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Wednesday, 26 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
  • 04/05/2017 - 11:58am
    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:01am
    lashayduva
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:56pm
    neilheaney
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:53pm
    jennipurne
  • 10/01/2017 - 11:50pm
    relativ7

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Getting Started with Rust: Working with Files and Doing File I/O

    This article demonstrates how to perform basic file and file I/O operations in Rust, and also introduces Rust's ownership concept and the Cargo tool. If you are seeing Rust code for the first time, this article should provide a pretty good idea of how Rust deals with files and file I/O, and if you've used Rust before, you still will appreciate the code examples in this article.

  • PyCharm 2019.2 EAP 4

    This week’s Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm can now be downloaded from our website.

  • The First Step in Contributing to Open Source Projects

    I've been "programming" in Python for a while now, enough to be dangerous as they say. I've learned enough to be able to help others from time to time, but new enough that I still get distracted by the next shiny package I hear about on a podcast.

    I recently decided that, to help progress me further and to give back a little, I would help contribute to a package. I've heard the call to arms a few times, "Update the documentation, fix the bugs, build new features!". It's the Emerald City of the open source world. Being able to give back to the community that gives me something I enjoy so much was something that couldn't be ignored.

    But where to start? PyPI has over 100,000 packages, how does one just randomly pick one? Do I pick a well known product? Surely they can always use the help, but the large packages are so refined. With dozens of contributors already helping how could I possibly add something of value? Is it better to go for a smaller package? Find one that still needs work?

  • Python Pandas : Drop columns from Dataframe
  • What's the difference between PyQt5 and PySide2?
  • #135 macOS deprecates Python 2, will stop shipping it (eventually)
  • For Loop – Python Programming
  • EuroPython 2019: Beginners’ Day Workshop
  • GNU Guile: GNU Guile 2.2.5 released

    We are pleased to announce GNU Guile 2.2.5, the fifth bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series. This release represents 100 commits by 11 people since version 2.2.4. It fixes bugs that had accumulated over the last few months, notably in the SRFI-19 date and time library and in the (web uri) module. This release also greatly improves performance of bidirectional pipes, and introduces the new get-bytevector-some! binary input primitive that made it possible.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Jelle Van der Waa: Mini DebConf Hamburg 2019

    The reproducible builds project was invited to join the mini DebConf Hamburg sprints and conference part. I attended with the intention to get together to work on Arch Linux reproducible test setup improvements, reproducing more packages and comparing results.

    The first improvement was adding JSON status output for Arch Linux and coincidently also OpenSUSE and in the future Alpine the commit can be viewed here. The result was deployed and the Arch Linux JSON results are live.

    The next day, I investigated why Arch Linux's kernel is not reproducible.

  • Rogue Raspberry Pi allowed hackers to infiltrate NASA's systems [iophk: "article is missing any relevant details, lack of bureaucracy was not the cause here unlike what is asserted]

    That's according to a recent audit by the agency's Office of Inspector General, which reveals a number of security weaknesses affecting its Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

    The report claims that multiple IT security control weaknesses "reduce JPL's ability to prevent, detect and mitigate attacks targeting its systems and networks" while "exposing NASA systems and data to exploitation by cybercriminals".

  • Hacking Hardware Security Modules

    This highly technical presentation targets an HSM manufactured by a vendor whose solutions are usually found in major banks and large cloud service providers. It will demonstrate several attack paths, some of them allowing unauthenticated attackers to take full control of the HSM. The presented attacks allow retrieving all HSM secrets remotely, including cryptographic keys and administrator credentials. Finally, we exploit a cryptographic bug in the firmware signature verification to upload a modified firmware to the HSM. This firmware includes a persistent backdoor that survives a firmware update.

  • The looming threat of malicious backdoors in software source code

    The history of backdoors in source code has largely been about managing insider threats. For example, a rogue developer looking to sabotage the organization. What’s changed is that increasingly well-funded nation-state attackers can afford to take a much longer-term view. This means writing useful code with backdoors planted deep inside it, making the code widely available, and waiting to see who adopts it.

  • A Florida city paid a $600,000 bitcoin ransom to hackers who took over its computers — and it's a massive alarm bell for the rest of the US [iophk: "Windows TCO"]

    A Florida city's council voted to pay a ransom of $600,000 in Bitcoin to [crackers] that targeted its computer systems — and the payout is a sign of how unprepared much of the US is to deal with a coming wave of cyberattacks.

Linux productivity: Why it’s needed and the top 10 apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

People choose Linux for a variety of reasons, be it as hobby machines, trying out new things, or due to professional requirements. It's becoming easier than ever to use a Linux OS, with positive news coming out every day, such as Chromebooks being able to run Linux apps and new Linux distributions coming out weekly.

All of this is leading to more Linux adoption across the world, from offices to home computers.

Read more

Games: Albion Online, Reign of Blood and MewnBase

Filed under
Gaming
  • Albion Online's seventh major post-launch update 'Percival' to launch on July 10th

    Albion Online is going to get bigger once again and the Percival actually sounds like it's going to be pretty good, especially if you're a solo player.

    For starters, the new randomized dungeon feature is finally going to have a version for solo players! Just like the version for groups they will spawn at random throughout the world of Albion. You will be able to use dungeon maps to unlock higher tiers, for a bigger challenge and better loot too. That makes me happy, as Albion is far too geared towards bigger groups, nice to see solo players get some attention this time.

  • War not bloody enough? The Reign of Blood DLC for Total War: THREE KINGDOMS might change your mind

    Creative Assembly has announced the Reign of Blood effects pack that's coming to Total War: THREE KINGDOMS and it looks quite brutal. The developer says it will enable you to experience "the battlefields of ancient China in gruesome detail" if that's your thing.

    For the campaign it will include event-pictures depicting blood and gore, along with blood effects for battle-resolution combat animations between characters. For the battles it will add dismemberment, charred bodies, blood spray and…you get the idea.

  • Sweet survival base-builder 'MewnBase' has another update out, continues looking fun

    Not as serious as other survival games, MewnBase from developer Cairn4 has a sweet style and you're a space cat because why not.

Kali Linux Vs. Linux Mint: Which One Should You Pick?

Filed under
Linux

At the end of it, it comes down to not only the user’s preference but also the use-case. Mint has many advantages, being easy-to-use, low-powered, accessible and easily installable. However, it does come with the pitfalls of Ubuntu-based distributions such as network settings being saved or noisy traffic on networks.

On the other hand, Kali has a high number of advantages for those looking to use an OS for hacking and penetration testing. It comes with a steep learning curve and is definitely not made for everyone. However, its set of tools and utilities, along with its base architecture security, is paramount to hackers.

All in all, it depends on what the user is using it for. In case of looking for a Linux distro similar to Windows in properties and use-case, Linux Mint is recommended. For a robust platform used for penetration testing and hacking, Kali Linux is robust and dependable.

Read more

The state of open source translation tools for contributors to your project

Filed under
OSS

In the world of free software, many people speak English: It is the one language. English helps us cross borders to meet others. However, this language is also a barrier for the majority of people.

Some master it while others don't. Complex English terms are, in general, a barrier to the understanding and propagation of knowledge. Whenever you use an uncommon English word, ask yourself about your real mastery of what you are explaining, and the unintentional barriers you build in the process.

Read more

Making Fedora 30

Filed under
Red Hat

Although Fedora 29 released on October 30, 2018, work on Fedora 30 began long before that. The first change proposal was submitted in late August. By my count, contributors made nine separate change proposals for Fedora 30 before Fedora 29 shipped.

Some of these proposals come early because they have a big impact, like mass removal of Python 2 packages. By the time the proposal deadline arrived in early January, the community had submitted 50 change proposals.

Read more

Red Hat's last quarterly report?

Filed under
Red Hat

Soon, IBM will complete its acquisition of Red Hat for $34-billion. But, Red Hat's not resting on its laurels waiting. The company announced its financial results for the first quarter of fiscal year 2020 ended May 31, 2019. With first quarter total revenue of $934 million, up 15 percent year-over-year in USD, or 18 percent in constant currency, Red Hat did quite well.

Still, Wall Street expected Red Hat to report net income of $162.4 million, or 87 cents a share, on sales of $931.6 million after the market closes on Thursday, based on a FactSet survey of 14 analysts. In reality, Red Hat GAAP net income for the quarter was $141 million, or $0.76 diluted earnings per share. Non-GAAP adjusted net income for the quarter was $186 million, or $1.00 diluted EPS.

Not bad. Not bad at all.

Read more

Kwort Linux 4.3.4 is out, check what’s new

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Kwort Linux team proudly announced the new release of Kwort Linux 4.3.4 on 16 June, 2019.

It’s CRUX-based distribution featuring with Openbox window manager and offering a own package manager called kpkg.

Kwort is a modern, small (included only useful applications) and fast Linux distribution that is designed especially for power users as it doesn’t offer any installer script.

And users needs to follow the official instruction to install the system manually.

Read more

Also: The 2019 System76 Oryx Pro, Full Review!

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Podcast, Wine Concerns, Parallel Installs and Vanilla Framework 2.0

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E11 – 1942

    This week we’ve been to FOSS Talk Live and created games in Bash. We have a little LXD love in and discuss 32-bit Intel being dropped from Ubuntu 19.10. OggCamp tickets are on sale and we round up some tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 11 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Wine Developers Appear Quite Apprehensive About Ubuntu's Plans To Drop 32-Bit Support

    It's looking like the plans announced by Canonical this week to drop their 32-bit packages/libraries beginning with Ubuntu 19.10 will be causing problems for the Wine camp at least in the near-term until an adequate solution is sorted out for providing their 32-bit Wine builds to Ubuntu users.

    Wine and Steam are among the few prominent Linux software packages still prominently living mostly in a 32-bit world. Valve certainly has the resources to come up with a timely solution especially with Ubuntu being the most popular Linux distribution used by Steam and they can move on with shipping their own 32-bit Steam Runtime libraries and other changes as needed. For the upstream Wine project it might be a bit more burdensome providing 32-bit Wine packages for Ubuntu.

  • Parallel installs – test and run multiple instances of snaps

    In Linux, testing software is both easy and difficult at the same time. While the repository channels offer great availability to software, you can typically only install a single instance of an application. If you want to test multiple instances, you will most likely need to configure the remainder yourself. With snaps, this is a fairly simple task.

    From version 2.36 onwards, snapd supports parallel install – a capability that lets you have multiple instances of the same snap available on your system, each isolated from the others, with its own configurations, interfaces, services, and more. Let’s see how this is done.

  • Vanilla Framework 2.0 upgrade guide

    We have just released Vanilla Framework 2.0, Canonical’s SCSS styling framework, and – despite our best efforts to minimise the impact – the new features come with changes that will not be automatically backwards compatible with sites built using previous versions of the framework.

    To make the transition to v2.0 easier, we have compiled a list of the major breaking changes and their solutions (when upgrading from v1.8+). This list is outlined below. We recommend that you treat this as a checklist while migrating your projects.

With Regolith, i3 Tiling Window Management Is Awesome, Strange and Easy

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Regolith Linux brings together three unusual computing components that make traipsing into the i3 tiling window manager world out-of-the-box easy.

Much of the focus and attraction -- as well as confusion -- for newcomers to the Linux OS is the variety of desktop environments available. Some Linux distributions offer a range of desktop types. Others come only with a choice of one desktop.

i3 provides yet another option, but it is a much different choice that offers an entirely new approach to how you interact with the operating system.

Window managers usually are integrated into a full-fledged desktop system. Window managers control the appearance and placement of windows within the operating system's screen display. A tiling window manager goes one step further. It organizes the screen display into non-overlapping frames rather than stacking overlapping windows.

The i3 tiling window manager in Regolith Linux serves as what essentially becomes a standalone pseudo desktop. It automatically arranges windows so they occupy the whole screen without overlapping.

Read more

Security: John Deere, Windows, Debian, Ubuntu, and Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Security
  • John Deere's Promotional USB Drive Hijacks Your Keyboard

    “The device itself, it’s pretty ingenious, actually,” the Reddit user said. “It’s an HID-compliant keyboard that, when connected detects what platform it’s on and automatically sends a keyboard shortcut to open a browser, and then it barfs the link into the address bar.”

  • New Variant of the Houdini Worm Emerges

    WSH RAT is currently being offered as a subscription, at $50 per month. The malware operators are actively marketing the malware as compatible with all Windows XP to Windows 10 releases, featuring automatic startup methods, and various remote access, evasion, and stealing capabilities.

  • Debian's Intel MDS Mitigations Are Available for Sandy Bridge Server/Core-X CPUs

    The Debian Project recently announced the general availability of a new security update for the intel-microcode firmware to patch the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs.

    Last month, on May 14th, Intel disclosed four new security vulnerabilities affecting many of its Intel microprocessor families. The tech giant was quick to release updated microcode firmware to mitigate these flaws, but not all the processor families were patched.

  • Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS

    Canonical released a new Linux kernel live patch for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series to address the recently disclosed TCP Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerabilities.

    Coming hot on the heels of the recent Linux kernel security updates published earlier this week for all supported Ubuntu releases, the new Linux kernel live patch is only targeted at Ubuntu versions that support the kernel live patch and are long-term supported, including Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

  • Firefox Users Warned to Patch Critical Flaw

    Mozilla is urging users of its Firefox browsers to update them immediately to fix a critical zero-day vulnerability. Anyone using Firefox on a Windows, macOS or Linux desktop is at risk.

    The vulnerability, CVE-2019011707, is a type confusion in Array.pop. It has been patched in Firefox 67.0.3 and Firefox ESR 60.7.1.

    Mozilla announced the patch Tuesday, but the vulnerability was discovered by Samuel Groß of Google Project Zero on April 15.

    Mozilla implemented the fix after digital currency exchange Coinbase reported exploitation of the vulnerability for targeted spearphishing attacks.

    "On Monday, June 17, 2019, Coinbase reported a vulnerability used as part of targeted attacks for a spear phishing campaign," Selena Deckelmann, senior director, Firefox Browser Engineering, told TechNewsWorld. "In less than 24 hours, we released a fix for the exploit."

Tails 3.14.1 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Web
Debian

This release is an emergency release to fix a critical security vulnerability in Tor Browser.

It also fixes other security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

Read more

Also: It's Time to Switch to a Privacy Browser

Games: A Year Of Rain, Evan's Remains, Dota Underlords, ISLANDERS, Nowhere Prophet, Fear The Rampager and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Daedalic Entertainment's new RTS "A Year Of Rain" will be coming to Linux

    This is really exciting news, as a huge fan of such RTS games, Daedalic Entertainment's "A Year Of Rain" looks really good and it turns out they're going to support Linux.

    Interestingly, back when it was first announced in March I did email Daedalic to ask about Linux support. They told me then, that they didn't really have any answer on it. However, it seems things have changed and they've decided Linux will be supported. On Steam, the developer said it's planned and it seems it may even happen during the Early Access period.

  • Evan's Remains, a beautiful-looking puzzle platformer with visual novel elements plans Linux support

    Evan's Remains from Matías Schmied and Whitethorn Digital is a new one to capture my interest. Blending a rather atmospheric puzzle platformer, with a little visual novel flair and it's planned for Linux.

  • Dota Underlords from Valve is now in open beta for Linux, mobile too

    Valve are doing some really impressive work with Dota Underlords, their new strategy game that everyone can now try.

    As a quick reminder on the gameplay: you go through rounds, picking heroes and placing them on the board, then you fight against the choices of other players and neutral enemies for loot. The actual battles are done by AI, with the tactical part based on your choices and positioning. You lose health based on the amount of enemy heroes left if they beat you and it's the last player standing to win.

    It's free and will remain free to play, with some sort of optional Battle Pass likely to come for cosmetic items in future. They have a lot more planned for it including: daily challenges, a level up system, a tournament system, seasonal rotation for heroes and more. They said that during the Open Beta Season, it will regularly see new features and updates.

  • Colourful city-builder 'ISLANDERS' has officially released for Linux and it's really lovely

    I don't think I've hit the buy button on Steam that quickly in a while, as ISLANDERS, a colourful city-builder is now officially out for Linux.

    Developed by GrizzlyGames, ISLANDERS is a minimalist strategy game for those who don't have hours to invest in resource management. Released back in April, the Linux version arrived yesterday along with a big update that also adds in a Sandbox Mode and the ability to undo your last building placement which sounds handy.

  • Roguelike deck-building game 'Nowhere Prophet' releasing on July 19th, looks very interesting

    Deck-building card-based games really are all the rage now! I'm okay with this, as I love them and I am excited to see what more developers do with it. Nowhere Prophet is one that looks great and it's out next month. Developer Sharkbomb Studios and publisher No More Robots have now confirmed the release date of July 19th. We got confirmation back in April, that Linux will be supported too.

    Set on planet Soma, this science-fiction post-apocalypse game mixes in two distinct modes of play. The first is the travel system, with you facing encounters across a procedurally generated map (so the game is different each time). If you enter combat, it switches into the turn-based card game mode.

  • Dead Cells "Fear The Rampager" update is live and it continues being awesome

    Still one of my top games, Dead Cells just got another big free update "Fear The Rampager" so it's time to jump back in for one more run.

    The big addition this time is the introduction of The Rampager. A new foe to challenge you that's currently haunting a variety of biomes in Boss Stem Cell 3 and higher.

  • Heroes of Hammerwatch updated and the Witch Hunter expansion is out now

    Crackshell have expanded their rogue-lite action-adventure game Heroes of Hammerwatch with a free update along with the great sounding Witch Hunter expansion.

    First up, the free update available for everyone adds in a few new features including new dungeon mechanics, companions, new drinks and a new statue if you have the Pyramid of Prophecy DLC. Additionally the free update has some performance improvements, more chest room variations, enemies can now be killed by poison and plenty of other balance changes.

  • My Friend Pedro | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    My Friend Pedro running through Steam play.

MX GNU/Linux, A Desktop Mix of Mepis and Antix without Systemd

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

MX is an interesting desktop GNU/Linux based on Debian but without Systemd. It's powered with simple and user friendly interface thanks to XFCE Desktop. It's actually very lightweight, shipped with a lot of MX own tools (including remastering and tweaking ones), available in 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. The latest version, MX-18 "Continuum", equipped with ability to search and install Flatpak applications. Last but not least, MX exists as collaboration between two big communities, Mepis and antiX, hence the name MX since 2008 up to today. I hope you enjoy my overview below introducing several good points of MX.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

4 open source Android apps for writers

While I'm of two minds when it comes to smartphones and tablets, I have to admit they can be useful. Not just for keeping in touch with people or using the web but also to do some work when I'm away from my computer. For me, that work is writing—articles, blog posts, essays for my weekly letter, e-book chapters, and more. I've tried many (probably too many!) writing apps for Android over the years. Some of them were good. Others fell flat. Here are four of my favorite open source Android apps for writers. You might find them as useful as I do. Read more

How a trip to China inspired Endless OS and teaching kids to hack

Last year, I decided to try out Endless OS, a lightweight, Linux-based operating system developed to power inexpensive computers for developing markets. I wrote about installing and setting it up. Endless OS is unique because it uses a read-only root file system managed by OSTree and Flatpak, but the Endless company is unique for its approach to education. Late last year, Endless announced the Hack, a $299 laptop manufactured by Asus that encourages kids to code, and most recently the company revealed The Third Terminal, a group of video games designed to get kids coding while they're having fun. Since I'm so involved in teaching kids to code, I wanted to learn more about Endless Studios, the company behind Endless OS, The Third Terminal, The Endless Mission, a sandbox-style game created in partnership with E-Line Media, and other ventures targeted at expanding digital literacy and agency among children around the world. I reached out to Matt Dalio, Endless' founder, CEO, and chief of product and founder of the China Care Foundation, to ask about Endless and his charitable work supporting orphaned children with special needs in China. Read more

AMD Releases Firmware Update To Address SEV Vulnerability

A new security vulnerability has been made public over AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) having insecure cryptographic implementations. Fortunately, this AMD SEV issue is addressed by a firmware update. CVE-2019-9836 has been made pulic as the AMD Secure Processor / Secure Encrypted Virtualization having an insecure cryptographic implementation. Read more