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Sunday, 15 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode Driver Coming To Linux 4.19

Filed under
Linux

The USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode driver will be coming to the Linux 4.19 kernel.

Intel developers have been working on a USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode support for the mainline Linux kernel so it can play nicely with hardware supporting DP displays/adapters over the USB Type-C interface.

That work is now ready for mainline with USB subsystem maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman pulling the USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode support into his usb-next Git branch of material that will end up landing in Linux 4.19.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GSoC 2018: Coding period (week 4-8)

    Since the last blogpost, the import of JSON files has been significantly improved, now this code is merged into the master branch. Previously, you could import data only from the field of the root object, whose name was specified manually. But then there was implemented the feature to overview the structure of JSON file that lets you import data by selecting an item in the file structure. To implement this, a QTreeView has been added to the ImportFileWidget. To fill it I used QJsonModel, which I and my mentor Alexander Semke improved a little for our needs:we made a display of icons for objects and arrays in the structure, added a display of the root element of the document and more.

  • GUADEC 2018

    Today, my first GUADEC experience has come to an end, and it was great! Kudos to the organizers for a very well-planned and executed event. Being a part of the volunteer team was a fantastic experience and thanks for the nice t-shirt!

    It was wonderful to meet the GNOME community in person, quite a surreal experience to say the least. The talks were a great opportunity to learn about everything going on at GNOME. I had amazing discussions with my mentors on various topics ranging from “Integrating AI in gnome applications” to “The big dilemma: Is a PhD really worth it?” and finally, some stuff about the GSoC project too.

  • GNOME's GLib Finally Has A Generic Reference Counting API

    Fulfilling a 6+ year desire, GNOME's GLib library now has a generic memory reference counting API.

  • My Free Software [Debian] Activities in June 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • StarTech releases UVCHDCAP HDMI to USB-C Video Capture Device for Windows, Mac, and Linux

    While all desktops (and most laptops) have video outputs, having a video input is much more rare. The reason why is simple -- most people don't need such a thing. Quite frankly, outside of some business use, home users never really had much of a need. With the invent of video gameplay streaming on platforms like Twitch, however, this changed. Now, more and more home users want video capture devices to connect a game console to their PC.

  • Signage-oriented Mini-STX SBC taps Ryzen V1000

    Sapphire has launched a Linux-friendly “FS-FP5V” SBC starting at $325 that features an AMD Ryzen V1000 SoC, as well as SATA III, 2x M.2, 4x DP++, 2x GbE, and 4x USB ports including a USB 3.1 Type-C.

    Sapphire, which makes AMD-based graphics cards and motherboards, has launched a 147.3 x 139.7mm Mini-STX (5×5-inch) form factor SBC that runs Ubuntu 16.04 or Windows on AMD’s new Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. AMD’s Ryzen V1000 is highly competitive on CPU performance with the latest Intel Core chips, and the Radeon Vega graphics are superior, enabling four 4K displays to run at once.

  • Elsevier Will Monitor Open Science In EU Using Measurement System That Favors Its Own Titles

        

    In other words, one of the core metrics that Elsevier will be applying as part of the Open Science Monitor appears to show bias in favor of Elsevier's own titles. One result of that bias could be that when the Open Science Monitor publishes its results based on Elsevier's metrics, the European Commission and other institutions will start using Elsevier's academic journals in preference to its competitors. The use of CiteScore creates yet another conflict of interest for Elsevier.

  • 15 open source applications for MacOS
  • 6 Open Source Software Security Concerns Dispelled [Ed: White Source typically badmouths FOSS to sell its wares and services. Anat Richter, for a change, tries a more positive approach.]

    Used by developers around the world, open source components makes up 60%-80% of the codebase in modern applications. Open source components are downloaded thousands of times per day to create applications for organizations of varying sizes and across all industries.

    But despite the continuously growing adoption there are still myths to dispel and concerns to mitigate around the usage of open source components in commercial software. The following is a list of the top concerns associated with open source usage and how to overcome each one of these stumbling blocks:

How ProPublica Illinois Uses GNU Make to Load 1.4GB of Data Every Day

Filed under
GNU
Misc

I avoided using GNU Make in my data journalism work for a long time, partly because the documentation was so obtuse that I couldn’t see how Make, one of many extract-transform-load (ETL) processes, could help my day-to-day data reporting. But this year, to build The Money Game, I needed to load 1.4GB of Illinois political contribution and spending data every day, and the ETL process was taking hours, so I gave Make another chance.

Now the same process takes less than 30 minutes.

Here’s how it all works, but if you want to skip directly to the code, we’ve open-sourced it here.

[...]

GNU Make is well-suited to this task. Make’s model is built around describing the output files your ETL process should produce and the operations required to go from a set of original source files to a set of output files.

As with any ETL process, the goal is to preserve your original data, keep operations atomic and provide a simple and repeatable process that can be run over and over.

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Windstream's Nichols, Frane discuss why open source is important

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

While the road to virtualization has included potholes and bad signage, open source can provide the right roadmap, according to Windstream executives.

Although some service providers are still on the fence when it comes to using open source, Windstream Enterprise's Arthur Nichols, vice president of network architecture and technology, and Mike Frane, vice president of product development and portal, are believers.

Windstream is using open source technologies or applications from OpenStack, ONOS, Kafka, Message Bus and RabbitMQ, to name just a few. It's also a member of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) open source community.

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Also:

  • Istio: The New Open Source Cloud Hotness

    Expect to hear a lot more about Istio, an emerging open source technology for orchestrating microservices networking. The buzz is already building, says Kip Compton, senior vice president of Cisco's cloud platform and solutions group.

  • Mapping Open Source Governance Models

    If you would like to contribute some data about the governance on an open source project which is not listed there or you have more details about one which is already listed please don't hesitate to contribute. Create a pull request or an open an issue and I'll get the information added.

    This is a nice small fun project. SUSE Hack Week gives me a bit of time to work on it. If you would like to join, please get in touch.

Acquia CTO defines ‘decoupled’ Drupal

Filed under
Drupal

Many open source enthusiasts (practitioners, paragons, partisans, preachers and protagonists) will have heard of Drupal.

For those that haven’t, Drupal is an open source content management framework, as well as an extended community of developers, maintainers and business supporters.

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Security: NotSoSecure, Security Keys, Reproducible Builds and Hyped Malware

Filed under
Security
  • Claranet Buys NotSoSecure

    Claranet, a managed service provider with services focused on western Europe and Brazil, has purchased NotSoSecure, a firm specializing in penetration testing and ethical hacker training.

    The purchase follows Claranet's 2017 acquisition of SEC-1, a security firm based in the United Kingdom. According to a Claranet statement announcing the purchase, the security acquisitions, together with the opening of a security operations center in Portugal, are part of the company's intention to increase their overall security services capabilities.

  • Firefox, Security Keys, U2F, and Google Advanced Protection

    Advanced Protection for Google Accounts uses a legacy web technology that is only partially supported in Firefox. Here is how you get started with physical security keys and extra protections for your Google Account in Firefox.

    [...]

    Before you can enroll in the Google Advanced Protection program, you must have at least two security keys at the ready. You can use the same keys for multiple Google Accounts, and even reuse the same keys with different U2F-enabled web services.

    You should keep a record of which of your keys are registered with which websites. If you loose a key or want to decommission one, you’ll need this record to know all the accounts you’ll need to update.

    You can use any FIDO U2F security keys as long as they’re compatible with your devices. Google recommend you get one regular key with USB as your backup token, and one mobile-capable with wireless Bluetooth and NFC as the primary key you carry around with you. Specifically, Google recommends the YubiKey U2F (USB) and either the Feitan Multipass (Bluetooth/NFC/USB) or YubiKey Neo (NFC/USB). Bluetooth is more compatible with a wider range of devices, but the Bluetooth capabilities requires you to charge the key. NFC is less compatible with cheaper smartphones and other devices. However, neither NFC nor USB modes require you to charge the keys for them to operate.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #167
  • WellMess: This Go-based Malware Attacks Both Linux And Windows Machines [Ed: If the user actually needs to install it, then the threat is the user, not the program]

6 open source cryptocurrency wallets

Filed under
OSS

Without crypto wallets, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum would just be another pie-in-the-sky idea. These wallets are essential for keeping, sending, and receiving cryptocurrencies.

The revolutionary growth of cryptocurrencies is attributed to the idea of decentralization, where a central authority is absent from the network and everyone has a level playing field. Open source technology is at the heart of cryptocurrencies and blockchain networks. It has enabled the vibrant, nascent industry to reap the benefits of decentralization—such as immutability, transparency, and security.

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Top 31 Best Linux Games You Can Play for FREE

Filed under
Gaming

You don’t have to spend money to play the best Linux games. Here is a list of awesome free Linux games so that you can enjoy gaming on your Linux system without worrying about your wallet.
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Linux and Graphics: Gasket, MoltenVK, RADV and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Google's Gasket Driver Framework Landing For Linux 4.19

    Queued into the staging code for introduction with the Linux 4.19 kernel is the Gasket driver framework and the first driver based upon it, Apex.

    Gasket in this context is short for Google ASIC Software, Kernel Extensions, and Tools. The Gasket framework aims to make it easier to develop thin kernel drivers that provide the basic functionality in kernel-space but any extra functionality is to be achieved in user-space code.

  • MoltenVK Gets Patches To Workaround iOS API Issue, App Store Rejection

    A new pull request has been submitted to MoltenVK, the open-source project for mapping the Vulkan graphics/compute API over Apple's Metal to run on iOS/macOS. This pull request is working to address the issue that caused at least one MoltenVK-using iPhone/iPad game to be rejected from the Apple App Store.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Gets Minor CPU Overhead Reductions, Conditional Rendering Patches

    Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's open-source Linux GPU driver team has been particularly busy in recent days with "RADV" Radeon Vulkan driver enhancements.

    Pitoiset this weekend sent out patches for enabling the new VK_KHR_create_renderpass2 extension, which was introduced in Saturday's release of Vulkan 1.1.80. RenderPass2 allows for render passes to be easily extended.

  • RADV Driver Gets Faster Shader LLVM Compilation

    It's an exciting day in RADV land as in addition to work on the new Vulkan 1.1.80 extensions, David Airlie landed a patch he's been baking for speeding up the shader compilation performance for this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within Mesa.

OSS Leftovers

  • Why you really don't want just one vendor running an open source project

    When someone calls out Linux and Hadoop as two multi-vendor open source communities that have "made commercialization of the technology extremely competitive and difficult," it would be reasonable to wonder what planet they live on. After all, as MongoDB's Henrik Ingo challenged, "Surely those are the two biggest and most successful ecosystems???"

    Joseph Jacks, who made the first statement, is active with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. He's not a newbie to open source. In arguing for single-vendor open source "communities" and their allegedly superior economics, he has perhaps unwittingly argued for (one) winner-takes-all when far more money is available in (many) winners-take-much markets.

    But first, here's what we're not talking about.

  • Privacy-Centric ‘Bob Wallet’ Adds Bitcoin Cash Support

    Privacy is important in the cryptocurrency ecosystem to a large number of individuals, and people believe private transactions are needed badly these days in a society watched by the ‘deep state.’ Because people find privacy to be extremely important, some developers have designed bitcoin mixers and tumblers that help obfuscate cryptocurrency transactions recorded on public blockchains. One specific project in the works called Bob Wallet offers a privacy-centric client that enables users to move BTC and BCH from a public wallet to a private wallet in a secretive fashion.

  • Private & Public Open Source Bob Wallet Adds Bitcoin Cash (BCH) Crypto Support

    Privacy-centric Bob Wallet recently added Bitcoin Cash (BCH) support so BCH users can use BCH Testnet coins and experiment with the mixing service. The Wallet was created to help preserve Bitcoins fungibility. Today it is easy to trace bitcoin transactions from address to address by simply using any public Block Explorer. Bob Wallet helps fix this.

    The open source project doesn’t allow you to make payments to others as its only purpose is to allow the movement of funds from your public wallet to a private wallet in an isolated manner. The project, which is currently in Beta should only be used in Testnet for now until the software is thoroughly tested. Users can visit the Bob Wallet website or drag and drop the ‘bobwallet.html’ into a browser to create a new Bob Wallet.

  • Rainmeter 4.2 Build 3111 [Ed: GPL, but Windows only]

    Rainmeter is a free, open-source platform that enables skins to run on the desktop. Rainmeter allows you to display customizable skins on your desktop, from hardware usage meters to fully functional audio visualizers. You are only limited by your imagination and creativity.

    Rainmeter is the best known and most popular desktop customization program for Windows. Enhance your Windows computer at home or work with skins; handy, compact applets that float freely on your desktop. Rainmeter skins provide you with useful information at a glance. It's easy to keep an eye on your system resources, like memory and battery power, or your online data streams, including email, RSS feeds, and weather forecasts.

  • Oasis Labs to Create Blockchain-Based Privacy-First Cloud Computing Platform, Elisa Music Player Version 0.2 Released, Unitary Fund Awarding Grants to Projects Developing Open-Source Quantum Software and More

    The Unitary Fund, which was created with "personal donations from founder of security firm Lookout, John Hering, and developer of quantum integrated circuits Rigetti Computing product manager Nima Alidoust", recently launched. The fund is offering $2000 grants to projects developing open-source quantum software. According to ComputerWorld, "Any project that 'will benefit humanity that leverages near-term quantum computing' qualifies to apply for the fund.

  • Quantum computing fund set up for open-source projects

    A new program to support the development of open source projects in quantum computing has been launched. The Unitary Fund will offer six grants of $2,000 to fund open source quantum computing projects.

    The fund was created by William Zeng, head of quantum cloud services for the quantum computing company Rigetti. According to Zeng, in order for quantum computing hardware and platforms to advance, they need smart software

  • GCC's Conversion To Git Is Being Held Up By RAM, a.k.a. Crazy DDR4 Prices

    After converting the GNU Emacs repository to Git a few years back, Eric S Raymond has been working on the massive undertaking of transferring the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) repository in full over to Git. But the transition to GCC Git is being hampered since due to the massive size of the repository, Raymond's system is running under extreme memory pressure with 64GB of RAM.

    ESR provided an update on the GCC repository conversion process. He has managed to solve the only known remaining technical bug that's been blocking the repository, but now he can't get the process completed since he's over-running memory capacity. His primary workstation has 64GB of DDR4 memory and that's turned out to not be enough for the GNU Compiler Collection repository with more than a quarter million commits over the past three decades.

  • Why DOD Should Look Before Leaping into Open Source

    In February 2018, the Department of Defense (DOD) Defense Digital Service (DDS) relaunched Code.mil to expand the use of open source code. In short, Code.mil aims to enable the migration of some of the department’s custom-developed code into a central repository for other agency developers to reduce work redundancy and save costs in software development. This move to open source makes sense considering that much of the innovation and technological advancements we are seeing are happening in the open source space.

    Since its launch, Code.mil has, according to the DDS, helped spur many open source-enabled projects, including the creation of eMCM last March—an easily accessible web-based version of the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM) that outlines the official conduct guide to the courts-martial in the U.S. military. Before the digital relaunch of MCM, the process for updating the Manual for Courts-Martial was tedious and involved approvals from a handful of government offices, resulting in delayed and outdated releases of guidance that occurred only once every several years. In its open version, the MCM is periodically updated allowing for a live version to be widely accessible across the U.S. military.

FreeNAS 11.2-BETA1

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeNAS 11.2-BETA1

    We are pleased to announce the general availability of FreeNAS 11.2-BETA1. This initial version of the 11.2 series is considered to be feature-complete and ready for testing. Users, especially those who use Plugins, Jails, or VMs, are encouraged to update to this release in order to take advantage of the many improvements and bug fixes to those subsystems. Please report any bugs to https://redmine.ixsystems.com/projects/freenas/.

    To update to this release, select the 11.2-STABLE train in System → Update. Should you need to return to the 11.1 series after updating, reboot and select that boot environment from the boot menu.

  • FreeNAS 11.2 Beta Rolls Out With FreeBSD Bootloader, Self-Encrypting Drives

    The folks at iX Systems have announced their first public beta of FreeNAS 11.2, their downstream of FreeBSD 11.2 focused on supporting network-attached storage (NAS) systems.

ARM Launches "Facts" Campaign Against RISC-V

Filed under
Hardware

It looks like Arm Limited is going on the offensive against the RISC-V open-source processor instruction set architecture.

ARM has launched RISCV-Basics.com as a site to "understanding the facts" about the RISC-V architecture.

Their five points they try to make before designing a SoC is that the ISA accounts for only a small portion of the total investment to creating a commercial processor, RISC-V doesn't yet have an a large developer ecosystem, there is the risk of fragmentation with this open-source ISA, RISC-V is new and thus not yet as mature in terms of being a proven architecture around security, and greater design costs with RISC-V due to potential re-validation if modifying the ISA.

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Events: Open Source Summit, GUADEC and Debconf

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Debian
  • Open Collaboration in Practice at Open Source Summit

    A key goal in my career is growing the understanding and best practice of how communities, and open source communities in particular, can work well together. There is a lot of nuance to this work, and the best way to build a corpus of best practice is to bring people together to share ideas and experience.

    In service of this, last year I reached out to The Linux Foundation about putting together an event focused on these "people" elements of Open Source such as community management, collaborative workflow, governance, managing conflict, and more. It was called the Open Community Conference, which took place at the Open Source Summit events in Los Angeles and Prague, and everything went swimmingly.

  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GUADEC 2018 Day 3

    Surprisingly, the castle tour featured an exciting belly dance and a bonus theater show starring GNOME’s legendary actors.

  • Taiwan Travel Blog - Day 1

    I'm going to DebConf18 later this month, and since I had some free time and I speak a somewhat understandable mandarin, I decided to take a full month of vacation in Taiwan.

    I'm not sure if I'll keep blogging about this trip, but so far it's been very interesting and I felt the urge to share the beauty I've seen with the world.

    This was the first proper day I spent in Taiwan. I arrived on the 8th during the afternoon, but the time I had left was all spent traveling to Hualien County (花蓮縣) were I intent to spend the rest of my time before DebConf.

  • Still not going to Debconf....  (100%)

        

    I was looking forward to this year's Debconf in Taiwan, the first in Asia, and the perspective of attending it with no jet lag, but I happen to be moving to Okinawa and changing jobs on August 1st, right at the middle of it...

Games: Chasm, Emulators and WineConf

Filed under
Gaming
  • Long-awaited adventure platformer 'Chasm' to launch with same-day Linux support on July 31st

    The day after my birthday like a fashionably late present, Chasm is to launch with same-day Linux support on July 31st.

    You can't link directly to comments on Steam news posts, but the developer clearly replied to a user asking about Linux support with "Win/Mac/Linux on launch!". You can't get better than that!

  • Video game emulators for Linux

    Everything in this repo is 100% legal. Games, firmware, or BIOS dumps are NOT included and will never be (unless someone makes a legal reimplementation of those). Some emulators are still highly experimental (such as Decaf) and don’t even work for anything but simple homebrew stuff.

    It’s not always possible but I try to target the current and the last Fedora releases, the current and the last openSUSE Leap releases, as well as openSUSE Tumbleweed. I build for x86-64 only. Some of the packages would also build for CentOS, Mageia, and 32bit x86 but I decided not not enable these build targets to reduce strain on OBS servers – I’d be happy to accept tweaks and fixes, should anyone of you fork a package into your OBS home repo and build it there.

  • Notes From WineConf 2018: x86 On ARM Progress, Wine-Staging Needs More Help

    Taking place last week in The Hague, Netherlands, was the WineConf 2018 conference. This year's WineConf -- on top of the usual annual discussions about this open-source project for running Windows games/applications on Linux/macOS -- took the time to celebrate the project's 25th anniversary.

Google Releases Open Source Tool to Containerize Java App Deployments

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google wants to make it easier for Java developers to containerize their applications.

The company this week announced Jib, an open-source Java tool that it says will enable developers to build Java containers more easily using tools with which they are already familiar.

In a blog post July 9, Google software engineers Appu Goundan and Qingyang Chen described Jib as a container image builder designed to handle all the steps involved in packaging a Java application into a container.

"Containerizing a Java application is no simple task," Goundan and Chen wrote. "You have to write a Dockerfile, run a Docker daemon as root, wait for builds to complete, and finally push the image to a remote registry."

Read more

Also: How open source can transform the way a company's developers work together

Watch Desktop Linux Apps (like GIMP) Running on Chrome OS [Video]

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Linux fans enthusiastic about Google’s effort to bring desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS owe to themselves to watch the following video.

In it, technology YouTuber Lon Seidman demos the current state of the Crostini project (‘Crostini’ is the codename for the “run desktop and CLI Linux apps on Chrome OS” feature we keep gushing about) on both an Intel Chromebox and an ARM-based Chromebook.

This latter demo, of ARM support, is of particular interest.

I had (wrongly, it turns out) assumed Google would restrict Crostini to running on its higher-end Chromebooks, like the pricey Google Pixelbook and the ‘spensive Samsung Chromebook Plus.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4

The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes. openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of nine snapshots have been released in July 2018 for the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux operating system series, which follows a rolling release model where users install once and receive updates forever. As expected, these 9 snapshots bring numerous updates and bugfixes. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.