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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Freedreno Gallium3D Lands A5xx Texture Tiling For Better Performance

    Freedreno lead developer Rob Clark has landed initial support for texture tiling with Qualcomm Adreno A5xx graphics hardware.

  • Nintendo Switch 'Yuzu' Emulator Announced for PC, Mac, Linux

    A new emulator that aims to open up the doors to Nintendo Switch-exclusive games has just been announced for computers. Named Yuzu, the emulator was created by the same team that designed Citra, a similar 3DS emulator. Yuzu's official website calls it an "experimental" open-source emulator, and has builds ready and maintained for PC, Mac, and Linux. The project is "in its infancy" for now, but has some pretty big goals on the horizon.

  • I pushed an implementation of myself to GitHub

    Roughly 4 years ago, I mentioned that there appears to be an esotieric programming language which shares my full name.

    I know, it is really late, but two days ago, I discovered Racket. As a Lisp person, I immediately felt at home. And realizing how the language dispatch mechanism works, I couldn't resist and write a Racket implementation of MarioLANG. A nice play on words and a good toy project to get my feet wet.

  • digest 0.6.14

    Another small maintenance release, version 0.6.14, of the digest package arrived on CRAN and in Debian today.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • A "Newer" ASUS Mini-ITX AMD Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot

    The ASUS AM1I-A as implied by the name is an AM1 socket motherboard for those Athlon/Sempron processors... Not nearly as exciting as if a Ryzen motherboard would be supported by Coreboot, but this motherboard isn't too old compared to some other Coreboot ports and can still be found from a few online shops albeit refurbished. The ASUS AM1I-A is a mini-ITX board with USB 3.0, DVI/HDMI/VGA outputs, and all the other usual candidates for an AM1 class motherboard.

  •  

  • Mozilla.Org: The Big SUMO Report: 2017

    Just like the year before, our activity and its results could be analysed from many perspectives, with dozens of data sources. Putting everything together, especially given our platform changes in 2018, is quite impossible – and the numbers have been affected by interruptions in tracking, as expected.

  • Open source software security challenges persist, but the risk can be managed [Ed: Maria Korolov writes an advert for anti-FOSS firms like Snyk and Black Duck]
  • Spectre Mitigation Added To GCC 8, Seeking Backport To GCC 7

    Hitting the GCC 8 compiler Git/SVN code this Sunday morning are the changes needed compiler-side for CVE-2017-5715 / Spectre mitigation.

    Veteran GNU toolchain developer H.J. Lu of Intel has committed the set of patches for introducing -mindirect-branch=, -mfunction-return= and -mindirect-branch-register for dealing with indirect branches from the compiler side and is also compiler features already used by the Linux kernel Retpoline patches when built with a supported compiler for full enforcement against Spectre vulnerabilities.

  • Tony Sebro to Join Conservancy Board of Directors & Outreachy Leadership

    Tony Sebro, who was Conservancy’s second full-time employee, is moving on to become Deputy General Counsel at the Wikimedia Foundation, the home of Wikipedia. We say goodbye to Tony as a Conservancy employee today, but more importantly we welcome him to a number of new volunteer roles at our organization.

    Specifically, Conservancy’s Board of Directors has invited Tony to serve as an at-large Director. Tony has also joined the Project Leadership committee of Conservancy’s Outreachy project (our internship program for free and open source software contribution for underrepresented groups). We are thrilled that Tony will continue to contribute his expertise to our organization, and to formalize his participation with our key internship program.

  • Open source model, drugs for the masses

    Nearly one person dies of tubercolosis every two minutes in India, said Professor Jaykumar Menon, the award-winning international human rights lawyer and social entrepreneur. Professor Jaykumar began the Open Source Pharma Foundation, which looks at generating breakthroughs in affordable public healthcare; the initiative has drawn over $110 million in funding the likes of Tata Trusts, Gates Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation and the Soros Foundations. Speaking at the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bengaluru, Menon said, "We are working on complex issues that affect Indian and global society. Our first target, therefore, is Mycobacterium tubercolosis, which inhabits approximately a quarter of the human population in India."

  • #DLNchat: Open Educational Resources (OER) in Higher Ed

    Can open educational resources, or OER, truly create more equity and access? That was the question at the heart of our #DLNchat on January 9, which centered around OER in Higher Education. Our special guest, Lisa Petrides, creator of OER Commons, kicked things off by defining the topic at hand: “OER are teaching & learning materials freely available for anyone to use. These materials typically reside in the public domain, or have an alternative copyright license, i.e. Creative Commons or GNU, that specify how the resource may be reused, adapted, and shared. To me OER is also about the democratization of access to education, and the pursuit and sharing of knowledge. And the ecosystem of open knowledge sharing is fundamental to teaching, to learning, and to equity."

deepin 15.5 - A different desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

deepin is a Debian-based Linux distribution which features the custom Deepin Desktop Environment along with several in-house desktop applications. The deepin project develops its own file manager, media players, software centre and settings panel, along with other desktop applications. Clearly, the deepin team is very busy working on a desktop solution, one which is easy to navigate.

deepin is available as a 3.2GB download for 64-bit x86 computers. Booting from the project's media gives us the option of starting the installation process, booting the operating system in failsafe mode or checking the media's integrity. In both of my test environments, deepin would boot and launch the installer (the first option), but was unable to boot in failsafe mode, whether run in UEFI or Legacy BIOS mode.

Taking the install option brings up a graphical environment where we are asked to select our preferred language from a list. In the upper-right corner of the screen there is an "X" which, when clicked, lets us abort the installation. Quitting the installer immediately powers off the computer. Once we have selected our language we are asked to create a username and password for ourselves. We can then select our time zone from a map of the world.

Partitioning comes next and here I encountered several options. We are asked whether we want Simple or Advanced partitioning. The Simple option takes over the entire hard drive, creating an ext4 file system. A 4GB swap file is set up on the root partition for us. This is the easy way forward, but it wipes out any other installed systems or partitions.

The Advanced option lets us select where to install the system's boot loader and presents us with a list of available partitions and free space. At first I wasn't able to find any way to add new partitions, but eventually found the button for adding and editing partitions is a grey icon on a grey background, making it difficult to spot. Once the button was found, setting up new partitions was fairly straight forward. The deepin installer will not proceed if the root partition is 16GB or smaller in size when we take the Advanced partitioning option. However, I found I could create a root partition smaller than 16GB if I used the Simple partitioning option. Once our partitions are assigned mount points, the installer copies its files to the computer and reboots the system.

Read more

Also: What’s New in MX Linux 17

Linspire, Freespire and Black Lab Enterprise Linux Patched

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
  • Linspire 7.0.1 and Freespire 3.0.1 Released - Meltdown and Spectre fix

    This morning we have released Linspire 7.0.1 and Freespire 3.0.1 . With this release we have addressed the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities in Intel Processors. We have included no new features.

  • Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.51 Released - Meltdown and Spectre Fix

    Today we have released Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.51. This release addresses the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities in Intel Processors. We have included no new features. To apply the fix simply run your system updater and the fix will be applied.

    This update has been thoroughly tested and does not cause any issues or malfunctions

  • At CES, Spectre haunted tech executives in public and private meetings

    Despite being drenched and briefly thrust in to darkness, the largest annoyance for many top tech executives at CES was the shadow of Spectre.

    The world’s largest electronics show immediately careened toward the twin maladies dubbed Spectre and Meltdown, potentially exploitable weaknesses in the brains of PCs and servers world-wide.

Linux 4.15 RC8 and Linux Kernel Mailing List Downtime

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.15-rc8

    Ok, another week has gone by, and here's the promised rc8.

    I'm still hoping that this will be the last rc, despite all the
    Meltdown and Spectre hoopla. But we will just have to see, it
    obviously requires this upcoming week to not come with any huge
    surprises.

    The patches aren't huge, but architecture updates do end up being a
    largish part. That's partly due to the x86 "retpoline" support (well,
    the basic stuff that is uncontested), but also because the powerpc
    people decided they wanted to play too, so there's some low-level
    kernel entry changes there too. Aren't we lucky?

    Oh, and there's a small RISC-V update too.

    But outside of that, we've got driver updates (gpu, networking, usb,
    sound, NVMe), some core networking, and some tooling updates (mostly a
    few new x86 selftests). And some random misc fixlets (documentation,
    apparmor, crypto).

    Go forth and test. It all looks pretty solid to me,

    Linus

  • Kernel prepatch 4.15-rc8

    The 4.15-rc8 kernel prepatch is out for testing. Among other things, it includes the "retpoline" mechanism intended to mitigate variant 2 of the Spectre vulnerability. Testing of this change will be hard, though, since it requires a version of GCC that almost nobody has — watch LWN for a full article in the near future.

  • Linux 4.15-rc8 Released As The Last Before Final

    LINUX KERNEL --
    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 4.15-rc8 as the last planned release candidate prior to officially debuting Linux 4.15 next weekend.

    Linux 4.15-rc8 brings some BPF security improvements in the wake of the Spectre CPU vulnerabilities and there is the other smothering of bug/regression fixes too with this weekly Linux 4.15 release candidate.

  • An Incident Worth Noticing: Linux Kernel Mailing List Website Goes Down for Days

    Reality: the website goes down because it is hosted on a home server that suffered a power outage and needed the password to boot. Problem was that owner Jasper was on vacation when this incident happened.

GPD Win 2 – A Pocket-Sized Linux Games Machine?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Gaming

Dream of owning a pocket-sized Linux games console? Well, your dream just inched a little nearer.

Early reviews of the 6-inch GPD Win 2 pocket computer claim that Linux runs “perfectly” — opening up the possibility to use the device as a portable Steam machine, with your full Linux games library literally in your hand.

Read more

Today in Techrights

Filed under
News

Games: CAPS0ff, Godot, Quake 4, Event[0], Cold Space, Tale of Toast

Filed under
Gaming
  • Introducing the CAPS0ff Project

    It's no secret that I love classic video games. Fortunately, thanks to emulation, many of the classic arcade games still can be enjoyed and forever will be available via digital copies of the ROM chips. Sadly, some older systems have protection, making them impossible to dump into ROMs properly. If the chips can't be dumped, how will you ever get a digital copy of the ROM data? Well, the folks over at the CAPS0ff blog actually are disassembling the original chips and painstakingly transcribing the contents one bit at a time. They're literally looking at the chips and determining the 1s and 0s burned onto them.

  • Godot 3.0 Release Candidate 1 Debuts Ahead Of This Imminent Game Engine Release

    The crew responsible for the open-source Godot cross-platform game engine have announced the 3.0 Release Candidate ahead of the imminent stable release of this major update.

  • Dev snapshot: Godot 3.0 RC 1

    So Godot 3.0 won't be a 2017 release as we had hoped during the last semester, but we are pretty confident that you will get it in January 2018 to properly kickstart this new year!

    We fixed hundreds of bugs and declared the release freeze, which means that many non critical bugs and enhancements have been moved to the 3.1 milestone, allowing us to tend faster towards the final 3.0 release by focusing on the big issues.

  • Playing Quake 4 on Linux in 2018

    A few months back I wrote an article outlining the various options Linux users now have for playing Doom 3, as well as stating which of the three contenders I felt to be the best option in 2017. Having already gone to the trouble of getting the original Doom 3 binary working on my modern Arch Linux system, it made me wonder just how much effort it would take to get the closed source Quake 4 port up and running again as well.

  • Looks like the sci-fi narrative exploration game Event[0] may still be coming to Linux

    I know a fair few people were upset by the silence surrounding the previously promised Linux version of Event[0]. It looks like it might still be happening.

    As of a few hours ago, it seems the developer added a Linux content depot, so it seems like they might actually be working on it now. Either that, or it took some time to get it into a state where they could get something up on Steam. I will keep a close on eye on it and let you know of any changes in regards to an actual release.

  • Cold Space, a fast-paced one-shot kill FPS has Linux support

    A rather interesting looking fast-paced FPS released with Linux support recently called Cold Space [Steam, Official Site], I took a look to see if it's any good.

    The Linux build released only a few days ago, not long after the Windows version. The initial announcement said it was only for NVIDIA, but it seems it may work on AMD GPUs now too as it's listed in the system requirements.

  • Tale of Toast, another open world MMO that's going to release with Linux support

    Tale of Toast [Official Site, Steam] is another MMO that will release with Linux support, it will be free to play without any pay to win apparently.

    It will have no classes, open world PvP combat with a zone system that sounds like it might be similar to Albion Online and they're focusing on "quality before quantity" when it comes to the quests that will be available.

Graphics: Weston, Trends and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Some Of What's Coming For Wayland's Weston 4.0 Compositor

    Earlier this week ongoing Wayland/Weston release manager Bryce Harrington at Samsung laid out plans for Wayland 1.15 and Weston 4.0. There's been some push-back on the proposed dates to try to allow some more work to land in these upcoming six month releases to Wayland/Weston, but long story short, these next releases will be here in the near future.

    With Wayland itself quite mature, there isn't much that's exciting for end-users about Wayland 1.15. In fact, not many changes at all unless there's a last-minute rush of new work to land. As is the case these days, most of the interesting work is happening within the Weston compositor space as developers flesh out new functionality and prototype features that will hopefully be picked up by the other Wayland compositors that are becoming widely used on the Linux desktop.

  • Linux Graphics Trends Over The Past Five Years

    Yesterday I posted some Linux hardware statistics going back to 2011 using data collected by the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org. Those yearly metrics hadn't contained any GPU/driver data, but here are those numbers.

    The graphics numbers were omitted from yesterday's article as I had to make some tweaks to its parser and post-processor due to the wide assortment of graphics driver/hardware combinations, joining the ATI and AMD data, etc compared to the statistics collection on more basic/uniform hardware components. The sample set used was a maximum of 100,000 systems per year with the data being collected through the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.8 M2 Released As "Folldal" Development Heats Up

    Just one week after Phoronix Test Suite 7.8 Milestone 1, the second development release of 7.8-Folldal is now available for testing.

    Phoronix Test Suite 7.8 M2 is heavier on the end-user facing changes as this quarterly development cycle heats up and also initial planning underway for Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 that in turn will ship this summer.

Benchmarking Ubuntu's Low-Latency Kernel & Liquorix Post-Meltdown

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Security
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu low-latency kernel is designed for, well, low-latency workloads like audio processing/recording. The lowlatency kernel compared to the generic Linux x86_64 kernel enables IRQ_FORCED_THREADING_DEFAULT, disables TREE_RCU in favor of PREEMPT_RCU, disables OPTPROBES, enables UNINLINE_SPIN_UNLOCK while disables the INLINE_*_UNLOCK tunables, enables PREEMPT support, changes to 1000Hz tick from 250Hz, and enables LATENCYTOP support.

The Liquorix kernel continues to be a bit more unique and among its alterations compared to a generic kernel is Zen interactive tuning, making use of the MuQSS process scheduler, hard kernel preemption, BFQ I/O scheduler by default, network optimizations, and more as outlined at Liquorix.net. Liquorix also defaults to CPUFreq on Intel CPUs and uses the ondemand governor rather than the other tested kernels defaulting to P_State powersave.

For these tests were benchmarks of 4.13.0-25-generic (the current default Ubuntu 17.10 kernel with KPTI patched), 4.14.13-041413-generic as the latest upstream stable kernel from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA, 4.14.13-041413-lowlatency as the equivalent low-latency Ubuntu kernel, and then 4.14.0-13.1-liquorix as the latest Liquorix kernel via its Launchpad PPA. All of these kernels had KPTI protection present and enabled, none of them currently have the (currently out-of-tree) Retpoline support.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 17.10.1 ISOs available with corrupting BIOS fix

Linux 4.15-rc8 Bringing BPF Security Improvements For Fending Speculative Attacks

Filed under
Linux

With the Linux 4.15-rc8 kernel that is expected for release today as the final step before Linux 4.15, it's still seeing continued security improvements in the wake of the Spectre CPU vulnerabilities.

Landing in the mainline Git tree at this stage of the Linux 4.15 kernel cycle were some security features around BPF, the Berkeley Packet Filter and the related and popular Extended BPF (eBPF) virtual machine for the Linux kernel.

Read more

Software: uGet, GNU/Linux Media Players, Opera 51

Filed under
Software
  • uGet 2.2.0 and uGet for Android 1.4.8 Now Available!

    After almost a year of development, we are excited to announce the immediate availability of the latest stable version of uGet, version 2.2.0 and the latest version of uGet for Android, version 1.4.8. These releases include a LOT of improvements such as bug fixes, maintenance improvements and many highly requested features like support for Downloading from YouTube.

  • 7 Best Open Source Linux Media Players You Need To Try In 2018

    Honestly speaking, I have started using media player software less often. That’s probably because of the online streaming boom in the last couple of years. It’s hard to remember the last time I slid a DVD into my computer. Most of the time, I find myself binge-watching TV shows on Prime Video (it even has a free trial in India), or some random stuff on YouTube.

  • Opera 51 Browser Enters Beta with Support for AppleScript and Many New Features

    The upcoming Opera 51 web browser was promoted on Thursday to the beta channel, giving users a more in-depth look at what to expect from the final release, which will be available next month.

Programming: Continuous Integration, JavaScript Frameworks, Visualizing Molecules with Python

Filed under
Development
  • Librsvg gets Continuous Integration

    One nice thing about gitlab.gnome.org is that we can now have Continuous Integration (CI) enabled for projects there. After every commit, the CI machinery can build the project, run the tests, and tell you if something goes wrong.

    Carlos Soriano posted a "tips of the week" mail to desktop-devel-list, and a link to how Nautilus implements CI in Gitlab. It turns out that it's reasonably easy to set up: you just create a .gitlab-ci.yml file in the toplevel of your project, and that has the configuration for what to run on every commit.

  • The Brutal Lifecycle of JavaScript Frameworks

    Using the Stack Overflow Trends tool and some of our internal traffic data, we decided to take a look at some of the more prominent UI frameworks: Angular, React, Vue.js, Backbone, Knockout, and Ember.
     

  • Visualizing Molecules with Python

    The PyMOL Wiki also hosts a script library, and it's a good place to look before you start down the road of creating your own script, as someone else may have run into the same issue and may have found a solution you can use. If nothing else, you may be able to find a script that could serve as a starting point for your own particular problem.

    When you're are done working with PyMOL, there are many different ways to end the session. If there is work you are likely to pick up again and continue with, click File→Save Session to save all of the work you just did, including all of the transitions applied to the view. If the changes you made were actually structural, rather than just superficial changes to the way the molecule looked, you can save those structural changes by selecting File→Save Molecule. This allows you to write out the new molecule to a chemical file format, such as a PDB file.

    If you need output for publications or presentations, a few different options are available. Clicking File→Save Image As allows you to select from saving a regular image file in PNG format or writing out data in a POVRay or VRML 3D file format. If you are doing a fancier presentation, you even can export a movie of your molecule by clicking File→Save Movie As. This lets you generate an MPEG movie file that can be used either on a web-based journal or within a slide deck for a presentation.

Security: KPTI, Kaspersky, FUD, and Yet More Promises From WPA

Filed under
Security
  • KPTI Support For 64-bit ARM Getting Buttoned Up Ahead Of Linux 4.16

    Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) landed at the start of the year for x86/x86_64 systems for fending off the much talked about CPU attacks while the AMD64 / 64-bit ARM code is still a work-in-progress but looks like it will be squared away for the upcoming Linux 4.16 kernel cycle.

    There is this Git branch and the base work for those wishing to track the last minute alterations. There is currently the latest KPTI page table isolation patches for ARM64 and does include a return trampoline, a new HARDEN_BRANCH_PREDICTOR Kconfig switch, branch predictor hardening for Falkor and Cortex-A CPUs, and other security hardening improvements.

  • 'Very high level of confidence' Russia used Kaspersky software for devastating NSA leaks

    Three months after U.S. officials asserted that Russian intelligence used popular antivirus company Kaspersky to steal U.S. classified information, there are indications that the alleged espionage is related to a public campaign of highly damaging NSA leaks by a mysterious group called the Shadow Brokers.

    “That’s a Russian intelligence operation,” a former senior intelligence official, who requested anonymity to speak bluntly, told Yahoo Finance. “They’ve gotten a lot noisier than they used to be.”

  • FOSS Community Struggles to Patch Against Spectre, Meltdown Flaws [Ed: Unlike what? The proprietary software 'community'? Microsoft is bricking Windows-running PCs.]

    Many in the open source community worked feverishly this week to respond to heightened fears that software updates to fix the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities would put millions of computers at risk of slowdowns or even total disability.

  • WPA3 – The Promise of Security

KDE: Flatpak support in Discover, KDE Frameworks 5.42.0, digiKam 5.8.0, KDE in Trisquel 8, Activity in Elisa

Filed under
KDE
  • Flatpak support in Discover

    People often ask about the state of Flatpak in Discover, so today I’m going to write about that. Thew good news is that Discover’s Flatpak support is very good and getting better all the time. It’s fully production ready and we encourage you to use it!

  • Flatpak Support Is Now "Production Ready" In KDE Discover

    It seems to be a busy weekend for KDE news... The latest is that the Flatpak app sandboxing support formerly known as XDG-App is considered production ready within KDE Discover.

    KDE Discover, the closest thing currently to an "app store" on the KDE desktop and for managing add-ons and installing other packages, now has vetted Flatpak support. Going back a year KDE Discover has been working on Flatpak support as well as Ubuntu Snap/Snappy support but now the Flatpak support is in good standing.

  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.42.0

    KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.42.0.

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

    This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.42 Brings Wayland Improvements, Plasma & KIO Activity

    KDE Frameworks 5.42.0 was released today as the latest monthly feature update to this collection of add-on KDE libraries complementing Qt5.

    With KDE Frameworks 5.42.0 there is some new icons/support to the Breeze icon set, a number of KIO changes, continued work on Kirigami, experimental RCC file support in KPackage, various KWayland improvements, and more refining to the Plasma Framework.

  • digiKam 5.8.0 is released

    Following the release of 5.7.0 published in September 2017, the digiKam team is proud to announce the new release 5.8.0 of the digiKam Software Collection. In this version a lot of work has happened behind the scenes and in fixing bugs as usual, which does not mean there are no enhancements: a new tool to export collections to UPNP/DLNA compatible devices has been introduced.

  • DigiKam 5.8 Released With Export Support To UPnP/DLNA Devices

    The KDE-developed, Qt-powered digiKam photo management software is out with its first feature update of 2018.

    DigiKam 5.8.0 is the new release out this weekend. Most of the digiKam 5.8 development work the past quarter was focused on under-the-hood type improvements, but there is also many bug fixes, improved AppImage support with now handling Firejail sandboxing, MySQL support improvements, the ability to export to UPnP/DLNA compatible devices, DropBox exporting now supports OAuth2, and various other enhancements.

  • KSuperkey, Plasma, and Trisquel 8

    This short tutorial explains how to enable pressing Win key to open menu at Plasma 5.5 on Trisquel 8. For that purpose, you need KSuperkey program, which needs git and make programs to obtain the source code and install it onto your Trisquel system. Fortunately, the KSuperkey program is small, the process is very easy and quick, and it needs only less than 3 minutes. Follow instructions below.

  • Last Weeks Activity in Elisa

    Elisa is a music player designed to be simple and nice to use. It allows to browse music by album, artist or all tracks. You can build and play your own playlist. We aim to build a fluid interface that is easy to use.

    We are preparing for the next alpha release when the following features will be done. Alexander is working on a metadata view for tracks. I am working on cleaning the different grid views into a generic one.

    Diego Gangl did several modifications of the interface as part of the interactions with KDE VDG.

Hands on With System76’s Beautiful Linux Distro Pop!_OS

Filed under
Reviews

Linux system manufacturer System76 introduced a beautiful looking Linux distribution called Pop!_OS. But is Pop OS worth an install? Read the Pop OS review and find out yourself.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

PlayOnLinux For Easier Use Of Wine

PlayOnLinux is a free program that helps to install, run, and manage Windows software on Linux. It can also manage virtual C: drives (known as Wine prefixes), and download and install certain Windows libraries for getting some software to run on Wine properly. Creating different drives using different Wine versions is also possible. It is very handy because what runs well in one version may not run as well (if at all) on a newer version. There is PlayOnMac for macOS and PlayOnBSD for FreeBSD. Read
more

Linux Kernel: KPTI, SEV, CBS

  • Experimental KPTI Support For x86 32-bit Linux
    For the Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) support currently within the Linux kernel for addressing the Meltdown CPU vulnerability it's currently limited to 64-bit on the x86 side, but for the unfortunate souls still running x86 32-bit operating systems, SUSE is working on such support.
  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Is Ready To Roll With Linux 4.16
    With the Linux 4.16 kernel cycle that is expected to begin immediately following the Linux 4.15 kernel debut on Sunday, AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) technology supported by their new EPYC processors will be mainline. Going back to the end of 2016 have been Linux patches for Secure Encrypted Virtualization while with Linux 4.16 it will finally be part of the mainline kernel and supported with KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) virtualization.
  • Deadline scheduler part 2 — details and usage
    Linux’s deadline scheduler is a global early deadline first scheduler for sporadic tasks with constrained deadlines. These terms were defined in the first part of this series. In this installment, the details of the Linux deadline scheduler and how it can be used will be examined. The deadline scheduler prioritizes the tasks according to the task’s job deadline: the earliest absolute deadline first. For a system with M processors, the M earliest deadline jobs will be selected to run on the M processors. The Linux deadline scheduler also implements the constant bandwidth server (CBS) algorithm, which is a resource-reservation protocol. CBS is used to guarantee that each task will receive its full run time during every period. At every activation of a task, the CBS replenishes the task’s run time. As the job runs, it consumes that time; if the task runs out, it will be throttled and descheduled. In this case, the task will be able to run only after the next replenishment at the beginning of the next period. Therefore, CBS is used to both guarantee each task’s CPU time based on its timing requirements and to prevent a misbehaving task from running for more than its run time and causing problems to other jobs.

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

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