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Tuesday, 20 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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  • 07/07/2019 - 5:40pm
    JamieCull
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Upgrade from Windows 7 to Ubuntu Part 2: Releases

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Knowing Ubuntu releases is important to understand it better. Ubuntu is released twice a year, more precisely, every April and October, hence the number 04 and 10 in every version. It has special release called Long Term Support (LTS) released once in two years, only when the year number is even, hence all LTS version numbers are ended with 04. More importantly, you will also see 3 different periods of Ubuntu Desktop, that have been going through GNOME2, Unity, and GNOME3 eras, with OpenOffice.org and then LibreOffice as the main office suite. You will also see Ubuntu siblings like Kubuntu and Mythbuntu. I hope this will be interesting enough for everybody to read. Go ahead, and learn more about Ubuntu!

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Announcing Rust 1.37.0

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF

The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.37.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux-maker Red Hat Purchase Adds Risk to Owning IBM Stock

    Amid evolving technologies, IBM has to pivot again to remain relevant. It has attempted this feat by buying Red Hat. Investors are bailing out of the shares as integration of the Linux maker will take time. Given the time lag and the falling profits, owning the stock amounts to a gamble on whether management can successfully absorb Red Hat into the company.

  • FLOSS Weekly 542: Dancer

    Dancer is a web application framework for Perl. It was inspired by Sinatra and was written by Alexis Sukrieh originally.

    It has an intuitive, minimalist, and very expressive syntax: has PSGI support, plugins and its modular design allow for strong scalability: and Dancer depends on as few CPAN modules as possible, making it easy to install.

  • Biometrics of one million people discovered on publicly accessible database

    A biometrics database used by the police, banks and defence contractors has been discovered online unprotected, with the fingerprints and facial recognition scans unencrypted.

    Furthermore, the Biostar 2 database - used as part of security systems for warehouses and offices - also contained user names, passwords and other personal information. And the database was so exposed that data could easily be manipulated, and new accounts with corresponding biometrics added

  • Apple locked me out of its walled garden. It was a nightmare

    I started to realize just how far-reaching the effects of Apple disabling my account were. One of the things I love about Apple’s ecosystem is that I’ve built my media collection on iTunes, and can access it from any of my Apple devices. My partner and I have owned numerous iPods, iPhones, iPads, MacBooks, iMacs, Apple Watches, Apple TVs, and even a HomePod, over the years. Apple plays a big part in my professional life too: I’m the IT manager for Quartz, and we use Apple hardware and publish on Apple platforms.

    But when Apple locked my account, all of my devices became virtually unusable. At first, it seemed like a mild inconvenience, but I soon found out how many apps on my iOS and Mac devices couldn’t be updated, not to mention how I couldn’t download anything new. When I had to take a trip for a family emergency, the JetBlue app wouldn’t let me access my boarding pass, saying I had to update the app to use it. It was the first time I’d flown with a paper boarding pass in years. I couldn’t even pass time on the flight playing Animal Crossing on my phone, because I got a similar error message when I opened the game.

  • VMware says it’s looking to acquire Pivotal

    VMware today confirmed that it is in talks to acquire software development platform Pivotal Software, the service best known for commercializing the open-source Cloud Foundry platform. The proposed transaction would see VMware acquire all outstanding Pivotal Class A stock for $15 per share, a significant markup over Pivotal’s current share price (which unsurprisingly shot up right after the announcement).

  • VMware All Set To Acquire Pivotal
  • rideOS Launches New Devoted Platform to Power the Future of Ridehailing

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos

GNOME Developers: Microsoft Stifling the Competition and GStreamer/Graphene

Filed under
GNOME
  • Musings on the Microsoft Component Firmware Update (CFU) Protocol

    CFU has a bazaar pre-download phase before sending the firmware to the microcontroller so the uC can check if the firmware is required and compatible. CFU also requires devices to be able to transfer the entire new transfer mode in runtime mode. The pre-download “offer” allows the uC to check any sub-components attached (e.g. other devices attached to the SoC) and forces it to do dep resolution in case sub-components have to be updated in a specific order.

    Pushing the dep resolution down to the uC means the uC has to do all the version comparisons and also know all the logic with regard to protocol incompatibilities. You could be in a position where the uC firmware needs to be updated so that it “knows” about the new protocol restrictions, which are needed to update the uC and the things attached in the right order in a subsequent update. If we always update the uC to the latest, the probably-factory-default running version doesn’t know about the new restrictions.

    The other issue with this is that the peripheral is unaware of the other devices in the system, so for instance couldn’t only install a new firmware version for only new builds of Windows for example. Something that we support in fwupd is being able to restrict the peripheral device firmware to a specific SMBIOS CHID or a system firmware vendor, which lets vendors solve the “same hardware in different chassis, with custom firmware” problem. I don’t see how that could be possible using CFU unless I misunderstand the new .inf features. All the dependency resolution should be in the metadata layer (e.g. in the .inf file) rather than being pushed down to the hardware running the old firmware.

  • Emmanuele Bassi: Another layer

    Five years (and change) ago I was looking at the data types and API that were needed to write a 3D-capable scene graph API; I was also learning about SIMD instructions and compiler builtins on IA and ARM, as well as a bunch of math I didn’t really study in my brush offs with formal higher education. The result was a small library called Graphene.

    Over the years I added more API, moved the build system from Autotools over to Meson, and wrote a whole separate library for its test suite.

    In the meantime, GStreamer started using Graphene in its GL element; GTK 3.9x is very much using Graphene internally and exposing it as public API; Mutter developers are working on reimplementing the various math types in their copies of Cogl and Clutter using Graphene; and Alex wrote an entire 3D engine using it.

PiVoyager is a UPS for the Raspberry Pi With a Real-Time Calendar Clock

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi is a powerful SBC (Single Board Computer), and aside from being used for everyday computing stuff, the Raspberry Pi can be embedded as the brain of various projects.

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Server: Kata Containers in Tumbleweed, Ubuntu on 'Multi' 'Cloud', and Containers 101

Filed under
Server
  • Kubic Project: Kata Containers now available in Tumbleweed

    Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

    We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

    It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

  • Why multi-cloud has become a must-have for enterprises: six experts weigh in

    Remember the one-size-fits-all approach to cloud computing? That was five years ago. Today, multi-cloud architectures that use two, three, or more providers, across a mix of public and private platforms, are quickly becoming the preferred strategy at most companies.

    Despite the momentum, pockets of hesitation remain. Some sceptics are under the impression that deploying cloud platforms and services from multiple vendors can be a complex process. Others worry about security, regulatory, and performance issues.

  • Containers 101: Containers vs. Virtual Machines (And Why Containers Are the Future of IT Infrastructure)

    What exactly is a container and what makes it different -- and in some cases better -- than a virtual machine?

LiVES Video Editor 3.0 is Here With Significant Improvements

Filed under
Software

We recently covered a list of best open source video editors. LiVES is one of those open source video editors, available for free.

Even though a lot of users are still waiting for the release on Windows, a major update just popped up for LiVES Video Editor (i.e v3.0.1 as the latest package) on Linux. The new upgrade includes some new features and improvements.

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Also: elfutils 0.177 released with eu-elfclassify

8 Ways Snaps are Different

Filed under
Ubuntu

Depending on the audience, the discussion of software packaging elicits very different responses. Users generally don’t care how software is packaged, so long as it works. Developers typically want software packaging as a task to not burden them and just magically happen. Snaps aren’t magic, but aim to achieve both ease of maintenance and transparency in use.

Most software packaging systems differ only a little in file format, tools used in their creation and methods of discovery and delivery. Snaps come with a set of side benefits beyond just delivering bytes in a compressed file to users. In this article, we’ll cover just 8 of the ways in which snaps improve upon existing Linux software packaging.

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System76’s First 4K OLED Linux Laptop is Here

Filed under
Gadgets

System76 launched its latest high-end Linux powered laptop – Adder WS.

System76 – the american computer manufacturer introduced the first 4K OLED Linux powered laptop. Named Adder WS, this device targets to the content creators, gamers and researchers who needs high performance hardware with Linux. Powered by Intel i9 series 8-core CPU and 64GB ram, this device includes a 15″ 4K OLED display with RTX 2070 graphics.

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Linux Foundation: Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe and Cloud Native Computing Foundation Milestone

Filed under
OSS
  • Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe 2019 Schedule – October 28-30

    I may have just written about Linaro Connect San Diego 2019 schedule, but there's another interesting event that will also take place this fall...

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Reaches 100 End User Community Members

    "The End User Community is a crucial pillar of CNCF, providing feedback on projects, suggesting new projects, and ensuring the community remains vendor neutral," said Cheryl Hung, Director of Ecosystem at Cloud Native Computing Foundation. "We are hugely grateful for these member organizations and their commitment to the cloud native community, and look forward to continued growth in both the development and use of cloud native technologies."

Devices: Commell SBC, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Teensy and Linaro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Report From LibreOffice Asia Conference and More Reasons to Move to LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft
OSS
  • LibreOffice Asia Conference Report: Part 2

    Foreword: the LibreOffice Asia Conference was successfully held in May 2019 in Tokyo. Kuan-Ting Lin, a university student and civic tech reporter also attended this conference and gives his observations here. In Part II, Kuan-Ting starts with the Open Document Format, and expounds on how to form an open government and better autonomy of Taiwan.

    The “Taiwanese Language channel” (tâi-gí-tâi) of the Public Television Service (PTS) in Taiwan started its broadcasting service in July 2019. This channel became possible only because the National Languages Act was approved in parliament. This policy was rooted by many in the decision to improve expression, alleviation of limits on speeches, and the consolidation of autonomy following the new law.

    After a long-time struggle, the state also sees a silver lining regarding another autonomy issue: document liberation.

  • Let's see what the sweet, kind, new Microsoft that everyone loves is up to. Ah yes, forcing more Office home users into annual subscriptions

    Microsoft is continuing its campaign to drive Office users onto a subscription plan by killing off its discounted Home Use program.

    The program covers individuals whose employer already has an Office subscription and allowed them to download standalone software on a separate home machine for a greatly reduced price of just $15. But no more.

    Eligible users will still get a discount – but only on an Office subscription package. No more standalone software. Microsoft is keen that everyone recognizes this change for the wonderful opportunity it is.

    "Microsoft is updating the Home Use Program to offer discounts on the latest and most up to date products such as Office 365, which is always up to date with premium versions of Office apps across all your devices," it chirpily announced in a new FAQ question this week, before noting that "Office Professional Plus 2019 and Office Home and Business 2019 are no longer available as Home Use Program offers."

    Why the change? You won't believe this but it seems money is at the root of it. Rather than pay $15 for a piece of software that you can then use for years, Microsoft's "update" will require home users (whose employers already have a subscription with Microsoft) to pay either $49 or $70 for the Personal and Home Office 365 services respectively. Every year.

AMD and Intel: RdRand and Clear Linux Documentation

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AMD Bulldozer/Jaguar CPUs Will No Longer Advertise RdRand Support Under Linux

    Not directly related to the recent AMD Zen 2 BIOS update needed to fix an RdRand problem (though somewhat related in that the original systemd bug report for faulty AMD RdRand stems from these earlier CPUs), but AMD has now decided to no longer advertise RdRand support for Family 15h (Bulldozer) and Family 16h (Jaguar) processors under Linux.

    The RdRand instruction will still work on capable CPUs, but the CPU ID bit is being cleared so that it won't be advertised for software explicitly checking for the support. Tom Lendacky of AMD reesorted to clearing the RDRAND CPU ID bit for 15h/16h processors (no impact for Zen, etc) due to RdRand issues cropping up after suspend/resume. Those issues have affected some users for a while and originate with the original AMD RdRand systemd bug report over problems following that cycle.

  • Clear Linux Project has a new documentation site

    The Clear Linux OS Docs team is happy to announce that our documentation site for the Clear Linux Project has moved to a Sphinx/reST site with the ubiquitous Read-The-Docs theme, consistent with many open source documentation projects.

  • Clear Linux Rolls Out Revamped Documentation

    While Arch Linux remains the gold standard for quality Linux documentation, Intel's Clear Linux has rolled out a new documentation web-site to assist new/existing users in making use of this performance-optimized and security-oriented Linux operating system.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

12 extensions for your GNOME desktop

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME desktop is the default graphical user interface for most of the popular Linux distributions and some of the BSD and Solaris operating systems. Currently at version 3, GNOME provides a sleek user experience, and extensions are available for additional functionality.

We've covered GNOME extensions at Opensource.com before, but to celebrate GNOME's 22nd anniversary, I decided to revisit the topic. Some of these extensions may already be installed, depending on your Linux distribution; if not, check your package manager.

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Also: Happy anniversary GNOME: What's your favorite version?

How to record screencasts in GNOME 3

Oracle Is Working To Upstream More Of DTrace To The Linux Kernel & eBPF Implementation

Filed under
Linux

While DTrace prospects for the Linux kernel are no longer viewed as magical or groundbreaking as they once were more than a decade ago, Oracle continues to work on its DTrace port to Linux and extending its reach beyond just their "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" for their RHEL-cloned Oracle Linux. Oracle now says they are working towards upstreaming more work as well as getting an eBPF-based implementation for the kernel.

On Wednesday, Oracle published a blog post outlining DTrace on Fedora. Getting DTrace working on Fedora isn't trivial: currently it requires building a patched version of the Linux kernel and also building the DTrace user-space utilities. That's how it currently is for most or all Linux distributions besides Oracle Linux with UEK.

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OpenBSD and FreeBSD Updates

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD -stable binary packages

    The OpenBSD base system has received binary updates for security and some other important problems in the base OS through syspatch(8) for the last few releases.

    We are pleased to announce that we now also provide selected binary packages for the most recent release. These are built from the -stable ports tree which receives security and a few other important fixes: [...]

  • FreeBSD Around the World

    One of our major goals this year is to increase FreeBSD awareness around the world. I’m excited about upcoming events, like the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit, where we are giving a talk on FreeBSD. But first, I wanted to highlight some of the events we’ve attended over the past few months. I have been pretty bad about writing event reports, so I’m summarizing some of them here. It’s a good thing our Marketing Director isn’t local, otherwise she would be camping in our office forcing me to write the reports.

New Finnish government to promote open source

Filed under
OSS

The new government of Finland, formally appointed on 6 June, will promote the use of open source software for public services’ IT systems. The preference for open source, open (programming) interfaces and open data is part of the Government Programme that was published on 3 June. A machine translation from the Government Programme entitled: “A participatory and knowledgeable Finland - a socially, economically and ecologically sustainable society”: [...]

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Also: >Why Los Angeles decided to open source its future

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