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Tuesday, 11 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Road Ahead for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Linux and the open source business model are far different today than many of the early developers might have hoped. Neither can claim a rags-to-riches story. Rather, their growth cycles have been a series of hit-or-miss milestones.

The Linux desktop has yet to find a home on the majority of consumer and enterprise computers. However, Linux-powered technology has long ruled the Internet and conquered the cloud and Internet of Things deployments. Both Linux and free open source licensing have dominated in other ways.

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NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While we have delivered many Linux benchmarks the past number of weeks from the GeForce RTX 2070 and GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, up until recently we didn't have access to the RTX 2080 that is the card positioned between those two current consumer Turing graphics cards. In kicking off our RTX 2080 Linux benchmarking, here is a look at the Linux gaming performance compared to an assortment of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards tested on Ubuntu Linux while in the days ahead will be the OpenCL/CUDA tests and more.

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Open Source Compliance Projects Unite Under New ACT Group

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OSS

As open source software releases and customer adoption continue to increase, many companies underestimate what’s involved with going open source. It’s not only a matter of volunteering for the encouraged, but optional, upstream contributions to FOSS projects, but also complying with the legal requirements of open source licenses. Software increasingly includes a diverse assortment of open source code with a variety of licenses, as well as a mix of proprietary code. Sorting it all out to can be a major hassle, but the alternative is potential legal action and damaged relations with the open source community.

The Linux Foundation has just launched an Automated Compliance Tooling (ACT) project to help companies comply with open source licensing requirements. The new group consolidates its existing FOSSology and Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) projects and adds two new projects: Endocode’s QMSTR for integrating open source compliance toolchain within build systems and VMware’s Tern, an inspection tool for identifying open source components within containers.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release Five, 5G ready

    ETSI announced the availability of OSM Release Five, which is an advancement towards 5G network deployments and their orchestration by telecom operators. In Release Five, OSM extends its orchestration functionalities beyond virtual domains, expanding them across transport networks, as well as physical and hybrid network elements. OSM Release Five embraced a new micro-service architecture to facilitate the integration of an impressive number of new features, making Release Five suited for 5G scenarios, distributed and Edge deployments, and any kind of Network as a Service (NaaS) offer.

  • Despite risks and side effects: “Open source will become even more important in the future” [Ed: Synopsys are anti-FOSS; here they are promoting the "risk" talking point; they hired all the Black Duck staff after a Microsoft marketing man had founded this anti-GPL firm.]
  • Docker CEO Steve Singh on the firm's drive to enterprise and the future of open source

    Which problems lie in the future, and what are customers starting to say now that Docker might have to further address in the future? Singh explains that there is a growing tendency for companies to want to share their applications, whether they're legacy or brand new, with other businesses. Taking those apps out of their environments, containerising them and then making them shareable is somewhere Docker could increasingly fit in.

    "If there's a great piece of technology that moves money from location A to location B you might ask yourself, well, why do I have to rewrite that piece of technology? Why can't I share that technology if somebody else has written a fantastic service for funds transfer?

  • Wipro, Alfresco Expand Partnership to Offer Open Source Based Digital Transformation Capabilities
  • Comcast's Howald: Open source is key to service providers' future

    Low latency services and applications, the constant need for more bandwidth, IoT, and augmented reality and virtual reality services are not just dim possibilities for service providers, they're constant drumbeats that are getting louder.

    Speaking in a keynote session Wednesday morning at ONF Connect, Comcast's Rob Howald, vice president of access architecture, said it's no longer business as usual for carriers.

    Service providers need to do things differently to meet the onslaught of challenges, but they also need to provide a better customer experience while also not having an impact on the current services, Howald said.

  • Brahma Wallet Officially Released Version 1.0: Open Source, Efficient and User Friendly

    The general version of Brahma Wallet was officially released on December 1st, 2018. It can be adapted to Android 5.0 or above mobile phones. This is another product of Brahma OS besides the Brahma Image. It also demonstrates that Brahma OS is building the underlying platform of high-performance block chain. At the same time, Brahma OS is building and perfecting the ecological system of Brahma OS decentralized operating system which was seamlessly docked with digital asset management.

  • Google Chrome 71 now rolling out for Windows, Mac, and Linux operating system

    Google has announced its newly-released Chrome 71, the latest version of its web browser, is now rolling out for Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems (OS), which aims to keep deceptive websites off.

    The latest version of Google's browser was in the works over the past few months and has just left the beta programme.

    "The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 71 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux." This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

  • A call for open research computation

    The next step is likely to be what's now dubbed open research computation: publication of the software originally used to obtain and process scientific data, and to derive the output quoted in a paper. Validity and reproducibility of results are pivotal in the quest to converge on a universal truth (i.e. the scientific method), and represent an important driving force behind the movement toward open science.

Linux 4.20 and LF Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
  • Revised High Resolution Scroll Wheel Support For Logitech/Microsoft Mice On Linux

    Originally slated for the current Linux 4.20 kernel cycle was high-resolution scroll wheel support for Logitech mice. Just a short time after merging, the support was reverted as it ended up breaking support for some existing devices. Fortunately, the revised implementation is progressing and perhaps will be ready for Linux 4.21.

  • OpenChain Project Gains Facebook, Google and Uber as Platinum Members

    The OpenChain Project, which builds trust in open source by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent, announced today at Open Compliance Summit that Facebook, Google and Uber have joined as platinum members.  The only standard for open source compliance in the supply chain, OpenChain provides a specification as well as overarching processes, policies and training that companies need to be successful.

    Every day companies consume billions of lines of open source software through their supply chains as they build exciting new products and services. One key challenge as  code flows between companies is ensuring the relevant license requirements are met in a timely and effective manner. Many organizations seek to address similar compliance issues in a similar manner, providing an excellent opportunity for consolidation and harmonization.

    The OpenChain Project provides companies with a consistent way to address these challenges. At the heart of the project is a specification, an overarching standard for how companies of all sizes, whether in physical products, in the cloud or internally, can deal with open source compliance.

    Running some of the largest data centers, platforms and cloud infrastructure in the world, Facebook, Google and Uber use a considerable amount of open source software in their businesses and are joining the OpenChain project to proactively manage open source across their supply chains.

Audiocasts: Ubuntu Podcast and Destination Linux

Filed under
Interviews
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E39 – The Thirty-Nine Steps

    This week we’ve been flashing devices and getting a new display. We discuss Huawei developing its own mobile OS, Steam Link coming to the Raspberry Pi, Epic Games laucnhing their own digital store and we round up the community news.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 39 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Destination Linux EP99 - ASCII And You Shall Receive

    On this episode of Destination Linux, we discuss some distro news with VyOS & Fedora. We have great follow up regarding the kernel performance killer news we discussed last week. Some very big updates are coming from great software projects like Blender & Kodi. Later in the show, we check out some of Zeb’s favourite type of games! We also talk about the Plasma Mobile related news from Necuno Solutions. All that and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

Canonical Aggressively Pursuing the Kubernetes With Ubuntu

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • Canonical and Dell EMC provide certified, production-ready Kubernetes solution

    Dell EMC and Canonical today announced the continued evolution of their long-standing partnership to bring a tested and validated container orchestration solution to market through a reference architecture framework that helps organisations quickly and confidently implement Kubernetes technologies into production.

    The partnership brings to market a reliable solution founded upon Dell’s 14th generation of PowerEdge servers and ethernet switches, Canonical’s Charmed Kubernetes, and leveraging Software Defined Storage (Ceph).

  • Canonical launches MicroK8s – deploy Kubernetes in seconds

    Canonical has released MicroK8s – a fast and efficient upstream Kubernetes delivered as a single snap package that installs on 42 flavours of Linux. With a small disk and memory footprint, MicroK8s provides an efficient way to get started with Kubernetes, whether on the desktop, the server, an edge cloud, or IoT device.

  • Canonical widens Kubernetes support with kubeadm

    Canonical is pleased to announce commercial support for Kubernetes clusters deployed using kubeadm. Companies using kubeadm to deploy Kubernetes in production, development or multi-stage environments, can immediately benefit from enterprise support through Ubuntu Advantage for Kubernetes on a per-node basis. Support for official Debian packages released by the CNCF and used with kubeadm is also included.

    For both new and experienced users of Kubernetes, kubeadm offers the ability to get Kubernetes running in any Linux environment. Using kubeadm allows for fine-grained exploration of Kubernetes capabilities, and it allows developers and operators to have better visibility into the low-level mechanics of setting up Kubernetes. These capabilities make kubeadm a great option for those who need in-depth operational experience and offers immediate engagement with the Kubernetes operator community.

  • Canonical and Supermicro collaborate to advance enterprises’ Kubernetes adoption

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, and Supermicro, a global leader in enterprise computing, storage, networking and green technologies, today announce a joint offering helping enterprises to accelerate the design and deployment of their Kubernetes stack through an optimised, pre-certified solution.

Tumbleweed Rolls with Package Updates of Git, Virtualbox, OpenSSH

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SUSE

openSUSE’s rolling release Tumbleweed had a total of five snapshots this week and is preparing for an update to the KDE Plasma 5.14.4 packages in forthcoming snapshots.

The five Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought the 5.19.5 Linux Kernel, which was the only package updated in the 20181130 snapshot. The kernel-source 4.19.5 package added a force option for the pciserial device for x86 architecture and fixed HiperSockets sniffer for s390 architecture.

The most recently released snapshot, 20181204, had more than a dozen packages updated. GNOME’s application for manage their Flickr image hosting accounts, frogr 1.5, fixed issues with the content and installation of the AppData file and moved the functionality menu. GNOME’s goffice had a version bump to 0.10.44. Various rubygem packages were updated and the most significant change was of the packages was that rubygem-pry 0.12.2 dropped support for Rubinius. Both python-boto3 1.9.57 and python-botocore 1.12.57 had multiple application programming interface (API) changes. The obs-service-set_version 0.5.11 package needed “python suff” and now allow running tests with python3.

The first snapshot to arrive in December was snapshot 20181203. Among the package changes were an update to checkmedia 4.1, which fixed digest calculation in tagmedia, GNOME’s framework for media discovery grilo 0.3.7, and distributed compiler icecream 1.2, which made load calculations better and also cleaned up the general code. A python-docutils build dependency was added with cifs-utils 6.8 and elfutils 0.175 fixed three Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures issues. Major changes came with the man 2.8.4 package. One of the changes relies on decompressors reading from their standard input rather than redundantly passing them the input file on their command line; this works better with downstream AppArmor confinement of decompressors. Virtualbox 5.2.22 fixed a regression in the Core Audio backend causing a hang when returning from host sleep when processing input buffers and webkit2gtk3 2.22.4 fixed serval crashes and rendering issues and Fix a crash when using graphics library Cairo versions between 1.15 and 1.16.0.

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Linux Distro Spotlight: What I Love About Ubuntu Budgie

Filed under
Ubuntu

I recently received a custom-built Linux PC to evaluate from Tuxedo Computers (you can catch me live-tweeting some impressions and results on Twitter, or stay tuned here for a full review). This small form factor rig came with Ubuntu Budgie pre-installed*, and it's been my first opportunity to spend a serious chunk of time with this official Ubuntu flavor.

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Server: OpenShift and Reasons to Scale Horizontally

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • “The power of Kubernetes & OpenShift lies not only in the capabilities but also in the broad ecosystem of products”

    Last month, Red Hat announced the general availability of OpenShift Container Platform 3.11 – an important release because it incorporates the first wave of technology from the CoreOS acquisition. We talked to Diane Mueller, Red Hat’s director of Community Development for OpenShift about the importance of this release, their plan to continue innovating both in and around Kubernetes and Operators & more.

  • Exploring Stretch Clusters for Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated

    Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated has evolved as an effective way to consume OpenShift as a managed service in the public cloud. As we continue to collect feedback from customers, partners, and internal users, we’re excited to be able to present some substantial improvements to the offering, effective this month. I want to focus mainly on the new options available for new OpenShift Dedicated clusters, along with new features that are now available for all OpenShift Dedicated deployments.

  • Reasons to Scale Horizontally

    Scaling vertically is also known as “scaling up”, whereas horizontal scaling is known as “scaling out.” So vertical scaling is adding more resources to a single node in a system, and horizontal scaling is the process of adding more nodes to a system.

Qt 5.12 LTS Released

Filed under
Development

I’m really happy to announce that we will now fully support Qt for Python, making all of the Qt APIs available to Python developers. The tech preview is currently available for you to test, while the official release will follow shortly after Qt 5.12. Qt for Python originates from the PySide project that we have been hosting on qt-project.org for many years. Qt for Python supports most of Qt’s C++ APIs and makes them accessible to Python programmers. In short: Python developers now can also create complex graphical applications and user interfaces. You can find more details in the Qt for Python blog posts.

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Also: Qt 5.12 Released With Many Improvements, Joined By Qt Creator 4.8

Another Linux 4.20 Performance Regression Has Now Been Addressed (THP)

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Linux

The bumpy Linux 4.19~4.20 road continues but at least another performance regression is now crossed off.

Google's David Rientjes has landed a patch in mainline Linux 4.20 Git as of yesterday that restores node-locale hugepage allocations. Changes to Transparent Huge-Pages, which THP itself was designed to improve performance and make it easier to utilize huge-pages, had caused a performance regression to be introduced back during the 4.20 merge window.

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Security: Windows Back Doors Cost Dearly, Adobe Flash is a Mess, and Microsoft Deals With Defects

Filed under
Security

Programming Leftovers (Mostly Python Links)

Filed under
Development
  • Create the third level for this pygame project

    In this article we are going to create the third level for our pygame project after we have created the previous two levels, the reason I create the third game level in this chapter is because this level is different from the second level which is only using the same enemy class to generate different type of enemy ship. In this chapter we are going to create a new enemy class which will act...

  • Python Pandas Groupby Tutorial
  • Everything you need to know about tree data structures

    When you first learn to code, it’s common to learn arrays as the “main data structure.”

  • Introducing Zato public API services

    Most users start to interact with Zato via its web-based admin console. This works very well and is a great way to get started with the platform.

    In terms of automation, the next natural step is to employ enmasse which lets one move data across environments using YAML import/export files.

    The third way is to use the API services - anything that can be done in web-admin or enmasse is also available via dedicated API services. Indeed, both web-admin and enmasse are clients of the same services that users can put to work in their own integration needs.

    The public API is built around a REST endpoint that accepts and produces JSON. Moreover, a purpose-built Python client can access all the services whereas an OpenAPI-based specification lets one generate clients in any language or framework that supports this popular format.

  • 6 steps to optimize software delivery with value stream mapping

    Do your efforts to improve software development fall short due to confusion and too much debate? Does your organization have a clear picture of what is achievable, and are you sure you’re moving in the right direction? Can you determine how much business value you've delivered so far? Are the bottlenecks in your process known? Do you know how to optimize your current process?

    If you are looking for a tool that will help you answer these questions, consider integrating value stream mapping and lean concepts into the way you deliver software.

  • Delete duplicate file with python program

On Linus' Return to Kernel Development

Filed under
Development
Linux

On October 23, 2018, Linus Torvalds came out of his self-imposed isolation, pulling a lot of patches from the git trees of various developers. It was his first appearance on the Linux Kernel Mailing List since September 16, 2018, when he announced he would take a break from kernel development to address his sometimes harsh behavior toward developers. On the 23rd, he announced his return, which I cover here after summarizing some of his pull activities.

For most of his pulls, he just replied with an email that said, "pulled". But in one of them, he noticed that Ingo Molnar had some issues with his email, in particular that Ingo's mail client used the iso-8859-1 character set instead of the more usual UTF-8. Linus said, "using iso-8859-1 instead of utf-8 in this day and age is just all kinds of odd. It looks like it was all fine, but if Mutt has an option to just send as utf-8, I encourage everybody to just use that and try to just have utf-8 everywhere. We've had too many silly issues when people mix locales etc and some point in the chain gets it wrong."

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Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Xfce, MATE and Cinnamon

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Xfce – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” MATE – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Cinnamon – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

Games: Sundered, Two Point Hospital, Dead Cells, Endhall, Grapple Force Rena

Filed under
Gaming
  • Sundered to get a big free update this month, sounds pretty good

    Sundered, the metroidvania action-platform with some fantastic art is going to expand soon and the update will be free.

  • Two Point Hospital: Bigfoot DLC now available with new weird ailments

    Two Point Hospital has expanded already with the first DLC already available and it does sound pretty good.

    Despite some shortcomings, Two Point Hospital is a great game for those who aren't looking for something serious. I enjoyed it a lot and certainly even more with a recent update adding in the extra sandbox mode.

    The new Bigfoot DLC was announced and released at the same time, adding in multiple new ailments to cure like Barking Mad, Mechanical Metropolism, Reptilian Metropolism, Bard Flu, Knightmares and Monster Mishmash. There's also entirely new hospitals for you to run and new decorative items, so there's plenty on offer.

  • Dead Cells, one of my favourite releases this year has a major testing build up

    Dead Cells, the incredibly stylish action-platformer with a sprinkle of metroidvania elements to make up what they call a Roguevania has a new major build out for testing.

  • Endhall, a small and challenging roguelike that's good for quick runs

    HeartBeast Studios L.L.C. just released their "byte sized roguelike" for those with little time on their hands.

  • Action platformer 'Grapple Force Rena' will have you swinging off everything

    Grapple Force Rena from developer GalaxyTrail is a sweet action platformer where your magic bracelets allow you to hook into any surface. That includes enemies too, as you hook into them and throw them out of your way.

    The gameplay and style is very reminiscent of early platformers we might have seen on something like the Sega Mega Drive (Genesis), it feels like a genuinely decent throwback.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Director v1.6.0 is available
    Icinga Director v1.6.0 has been released with Multi-Instance Support, Configuration Baskets and improved Health Checks. We’re excited to announce new features that will help you to work more efficiently.
  • Fedora Looks To Build Firefox With Clang For Better Performance & Compilation Speed
    Following the move by upstream Mozilla in switching their Linux builds of Firefox from being compiled by GCC to LLVM Clang, Fedora is planning the same transition of compilers in the name of compilation speed and resulting performance. FESCo Ticket 2020 laid out the case, "Mozilla upstream switches from gcc to clang and we're going to follow upstream here due to clang performance, maintenance costs and compilation speed. Tom Stellard (clang maintainer) has asked me to file this ticket to comply with Fedora processes."
  • Work in progress: PHP stack for EL-8
  • Sandwich-style SBC offers four 10GbE SFP+ ports
    SolidRun’s “ClearFog CX 8K” SBC is built around a “CEx7 A8040” COM Express Type 7 module that runs Linux on a quad -A72 Armada A8040. Features include 4x 10GbE SFP+ ports and mini-PCIe, M.2, and SATA expansion. In August, SolidRun updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router boards with a high-end ClearFog GT 8K SBC with the same 2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 Marvell Armada A8040 SoC found on its MacchiatoBIN Double Shot Mini-ITX board. Now, the company has returned to the headless (no graphics) Armada A8040 with the ClearFog CX 8K. [..] It’s rare to see an Arm-based Type 7 module.
  • Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10
    Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process. This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

OSS Leftovers

  • DAV1D v0.1 AV1 Video Decoder Released
    Out today is DAV1D as the first official (v0.1) release of this leading open-source AV1 video decoder. This release was decided since its quality is good enough for use, covers all AV1 specs and features, and is quite fast on desktop class hardware and improving for mobile SoCs.
  • PikcioChain plans for open-source MainNet in roadmap update
    France-based PikcioChain, a platform designed to handle and monetize personal data, has announced changes to its development roadmap as it looks towards the launch of its standalone MainNet and block explorer in the first quarter of 2019.
  • New Blockstream Bitcoin Block Explorer Announces The Release Of Its Open Source Code Esplora
    Blockstream has just announced a release of Esplora, its open source software. This is the software that keeps the website and network running. This new release follows on the heels of its block explorer that was released in November to the public. The company released the block explorer, and after making sure it was successful, released the code behind that block explorer. This way, developers can easily create their block explorers, build add-ons and extensions as well as contribute to Blockstream.info.
  • Will Concerns Break Open Source Containers?
    Open source containers, which isolate applications from the host system, appear to be gaining traction with IT professionals in the U.S. defense community. But for all their benefits, security remains a notable Achilles’ heel for a couple of reasons. First, containers are still fairly nascent, and many administrators are not yet completely familiar with their capabilities. It’s difficult to secure something you don’t completely understand. Second, containers are designed in a way that hampers visibility. This lack of visibility can make securing containers extremely taxing.
  • Huawei, RoboSense join group pushing open-source autonomous driving technology
    Telecommunications equipment giant Huawei Technologies, its semiconductor subsidiary HiSilicon and RoboSense, a maker of lidar sensors used in driverless cars, have become the first Chinese companies to help establish an international non-profit group that supports open-source autonomous driving projects. The three firms are among the more than 20 founding members of the Autoware Foundation, which aims to promote collaboration between corporate and academic research efforts in autonomous driving technology, according to a statement from the group on Monday. The foundation is an outgrowth of Autoware.AI, an open-source autonomous driving platform that was started by Nagoya University associate professor Shinpei Kato in 2015.
  • 40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019
    Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year. Which conferences do you plan to attend in 2019? If you don't see your conference on this list, be sure to tell us about it in the comments and add it to our community conference calendar. (And for more events to attend, check out The Enterprisers Project list of business leadership conferences worth exploring in 2019.)
  • Adding graphics to the Windows System for Linux [Ed: CBS is still employing loads of Microsoft boosters like Simon Bisson, to whom "Linux" is just something for Microsoft to swallow]/
  • Kong launches its fully managed API platform [Ed: Typical openwashing of APIs, even using the term "open source" where it clearly does not belong]g
  • How Shared, Open Data Can Help Us Better Overcome Disasters
    WHEN A MASSIVE earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant failed, leaking radioactive material into the atmosphere and water. People around the country as well as others with family and friends in Japan were, understandably, concerned about radiation levels—but there was no easy way for them to get that information. I was part of a small group of volunteers who came together to start a nonprofit organization, Safecast, to design, build, and deploy Geiger counters and a website that would eventually make more than 100 million measurements of radiation levels available to the public. We started in Japan, of course, but eventually people around the world joined the movement, creating an open global data set. The key to success was the mobile, easy to operate, high-quality but lower-cost kit that the Safecast team developed, which people could buy and build to collect data that they might then share on the Safecast website.

Security: Updates, Ransomware, and DNS Blame Misplaced

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Ransomware still dominates the global threat landscape
     

    Ransomware attacks continues as the main world’s main security threat and the most profitable form of malware, but a new global report indicates that despite “copious” numbers of infections daily there’s emerging signs the threat is no longer growing.  

  • Someone messed with Linux.org's DNS to deface the website's homepage [Ed: That's not "deface"' but more like redirect and it's not the site's DNS system but something upstream, another company that's at fault]
    SO IMAGINE YOU REALLY LOVE OPEN SOURCE; you've poured yourself a glass of claret from a wine box and have settled into a night of perusing Linux.org. You feel a tingle of excitement as you type in the URL - you're old skool - but that sours to despair as you see a defaced website greet your eyes. Yep, it looks like someone managed to get into the Linux.org website's domain name service (DNS) settings and point the domain to another server that served up a defaced webpage, which depending on when you may have accessed it, greeted visitors with racial slurs, an obscene picture and a protest against the revised Linux kernel developer code of conduct.

Tails 3.11 and Tor Transparency (Financials)