Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 22 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

FOSS – A boon for e-governance and educational institutions

Filed under
OSS

Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) Community is By the Community, For the Community, of the Community, To the Community on No Profit No Loss Basis. Open Source Software, is and will always remain free. There is no license to pay to anybody.The central government mooted out a policy on adoption of open source software, which makes it mandatory for all software applications and services of the government be built using open source software, so that projects under Digital India “ensure efficiency, transparency and reliability of such services at affordable costs”. “Government of India shall endeavour to adopt Open Source Software in all e-Governance systems implemented by various Government organizations, as a preferred option in comparison to Closed Source Software,” said the policy statement, put on the website of the Department of Electronics and Information Technology.The Open Source Software shall have the following characteristics:- A) The source code shall be available for the community / adopter / end user to study and modify the software and to redistribute copies of either the original or modified software. Cool Source code shall be free from any royalty.

Read more

Programming: GitLab, JDK, Eclipse, pdb, Julia and More

Filed under
Development
  • GitLab Adopted by KDE to Foster Open Source Contributions

    Today GitLab, the DevOps platform delivered as a single application, announced that KDE, an international technology community that creates free and open source software for desktop and portable computing, is adopting GitLab for use by its developers to further enhance infrastructure accessibility and encourage contributions.

    KDE is a free and open source software community dedicated to creating a user-friendly computing experience. It offers an advanced graphical desktop, a wide variety of applications for communication, work, education and entertainment, and a platform for easily building new applications. Adding access to GitLab will provide the KDE community with additional options for accessible infrastructure for contributors, code review integration with git, streamlined infrastructure and tooling, and an open communication channel with the upstream GitLab community.

  • Oracle releases JDK 13 with switch expressions and text blocks preview features, and more!

    Yesterday, Oracle announced the general availability of Java SE 13 (JDK 13) and that its binaries are expected to be available for download today. In addition to improved performance, stability, and security, this release comes with two preview features, switch expressions and text blocks. This announcement coincides with the commencement of Oracle’s co-located OpenWorld and Code One conferences happening from September 16-17 2019 at San Francisco.

    Oracle’s director of Java SE Product Management, Sharat Chander, wrote in the announcement, “Oracle offers Java 13 for enterprises and developers. JDK 13 will receive a minimum of two updates, per the Oracle CPU schedule, before being followed by Oracle JDK 14, which is due out in March 2020, with early access builds already available.”

    This release is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 with the Classpath Exception (GPLv2+CPE). For those who are using Oracle JDK release as part of an Oracle product or service, it is available under a commercial license.

  • Eclipse Che, Kubernetes-native IDE, version 7 now available

    Today, the Eclipse Foundation announced the release of Eclipse Che 7, the Kubernetes-native IDE, enabling developer teams to code, build, test, and run cloud-native applications. We are excited by this announcement and the new capabilities that this version offers the community and developers building containerized applications.

  • Python Debugging With pdb

    Nowadays, we often take for granted the excellent debuggers built into our favorite IDEs. But how do you debug your Python code when you don’t have the luxury of using an IDE?

    pdb, short for Python DeBugger, is a module for interactive source code debugging. It’s built into the Python Standard Library, so it’s always accessible to you. Because it runs in the command line, it’s especially helpful when you’re developing on remote systems.

    In this course, you’ll learn how to perform the most common debugging tasks using pdb, including setting breakpoints, stepping through code, viewing stack traces, creating watch lists, and more.

  • Happy Birthday Practical Business Python!

    On September 17th, 2014, I published my first article which means that today is the 5th birthday of Practical Business Python. Thank you to all my readers and all those that have supported me through this process! It has been a great journey and I look forward to seeing what the future holds.

    This 5 year anniversary gives me the opportunity to reflect on the blog and what will be coming next. I figured I would use this milestone to walk through a few of the stats and costs associated with running this blog for the past 5 years. This post will not be technical but I am hopeful that my readers as well as current and aspiring bloggers going down this path will find it helpful. Finally, please use the comments to let me know what content you would like to see in the future.

  • 6 Excellent Free Books to Learn Julia

    Julia is a high-level, high-performance dynamic programming language for technical computing by Alan Edelman, Stefan Karpinski, Jeff Bezanson, and Viral Shah. Julia aims to create an unprecedented combination of ease-of-use, power, and efficiency in a single language.

    It’s a homoiconic functional language focused on technical computing. While having the full power of homoiconic macros, first-class functions, and low-level control, Julia is as easy to learn and use as Python.

    Although Julia is a new language, first appearing in 2012, its roots are in Lisp, so it comes with mature features like macros and support for other metaprogramming techniques like code generation. Julia’s expressive grammar lets you write easy-to-read and easier-to-debug code, and its speed gets you through more work in less time. It’s a great choice whether you’re designing a machine learning system, crunching statistical data, or writing system utilities.

    Distinctive aspects of Julia’s design include a type system with parametric polymorphism and types in a fully dynamic programming language and multiple dispatch as its core programming paradigm. It allows concurrent, parallel and distributed computing, and direct calling of C and Fortran libraries without glue code.

  • A slack hack

Security: TrendMicro, Mozilla's Firefox Monitor and Capsule8

Filed under
Security
  • New Linux malware mines crypto after installing backdoor with secret master password [Ed: Skips the part about it having to be installed in the first place (not the fault of Linux)]

    Cybersecurity researchers have identified a new strain of Linux malware that not only mines cryptocurrency illicitly, but provides the attackers with universal access to an infected system via a “secret master password.”

    TrendMicro’s latest blog also reveals that Skidmap attempts to mask its cryptocurrency mining by faking network traffic and CPU-related statistics.

  • Linux malware masks illicit crypto mining with fake network traffic

    A new cryptocurrency mining malware targeting Linux systems has demonstrated how complex this type of malware has become. Known as Skidmap, the malware is not only harder to detect, it also gives the attackers unfiltered access to the affected system.

  • What to do after a data breach

    You saw the news alert. You got an email, either from Firefox Monitor or a company where you have an account. There’s been a security incident — a data breach. And your account has been compromised.

    Getting notified that you’ve been a victim of a data breach can be alarming. You have valid cause for concern, but there are a few steps you can take immediately to protect your account and limit the damage.

  • Capsule8 Protect Earns HIPAA Compliance Certification

Graphics: CUDA, Radeon and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • HIPCL Lets CUDA Run On OpenCL+SPIR-V

    Based off AMD's GPUOpen HIP as part of their ROCm stack, researchers at Tampere University in Finland have created HIPCL as leveraging HIP as well as POCL for routing CUDA codes to run on any hardware supporting OpenCL+SPIR-V.

    HIPCL provides a path of running CUDA on top of OpenCL, permitting the OpenCL driver also supports the SPIR-V intermediate representation. The OpenCL implementation also needs to support Shared Virtual Memory (SVM) so that actually rules out using NVIDIA's own driver for taking this route in place of their actual CUDA driver. HIPCL also relies upon a patched version of the LLVM Clang compiler.

  • Radeon RADV Vulkan Driver Tackling NGG Stream-Out

    One of the areas the RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV/AMDVLK Vulkan drivers have had a challenging time promptly support with AMD Navi GPUs has been the NGG (Next-Gen Geometry) functionality but it's slowly getting worked out.

    The NGG engine support has required various fixes to the graphics drivers, Navi 14 NGG support is borked, and various other Next-Gen Geometry support issues in the Navi driver code. At least on the software side the open-source developers have continued to improve the support and today the latest improvements arrived for the Mesa RADV Vulkan driver.

  • Radeon Navi 12/14 Open-Source Driver Support Now Being Marked As "Experimental"

    In an interesting change of course, the open-source driver support for AMD Radeon Navi 12 and Navi 14 GPUs is being flagged as experimental and hidden behind a feature flag.

    Back at the start of August AMD sent out their AMDGPU Linux kernel driver support for Navi 12 along with Navi 14. That Navi 12/14 support has since been queued up for introduction in the Linux 5.4 kernel along with the new Vega-based Arcturus GPU.

  • Vulkan 1.1.123 Released With Two New Extensions

    Vulkan 1.1.123 is the latest weekly update to this high performance graphics API and it's formally introducing two more extensions.

    Besides the usual variety of documentation clarifications and corrections, there are two new Vulkan extensions with version 1.1.123.

Purism: A Privacy Based Computer Company

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

It all started when Todd Weaver, Founder and CEO of Purism, realized Big Tech could not be trusted as moral guardians of his and his children’s data. The current paradigm of corporations data hoarding is, as Todd describes it, built on “a tech-stack of exploitation”–and not by accident, but by design. Companies such as Google and Microsoft–and especially Facebook–intentionally collect, store and share user data to whomever they see fit. In recent events, the California Consumer Privacy Act, which becomes effective on January 1, 2020, will make residents of California able to know what personal data is being collected about them, know whether their personal data is sold or disclosed and to whom, say no to the sale of personal data, access their personal data, request a business delete any personal data information about a consumer collected from that consumer and not be discriminated against for exercising their privacy rights. This sounds good, and it is, but not according to Big Tech. Big Tech such as Facebook hired a firm to run ads that said things like “Your next click could cost you $5! Say no to the California Consumer Privacy Act”. Big Tech does not care about privacy, they care about their bottom line. This is where Purism comes in.

Purism is a privacy focused company. Their devices, the Librem5, Librem13 and Librem15 run PureOS–a GNU/Linux distribution that puts privacy, security and freedom first, by design. It includes popular privacy-respecting software such as PureBrowser. The OS helps you “Surf the web safely without being tracked by advertisers or marketers” and allows you to easily encrypt your entire OS and data with your own encryption keys. This is huge, especially if you understand how much of your “private” data is actually being shared.

Read more

Benchmarks: Linux Boot Times, 16-Core HoneyComb LX2K ARM Workstation and New PTS Release

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A Look At The Speedy Clear Linux Boot Time Versus Ubuntu 19.10

    Given the interest last week in how Clear Linux dropped their kernel boot time from 3 seconds to 300 ms, here are some fresh boot time benchmarks of Clear Linux compared to Ubuntu 19.10 on both Intel and AMD hardware.

    The systemd-reported boot time was compared between the latest Clear Linux and Ubuntu 19.10 daily images. Ubuntu 19.10 was used for offering the bleeding-edge packages and being more in line to what is offered by the rolling-release Clear Linux. As well, Canonical has been working on some boot time improvements for Ubuntu 19.10.

  • 16-Core HoneyComb LX2K ARM Workstation Looks To Offer A Decent Performance Oomph

    When it comes to ARM-powered workstation boards there hasn't been a whole lot to get excited about with the likes of the Socionext 96Boards Developerbox being quite expensive and not yielding good performance or featureful boards compared to alternative Intel/AMD/POWER workstation/enthusiast boards. One of the more promising ARM workstation boards we have been following is the HoneyComb LX2K (formerly the "ClearFog" board) and it's looking like it could end up being a decent offering in this space.

    The HoneyComb LX2K / ClearFog is the 16-core mini-ITX workstation board we have been following since earlier this year. They have been aiming for this 16-core ARM workstation board for $500~750 USD and it looks like they will actually strike on the lower-end of that price-range.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 Released With New Result Viewer, Offline/Enterprise Benchmarking Enhancements

    Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 is now available as the latest quarterly feature release to our cross-platform, open-source automated benchmarking framework. With Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 comes a rewritten result viewer to offer more result viewing functionality previously only exposed locally via the command-line or through a Phoromatic Server (or OpenBenchmarking.org when results are uploaded), new offline/enterprise usage improvements, various hardware/software detection enhancements on different platforms, and a variety of other additions.

SDR dev kit builds on Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Avnet has launched an “RFSoC Development Kit” that extends Xilinx’s eval kit for its Linux-powered, Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC. The kit adds a Qorvo 2×2 Small Cell RF front-end for SDR prototyping and integrates MATLAB and Simulink.

Xilinx launched its 5G-focused Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC variant of its Arm/FPGA hybrid Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoc last year and then announced a Gen3 update in early February. Avnet has now launched an extended version of the Linux-driven Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC ZCU111 Evaluation Kit that adds a Qorvo 2×2 Small Cell RF Front-end 1.8GHz Card and MATLAB support for software-defined radio (SDR) prototyping,

Read more

Also: SMARC 2.0 module runs Linux on i.MX8M Mini

PCLinuxOS 2019.09 updated installation media release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
PCLOS

The KDE versions both full and the minimalistic Darkstar contain kernel 5.2.15 plus a fully updated KDE Plasma desktop. Plasma desktop 5.16.5, Plasma Applications 19.08.1 and Plasma Frameworks 5.62.

The Mate Desktop was refreshed with kernel 5.2.15 and the applications and libraries were updated to their most recent stable versions from the previous release.

The Xfce Desktop was tweaked and now uses the Whisker menu by default. A login sound was added and the applications were updated along with some minor bug fixes.

In addition all ISOs now include the Nvidia 430.50 driver and will be used instead of the nouveau driver if your video card supports it. Hardware detection scripts were updated to provide better support for video cards that can use the Nvidia 430.50 driver. Pulseaudio has been updated to the stable 13.0 release. The Simple Update Notifier was reworked and now works for keeping you notified of system updates and the ability to update from the applet using apt-get. Small improvements were made to the Live media boot scripts. Vbox test media is also included on the installation media. This program allows you to quickly test an ISO on the fly or usbstick with various options without having to create a permanent VM in Virtualbox. Requires a valid Virtualbox installation. Thanks to the people involved for their contributions to this program.

Read more

OSGeoLive 13.0 Released, which Brings Some New Applications

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Astrid Emde has announced the new release of OSGeoLive 13.0 on Sep 12, 2019.

This release has improved the Python experience a lot by adding an additional Python modules like Fiona, rasterio, cartopy, pandas, geopandas, mappyfile.

Also, added the following new applications MapCache, GeoExt, t-rex, actinia.

Many packages have been updated to the latest version.

[...]

It is featuring a large collection of open-source geospatial software and free world maps.

It provides bootable ISO-Images and Virtual Machines which allow users to try out fully-operational versions of popular Free Geospatial Software without the need to install a thing.

Read more

Security: Updates, Drama and FUD

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (dino-im, python2.7, python3.4, and wpa), Fedora (kmplayer), openSUSE (podman and samba), Oracle (thunderbird), Red Hat (thunderbird), Slackware (expat), SUSE (curl), and Ubuntu (apache2).

  • This New Linux Malware Mines Crypto By Creating Malign Linux Modules

    As per the research, the new Linux malware mines crypto by creating malicious loadable kernel modules (LKM) to stay under the wraps. As the malware utilizes Linux kernel module rootkits, it becomes difficult to detect and patch it. This is because of its overwriting and modification of kernel parts capabilities.

  • A Critical Exim Vulnerability, Lilocked Ransomware on the Rise, but Linux Not to Blame

    In the context of these recent vulnerabilities and exploits, it is easy to label Linux and Open Source as “vulnerable” or “insecure”. However, doing so is unfair as well as incorrect. Unlike Windows and MacOS, Linux is a multi-user environment (a characteristic that the OS inherited from Unix) where users are granted specific privileges. This design prevents the compromise of one user account from impacting an entire system. In order to gain control over a Linux system, malware would have to gain root access to the system.

    Vulnerabilities exist in every system, and in terms of security vulnerabilities, Linux has a relatively clean record when compared to other popular operating systems. In the words of Linux creator Linus Torvalds, “Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow”. Because of the intense review that Linux is continuously undergoing from security experts in the Open Source community, vulnerabilities are quickly identified and fixed. Because of this, as well as the way in which Linux manages privileges, relatively few viruses and worms are written to attack Linux systems. In comparison, proprietary operating systems like Microsoft Windows are easy targets for malicious coders, making them frequent victims of malware and viruses. This year, a total of 700 vulnerabilities in Microsoft Windows were disclosed, 189 of which were classified as critical.

    Exim, however, is a notoriously insecure mail server. In spite of this, it has a market share of over 57 percent, due to the fact that the MTA has been bundled with many Linux distros, including Debian and Red Hat. Thus, the frequent security bugs and exploits involving Exim affect a large number of Linux users, but are not a reflection of the inherent security of the Linux OS.

Games; CHOP, LeClue - Detectivu, Nantucket, MOTHERGUNSHIP

Filed under
Gaming
  • Brutal local co-op platform brawler CHOP has released

    CHOP, a brutal local co-op platform brawler recently left Early Access on Steam. If you like fast-paced fighters with a great style and chaotic gameplay this is for you. There's multiple game modes, up to for players in the standard modes and there's bots as well if you don't have people over often.

    Speaking about the release, the developer told me they felt "many local multiplayer games fall into a major pitfall : they often lack impact and accuracy, they don't have this extra oomph that ensure players will really be into the game and hang their gamepad like their life depends on it." and that "CHOP stands out in this regard". I've actually quite enjoyed this one, the action in CHOP is really satisfying overall.

  • Mystery adventure game Jenny LeClue - Detectivu is releasing this week

    Developer Mografi has confirmed that their adventure game Jenny LeClue - Detectivu is officially releasing on September 19th. The game was funded on Kickstarter way back in 2014 thanks to the help of almost four thousand backers raising over one hundred thousand dollars.

  • Seafaring strategy game Nantucket just had a big patch and Masters of the Seven Seas DLC released

    Ahoy mateys! Are you ready top set sail? Anchors aweigh! Seafaring strategy game Nantucket is now full of even more content for you to play through.

    Picaresque Studio and Fish Eagle just released a big new patch adding in "100+" new events, events that can be triggered by entering a city, the Resuscitation command can now heal even if someone isn't dead during combat, the ability to rename crew to really make your play-through personal, minor quests give off better rewards and more. Quite a hefty free update!

  • MOTHERGUNSHIP, a bullet-hell FPS where you craft your guns works great on Linux with Steam Play

    Need a fun new FPS to try? MOTHERGUNSHIP is absolutely nuts and it appears to run very nicely on Linux thanks to Steam Play.

    There's a few reasons why I picked this one to test recently: the developers have moved onto other games so it's not too likely it will suddenly break, there's not a lot of new and modern first-person shooters on Linux that I haven't finished and it was in the recent Humble Monthly.

GNU community announces ‘Parallel GCC’ for parallelism in real-world compilers

Filed under
Development
GNU

Yesterday, the team behind the GNU project announced Parallel GCC, a research project aiming to parallelize a real-world compiler. Parallel GCC can be used in machines with many cores where GNU cannot provide enough parallelism. A parallel GCC can be also used to design a parallel compiler from scratch.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 3 Ways to disable USB storage devices on Linux
  • Fedora Community Blog: Fedocal and Nuancier are looking for new maintainers

    Recently the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team announced that we need to focus on key areas and thus let some of our applications go. So we started Friday with Infra to find maintainers for some of those applications. Unfortunately the first few occurrences did not seem to raise as much interest as we had hoped. As a result we are still looking for new maintainers for Fedocal and Nuancier.

  • Artificial Intelligence Confronts a 'Reproducibility' Crisis

    Lo and behold, the system began performing as advertised. The lucky break was a symptom of a troubling trend, according to Pineau. Neural networks, the technique that’s given us Go-mastering bots and text generators that craft classical Chinese poetry, are often called black boxes because of the mysteries of how they work. Getting them to perform well can be like an art, involving subtle tweaks that go unreported in publications. The networks also are growing larger and more complex, with huge data sets and massive computing arrays that make replicating and studying those models expensive, if not impossible for all but the best-funded labs.

    “Is that even research anymore?” asks Anna Rogers, a machine-learning researcher at the University of Massachusetts. “It’s not clear if you’re demonstrating the superiority of your model or your budget.”

  • When Biology Becomes Software

    If this sounds to you a lot like software coding, you're right. As synthetic biology looks more like computer technology, the risks of the latter become the risks of the former. Code is code, but because we're dealing with molecules -- and sometimes actual forms of life -- the risks can be much greater.

    [...]

    Unlike computer software, there's no way so far to "patch" biological systems once released to the wild, although researchers are trying to develop one. Nor are there ways to "patch" the humans (or animals or crops) susceptible to such agents. Stringent biocontainment helps, but no containment system provides zero risk.

  • Why you may have to wait longer to check out an e-book from your local library

    Gutierrez says the Seattle Public Library, which is one of the largest circulators of digital materials, loaned out around three million e-books and audiobooks last year and spent about $2.5 million to acquire those rights. “But that added 60,000 titles, about,” she said, “because the e-books cost so much more than their physical counterpart. The money doesn’t stretch nearly as far.”

  • Libraries are fighting to preserve your right to borrow e-books

    Libraries don't just pay full price for e-books -- we pay more than full price. We don't just buy one book -- in most cases, we buy a lot of books, trying to keep hold lists down to reasonable numbers. We accept renewable purchasing agreements and limits on e-book lending, specifically because we understand that publishing is a business, and that there is value in authors and publishers getting paid for their work. At the same time, most of us are constrained by budgeting rules and high levels of reporting transparency about where your money goes. So, we want the terms to be fair, and we'd prefer a system that wasn't convoluted.

    With print materials, book economics are simple. Once a library buys a book, it can do whatever it wants with it: lend it, sell it, give it away, loan it to another library so they can lend it. We're much more restricted when it comes to e-books. To a patron, an e-book and a print book feel like similar things, just in different formats; to a library they're very different products. There's no inter-library loan for e-books. When an e-book is no longer circulating, we can't sell it at a book sale. When you're spending the public's money, these differences matter.

  • Nintendo's ROM Site War Continues With Huge Lawsuit Against Site Despite Not Sending DMCA Notices

    Roughly a year ago, Nintendo launched a war between itself and ROM sites. Despite the insanely profitable NES Classic retro-console, the company decided that ROM sites, which until recently almost single-handedly preserved a great deal of console gaming history, need to be slayed. Nintendo extracted huge settlements out of some of the sites, which led to most others shutting down voluntarily. While this was probably always Nintendo's strategy, some sites decided to stare down the company's legal threats and continue on.

  • The Grey Havens | Coder Radio 375

    We say goodbye to the show by taking a look back at a few of our favorite moments and reflect on how much has changed in the past seven years.

  • 09/16/2019 | Linux Headlines

    A new Linux Kernel is out; we break down the new features, PulseAudio goes pro and the credential-stealing LastPass flaw.

    Plus the $100 million plan to rid the web of ads, and more.

  • Powering Docker App: Next Steps for Cloud Native Application Bundles (CNAB)

    Last year at DockerCon and Microsoft Connect, we announced the Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB) specification in partnership with Microsoft, HashiCorp, and Bitnami. Since then the CNAB community has grown to include Pivotal, Intel, DataDog, and others, and we are all happy to announce that the CNAB core specification has reached 1.0.

    We are also announcing the formation of the CNAB project under the Joint Development Foundation, a part of the Linux Foundation that’s chartered with driving adoption of open source and standards. The CNAB specification is available at cnab.io. Docker is working hard with our partners and friends in the open source community to improve software development and operations for everyone.

  • CNAB ready for prime time, says Docker

    Docker announced yesterday that CNAB, a specification for creating multi-container applications, has come of age. The spec has made it to version 1.0, and the Linux Foundation has officially accepted it into the Joint Development Foundation, which drives open-source development.

    The Cloud Native Application Bundle specification is a multi-company effort that defines how the different components of a distributed cloud-based application are bundled together. Docker announced it last December along with Microsoft, HashiCorp, and Bitnami. Since then, Intel has joined the party along with Pivotal and DataDog.

    It solves a problem that DevOps folks have long grappled with: how do you bolt all these containers and other services together in a standard way? It’s easy to create a Docker container with a Docker file, and you can pull lots of them together to form an application using Docker Compose. But if you want to package other kinds of container or cloud results into the application, such as Kubernetes YAML, Helm charts, or Azure Resource Manager templates, things become more difficult. That’s where CNAB comes in.

Getting GNOME 3.34 on Various GNU/Linux Distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

I like to list out popular GNU/Linux distros that already ship latest desktop environment. For GNOME 3.34 case, currently I found Desktop Live distros that include it built-in to be Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE. You can download them and immediately test GNOME. Other names worth mentioning but I don't present them here are Alpine GNU/Linux, Debian, and Mageia. I write this at 17 September so things might change by day later. By this article, I also want to introduce several special distros like GNOME:Next and a certain awesome community service like Repology for you. Enjoy GNOME 3.34!

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.34: Between Fedora Rawhide and openSUSE GNOME:Next

Towards a UX Strategy for GNOME (Part 3)

Filed under
GNOME

This post is part of a series on UX strategy. In my previous two posts, I described what I hope are the beginnings of a UX strategy for GNOME. In the first post, I described some background research and analysis. In the second post, I introduced what I think ought to be the high-level goals and principles for the UX strategy.

Now it’s time for the fun bit! For this instalment, I’m going to go over recent work that the GNOME design team has been doing. I’m doing this for two reasons. First: I want to show off some of the great work that the design team has been doing! Second, I want to show this design work fits into the strategic approach that I’ve previously described. A key element of that plan was to prioritise on areas which will have the biggest impact, and I’m going to be using the prioritisation word a lot in what follows.

Read more

Moving Firefox to a faster 4-week release cycle

Filed under
Moz/FF

We typically ship a major Firefox browser (Desktop and Android) release every 6 to 8 weeks. Building and releasing a browser is complicated and involves many players. To optimize the process, and make it more reliable for all users, over the years we’ve developed a phased release strategy that includes ‘pre-release’ channels: Firefox Nightly, Beta, and Developer Edition. With this approach, we can test and stabilize new features before delivering them to the majority of Firefox users via general release.

And today we’re excited to announce that we’re moving to a four-week release cycle! We’re adjusting our cadence to increase our agility, and bring you new features more quickly. In recent quarters, we’ve had many requests to take features to market sooner. Feature teams are increasingly working in sprints that align better with shorter release cycles. Considering these factors, it is time we changed our release cadence.

Starting Q1 2020, we plan to ship a major Firefox release every 4 weeks. Firefox ESR release cadence (Extended Support Release for the enterprise) will remain the same. In the years to come, we anticipate a major ESR release every 12 months with 3 months support overlap between new ESR and end-of-life of previous ESR. The next two major ESR releases will be ~June 2020 and ~June 2021.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Futureproofing Your Python Tools

    The people who maintain Python and key Python platforms want to help you protect the code you write and depend on. [...] Publishing that package is a great way of making it so other people can run and deploy it, even within other parts of your organization. But -- who actually has the keys to the castle? Who can upload a new version, or delete a version that has a problem? You should probably make sure multiple people have either "owner" or "maintainer" privileges on the project on PyPI. And you should review your project security history display, which lists sensitive events (such as "file removed from release version 1.0.1") in your PyPI user account and your PyPI project. We just added this display, so you can look at things that have happened in your user account or project, and check for signs someone's stolen your credentials.

  • py3status v3.20 – EuroPython 2019 edition

    Shame on me to post this so long after it happened… Still, that’s a funny story to tell and a lot of thank you to give so let’s go!

  • Finding Python Developers for Your Startup

    Recently I stumble across a situation while I was helping out for one of the events for JuniorDev SG. There was not a lot of Python developers and some of my other developer's friend. Said that they hardly encounter any developer friends who are using Python for their work. It begins during a conversation, where one of the attendees for a JuniorDev SG event. Approached me to search for Python developers to work for their startup based in Singapore.

Geary 3.34 Debuts with Deeper GNOME Contacts Integration, Other Changes

The Geary email client has issued a brand new release, and in this post I tell you a bit about it. Geary 3.34.0 — you may recall that Geary switched to following GNOME numbering last year — is the latest update to this web-mail friendly mail tool, and there’s healthy dose of improvement on offer, as noted in the release notes. Among them is deeper integration with GNOME Contacts. Geary’s in-app contacts pop-over now supports adding and editing contacts stored in the GNOME Contacts app, and is able to auto-complete email addresses based on data from contacts too. Serial typo-makers like me will appreciate the spell checker now covering the mail composer’s subject line; while the addition of support for Outlook-specific email attachments (TNEF) will please those who regularly run in to issues on that front. Other changes in Geary 3.34.0 include “a substantial number” of server compatibility improvements, background syncing tweaks, and other bug fixes. Read more

today's howtos

Best free Linux firewalls of 2019: go beyond Iptables for desktops and servers

Linux distros will often come with at least a basic firewall bundled with it. Often this won't be active by default so will need to be activated. Additionally this will likely be the standard Iptables supplied, even though less experienced users may struggle with it. UFW - Uncomplicated Firewall is also bundled with some distros, and aims to make the process simpler. However, there are distros and applications out there that can cater for the more advanced user and the less experienced one, making it easier to setup and configure a firewall that works for your needs. Some, like ClearOS build it directly into the operating system as part of its security focus, but most other options would be applications that aim to block rogue IPs, monitor ports, and prevent otherwise prevent bad packets from interfering with your machine. For most home users there are few actual settings that need to be customized, so simple apps can be popular, but for those looking to manage their machine as a server, additional controls and advanced command options will tend to be the more welcome. Read more