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Monday, 10 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tor Browser: An Ultimate Web Browser for Anonymous Web Browsing in Linux Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 3:31am
Story LVFS and American Megatrends Inc. Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2018 - 3:09am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 9:54pm
Story Linaro partners with IIC on upcoming 96Boards Industrial Edition spec Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 9:45pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 5:53pm
Story AMD Radeon RX 590 Linux Benchmarks, 18-Way NVIDIA/AMD Gaming Comparison Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 5:41pm
Story 5 Screen Recorders for the Linux Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 5:34pm
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Now Rolling Out to Ubuntu Phone Users, Here's What's New Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 5:29pm
Story The December 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine MeeMaw 07/12/2018 - 4:30pm
Story Mesa 18.3.0 Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2018 - 3:53pm

A Journey on Budgie Desktop #3: Applets

Filed under
Reviews

Continuing second part, here I will discuss about Applets which can be added to Budgie Desktop. I highlight several of more than 20 applets available today: NetSpeed, Clocks, Brightness, Alt+Tab, Global Menu, Workspace Wallpapers, Weather, and Screenshot applets. If you wonder what it is, an "applet" in Budgie is the same as "extension" on GNOME or "widget" on KDE Plasma. Now, for this article I make a journey in installing them and putting them around my desktop and I have much fun. I really love to see things that I didn't see on another desktop environments before and I find many here. Who know that we can still use global menu even in Budgie, considering Unity has been dropped and Budgie itself is still new? Who know tif here is a splendid screenshot tool (with more features than built-in GNOME Screenshot) created solely for Budgie? I won't know until I tried them. I hope it will be more interesting for you this time and you can go try them now. Enjoy!

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Security: Reproducible Builds, Updates and Windows Back Doors

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Security
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #188
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • EternalSuffering: NSA Exploits Still Being Successfully Used To Hijack Computers More Than A Year After Patching [Ed: TechDirt calls Micrososft Windows-running machines with NSA back doors just “computers” (ha! How convenient an excuse; blame the user for back doors!)]

    More of the same, then. Perhaps not at the scale seen in the past, but more attacks using the NSA's hoarded exploits. Hoarding exploits is a pretty solid plan, so long as they don't fall into the hands of… well, anyone else really. Failing to plan for this inevitability is just one of the many problems with the NSA's half-assed participation in the Vulnerability Equities Process.

    Since the tools began taking their toll on the world's computer systems last year, there's been no sign the NSA is reconsidering its stance on hunting and hoarding exploits. The intelligence gains are potentially too large to be sacrificed for the security of millions of non-target computer users. It may claim these tools are essential to national security, but for which nation? The exploits wreaked havoc all over the world, but it would appear the stash of exploits primarily benefited one nation before they were inadvertently dumped into the public domain. Do the net gains in national security outweigh the losses sustained worldwide? I'd like to see the NSA run the numbers on that.

GNOME: Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo", Daniel García Moreno and Amber

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell In Ubuntu 19.04 Should Be Faster, Ubuntu Devs Still Working On New Installer

    Being more than a month past the Ubuntu 18.10 release, development on Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" is progressing at full-speed.

    Ubuntu 19.04 is starting to take shape with more changes queuing for this next six-month installment to Ubuntu Linux. Over the past week in particular have been several development changes/additions worth pointing out from their development summary.

  • I tried and I failed.

    This summer, during the GUADEC 2018, the GNOME foundation announces some job positions. One of that job was for a Gtk+ core developer. I tried to get that job and after a long period I was rejected.

    The final developer selected for this possition is Emmanuel Bassi, a very active developer in the core of GNOME and the one that's behind the great The History of GNOME Podcast.

    To be honest, I really wanted that job. It's a dream job for me, working fulltime in a free software project, by a foundation, with the great GNOME technology and community.

    But I've to say that just when I saw the foundation announcement about this position I thought about ebassi, because as far as I know, he's the best one to do that job. In any case, I wanted to give a try and go for that job, I didn't know about other people going for it, so maybe I can do it.

  • Amber Is A Cool Ambiance-Inspired Gtk / Gnome Shell Theme

    Amber is a Gtk+ 3, Gtk+ 2 and Gnome Shell theme inspired by Ubuntu's Ambiance theme.

    Amber uses slightly different colors than Ambiance, and no gradients for the applications toolbar, while still reminding of the ex-default Ubuntu theme (Ambiance was default until Ubuntu 18.10, when the default theme was changed to Yaru).

    Designed by Mattias (lassekongo83), known for his work on the beautiful Zuki themes, Amber "is almost finished", with some polishing being on the todo list, or so it says on its repository page. The theme looks great on my Ubuntu 18.10 desktop (with Gtk 3.24 and Gnome Shell 3.30), and I've been using it for about a week with no issues.

Games: Insurgency: Sandstorm, Battle Royale, Life Goes On

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Gaming
  • Insurgency: Sandstorm releases soon, Linux support still confirmed with no ETA

    Insurgency: Sandstorm, the team-based, tactical FPS that's acting as a sequel to the first standalone Insurgency title is releasing soon. Linux is coming, but no ETA.

    [...]

    While it's not exactly different to what they said before, the importance of this is that NWI continue to confirm they will be doing Linux support. I think getting that confirmation more than once is important. It keeps the Linux version in their minds and shows them there's interest when people keep asking about it. Such shooters might be quite common on Windows, but they're lacking on Linux.

  • Geneshift has tweaked the Battle Royale mode, graphical style and introduced challenges

    Geneshift, the impressive action game that has a single-player and co-op campaign, various multiplayer modes and a Battle Royale game mode has a big update out.

    Firstly, they've introduced a "Complete Edition" which all existing owners will get free. It seems the main game has now moved over to a focus on the Battle Royale modes, with the Complete Edition DLC containing all the other content. I assume, the BR mode will be free to play with this change.

  • Life Goes On | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Native

    Life goes on running on Ubuntu Linux natively. Kill yourself. No seriously, kill yourself. Numerous times to help yourself along in the level! An interesting take on a 2d platformer where death is helpful!

Best Xfce distro of 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The current calendar year is slowly converging toward its end. That means one thing! Well, two things. Festivities and liver stress testing for most people (that?s one thing), and Linux distro evaluation. Indeed, the past almost-year has gone by with many an ISO etched and booted. Following the tradition from the previous few years, we shall examine the annual landscape and do some awards, and the first desktop environment to undergo the verbal treatment shall be Xfce.

Before we begin, please remember. This is an entirely subjective article. It is also an article with a limited scope, because there are so many distros and only so few Dedoimedos ? Highlander style, there be only one. Hence, I will focus on the systems I?ve tested and tried. If you don?t see your favorite Linux here, don?t go all crusading on me right away. Instead, comment down your own experience, and perhaps next year, I may choose those over and among the many samplings and delights out there. Now, let us peacefully and civilly proceed.

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Plymouth Lands Its Tighter Integration With UEFI Flicker-Free Boot Experience

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Red Hat

The Fedora-led effort for perfecting the flicker-free Linux boot experience has landed its Plymouth boot splash screen changes for reusing the UEFI boot/logo screen during the boot process.

Red Hat's Hans de Goede has merged into the Plymouth graphical boot system support for the ACPI BGRT extension, which is an ACPI table that indicates where the UEFI firmware drew the system/motherboard logo at initialization time... Plymouth is now re-using that initial system power-on screen as part of the Linux boot process to provide a very smooth and seamless boot experience.

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Open source predictions for 2019

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OSS

Crystal ball? Are you there? Fine. I'll go it alone.

2018 was a rollicking fun year for open source, filled with highs, lows, and plenty of in-between. But what will 2019 hold for Linux and open source software? Let's shrug off the continued introductory dialog and prognosticate.

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Best Linux Marketing Campaigns

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Linux

I have long held the opinion that one of the biggest problems holding back Linux-based systems from dominating (market-share-wise) in the desktop computing space...is marketing. Our lack of attention-grabbing, hearts-and-minds-winning marketing is, in my oh-so-humble opinion, one of the most glaring weaknesses of the Free and Open Source Software world.

But, in a way, me saying that really isn't fair.

The reality is that we have had some truly fantastic marketing campaigns through the years. A few even managed to break outside of our own Linux-loving community. Let's take a stroll through a few of my favorites.

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SMARC module runs Linux on i.MX8M

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Linux

Axiomtek’s “SCM180” SMARC module features NXP’s dual- or quad-core i.MX8M SoC with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC plus TPM, GbE, HDMI 2.0, MIPI-DSI/CSI, and support for up to -40 to 85°C temperatures.

We cover a lot of Axiomtek products, but most are embedded systems or SBCs rather than computer-on-modules, which include last year’s Apollo Lake based Q7M311 Qseven module. We missed the company’s first SMARC module — the i.MX6 based SCM120. Now Axiomtek has returned with a second SMARC module with its SCM180, which taps NXP’s more recent, Cortex-A53 based i.MX8M SoC. The only other i.MX8M-based SMARC module we’ve seen is Seco’s SM-C12.

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All the F-Words in Linux Kernel Code Have Been Replaced with “Hug”

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News

To comply with the new code of conduct, all the F-words in the Linux kernel code are being replaced with “hug”.
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Games: Beholder 2, Lost in Sky: Violent Seed, Garden Variety Body Horror, Damsel

Filed under
Gaming
  • Become an officer in a ministry of a totalitarian state, Beholder 2 is out now

    What will you do with the power to control? Beholder 2 seems it will ask that question and it's out now with Linux support.

  • Lost in Sky: Violent Seed, an intense story-based action platformer will have Linux support

    While the release is a little while away, we have it confirmed that the story-based action platformer Lost in Sky: Violent Seed will have Linux support. We spoke to the developer earlier today, who confirmed Linux support to us.

    It will mix-in comic book styled storytelling, with intense action platformer segments and I have to say it does look pretty good.

  • Garden Variety Body Horror, a 90's styled survival-horror has Linux support

    Here's one we missed that released. Garden Variety Body Horror, a 90's styled survival-horror that acts as a sequel to Prototype Mansion released with Linux support.

    When they say 90's, they're not kidding. It looks like a game that would have fit in well on something like the original PlayStation.

  • The challenging action-platformer 'Damsel' is now available on Linux

    Damsel from Screwtape Studios is a mighty fine looking action-platformer set in a dark cartoon-like world and it's now on Linux. It was only recently we noted that it looked like it was coming, didn't take long after that!

    Released yesterday, the developers noted that Linux (and Mac) support arrived with a few other tweaks to the game to make it a little more accessible. Apart from a few gameplay tweaks, they also added support for using the OpenDyslexic font if you have trouble reading the in-game text which is a nice feature.

Best Free Linux Script Writing Tools (Updated 2018)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Script writing is the art and craft of writing scripts for the general public. The script can take the form of musicals, plays, novels, films, television programmes, and more. Each time you watch a show on television, visit the cinema, or read a book you are consuming the trials and tribulations of a script writer.

Script writing software is not designed to make writing judgments such as avoiding the use of cliches, jargon, and journalese, nor does it help with the rhythm and balance of the piece. Instead this type of software concentrates on helping the writer to present the text in an appropriate format.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Bring some color to your Linux terminal with lolcat

Filed under
Linux

Today marks the fifth day of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

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5 reasons to give Linux for the holidays

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Linux

Every year around this time, people ask me about the best computer to give (or get) for the holidays. I always give the same answer: Linux. After all, if you want your recipients to be happy, why wouldn't you give them the best operating system on the planet?

Many people don't realize they have options when it comes to computer operating systems. Just recently, two friends (who didn't do their research) fell for the clever marketing and bought brand-new systems at premium prices. I'm willing to bet that within six months they'll be dissatisfied with those expensive computers.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Liferea News Reader 1.12.6 Released (Ubuntu PPA)

    Liferea (Linux Feed Reader) 1.12.6 was released day. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.10.

  • Necuno is a New Open Source Smartphone Running KDE

    It’s been more than two years since Ubuntu’s dream of creating a Linux smartphone was shattered. But it hasn’t discouraged others from trying their own hands on a Linux-based smartphone.

    Librem 5, the privacy-focused Linux-based smartphone, should be arriving in 2019. Even Pine64 is aiming for a budget Linux smartphone.

  • My GUADEC 2018 presentation

    I just realized that I forgot to publish my presentation from this year's GUADEC. Sorry, here it is!

  • Proxmox VE 5.3 is available

    since almost half a year we have been constantly improving Proxmox VE and adding new features. Today, we are proud to announce the final release of the new Version 5.3.

    [...]

    Here are the highlights of the new version 5.3:

    Based on Debian 9.6 and Linux Kernel 4.15
    You can create CephFS and the Metadata servers (MDS) in the GUI
    Improved disk management: add ZFS raid volumes, LVM, and LVMthin pools
    ZFS over iSCSI storage plug-in can access LIO target in the Linux kernel
    LXC: nesting is enabled for containers - you can use LXC or LXD inside a container
    PCI passthrough and vGPUs via GUI
    Countless bugfixes
    and much more...

  • VyOS 1.2.0-rc10 is available for download

    We have a bunch of issues that need testing. Please tell us if the following features work for you, or help us figure out a reproducing procedure! We need to make sure they are resolved before we make a stable 1.2.0 release, but we are either unable to reproduce them because they are hardware-specific and we don't have required hardware anywhere; or we cannot reproduce them using the provided procedure, which may mean either that the procedure is incomplete, or that the bug is already fixed.

  • Nitrux 1.1.1 overview | Meet Nitrux, powered by Linux, KDE Plasma 5, Qt and Nomad Desktop.
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 04 December 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • Design and Web team summary – 04 December 2018

    Welcome to the latest work and updates from the design and web team.

  • Máirín Duffy: Fedora Design Team Meeting, 4 Nollaig 2018
  • Linux-friendly Type 7 modules take to the skies

    Congatec unveiled two rugged, up to 16-core COM Express Basic Type 7 modules for aircraft computers: a Xeon D 15xx and Pentium D-15xx based Conga-B7XD and an Atom C3xxx driven Conga-B7AC. There’s also a new Conga-X7EVAL Type 7 carrier.

    Congatec has been slow to get into the COM Express Basic Type 7 “server-on-module” market but has made up for lost time by announcing two Linux- and Windows supported Type 7 models. Designed for “converged edge servers in aircrafts,” the Intel Xeon D and Pentium D based Conga-B7XD and the Intel Atom C3xxx based Conga-B7AC are the first aviation-focused Type 7 modules we’ve seen.

  • Rugged box PC series features PoE+ and smart hardware monitoring

    EFCO launched four Linux-ready “Eagle Eye” embedded machine vision computers with Intel 7th/6th Gen Core or Atom processors. The high-end systems support PoE+ IP cameras and EFCO’s AI-infused EKit hardware monitoring platform.

  • Flutter 1.0 Release Shows Google Is Serious About Project Fuchsia

    In Google’s quest to create a universal OS (project fuchsia), they also need the tools to make it a reality. A big part of Android’s success can be attributed to the open source nature of the OS and the excellent SDK support for developers. We know Flutter will run natively on Fuchsia, but it does bring notable benefits now.

  • Shell in a Handbasket | LINUX Unplugged 278

    We chat with a developer who's gotten Linux running on iOS devices, do a deep dive into Clear Linux, and discuss Xubuntu ending 32bit support.

    Plus why Android in the cloud, and a bunch of community news.

    Special Guests: Alan Pope, Martin Wimpress, and Theodore Dubois.

  • LHS Episode #262: RigPi Deep Dive

    Welcome to Episode 262 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, we have a special guest, Howard Nurse, W6HN, a longtime amateur radio operator and open-source enthusiast. He has developed the RigPi Station Server, a Raspberry Pi-based hardware and software rig control and operation solution that will be manufactured and sold by MFJ Enterprises.

  • Seattle’s Upbound introduces Crossplane, an open-source project to help companies manage applications across multiple public clouds

    Eventually Crossplane could help users automate deployment practices such as specifying which cloud provider — and which region inside that cloud provider’s network — should run a given application depending on how and where it is used. If it works as designed, this could make it much easier to manage a multicloud environment, which is an undertaking most companies do for strategic rather than practical reasons at the moment.

  • IBM and Red Hat want to become the leader in global hybrid and multicloud market

    When the news hit on October 29, 2018, that IBM had acquired Red Hat Inc., in a $34 billion deal, it stunned the technology world. And with good reason, as Red Hat’s merging with IBM was the biggest software acquisition ever achieved. But outside all of the hype, what will this actually mean for Red Hat going forward? To put it simply: global growth and worldwide leadership.

    “It puts us several years ahead of where we have been — or where we would have been, frankly — and ultimately … our intent is that with IBM, we’ll become the leading hybrid and multicloud provider in the world,” said Mike Ferris (pictured), vice president of technical business development and business architecture at Red Hat.

  • Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

    t’s been some time since I last talked with you about putting JBoss BPM Suite (now called Red Hat Process Automation Manager) into your cloud, and with the new release, it’s time to talk AppDev in the cloud again.

    It’s time to update the story and see how to put Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud so you are set up with a standard configuration to start your first business rules project.

  • Red Hat leads the charge into remote site and edge computing with open source hyperconverged infrastructure

    Initially aimed at remote office/branch office (ROBO) deployment, more Red Hat customers have been looking for infrastructure solutions at the edge. In industries like energy, retail, banking, telecommunications, and the public sector, many organizations rely on business-critical applications that must be deployed with limited space, budgetary constraints, and a growing scarcity of specialized IT staff.  

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Best VPNs for GNU/Linux, and Google+ Chaos Again

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Best VPNs for Linux
  • After a Second Data Leak, Google+ Will Shut Down in April Instead of August
    Back in October, a security hole in Google+’s APIs lead Google to announce it was shutting down the service. Now, a second data leak has surfaced, causing the company to move the shutdown up by four months. This new data leak is quite similar to the first one: profile information such as name, email address, age, and occupation was exposed to developers, even for private profiles. It’s estimated that upwards of 52 million users were affected by this leak. The good news is that while the first hole was open for three years, this one was only an issue for six days, from November 7th to the 13th, 2018.

Linux and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Initial i.MX8 SoC Support & Development Board Possibly Ready For Linux 4.21
    While the i.MX8 series was announced almost two years ago and the open-source developers working on the enablement for these new NXP SoCs hoped for initial support in Linux 4.17, the Linux 4.21 kernel that will be released in the early months of 2019 is slated to possibly have the first i.MX8 support in the form of the i.MX8MQ and also supporting its development/evaluation board.
  • AeonWave: An Open-Source Audio Engine Akin To Microsoft's XAudio2 / Apple CoreAudio
    An open-source audio initiative that's been in development for years but flying under our radar until its lead developer chimed in is AeonWave, which supports Windows and Linux systems while being inspired by Microsoft XAudio and Apple's CoreAudio.
  • Take Linux Foundation Certification Exams from Anywhere
    2018 has seen a new wave of popularity for the open source community and it has sparked more interest in potential engineers, system administrators, and Linux experts. 2019 is around the corner and now is a good time to look up Linux certification examinations that will enable you to progress in your career. The good news we have for you is that the Linux Foundation has made certification examinations available online so that IT enthusiasts can get certificates in a wide range of open source domains.

Games Leftovers

  • The Linux version of Civilization VI has been updated with cross-platform multiplayer support
    Just in time for the holidays, Linux gamers finally have version parity with other platforms. Expect to be able to spend just one more turn playing with friends on other operating systems.
  • John Romero has announced a free unofficial spiritual successor to The Ultimate DOOM's 4th episode
    John Romero, one of the co-founders of id Software has revealed he's been working on SIGIL, a free megawad for the original 1993 DOOM. [...] These boxes, will contain music from Buckethead, along with a custom song written expressly for SIGIL. A tempting purchase for any big DOOM fan, I especially love the sound of a 16GB 3-1/2-inch floppy disk-themed USB. You have until December 24, 2018 to order one and I imagine stock will go quite quickly.
  • Unvanquished Open-Source Game Sees Its First Alpha Release In Nearly Three Years
    Unvanquished had been easily one of the most promising open-source games several years back with decent in-game visuals/art, a continually improving "Daemon" engine that was a distant mod of ioquake3 while leveraging ETXReaL components and more, and all-around a well-organized, advancing open-source game project. Their monthly alpha releases stopped almost three years ago while today that's changed just ahead of Christmas. The Unvanquished developers announced Unvanquished Alpha 51 today as their first release in two years and eight months after having made fifty monthly alpha releases. While this is the fifty-first alpha, the developers say they should soon be ready for the beta drop.
  • Unvanquished, the free and open source shooter has a huge new release now out
    After being quiet for some time, the Unvanquished team is back and they have quite a lot to show off in the new release of their free and open source shooter. This is their first new release since April 2016, so the amount that's changed is quite striking! Hopefully, this will be the start of regular release once again, since they used to do monthly releases a few years ago and it was fun to watch it grow.
  • Valve adds even more gamepad support to their latest client beta
    Valve are continuing to support as many devices as possible with a new Steam client beta now available. Since there's no gamepad to rule them all, it makes sense for Valve to support as many as they can. Even though I love the Steam Controller, I do understand that it's not going to be a good fit for everyone. Now, Steam will support the PowerA wired/wireless GameCube Style controllers, PowerA Enhanced Wireless Controller and the PDP Faceoff Wired Pro Controller to boost their already rather large list of supported devices.
  • The turn-based tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark is coming along nicely
    After a few months in Early Access, the tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark has come along nicely and it's quite impressive. It became available on Steam back in August, this was with same-day Linux support as promised from developer 6 Eyes Studio after their successful Kickstarter.
  • Citra, the Nintendo 3DS emulator now has 'Accurate Audio Emulation'
    Citra, the impressive and quickly moving Nintendo 3DS emulator has a new progress report out and it sounds great. They've made some great progress on accurate audio emulation, with their new "LLE (Accurate)" option. They say this has enabled games like Pokémon X / Y, Fire Emblem Fates and Echoes and more to work. There's a downside though, that currently the performance does take quite a hit with it so they're still recommending the "HLE (Fast)" setting for now. They go into quite a lot of detail about how they got here, with plenty of bumps along the way. Most of the work towards this, was done by a single developer who suffered a bit of a burn-out over it.
  • Mindustry, an open source sandbox Tower Defense game that's a little like Factorio
    Available under the GPL, the developer originally made it for the GDL Metal Monstrosity Jam which happened back in 2017 and it ended up winning! Seems the developer didn't stop development after this, as they're currently going through a new major release with regular alpha builds.
  • Have graphical distortions in Unity games with NVIDIA? Here's a workaround
    It seems a lot of Unity games upgrading to later versions of Unity are suffering from graphical distortions on Linux with an NVIDIA GPU. There is a workaround available.

Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 Released With Just Over 800 Patches On Top Of Wine

Released on Friday was Wine 4.0-RC1 while coming out over the weekend was the Wine-Staging re-base that is carrying still over 800 patches on top of the upstream Wine code-base. Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 is available with 805 patches over what's found in the "vanilla" Wine code-base. But prior to the Wine 4.0 RC1 milestone there were a fair number of patches that were promoted upstream including ntoskrnl, WindowsCodecs, user32, and DXGI changes. Read more