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Thursday, 19 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Containers: The Update Framework (TUF), Nabla, and Kubernetes 1.11 Release Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2018 - 3:02am
Story Mozilla: Firefox Locales and More Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2018 - 2:58am
Story Devices: Librem 5, Raspbian OS, Renegade Elite Mini PC Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2018 - 2:57am
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed: a Linux Distro review Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2018 - 2:46am
Story The oldest, active Linux distro, Slackware, turns 25 Roy Schestowitz 17/07/2018 - 2:37am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2018 - 10:15pm
Story Compact, rugged box computer runs Ubuntu on Jetson TX2 Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2018 - 10:08pm
Story Yum Won't Be Dropped For Fedora 29 Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2018 - 8:08pm
Story GNOME: GUADEC, GSoC, GitLab Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2018 - 7:50pm
Story OSS: Apache Cassandra, Jib,WSO2 and More Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2018 - 7:44pm

Graphics: Libinput, Mir, Wayland and Release of Mesa 18.1.4

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Libinput Gets Reworked Trackpoint Acceleration

    Peter Hutterer at Red Hat is trying again to get trackpoint acceleration performing nicely under the libinput library so trackpoints behave nicely across Wayland, X.Org, and Mir systems.

    Hutterer believes now that libinput's previous trackpoint acceleration code was "simply broken", but he believes this new code is on the right track and supports a wider configuration range.

  • libinput has a new trackpoint acceleration

    Just a heads-up, I just merged a branch that fixes trackpoint acceleration
    in libinput. The previous approach was simply broken, the new one is quite
    similar to what we had before anyway - calculating speed from the deltas and
    applying the acceleration curve from that. The curve is adjusted for
    trackpoints with a relatively wide configurable range.

  • Mir 0.32.1 Released With Launcher For Internal Wayland Clients, Fixes

    Canonical developers working on Mir have prepared the release of Mir 0.32.1 with a few fixes and improvements off the recent release of Mir 0.32.

    The Mir abstraction library (libmiral) now has a launcher for internal Wayland clients and the MirAL shell has reinstated the "spinner" in Wayland for when starting the shell. There are also several bug fixes pertaining to Mir's Wayland and Mesa support in this point release.

  • Wayland 1.16 & Weston 5.0 Reach Alpha

    Samsung's Derek Foreman has announced the alpha release of Wayland 1.16 as well as the Weston 5.0 reference compositor.

    As is often the case with recent Wayland releases, they are not all that large. Wayland 1.16 Alpha does away with the deprecated wl_global definition, fixes various oddities, the Wayland code generator now supports foreign enums, and updated contribution documentation.

  • mesa 18.1.4

    Hi list,

    Mesa 18.1.4 is now available for download.

    In this release we have:
    - Several fixes for i965
    - Several fixes for anv
    - A few fixes each for radeonsi, glx, the glsl compiler, the autotools build,
    nir, st/dri, and r600

    Dylan

  • Mesa 18.1.4 Released With Fixes For Intel & Radeon Drivers

    For those abiding by Mesa stable releases, Mesa 18.1.4 is now available -- in time for updating prior to any weekend Linux gaming or other activities -- for these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan driver components.

    Mesa 18.1.4 truth be told isn't all that of an exciting release, unless you happened to be affected by any of the just over two dozen fixes incorporated into this timed point release.

GNOME Desktop/GTK/GUADEC

Filed under
GNOME
  • Carlos Soriano: Gtk4 Flatpak example

    As part of Ernestas Kulik work on porting Nautilus to gtk4 he has created a tagged entry widget to replace libgd tagged entry and eventually upstream to gtk proper. To give easy testing he created a Flatpak file for building a simple app with this widget, which serves as an example of how to create a simple app with gtk4 too.

  • Philip Withnall: GUADEC 2018 thoughts

    GUADEC this year was another good one; thank you to the organisers for putting on a great and welcoming conference, and to Endless for sending me.

    Unfortunately I couldn’t make the first two days due to a prior commitment, but I arrived on the Sunday in time to give my talks. I’ve got a lot of catching up to do with the talks on Friday and Saturday — looking forward to seeing the recordings online!

    The slides for my talk on the state of GLib are here and the notes are here (source for them is here). I think the talk went fairly well, although I imagine it was quite boring for most involved — I’m not sure how to make new APIs particularly interesting to listen to!

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: My Perspective on This Year’s GUADEC

    This year, I had the pleasure to attend GUADEC at Almeria, Spain. Lots of things happened, and I believe some of them are important to be shared with the greater community.

    [...]

    A big cleanup was merged during GUADEC. This probably will mean small adaptations in extensions, but I don’t particularly think it’s groundbreaking.

    At the second BoF day, me and Jonas Ådahl dived into the Remote Desktop on Wayland work to figure out a few bugs we were having. Fortunately, Pipewire devs were present and we figured out some deadlocks into the code. Jonas also gave a small lecture on how the KMS-based renderer of Wayland’s code path works (thanks!), and I feel I’m more educated in that somewhat complex part of the code.

    As of today, Carlos Garnacho’s paint volume rework was merged too, after extensive months of testing. It was a high-impact work, and certainly reduces Mutter’s CPU usage on certain situations.

    At the very last day, we talked about various ideas for further performance improvements and cleanups on Mutter and GNOME Shell. I myself am on the last steps of working on one of these ideas, and will write about it later.

    [...]

    Even though I was reluctant to go, this GUADEC turned out to be an excellent and productive event.

  • Daniel García Moreno: GUADEC 2018

    GUADEC is the GNOME Users And Developers European Conference, is an annual conference that take place in Europe, and this year was in Spain, so I should go. I've became a foundation member this year and I've two Google Summer of Code students from GNOME organization working on Fractal, so this year GUADEC was an important one for me.

0.2.1 Release of Elisa

Filed under
KDE

The Elisa team is happy to announce our new bugfix release, version 0.2.1.

Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android).

We are creating a reliable product that is a joy to use and respects our users privacy. As such, we will prefer to support online services where users are in control of their data.

Read more

RK3399 based Renegade Elite debuts on Indiegogo for under $100

Filed under
Android
Linux

Libre Computer has launched its promised “Renegade Elite” SBC on Indiegogo for $99. The RK3399-based board features GbE with PoE, HDMI 2.0, 2x USB Type-C with DP, and PCIe.

In partnership with Firefly, Libre Computer has launched its previously announced Renegade Elite (ROC-RK3399) SBC on Indiegogo. There’s only one funding package with 4GB LPDDR4 and an empty eMMC socket, priced at $99, with shipments due in September. Libre Computer has released a few new details on the open-spec board, including the implementation of its promised Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) support. The 120 x 72 x 11.9mm SBC is touted for its thin profile, which could pay off in space-constrained applications such as robotics.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Greens 'bewildered' by kerfuffle over Microsoft's Protected cloud status

    The Australian Greens say they are "bewildered" at the way the Australian Signals Directorate has handled Microsoft's application for Protected cloud certification and the subsequent departure of a top female officer from the agency's ranks.

    Protected cloud is the highest security classification for vendors and allows a company to apply for contracts to store top-secret Australian Government data.

    In response to queries from iTWire, Greens' digital communications spokesperson Senator Jordon Steele-John said: "A staffer within the Australian Signals Directorate dared to refuse an application from foreign multinational company, Microsoft.

    "This application ensured secure cloud services receiving protected certification. Approving this certification meant that Microsoft overseas employees could access secure information for government departments.

    [...]

    Microsoft has been allowed to have staff based abroad handle systems on which top-secret data is stored. For the other four Australian companies, only staff vetted by the ASD can administer these systems.

    "It seems that there is one rule for multinational corporations, and another rule for Australian businesses, who are yet to get a look in to providing Protected cloud services to the Australian Public Service," Senator Steele-John said.

    "Australians have a right to know that the corporate interest is not being put ahead of the the security of our data."

  • Container Adoption Starts to Outpace DevOps

    A new survey finds the number of organizations using containers is poised to pass the number of organizations employing DevOps processes in the months ahead. Less clear, however, is the degree to which adoption of containers will force organizations to embrace DevOps.

    The survey of 601 IT decision-makers conducted by ClearPath Strategies on behalf of the Cloud Foundry Foundation (CFF) finds that 32 percent of respondents have adopted containers and are employing DevOps processes. But the number of respondents who plan to adopt or evaluate containers in the next 12 months is 25 percent, while 17 percent are planning to adopt or evaluate DevOps processes. Overall, the survey finds that within the next two years, 72 percent of respondents either already are or expect to be using containers. That compares to 66 percent who say the same for DevOps.

  • MKVToolNix 25.0.0 Released, Linux AppImage Now Available

    MKVToolNix, the free and open source set of tools used for creating, editing, and inspecting Matroska files (MKV, MK3D, MKA, and MKS), was updated to version 25.0.0, bringing quite a few bug fixes along with a few enhancements. With this release, a Linux AppImage is available "which should run on any Linux distribution released around the time of CentOS 7/Ubuntu 14.04 or later".

  •  

  • Fixing issues with the “New Messages” divider

    Fractal is a Matrix client for GNOME and is written in Rust. Matrix is an open network for secure, decentralized communication.

  • Hartwell J M Limited Partnership Increased Red Hat (RHT) Stake By $682,420; Suburban Propane Partners LP (SPH)’s Sentiment Is 0.85
  • Returning to Growth and Value Creating: Stitch Fix, Inc. (SFIX), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Offering Potential To Outperform Peers? – Delta Air Lines, Inc. (DAL), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

Games: Hacknet, Streets of Rogue, Scrunk, Fanatical

Filed under
Gaming

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • What's the difference between a fork and a distribution?

    If you've been around open source software for any length of time, you'll hear the terms fork and distribution thrown around casually in conversation. For many people, the distinction between the two isn't clear, so here I'll try to clear up the confusion.

  • Stordis and Barefoot Lead Open Source Networking in Europe

    The German company Stordis distributes telecom equipment in Europe. But Stordis is in the process of repositioning itself as the champion of open source networking hardware and software for European service providers. And it’s working closely with Barefoot Networks as part of its strategy.

    It plans to provide hardware from bare metal suppliers such as Edgecore and Delta. It will offer consultancy and support services to help European service providers adopt open source networking software. And the company is in the process of ramping the manufacturing of a 100 Gig switch that is based on Barefoot’s Tofino programmable chip.

    [...]

    But Stordis’ strategy of targeting broadcasters first will hopefully lead to a willingness for other service providers to try open source. And the company is involved with the Open Networking Foundation (ONF).

  • Talking mobile edge computing and open source software with Kontron Canada Inc.

    A crucial facilitator of Kontron Canada’s hardware-software evolution has been open source software.

    Integration of OpenStack in particular has proven a differentiator for the company, not least because it can tap into the expertise of a community of experts at an economical price. Open source software also enables flexibility for clients to build networks and data centres in their own way.

    However, while the perks of cloud adoption for organisations in industries such as telecoms are well-documented, deterrents such as higher than anticipated costs, start-up delays and being locked into a vendor’s specific approach do exist.

    Kontron’s OpenStack turnkey platform solution, fully integrated with the Canonical distribution of Ubuntu OpenStack, alleviates these concerns.

    Robert explains how Kontron’s hardware must keep aligned with updates from Canonical and the OpenStack community: “Canonical have their own releases of their distribution of OpenStack and our software team does all the work behind the scenes to make sure that it will be fully validated and integrated on our hardware.

  • Perspecta to Sponsor 7th Annual OSEHRA Open Source Summit; Mac Curtis Comments
  • Rethinking our approach to open-source data

    Open-source data is built on the foundation of long-term useability, authenticity and reliability. Its public nature means that it can be accessible anywhere with an internet connection.

    Yet when we talk about the government data that needs to be protected for national security reasons, classified information—related to defence and intelligence services—often takes precedence. But what about the protection of unclassified, open-source government data?

    Websites like data.gov.au, Trove and Parl Info Search host a broad range of data that collectively documents the political, social and cultural history of Australia. Over time, this data accumulates to paint a detailed picture of our country. It’s a high-value dataset given the trends big data analytics can reveal.

Windows Server 2016 vs. FreeBSD 11.2 vs. 8 Linux Distributions Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent releases of FreeBSD 11.2, Scientific Linux 6.10, openSUSE Leap 15, and other distribution updates in the past quarter, here are some fresh benchmarks of eight different Linux distributions compared to FreeBSD 11.2 and Microsoft Windows Server 2016. The tested Linux platforms for this go-around were CentOS 7.5, Clear Linux 23610, Debian 9.4, Fedora Server 28, openSUSE leap 15.0, Scientific Linux 6.10, Scientific Linux 7.5, and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Read more

Security: Chip Defects and More

Filed under
Security
  • Chrome Web Browser Will Now Use 10% More RAM With Spectre Fix
  • Chrome 67 protects against Spectre hacks but gobbles more RAM

    The new feature basically splits the render process into separate tasks using out-of-process iframes, which makes it difficult for speculative execution exploits like Spectre to snoop on data.

  • Linux, malware and data breaches – what can we learn? [VIDEO] [Ed: The insecurity industry, which profits from selling snake oil for Windows, relishes in the idea that GNU/Linux is not secure]

    We thought we’d dig into the recent malware infestation at Gentoo Linux – how it happened, how Gentoo responded, and how to avoid this sort of crisis in your own network.

    We think Gentoo did a good job in a bad situation, and we can all learn something from that.

  • Speculative Load Hardening Lands In LLVM For Spectre V1 Mitigation

    The Speculative Load Hardening (SLH) effort that has been in development for months as a compiler-based automated Spectre Variant One mitigation technique has landed within LLVM trunk.

    Happening in time for LLVM 7.0 is this initial Speculative Load Hardening for x86/x86_64 while ARM developers are also working on leveraging SLH within LLVM for AArch64 (64-bit ARM) as well.

  • Senators press federal election officials on state cybersecurity

    “Many elections across the nation do not have auditable elections. They are done completely electronically,” Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) told the panel of witnesses at a hearing on election security preparedness convened by the Senate Rules and Administration Committee.

    Thomas Hicks, the head of the EAC, indicated that states decide whether they want to have auditable elections.

Mozilla: Addons, OverbiteNX and Remarks on Indian Telecom Commission

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Upcoming changes for themes

    Theming capabilities on addons.mozilla.org (AMO) will undergo significant changes in the coming weeks. We will be switching to a new theme technology that will give designers more flexibility to create their themes. It includes support for multiple background images, and styling of toolbars and tabs. We will migrate all existing themes to this new format, and their users should not notice any changes.

    [...]

    It’s only a matter of weeks before we release the new theme format on AMO. Keep following this blog for that announcement.

  • OverbiteNX is now available from Mozilla Add-Ons for beta testing

    OverbiteNX, a successor to OverbiteFF which allows Firefox to continue to access legacy resources in Gopher in the brave courageous new world of WebExtensions, is now in public beta. Unlike the alpha test, which required you to download the repo and install the extension using add-on debugging, OverbiteNX is now hosted on Mozilla Add-Ons.

    Because WebExtensions still doesn't have a TCP sockets API, nor a spec, OverbiteNX uses its bespoke Onyx native component to do network operations. Onyx is written in open-source portable C with no dependencies and is available in pre-built binaries for macOS 10.12+ and Windows (or get the repo and build it yourself on almost any POSIX system).

  • India advances globally leading net neutrality regulations

    India is now one step away from having some of the strongest net neutrality regulations in the world. This week, the Indian Telecom Commission’s approved the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India’s (TRAI) recommendations to introduce net neutrality conditions into all Telecom Service Provider (TSP) licenses. This means that any net neutrality violation could cause a TSP to lose its license, a uniquely powerful deterrent. Mozilla commends this vital action by the Telecom Commission, and we urge the Government of India to move swiftly to implement these additions to the license terms.

  • India sets the bar for net neutrality with 'world's strictest' rules

     

    Whilst the US is still fumbling after FCC head Ajit ‘Pumpkin' Pie deregulated the internet to please his cable pals, India has just past a whole chunk of recommendations from the Telecom Regulatory Association of India (TRAI) to ensure it will never go the same way.

  • India implements strong net neutrality rules

     

    The government has taken an "unambiguous stand" in making sure that certain types of content are not prioritized over others and that broadband providers will be unable to slow down or block websites at their choosing, India's telecom regulatory body declared Thursday.
     

    Around two-thirds of the country’s 1.3 billion people still don't have [I]nternet access, but the country is moving forward with its net neutrality plans as more and more people begin to use smartphones.

Clear Linux Makes a Strong Case for Your Next Cloud Platform

Filed under
Reviews

There are so many Linux distributions available, some of which are all-purpose and some that have a more singular focus. Truth be told, you can take most general distributions and turn them into purpose-driven platforms. But, when it comes to things like cloud and IoT, most prefer distributions built with that specific use in mind. That’s where the likes of Clear Linux comes in. This particular flavor of Linux was designed for the cloud, and it lets you install either an incredibly bare OS or one with exactly what you need to start developing for cloud and/or IoT.

Read more

GCC 8.2 Compiler Will Be Releasing Soon

Filed under
Development
GNU

Developers behind the GNU Compiler Collection intend to get release preparations underway soon for the GCC 8.2 compiler.

GCC8 remains open for bug/regression fixes and documentation updates with GCC 8.2 due to be the first point release under the GCC versioning policy where the May release of GCC 8.1 marked the project's first stable feature release of GCC8. New feature development meanwhile remains focused on GCC 9, which will be released initially as GCC 9.1 around early 2019.

So to no surprise, GCC 8.2 is set to carry just various regression fixes primarily as more developers began trying out this annually updated compiler following the recent stable release.

Read more

Linux Foundation on Jobs and Funding

Filed under
Linux
  • 5 Reasons Open Source Certification Matters More Than Ever

    In today’s technology landscape, open source is the new normal, with open source components and platforms driving mission-critical processes and everyday tasks at organizations of all sizes. As open source has become more pervasive, it has also profoundly impacted the job market. Across industries the skills gap is widening, making it ever more difficult to hire people with much needed job skills. In response, the demand for training and certification is growing.

  • Developer Recruitment Drives Open Source Funding

    The latest 2018 Open Source Jobs Report points to several ways employers can help developers. For the study, the Linux Foundation and Dice surveyed over 750 hiring managers involved with recruiting open source professionals.

    Due to the survey’s subject, it is not surprising almost half of hiring managers (48 percent) say their company decided to financially support or contribute open source projects to help with recruitment. Although this sounds incredibly compelling, it is fair to question how much hiring managers actually know about open source management. Since 57 percent of hiring managers say their company contributes to open source projects, a back-of-the-envelope calculation says that 84 percent of companies that contribute to open source are doing so at least in part to get new employees.

    The New Stack and The Linux Foundation have teamed up to survey the community about ways to standardize and promote open source policies programmatically. We encourage readers to participate.

KDE and Akademy News

Filed under
KDE
  • Third Weekly Post

    I wonder if the palettes still need the tag system. All right, a question to ask in the next meeting.

    These 2 weeks have been great for me, because I had a change to really get myself familiarized with the Qt MVC system. I believe I’ll be confident when I need to use it in future projects.

    The next step is too make Krita store palettes used in a painting in its .kra file. There seems to be some annoying dependency stuff, but I should be able to handle.

  • I’m going to KDE Akademy 2018

    Less than a month left until KDE Akademy 2018. As part of the local organization team, this is going to be a busy time, but having Akademy in such a great city as Vienna is gonna be awesome.

    You will over the next weeks find many more “I’m going to Akademy” posts on Planet KDE detailing the Akademy plans of other people. So here in this post I don’t want to look forward, but back and tell you the story of the (in retrospect quite long) process of how a few people from Vienna decided to put in a bid to organize Akademy 2018.

  • I too am going to Akademy

    In about a month I’ll be in the beautiful city of Vienna, giving a talk on the weird stuff I make using ImageMagick, Kdenlive, Synfig and FFmpeg so I can construct videos so bad and campy you could almost confuse them for being ironic…

  • An update on KDE's Streamlined Onboarding Goal, Akademy talk and first sprint

    As I described in the introductory post, KDE has been working towards a trinity of goals and I have been responsible for pushing forward the Streamlined onboarding of new contributors one.

    Half a year has passed since my initial blog post and with Akademy, KDE’s annual conference, coming up in a month this is a great time to post a quick update on related developments.

Programming: Go, Python, GCC, Git and Qt

Filed under
Development
  • Locks versus channels in concurrent Go

    In this article, a short look at goroutines, threads, and race conditions sets the scene for a look at two Go programs. In the first program, goroutines communicate through synchronized shared memory, and the second uses channels for the same purpose. The code is available from my website in a .zip file with a README.

  • Pete Zaitcev: Guido van Rossum steps down
  • Guido van Rossum Stepping Down from Role as Python's Benevolent Dictator For Life

    Python's Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) Guido van Rossum today announced he's stepping down from the role.

    On the Python mailing list today, van Rossum said, "I would like to remove myself entirely from the decision process. I'll still be there for a while as an ordinary core dev, and I'll still be available to mentor people—possibly more available. But I'm basically giving myself a permanent vacation from being BDFL, and you all will be on your own."

  • GCC 8 Hasn't Been Performing As Fast As It Should For Skylake With "-march=native"

    It turns out that when using GCC 8 since April (or GCC 9 development code) if running on Intel Skylake (or newer architectures like the yet-to-be-out Cannonlake or Icelake) and compile your code with the "-march=native" flag for what should tune for your CPU microarchitecture's full capabilities, that hasn't entirely been the case. A fix is en route that can correct the performance by as much as 60%.

  • Upcoming git-crecord release

    More than 1½ years since the first release of git-crecord, I’m preparing a big update. Not aware how exactly many people are using it, I neglected the maintenance for some time, but last month I’ve decided I need to take action and fix some issues I’ve known since the first release.

  • Profiling memory usage on Linux with Qt Creator 4.7

    You may have heard about the Performance Analyzer (called “CPU Usage Analyzer” in Qt Creator 4.6 and earlier). It is all about profiling applications using the excellent “perf” tool on Linux. You can use it locally on a Linux-based desktop system or on various embedded devices. perf can record a variety of events that may occur in your application. Among these are cache misses, memory loads, context switches, or the most common one, CPU cycles, which periodically records a stack sample after a number of CPU cycles have passed. The resulting profile shows you what functions in your application take the most CPU cycles. This is the Performance Analyzer’s most prominent use case, at least so far.

Linux Foundation (LF) Introduces LF Energy

Filed under
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation Forms Open Source Energy Coalition

    The Linux Foundation formed a new open source coalition with support from European transmission power systems provider RTE, Vanderbilt University, the European Network of Transmission System Operators, and the Electric Power Research Institute.

    Called LF Energy, the coalition’s members seek to inform and expedite the energy transition, including the move to electric mobility as well as connected sensors and devices, while at the same time modernizing and protecting the grid, according to the Linux Foundation.

    The coalition intends to focus on reusable components, open APIs and interfaces through project communities that the energy sector can adopt into platforms and solutions, the foundation says.

    “LF Energy is an umbrella organization that will support and sustain multi-vendor collaboration and open source progress in the energy and electricity sectors to accelerate information and communication technologies (ICT) critical to balanced energy use and economic value,” says the Linux Foundation, which was founded in 2000 to accelerate open technology development and industry adoption.

  • The Linux Foundation Transforms the Energy Industry with New Initiative: LF Energy

    We are thrilled to introduce the new LF Energy initiative to support and promote open source in the energy and electricity sectors. LF Energy is focused on accelerating the energy transition, including the move to renewable energy, electric mobility, demand response and more.

    Open source has transformed industries as vast and different as telecommunications, financial services, automobiles, healthcare, and consumer products. Now we are excited to bring the same level of open collaboration and shared innovation to the power systems industry.

  • The Linux Foundation Launches LF ENERGY, New Open Source Coalition

    Just as open source software has transformed automobiles, telecommunications, financial services, and healthcare, The Linux Foundation today announces the formation of LF Energy with support from RTE, Europe's biggest transmission power systems provider, and other organizations, to speed technological innovation and transform the energy mix across the world.

    LF Energy also welcomes four new projects to be hosted at The Linux Foundation as part of the initiative, which will advance everything from smart assistants for system operators to smart grid controls software.

ARM Takes Down Its Website That Attacked Open-Source Rival

Filed under
Hardware

ARM, the incredibly successful developer of CPU designs, appears to be getting a little nervous about an open-source rival that’s gaining traction. At the end of June, ARM launched a website outlining why it’s better than its competitor’s offerings and it quickly blew up in its face. Realising the site was a bad look, ARM has now taken it down.

For the uninitiated, ARM Holdings designs various architectures and cores that it licenses to major chipmakers around the world. Its tech can be found in over 100 billion chips manufactured by huge names like Apple and Nvidia as well as many other lesser-known players in the low-power market. If ARM is Windows, you can think of RISC-V as an early Linux. Like ARM, it’s an architecture based on reduced instruction set computing (RISC), but it’s free to use and open to anyone to contribute or modify. While ARM has been around since 1991, RISC-V just got started in 2010 but it’s gaining a lot of ground and ARM’s pitiful website could easily be seen as a legitimising moment for the tech.

Read more

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More Android Leftovers (Mostly Microsoft's Antitrust Push Against Android)

Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Existing Users Must Upgrade to 18.04

Ubuntu 17.10 reached the end of life on 19th July 2018. This means that systems running Ubuntu 17.10 won’t receive security and maintenance updates from Canonical anymore leaving them vulnerable. Read more

3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

As more software businesses are selling open source products, we've seen a corresponding rise in the emphasis of building out developer communities around these products as a key metric for success. Happy users are passionate advocates, and these passionate advocates raise overall awareness of a company's product offerings. Attract the right vocal influencers into your community, and customers become more interested in forming a relationship with your company. Doing community building the right way, however, is a delicate balance. Undercut the needs of your user community in favor of driving sales, and your company will face a decrease in adoption and unfavorable brand awareness. Meanwhile, too little focus on the bottom line isn't good for the company. So how can this tension be balanced effectively, especially in a world in which developers are the "new kingmakers" and meeting their sensibilities is a cornerstone of driving corporate purchasing decisions? Over the past year, I've thought a lot about how to do effective community building while building the business bottom line. In this article, I'll outline three big steps to take toward building authentic, productive, sustainable developer communities. Read more Also: A 4-step plan for creating teams that aren't afraid to fail

Amid the 20th anniversary of open source, Tim O’Reilly warns that platform companies built on open-source software have lost their way

It’s rare to hear Chinese philosophy quoted on stage at a software-development conference. But O’Reilly Media founder and CEO Tim O’Reilly invoked the words of Lao Tzu Wednesday morning during the opening keynotes at OSCON 2018 in hopes of convincing those in attendance — many of whom work for the big internet platform companies of our time — that the tech industry needs to return to the spirit of openness and collaboration that drove the early days of the open-source community before it is too late. “We have an opportunity with these next generation of systems, to rebuild, to rethink the future, to discover what does it mean to get these systems right,” O’Reilly said. If the first era of the internet was dominated by open protocols, and the second era was dominated by the rise of huge platform companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, the third era we’re about to enter presents a chance to get it right again. Read more