Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical Under Fire for Ubuntu Data Collection Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 7:16am
Story Raspberry Pi Projects: Things Gateway by Mozilla, Bang and Olufsen and HiFiBerry Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 6:59am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:13pm
Story Debian and Canonical’s Juju Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:09pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:03pm
Story Openwashing Databases: iRODS, ArangoDB, Altibase Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 11:00pm
Story RISC-V Latest Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 10:57pm
Story Linux and DRM, Verizon Lockdown Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 10:53pm
Story What is a Linux "oops"? Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 10:46pm
Story Games, Unity3D (Microsoft Mono) and Microsoft Direct3D Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2018 - 10:16pm

GNOME: GNOME Mobile and Shelved Wallpapers

Filed under
GNOME
  • Python for GNOME Mobile?

    As you may already know, Python is one of the hottest programming language out there, with thousand of job offerings, so makes sense, at least for me, to push this language as official one for GNOME Mobile applications.

    elementary OS is doing a good job on engagement new developers, while use Vala as its official language. For me, Vala is a good candidate for advanced/performance constrained Mobile applications.

  • Shelved Wallpapers

    GNOME 3.28 will release with another batch of new wallpapers that only a freaction of you will ever see. Apart from those I also made a few for different purposes that didn’t end up being used, but it would be a shame to keep shelved.

    So here’s a bit of isometric goodness I quite enjoy on my desktop, you might as well.

Security: Mageia, Tizen, Equifax, Apple

  • Spectra-Meltdown mitigation update

    Since we released 4.14.18 yesterday, we now are in pretty good shape with the mitigations, especially on x86_64. We now have bits in place for Spectre v1, v2 and Meltdown.

    Of course over the coming weeks/months there will be more follow-up fixes upstream to cover corner cases, missed fixes and improvements for all of this…

    And we still need Intel and AMD to release microcodes so hardware vendors can release updated BIOS/EFI firmwares and to the public so we can provide microcode updates in case of vendors not providing new BIOS/EFI firmwares.

  • Samsung Tizen and Roku-powered Smart TVs Vulnerable to Hacking
  • Q&A: Why SMBs should heed lessons from Equifax breach and mitigate ‘open source’ risks [Ed: Equifax did not patch its software. This isn't about FOSS, but opportunists use that for self-promotion here.]
  • Apple AirPod began smoking in ear, blew apart, says man

     

    Suddenly, he said, he noticed smoke. It was coming from the area of his right ear. More specifically, the smoke was being emitted from one of his AirPods.
     

    He says that he immediately put both AirPods on a piece of workout equipment and walked away. By the time he came back, the smoking AirPod appeared to have completely burst apart.  

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • A Recap Of The Many Interesting Presentations At FOSDEM 2018

    Over the past week and a half we have highlighted many of the interesting presentations that took place at the annual Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting (FOSDEM) in Brussels. Here's a look back if you are behind on your Phoronix reading.

  • WebRender newsletter #14
  • Restricting AppCache to Secure Contexts

    The Application Cache (AppCache) interface provides a caching mechanism that allows websites to run offline. Using this API, developers can specify resources that the browser should cache and make available to users offline. Unfortunately, AppCache has limitations in revalidating its cache, which allows attackers to trick the browser into never revalidate the cache by setting a manifest to a malformed cache file. Removing AppCache over HTTP connections removes the risk that users could see stale cached content that came from a malicious connection indefinitely.

  • Altibase Challenges Oracle, IBM & Microsoft

    ...Altibase, an enterprise grade relational database, announced that it is now open source.

  • Putting Open Source GIS to Use
  • InfluxData scores $35 million Series C to expand time series database business

    In a world where sensors are capturing ever-increasing amounts of data, being able to collect that high volume and measure it over time becomes increasingly important. InfluxData, the startup built on top of the open source time series database platform, announced it has received a $35 million Series C investment today led by Sapphire Ventures, the investment arm of enterprise software giant, SAP.

  • EOH acquires LSD in open source drive

    The JSE-listed company says the partnership addresses an identified gap in the market by bringing the value and innovation that open source solutions provide, in enabling EOH customers' digital transformation journeys.

    LSD was founded by Stefan Lesicnik in 2001. In the early days, the company focused on supporting basic Linux servers.

  • Qt 5.10.1 Ships With More Than 300 Bug Fixes

    The Qt Company has announced the availability of Qt 5.10.1, the first bug-fix release to Qt 5.10 that shipped back in December.

    In the approximately two months since Qt 5.10.0, today's point release has more than 300 bug fixes and around 1,400 changes in total over the previous release.

Kudos to Namib Linux for Making Arch Approachable

Filed under
Reviews

Namib is an ideal Linux distro for anyone who wants to ease into the Arch approach to computing.

Namib is a newcomer -- the third and current release (version 17.11) arrived late last year. However, it makes up for its lack of age by its performance. Namib makes Arch simple.

Surprisingly very user-friendly as well as compatible with older computers, Namib also is very stable.

Since Namib is based on the Arch philosophy, it uses rolling releases so you do not have to reinstall the entire operating system every time a major update occurs. The Pacman package manager handles new system components along with security and application updates automatically.

Namib is very up to date.

Read more

Qt 5.10.1 Released

Filed under
Development
KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.10.1 is released today. As a patch release, Qt 5.10.1 does not add any new functionality but provides many bug fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.10.0, the new Qt 5.10.1 contains over 300 bug fixes and in total close to 1400 changes since Qt 5.10.0. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.10.1.

Read more

Getting started with the RStudio IDE

Filed under
Development

For as long as I can remember, I've been toying with numbers. As an undergraduate student in the late 1970s, I began taking statistics courses, learning ways to examine and analyze data to uncover some meaning.

Back then, I had a scientific calculator that made statistical calculations much easier than ever before. In the early '90s, as a graduate student in educational psychology working on t-tests, correlations, and ANOVA, I started doing my calculations by meticulously writing text files that were fed into an IBM mainframe. The mainframe was an improvement over my handheld calculator, but one minor spacing error rendered the whole process null and void, and the process was still somewhat tedious.

Read more

Games: Super Tony Land, Pocketsprite (GNU Inside), and Rise of the Tomb Raider Coming to GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Super Tony Land is a story-based platformer that will let you build your own awesome stories

    Super Tony Land [Official Site, Kickstarter] sounds like a platformer that I could enjoy, one that will enable you to make your own challenges, worlds and stories.

    The game will use a "block based programming language" allowing you to create some really wild stuff. Not just in the form of levels, but vehicles and all sorts of wacky creations.

  • pocketsprite game console is the open-source tamagotchi of 2018

    ...it’s open source. sure, you could in theory just turn on the pocketsprite wi-fi, connect your computer up to it, and download games via pocketsprite’s desktop interface, but where’s the challenge in that? if you understand a few youtube-tutorial’s-worth of hacking, you could upload whatever you want to this tiny emulator...

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider announced for Linux, port from Feral Interactive

    Many asked, now Feral Interactive have answered. Rise of the Tomb Raider [Steam] is officially on the way to Linux! What a fantastic way to start a Tuesday with news like this! It still amazes me to this day that Linux will have games like this, very happy with the news!

    Feral aren't saying exactly when it will arrive, but they had a tweet out that said "This Winter" which has since been deleted (Edit: replaced with this one). You can see the official confirmation on their official site which now says "This spring", so it could be here sometime between March and late June.

  • Feral Is Bringing Rise of the Tomb Raider To Linux

    Feral Interactive has announced today that they are porting Rise of the Tomb Raider to Linux.

    Rise of the Tomb Raider was released for Windows in January of 2016 as the latest in the Tomb Raider franchise. Now two years later the Linux port will be released in the months ahead. When Feral has asked the community about games coming to Linux, this title has repeatedly been brought up as a title many Linux gamers would like to see following the port of the 2013 Tomb Raider game.

Everything I know about open source I learned from SpaceX

Filed under
OSS

You probably heard, but the private rocket company SpaceX did a thing last week. And while it was really cool to watch live video from a freakin' rocket on my pocket computer, that's not all there is to it. As I thought about the Falcon Heavy launch, I realized it contains a lot of lessons from my experience in open source projects.

Read more

The best rising Linux distros in 2018

Filed under
Linux

Linux is built for tinkering and experimentation, which means it’s always morphing and changing. New distros are popping up all the time, because all it takes is a little bit of determination, time and effort to create a custom operating system.

Not all of them hit the mark – there are stacks of Linux distros that have seen little to no action, and we’re almost certain that some have been released and never installed by anyone other than their creator.

Read more

Top 6 Partition Managers (CLI + GUI) for Linux

Filed under
Software

Are you looking to tweak or manage your disks partitions in Linux? In this article, we will review some of the best tools that help Linux users partition and manage their disks. We will see both command line utilities as well as GUI applications for managing disk partitions in Linux.

Read more

Also: Min: An Open Source Web Browser for Minimalists

Movie Monad – A GTK Video Player Built with Haskell

Filed under
Software
Movies

Yes, guys – another video player! “What’s special about this one?”, you ask. Well, for starters, it began as a (blog post project) for Haskell programmers interested in functional programming and who also have an interest in building GTK UI apps.

Movie Monad is a free, simple, and open-source GTK video player written in Haskell. If features a UI reminiscent of VLC Media Player, keyboard shortcuts, and the ability to play both local and remote files.

Read more

Graphics: X.Org, RADV, Virtualized GPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

  • X.Org Server Patches Updated For Non-Desktop & Lease Handling

    Keith Packard has sent out his latest patches for implementing the non-desktop and DRM lease functionality from within the X.Org Server. This work also includes the relevant DDX bits being wired through for the xf86-video-modesetting driver.

    The "non-desktop" handling is the new property for indicating if a display output is not for a conventional desktop use-case, i.e. a VR HMD as the main use-case from Valve's perspective. When the VR HMD or other non-desktop output is set, it's not used by the X.Org Server and any desktop window manager so it can be reserved for the SteamVR compositor.

  • RADV Radeon Vulkan Driver Is Still A Better Bet Than AMDVLK In February 2018

    With the AMDVLK Radeon Vulkan driver that AMD open-sourced in December continuing to be updated in weekly batches with new Vulkan extensions / features / performance optimizations and the RADV Mesa-based Radeon Vulkan driver continuing to march to its own beat, I have spent the past few days conducting some fresh benchmarks between the AMDVLK and RADV Vulkan drivers with RX 560, RX 580, and RX Vega 64 graphics cards.

  • Virtualizing GPU Access

    Virtualized GPU access is becoming common in the containerized and virtualized application space. Let's have a look at why and how.

    For the past few years a clear trend of containerization of applications and services has emerged. Having processes containerized is beneficial in a number of ways. It both improves portability and strengthens security, and if done properly the performance penalty can be low.

    In order to further improve security containers are commonly run in virtualized environments. This provides some new challenges in terms of supporting the accelerated graphics usecase.

Red Hat Interview, Podcast and Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Annoying Windows 10 sounds could mean deeper problem, or a reason to switch to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If none of these tips work and you don’t really want to spend a few hundred dollars to fix the machine, I’d suggest switching to a different operating system, like Linux. A version called Ubuntu is more Windows-like and user friendly — and it’s free.

And a good resource is a Denver company called System 76, which I wrote about a few years ago: “System 76 in Denver shows how easy it is to use Ubuntu Linux computers.” The company sells Linux Ubuntu computers, but last year, it unveiled its own Linux-based operating system called Pop!_os, a trend PCWorld proclaimed “Exciting.”

Also, if you’re the type of person who prefers hand-holding when it comes to technology, System 76 does offer customer service with their machines — for life.

Read more

Also: What Microsoft’s Antitrust Case Teaches Us About Silicon Valley

Best Open Source Accounting Software

Filed under
OSS

Researching the best open source accounting software isn't as simple as one might think. There are a number of important variables you must consider before taking the leap. This is especially important for those businesses that already have an accounting/bookkeeping solution in place. Making sure you can achieve the same level of control and functionality is very important when switching to a Linux-centric accounting application.

Read more

LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

Definitely, check this distribution out whenever you get the chance. It doesn’t have all of the bells, whistles, and gimmicks that are found in other distros, but this one is still a very usable solid operating system. Installing it in VirtualBox wasn’t all smooth sailing; however, if you wish to install PCLinuxOS on a physical computer, you should have a positive experience with this Linux. Installing and updating packages to keep the system up to date is easy and straightforward, so is configuring your Plasma desktop.

The only major thing that occurred was not being able to enter the password when installing the bootloader. Minor issues did present themselves, but nothing that would greatly impact the overall experience with the system. So, PCLinuxOS isn’t perfect (well, what is?), but quite a solid distribution worth trying.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

SuiteCRM 7.10 Released

  • SuiteCRM 7.10 released
    SalesAgility, the creators and maintainers of SuiteCRM, are excited to announce a new major release of the world’s most popular open source CRM – SuiteCRM 7.10, including highly anticipated new features and many enhancements. SuiteCRM is a fully featured, highly flexible, open source CRM, which can be installed on-premise or in the cloud, and allows companies and organisations to have full control over their own customer data. It delivers actionable insights into customers, boosts conversions, helps increase sales, bolsters customer care and streamlines business operations. The CRM is as powerful as Salesforce and Dynamics, but with the unique benefit of being completely open source.
  • SuiteCRM 7.10 released
    SuiteCRM is a fork of the formerly open-source SugarCRM customer relationship management system.
  • SuiteCRM 7.10 Released For Open-Source Customer Relationship Management
    SuiteCRM 7.10 is now available as the latest major feature release to this customer relationship management (CRM) software forked from SugarCRM's last open-source release.
  • How startups and SME’s can leverage open source CRM to increase business
    Prominent Open Source CRM in India: – SugarCRM Founded in 2004, Sugar CRM has over 7,000 customers and more than half a million users worldwide. Easily one of the largest open sources CRM in the world, SugarCRM offers versatile functionalities including sales-force automation, marketing campaigns, customer support, collaboration, Mobile CRM, Social CRM and reporting. While SugarCRM has released no open source editions since early 2014, its earlier community versions continued to inspire other open source software, namely Suite CRM, Vtiger CRM and SarvCRM. – SuiteCRM Suite CRM is a popular fork of SugarCRM and was launched as the latest version of the SugarCRM in October 2013. In a short period of its existence, it has won several awards and has been adopted by reputed clientele, including the Govt. of UK’s National Health Scheme (NHS) program. Suite CRM is an enterprise-class open source alternative to proprietary alternatives and offers a series of extension for both free and paid-for enhancements. Prominent additional modules available with SuiteCRM include Teams security, Google Maps, Outlook Plugin, Products, Contracts, Invoices, PDF Templates, workflow, reporting and Responsive Theme.

Open source intelligent solutions to transform work, businesses

New trends are opening up new opportunities and new ways to deal with IT, according to Thomas di Giacomo, SUSE CTO, speaking at the SUSE executive roundtable, which the open source company hosted in partnership with ITWeb last week. There are many new and innovative technologies that can help IT leaders meet these new demands, he added. Open source based technologies have become the driving force behind most of the technologically disruptive innovations, said Di Giacomo. "It is pretty clear that all the new innovation is coming from open source. "For example, open source progress with Linux and virtualisation a couple of decades ago, cloud in the last 10 years, and more recently, containers for applications, software-defined infrastructure, and platform-as-a-service, empowering DevOps principles." However, these trends also present some new challenges, said Di Giacomo. Compared to a couple of decades ago, the number of open source projects today has skyrocketed - from hundreds in the different foundations like the Linux Foundation, Apache, Eclipse and others, to millions of projects on Github. Read more

today's lefftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words
    Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.
  • Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People
    Since then, I have heard of another email provider that you may be interested in. It’s a little different, but it touts some of the same features ProtonMail does: privacy, security, open-source code, etc. It’s called Tutanota, and like ProtonMail, I am a very big fan.
  • Open FinTech Forum – Event preview, October 10-11, New York City.
  • The tracker will always get through
    A big objection to tracking protection is the idea that the tracker will always get through. Some people suggest that as browsers give users more ability to control how their personal information gets leaked across sites, things won't get better for users, because third-party tracking will just keep up. On this view, today's easy-to-block third-party cookies will be replaced by techniques such as passive fingerprinting where it's hard to tell if the browser is succeeding at protecting the user or not, and users will be stuck in the same place they are now, or worse. I doubt this is the case because we're playing a more complex game than just trackers vs. users. The game has at least five sides, and some of the fastest-moving players with the best understanding of the game are the adfraud hackers. Right now adfraud is losing in some areas where they had been winning, and the resulting shift in adfraud is likely to shift the risks and rewards of tracking techniques.
  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - February 16, 2018
    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from January 23 - February 16.
  • The major milestones of the Government Digital Service (GDS)
  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft
    Most people have heard of Google’s Tensorflow which was released at the end of 2015, but there’s an active codebase called PyTorch which is easier to understand, less of a black box, and more dynamic. Tensorflow does have solutions for some of those limitations (such as Tensorflow-fold, and Tensorflow-Eager) but these new capabilities remove the need for other features and complexity of Tensorflow. Google built a great system for doing static computation graphs before realizing that most people want dynamic graphs. Doh! [...] I wish PyTorch used the AGPL license. Most neural networks are run on servers today, it is hardly used on the Linux desktop. Data is central to AI and that can stay owned by FB and the users of course. The ImageNet dataset created a revolution in computer vision, so let’s never forget that open data sets can be useful.
  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news
    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.