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Sunday, 10 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Qt 5.10 and Qt Creator 4.5 Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 6:04pm
Story Games: Just One Line, GZDoom and More Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 6:00pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 4:31pm
Story Security: Wiindows/LockCrypt, Uber Ransom, Windows Botnets and Windows at NSA Causes Leak Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 3:39pm
Story 8 Holiday Projects with Raspberry Pi and Arduino Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 3:25pm
Story Virtualbox Vs. Container Mohd Sohail 07/12/2017 - 12:42pm
Story LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of Nitrux Linux Mohd Sohail 07/12/2017 - 12:40pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 11:23am
Story Releases: Puppy Linux, Uruk GNU/Linux, deepin GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 11:10am
Story Everything In Its Right Place Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2017 - 11:07am

Security: Blockchains, Disabling Intel ME, Windows, and Mac OS

Filed under
Security
  • Blockchains Are Poised to End the Password Era

    The massive password heists keeping coming, and one thing is certain: the way we prove our identities online is in need of a major upgrade. A growing chorus of technologists and entrepreneurs is convinced that the key to revolutionizing digital identity can be found in the same technology that runs cryptocurrencies.

  • Three Laptop Makers Are Disabling Intel ME

    For years now, security experts warned that Intel’s Management Engine (ME) is at risk of being exploited; ME allows administrators to remotely access a computer and is present within every Intel processor since 2008. Finally – after staying quiet during the period of concern – Intel last month admitted that ME is vulnerable to exploitation. As a result, PC makers are making moves to protect users from said vulnerability. Indeed, Dell, Purism, and Linux PC vendor System76 are all disabling Intel ME on their laptops.

  • Microsoft Breaks Down Windows Update on Windows 7, PCs Hit with Error 80248015

    A number of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 systems are experiencing a Windows Update error that prevents them from checking for updates for an unclear reason.

    Posts on the company’s Community forums seem to indicate that the bug first appeared on December 3 and it’s a server-side issue, which means that users might not have anything to do to have this fixed. Instead, Microsoft has remained tight-lipped on the actual cause of the bug, despite the growing number of posts on the said Community thread.

    Checking for updates on the impacted systems fails with error “Windows could not search for new updates,” with some saying that an additional message reading “Windows Update cannot currently check for updates because the service is not running. You may need to restart your computer,” when they click the “Get help with this error” option in Windows Update.

  • Apple’s macOS 10.13.1 Update Brings Back Critical Root Vulnerability

Programming: Haskell in 2017 and C++17

Filed under
Development
  • Reflecting on Haskell in 2017

    Alas, another year has come and gone. It feels like just yesterday I was writing the last reflection blog post on my flight back to Boston for Christmas. I’ve spent most of the last year traveling and working in Europe, meeting a lot of new Haskellers and putting a lot of faces to names.

    Haskell has had a great year and 2017 was defined by vast quantities of new code, including 14,000 new Haskell projects on Github . The amount of writing this year was voluminous and my list of interesting work is eight times as large as last year. At least seven new companies came into existence and many existing firms unexpectedly dropped large open source Haskell projects into the public sphere. Driven by a lot of software catastrophes, the intersection of security, software correctness and formal methods have been become quite an active area of investment and research across both industry and academia. It’s really never been an easier and more exciting time to be programming professionally in the world’s most advanced (yet usable) statically typed language.

    Per what I guess is now a tradition, I will write my end of year retrospective on my highlights of what happened in the Haskell scene in retrospect.

  • C++17 Is Now Official

    The final standard of C++17 (formerly known as "C++1z") is now official.

    The final standard of C++17 has been published as ISO/IEC 14882:2017 and has been published on ISO.org.

    C++17 introduces a number of new language features, support for UTF-8 character literals, inline variables, fold expressions, and more. On the C++ standard library side is parallel versions of the STL algorithms, a file-system library derived from Boost, and other additions.

Project ZeroPhone: the ambitious DIY Raspberry Pi phone

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The growth of open hardware is undeniable and we’ve had high-profile smartphone projects appearing such as Purism’s security- and privacy-focused Librem 5 smartphone.

The ZeroPhone project led by Arsenijs Picugins is no less ambitious but much less expensive. As we started this interview we noted, with some irony, his apologies for the intermittent mobile connection as he’s taking a break away from his home city of Riga to enjoy the countryside of neighbouring Lithuania.

While you’ll be able to make calls and send SMS with Picugin’s ZeroPhone, it isn’t as cutting edge as Purism’s smartphone. Instead, it sits firmly in the middle of the makery and hacking spirit that powers the big budget open hardware projects.

Read more

Mozilla: Tor Browser Features and STT

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Quietly Adds Features From Tor Browser to Firefox

    In 2017, the developers at Mozilla have quietly added several features to Firefox that originated from the Tor Project’s Tor Browser. The new features come from the Tor Uplift project, which helps Mozilla integrate patches to Firefox that are used in the Tor Browser. The Tor Uplift project patches to Firefox help increase privacy and security, and the project has been helping improve Firefox since last year.

    Around 95% of the code in the Tor Browser itself comes from Mozilla, as it is based on Mozilla’s Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR). Mozilla, which earlier this month released Firefox version 57, known as Firefox Quantum, has most recently included a feature from the Tor Browser known as First Party Isolation.

  • Mozilla talks up speech-to-text application platform

    Mozilla is on a mission… and it’s a mission designed to ‘empower’ software application developers with tools to help create more STT apps.

    STT you say?

    Yes, that would be speech-to-text applications.

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

Slackware and New Upcoming Software Releases (Qt and darktable)

Filed under
Software
Slack
  • Welcome slackware.nl
  • VLC 2.2.8

    Last week, Robby Workman alerted me to a new release of the VLC media player by the VideoLAN team. I must confess that I had stopped following the development of my (yes, still) favorite media player. Looking a bit more closely, not only have they released version 2.2.8 without informing the world on their homepage (where they are still offering downloads for the now deprecated 2.2.6) but there’s now also a git repository called “vlc-3.0-git” and even a “vlc-4.0-dev” which seems to have been split off the 3.0 branch. I assume this is an indication – finally – that there is life beyond vlc-2.2.x and a 3.0 release is actually a possibility.

  • Qt 5.10.0 RC3 out

    We have released Qt 5.10.0 RC3 today. Delta to RC2 as an attachment.

  • Qt 5.10 RC3 Released, Qt 5.10 Now Expected This Week

    Mesa 17.3 isn't the only thing running behind schedule but also out today is Qt 5.10-RC3 after this tool-kit release failed to ship last month.

    Last week marked a late 5.10 release candidate but The Qt Company expressed hope in still shipping Qt 5.10.0 on 30 November.

  • darktable 2.4.0rc0 released

    we're proud to announce the first release candidate for the upcoming 2.4 series of darktable, 2.4.0rc0!

    the github release is here: https://github.com/darktable-org/darktable/releases/tag/release-2.4.0rc0.

    as always, please don't use the autogenerated tarball provided by github, but only our tar.xz.

  • darktable 2.4 RAW Image Editor Promises Support for Fujifilm's Compressed RAFs

    The developers of the darktable open-source and cross-platform RAW image editing software for GNU/Linux and macOS operating systems kicked off the development of the next major release, darktable 2.4.

    The biggest new features of the upcoming darktable 2.4 release is support for Microsoft Windows operating systems. That's right, you can now finally install darktable on Windows OSes, though some features are still missing, such as printing support, and there are a few limitations like the need for special drivers for tethering support.

Kernel: AMD, RC2, DRM, and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD Raven Ridge APU Firmware Added To Linux-Firmware.Git
  • Linux Kernel 4.15 Gets a Slightly Bigger Second RC, Linus Torvalds Isn't Worried

    The development cycle of the upcoming Linux 4.15 kernel continues with the second Release Candidate, which was announced this past weekend by Linus Torvalds.

    Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.15 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate milestone, which contained most of the changes that will land in the final version, due for release next year. And now he announces the second RC, which is slightly bigger that than the first one.

  • Suppressing The Concerns Over HDCP Content Protection For Intel's Linux DRM Driver

    Last week I wrote about a Google engineer working on HDCP content protection support for Intel's Direct Rendering Manager driver on Linux that is also obviously open-source. Understandably, that raised concerns by free software purists not wanting to potentially lock-down their system in any manner to playback protected content on their systems.

    HDCP / content protection / Digital Rights Management remains a very polarized topic for Linux users as can be seen by looking at the 65+ comments to last week's article about the Intel i915 Direct Rendering Manager driver bits for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection.

    One user and developer concerned about the possibility of HDCP restricting their rights had inquired on the Intel graphics mailing list. He was seeking to have a Kconfig switch for this HDCP code so it wouldn't even be compiled into their distribution's kernel. /blockquote>

  • The OpenChain Project: From A to Community

    Communities form in open source all the time to address challenges. The majority of these communities are based around code, but others cover topics as diverse as design or governance. The OpenChain Project is a great example of the latter. What began three years ago as a conversation about reducing overlap, confusion, and wasted resources with respect to open source compliance is now poised to become an industry standard.

    The idea to develop an overarching standard to describe what organizations could and should do to address open source compliance efficiently gained momentum until the formal project was born. The basic idea was simple: identify key recommended processes for effective open source management. The goal was equally clear: reduce bottlenecks and risk when using third-party code to make open source license compliance simple and consistent across the supply chain. The key was to pull things together in a manner that balanced comprehensiveness, broad applicability, and real-world usability.

  • Grafana Labs to Join Cloud Native Computing Foundation to Share Expertise in Time Series Data Visualization

    Grafana Labs, the team behind Grafana – the leading open source data visualization software, has announced it has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which sustains and integrates open source technologies such as Kubernetes and Prometheus.

Graphics: Way-Cooler and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

OpenCL on Raspberry Pi, “CM3-Home” on Raspberry Pi CM3

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • VC4CL: Bringing OpenCL To The Raspberry Pi

    VC4CL is a newer effort bringing OpenCL to the Broadcom VideoCore IV GPUs as found in the Raspberry Pi boards.

    VC4CL implements OpenCL 1.2 for the VideoCore 4 graphics processor albeit the embedded profile standard. This VC4CL implementation does support the OpenCL ICD concept for dealing nicely with most Linux systems.

  • Home and building automation carrier taps Raspberry Pi CM3

    Acme’s “CM3-Home” home automation carrier board for the RPi CM3 includes opto-isolated RS485, TP-Bus/KNX, and Light-Bus/DALI links, plus Grove support.

    Italy-based Acme Systems, which has launched several Linux-friendly COMs like the Atmel SAMA5 Acqua A5 and RoadRunner, has turned to the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Lite (CM3) as the foundation for its new CM3-Home home automation carrier board. Designed for OEM market and installation within a DIN-rail switchboard, the CM3-Home is available in a consumer-oriented, 130-Euro ($154) Lite model and a more advanced, 330-Euro ($392) “Full” version that targets commercial building automation.

Games: Steam, Cattails, Tempest, OpenMW

Filed under
Gaming
  • 30 Best Linux Games On Steam You Should Play in 2017

    When it comes to Gaming, a system running on Windows platform is what anyone would recommend. It still is a superior choice for gamers with better graphics driver support and perfect hardware compatibility. But, what about the thought of gaming on a Linux system? Well, yes, of course – it is possible – maybe you thought of it at some point in time but the collection of Linux games on Steam for Linux platform wasn’t appealing at all few years back.

  • Cattails is a very sweet and relaxing game, here's some thoughts

    Now that Cattails [Steam, Official Site], the animal simulation RPG is out in the wild I've managed to take a look, here's some thoughts.

  • A lot later than expected, but the open-world pirate RPG 'Tempest' is now in Beta for Linux

    I covered Tempest [Steam, Official Site] a couple times in the past, with the developer saying last year it would come to Linux. This open-world pirate RPG is now here with a Beta.

  • OpenMW 0.43 Continues Advancing Open-Source Morrowind For Linux

    OpenMW remains as the open-source game engine project re-implementing the code to power Elderscrolls III: Morrowind, the popular 2002 RPG game from Bethesda. OpenMW 0.43 is now available as the latest release.

    OpenMW 0.43 has implemented more engine functionality including rain/snow effects, AI improvements, new options, and implementing other previously missing features. There was also a lot of work on OpenMW-CS as the content development tool built by this open-source project.

The December 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

OSS: Moscow, Orange and More

Filed under
OSS
  • Moscow Government Open-Sources Blockchain Voting Tool

    The government of Moscow is pushing ahead with plans to test blockchain for use in local voting initiatives.

    Last year, officials from Moscow's government told local media that they were looking into the technology in a bid to reduce the risk of fraud when people are voting on city management issues. The possible use would come as part of its "Active Citizen" e-government project, constituting one of several areas in which blockchain is being explored (including as a basis for a new land registry system).

    Now, according to a Dec. 4 statement, officials have developed a pilot system for tracking votes via blockchain, declaring that the tech would make its ongoing Active Citizen program "more open" according to a translated statement.

  • Orange OCast software goes Open Source release

    OCast is designed to allow viewers to use a smartphone to play videos on devices including TV set-top boxes, TV sticks or TVs and control playback of the video with commands such as pause, fast forward and rewind. With the software, users can browse and explore their content libraries via their preferred interface, either the screen on their smartphone or on their tablet. Moreover, it means that with a single application they can watch content on a mobile or tablet outside or on their TV at home. Beyond video, OCast can also play and control slideshows, playlists and web apps.

  • Orange looks to tempt rivals with open sourced TV software

    Orange is making software that turns smartphones into remote controls open source as it looks to make the technology available to other operators.

    The France-based operator’s OCast software can be added to set-top boxes to enable consumers to use a smartphone to play videos, control playback and browse content libraries on their TVs.

    It said the kit was now available without licence fees to operators and developers.

    Deutsche Telekom is already testing OCast, Orange said.

  • Applying Open Source Strategies to the Data Center

    The open source story is a story about the power of collaboration in spurring innovation. Beyond software, open source allows a tech organization to deliver the most efficient piece of technology in the most efficient way possible at the time. Using an open source methodology, harnessing the power of the ecosystem, lets us deliver innovation in real time. To be clear, when we talk about innovation in this context, we are talking about innovation in delivery, which means finding new ways to reduce cost, increase speed, and make the data center more adaptive.

  • This Interview Was Conducted on an Anonymous, DIY Cell Phone Network

    Most people in the United States—and increasingly, around the world—carry the most sophisticated surveillance devices ever created in their pockets day in and day out. Although smartphones have enabled governments and corporations to track our movements and monitor our conversations with unprecedented ease, these devices are also an incredibly useful personal tool and have become an indispensable part of modern life.

    It’s a crappy trade off, but evidently one that most of us seem OK with. But Denver Gingerich, a programmer based in New York City, doesn’t see why we can’t have our smartphones and our privacy, too.

  • Sopranica: Text And Call Using This Open Source Cellular Network For Complete Anonymity

    Even without the revelations made by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and others, it was known to many that different governments across the world had been long involved in the act of mass surveillance.

    To deal with this privacy trade-off, a New York-based programmer named Denver Gingerich has worked hard to develop an open source cellular network named Sopranica. This DIY network lets one make phone calls, communicate via texts, and browser the web. All this with total privacy and anonymity.

GNOME: GNOME Boxes and ColorHug

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Boxes Makes It Easier to Test Drive Linux Distros

    The next major release of GNOME Boxes is able to download popular Linux (and BSD-based) operating systems directly inside the app itself.

    Boxes is free, open-source software. It can be used to access both remote and virtual systems as it is built around QEMU, KVM, and libvirt virtualisation technologies.

    For its new ISO-toting integration Boxes makes use of libosinfo, a database of operating systems that also provides details on any virtualized environment requirements.

  • Download and install operating systems directly in GNONE Boxes

    If you are closely following the development of GNOME Boxes, you probably have read Debarshi’s announcement of this new feature that allows you to download and install Red Hat Enterprise Linux gratis directly from Boxes.

  • ColorHug Plus Update

    I’ll update the website at some point this evening, I’m not sure whether to just post all this or remove the ColorHug+ page completely. Perhaps a sad announcement, but perhaps not one that’s too unexpected considering the lack of updates in the last few months. Sorry to disappoint everybody.

Security: Kaspersky, Updates, .NET

Filed under
Security

Raspberry Pi Vision

Filed under
Google
Hardware
  • Google is making a computer vision kit for Raspberry Pi

    Google is offering a new way for Raspberry Pi tinkerers to use its AI tools. It just announced the AIY Vision Kit, which includes a new circuit board and computer vision software that buyers can pair with their own Raspberry Pi computer and camera. (There’s also a cute cardboard box included, along with some supplementary accessories.) The kit costs $44.99 and will ship through Micro Center on December 31st.

  • Google made a computer vision kit so your Raspberry Pi devices can see

    At Google I/O earlier this year, Google wasn't shy about discussing technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning and how it is committed to integrating them into its products and services. So, it's not surprising to see the company announce AIY Vision Kit. It includes a new circuit board and computer vision software that you can connect to your tiny, low-cost Raspberry Pi computer and camera.

  • Google introduces $45 AIY Vision Kit for DIY computer vision hardware projects

    Google is launching a new hardware and software kit aimed at developers and hackers who want to build products that incorporate computer vision… on a budget.

Open-source community stresses worries on new Copyright Directive in open letter to EU

Filed under
OSS
Legal

This week, more than 80 organisations involved in open source software wrote an open letter to the Council of the EU and the European Commission expressing their concerns on the new Copyright Directive as it is currently proposed. According to the signatories, Article 13 in particular will cause irreparable damage to their fundamental rights and freedoms, their economy and competitiveness, their education and research, their innovation and competition, their creativity and their culture.

Article 13 obliges Internet service providers that store and provide public access to large amounts of works or other subject matter uploaded by their users to ensure the functioning of agreements concluded with rightholders. Where such agreements do not apply, service providers must prevent the availability of the rightholders' intellectual property on the service. To that purpose, service providers should cooperate with rightholders and implement measures such as the use of effective content recognition technologies.

Read more

Amazon spins Ubuntu-driven “AWS DeepLens” cam and an AWS-savvy Amazon FreeRTOS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Amazon unveiled a 4MP machine learning camera with AWS hooks that runs Ubuntu on a Cherry Trail SoC. It also launched an Amazon version of FreeRTOS.

Amazon Web Services, Inc. (AWS) expanded its AWS cloud ecosystem with a Linux-powered deep learning camera and a FreeRTOS variant, both of which feature built-in connections to AWS and the related AWS IoT Core platforms. The 4-megapixel, HD-ready AWS DeepLens development camera for machine learning is available for $249 pre-order, with shipments expected in April. Billed as “the world’s first video camera optimized to run machine learning models and perform inference on the device,” the WiFi-enabled camera supports a newly announced Amazon SageMaker development framework for managing the machine learning model process.

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