE/Wayland as well as some other Color Picker improvements to help GNOME/Wayland too. GIMP's Screenshot plugin also now has support for taking screenshots on KDE/Wayland either as a full-screen or individual windows. Granted, GIMP won't be all nice and dandy on Wayland itself until seeing the long-awaited GTK3 (or straight to GTK4) port.

Red Hat and Fedora

OSS Leftovers

  • How Open Source Databases Unlock Faster Computing
  • The art of the usability interview
    During a usability test, it's important to understand what the tester is thinking. What were they looking for when they couldn't find a button or menu item? During the usability test, I recommend that you try to observe, take notes, capture as much data as you can about what the tester is doing. Only after the tester is finished with a scenario or set of scenarios should you ask questions.
  • This open-source interview approach will help you avoid unconscious bias
    The lack of diversity in tech has been front and center this past year. Large tech companies have publicly vowed to fix the problem. But how? One answer is recognizing, acknowledging, and eliminating unconscious bias from the hiring process.
  • Microsoft Goes All In With Kubernetes
  • OpenBSD Now Officially Supports 64-bit ARM
    OpenBSD has graduated its 64-bit ARM (ARM64) architecture to being officially supported. As outlined in the OpenBSD Journal with a change made this week by lead OpenBSD developer Theo de Raadt, OpenBSD's ARM64 support is now considered officially supported.
  • LLVM Clang 6.0 Now Defaults To C++14
    Up to now LLVM's Clang C/C++ compiler has defaulted to using C++98/GNU++98 as its default C++ standard, but fortunately that's no more. Clang's default C++ dialect is now GNU++14 version of C++14 rather than GNU++98 (C++98). The older versions of the C++ standard remain available and can be set via the -std= argument, just as those previously could have specified C++11 / C++14 / C++17, but now in cases where not specified, GNU++14/C++14 is the default.
  • Tor Browser 7.0.11 is released
    Tor Browser 7.0.11 is now available from the Tor Browser Project page [1] and also from our distribution directory [2].

Android Leftovers