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Friday, 20 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Linux Tiny Box PCs and DeX

  • Linux Tiny Box PCs: Quad-core i.MX6 Dual Lite
    Kingdy's new ultra-compact tiny embedded platform for space limited solution, based on the ARM Cortex-A9TM iMX6 Dual Lite / Quad Core processor, delivers optimum I/O design for maximum connectivity with Pre-install Yocto 1.8 on eMMC.
  • Samsung to Give Linux Desktop Experience to Smartphone Users
    Samsung on Thursday announced a new app, Linux on Galaxy, designed to work with its DeX docking station to bring a full Linux desktop experience to Galaxy Note8, Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphone users. Samsung earlier this year introduced DeX, a docking station that connects to a monitor to give Galaxy smartphone users a desktop experience.

Fedora: Fedora Workstation and Fedora Council

  • Looking back at Fedora Workstation so far
    So I have over the last few years blogged regularly about upcoming features in Fedora Workstation. Well I thought as we putting the finishing touches on Fedora Workstation 27 I should try to look back at everything we have achieved since Fedora Workstation was launched with Fedora 21. The efforts I highlight here are efforts where we have done significant or most development. There are of course a lot of other big changes that has happened over the last few years by the wider community that we leveraged and offer in Fedora Workstation, examples here include things like Meson and Rust. This post is not about those, but that said I do want to write a post just talking about the achievements of the wider community at some point, because they are very important and crucial too. And along the same line this post will not be speaking about the large number of improvements and bugfixes that we contributed to a long list of projects, like to GNOME itself. This blog is about taking stock and taking some pride in what we achieved so far and major hurdles we past on our way to improving the Linux desktop experience.
  • Resigning from Fedora Council for Fedora 27
    Since I became a Fedora contributor in August 2015, I’ve spent a lot of time in the community. One of the great things about a big community like Fedora is that there are several different things to try out. I’ve always tried to do the most help in Fedora with my contributions. I prefer to make long-term, in-depth contributions than short-term, “quick fix”-style work. However, like many others, Fedora is a project I contribute to in my free time. Over the last month, I’ve come to a difficult realization.

KDE Events: Akademy 2017 and KDE Edu Sprint

  • Hey Mycroft, Drive Me to our Goals!
    Almost three months after Akademy 2017, I finally found the time to write a blog post about how I experienced it. Akademy is where I learn again about all the amazing things happening in our community, where I connect the dots and see the big picture of where all the effort in the various projects together can lead. And of course, I meet all the wonderful people, all the individual reasons why being in KDE is so amazing. This year was no different. Some people voiced their concern during the event that those who are not at Akademy and see only pictures of it on social media might get the feeling that it is mostly about hanging out on the beach and drinking beer, instead of actually being productive. Everyone who was ever at Akademy of course knows this impression couldn’t be further from the truth, but I’ll still take it as a reason to not talk about any of the things that were “just” fun, and focus instead on those that were both fun and productive.
  •  
  • KDE Edu sprint 2017 in Berlin
    I had the privilege to attend the KDE Edu sprint in Berlin that happened from the 6th to the 9th of October.

Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger

  • Introducing Narabu, part 2: Meet the GPU
    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You may or may not want to read part 1 first. The GPU, despite being extremely more flexible than it was fifteen years ago, is still a very different beast from your CPU, and not all problems map well to it performance-wise. Thus, before designing a codec, it's useful to know what our platform looks like.
  • ucaresystem Core v4.0 : Added option to upgrade Ubuntu to the next release
    Since Ubuntu 17.10 has just been released, I have added new feature to the ucaresystem Core that can be used by the user to upgrade his distribution to the next stable version or optionally to the next development version of Ubuntu. For those who are not familiar with the ucaresystem app it is an automation script that automatically and without asking for your intervention performs some crucial Ubuntu maintenance processes, which otherwise would be done one by one and pressing Y / N each time.
  • 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger
    Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself. Because Telegram is not just an app, it is an entire communication platform. It is not bound by restrictions or limitations like other apps.

Microsoft Breaks Privacy Law, Adds Back Doors, Then Blames North Korea

Filed under
Microsoft

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" Xfce

Filed under
Reviews

The mission for a swap Linux conveyance for Linux Mint 13 LTS "Maya" Xfce proceeds. With this post comes a review of the most recent MATE version of Linux Mint. Particularly for consistent perusers of this blog, I will simply say that with the most recent point discharge, it appears like the designers have put cleaner into the conveyance, including their new arrangement of "X-applications" intended to work crosswise over MATE, Cinnamon, Xfce, and GNOME, keeping away from the entanglements of more DE-particular applications. I need to perceive what has changed since my last review and to see whether this would be reasonable for the establishment and everyday use on my portable workstation. With that in mind, I made a live USB framework (once more, on my new SanDisk Cruzer USB streak drive) utilizing the "dd" order. Take after the bounce to perceive what it resembles. Note that I'll often refer to past review, noticing just changes and general imperative focuses as required.

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KDE: KWave and Plasma in Slackware

Filed under
KDE
Slack
  • Replacing Audacity with KWave

    KWave has been developed since 1998, yet few have heard of it. I only recently heard of it myself from writer and podcaster Marcel Gagné while I was setting up to do how-to-videos. Part of the reason for its obscurity might be that, despite its name, it only recently become an official KDE project in the last release. However, the major reason for its obscurity is probably that it has been overshadowed by the better-known Audacity — which is a pity, because in most ways, KWave is every bit as useful as an audio editor.

    Why would anyone want an Audacity substitute? For one thing, while Audacity is cross-platform, it is not well-integrated into Linux. Audacity handles its own resources, as you can tell by its lengthy load time. Often, Audacity frequently gives confusing options for input and playback sources, giving several names to the same device and offering irrelevant front and back options for mono devices, so that users can only find the one they need through trial and error. Sometimes, the necessary option for a particular source can change for no apparent each time Audacity starts.

  • October updates for the Slackware Plasma5 desktop

    There’s been updates to all the major components of the KDE Software Collection (I know they stopped using that name but I think it is still fitting). So I tasked my build box to compile hundreds of new packages and today I have for you the October ’17 set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current. KDE 5_17.10 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.39.0, Plasma 5.11.0 and Applications 17.08.2. All based on Qt 5.9.2 for Slackware-current and Qt 5.7.1 for Slackware 14.2.

Games: OpenRA, Hell Warders, Ubuntu, Fedora and Wine

Filed under
Gaming

Korora 26 Bloat - More is less or less is more?

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Korora 26 Bloat is a noble concept, but it does not solve the fundamental problem it aims to solve: make Fedora usable. It tries to minimize the wreck that is Fedora 26 and fails to do so. Additionally, it introduces problems that the original did not have, making an even bigger mess.
Korora comes with a slew of ergonomics issues, flaking hardware support, too much actual bloat, tons of niggles and issues that are technically Fedora's legacy, and then the horrible Nvidia support that is just embarrassing in 2017. To answer my own question, more is less in this case, and there isn't a justifiable reason why you should prefer Korora over Fedora, nor why you should use it against the likes of Ubuntu, Kubuntu or Mint. Alas, this is not a good release, 2/10. Unusable, which is a shame, because I did like what Korora managed to do in the past. But it just shows how fragile the Linux world is. Proper distro release QA is a joke, regressions are nothing but a silent excuse to move on and churn out more bad code, almost like industrial protein, and this is so depressing I sometimes wonder why I even bother.

Anyway, to sum it up, Fedora 26 is worse than its predecessors, and Korora 26 is both worse than its own forefathers and the original article it seeks to tame, with appalling support for proprietary graphics drivers and other distros in a multi-boot setup that I really cannot recommend it. The cosmetic issues are also important, but in the end, the real deal breaker is the hardware side. Waiting for Korora 27. Peace.

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KDE Celebrates 21st Anniversary with New Updates of KDE Applications, Frameworks

Filed under
KDE

Today, the KDE Project celebrates the 21st anniversary of the well-known and widely used desktop environment for GNU/Linux and UNIX-like operating systems with new releases of its KDE Frameworks and KDE Applications software stacks.

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Linux 4.13.7

Filed under
Android

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.7 kernel.

All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Raspberry Pi 3 based laptop features DIY hacking bay

Filed under
Linux

Pi-top has revised its RPi based laptop with a 14-inch HD screen and a slide-off keyboard that reveals a cooling unit and DIY space for a breadboard kit.

Pi-top’s Raspberry Pi driven laptop has received a major upgrade with a new model with a slightly larger 14-inch, HD screen and a 6 to 8 hour battery. The 2017 edition of the education-focused Pi-top features a modular design with a larger keyboard that slides forward to reveal a Raspberry Pi 3 with a new heatsink. It also includes an empty bay for DIY hacking, which can be filled with components from a free Inventor’s Kit. This DIY kit includes a breadboard, a motion sensor, LEDs, and a microphone, all mounted on a magnetic sliding rail.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Development: Gtk4, GNOME Foundation, Coda, AutoML, LLVM

Filed under
Development
GNOME
BSD
  • Modern Text Editor Design

    .

    Gtk4 development is heating up, and we are starting to see a toolkit built like a game engine. That’s pretty cool. But how will that change how we write editors? Should it?

    In the Gtk3 cycle, I added support to GtkTextView that would render using Alex’s GtkPixelCache. It helped us amortize the cost of rendering into mostly just an XCopyArea() when drawing a frame. It’s why we have that nice 60fps two-finger-scrolling.

  • Policy hacking

    The hackfest was part of an effort to redefine how the GNOME Foundation operates and is perceived.

    [...]

    Until now, the board has largely operated in an executive mode: each meeting we decide on funding requests, trademark questions and whatever other miscellaneous issues come our way. While some of this decision-making responsibility is to be expected, it is also fair to say that the board spends too much time on small questions and not enough on bigger ones.

  • Coda revival

    Coda is a distributed file system developed as a research project at Carnegie Mellon University, descended from a older version of the Andrew File System. It got dropped from FreeBSD some five years ago, due to not having been adopted for a MPSAFE world. The focus for this current project is to bring it back into sufficiently workable shape that it could return to the kernel. It is currently in a working condition. Work is underway to test it better, fix whatever issues are found, and commit it to 12-CURRENT.

  • Google's Learning Software Learns to Write Learning Software

    In a project called AutoML, Google’s researchers have taught machine-learning software to build machine-learning software. In some instances, what it comes up with is more powerful and efficient than the best systems the researchers themselves can design. Google says the system recently scored a record 82 percent at categorizing images by their content. On the harder task of marking the location of multiple objects in an image, an important task for augmented reality and autonomous robots, the auto-generated system scored 43 percent. The best human-built system scored 39 percent.

  • Intel Begins Working On "Knights Mill" Support For LLVM/Clang

    Intel compiler engineers have begun mainlining "Knights Mill" enablement within the LLVM compiler stack.

    Knights Mill is the codename for an upcoming Xeon Phi expected for release later this quarter. Details on Knights Mill are relatively light but it will cater to deep learning / AI use-cases and more efficient than Knights Landing (KNL).

    Intel has previously said Knights Mill is capable of twice the performance of Knights Landing for floating point operations per cycle and there are also new/optimized instructions for 8-bit and 16-bit arithmetic.

KDE Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

Filed under
KDE

Today marks twenty-one years since the KDE project was founded.

It was on 14 October 1996 that the "Kool Desktop Environment" was founded by Matthias Ettrich. At the time he wanted KDE to be a "consistent, nice looking free desktop-environment."

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Graphics and Games: AMDGPU DC, Vulkan, GOG

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • More Pre-4.15 AMDGPU DC Patches To Test Out This Weekend

    For Radeon RX Vega Linux users or those with newer Radeon GPUs and just wanting to make use of HDMI/DP audio, there are some new "AMDGPU DC" patches ready for testing this weekend.

    While AMDGPU DC is being staged as a pull request finally for Linux 4.15, the work hasn't yet settled down as AMD developers continue taming this massive code-base of more than 120,000 lines of code. Just recently in fact were another 100+ patches for this display code that allows Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting, and other display feature updates long sought after by Radeon users.

  • Vulkan 1.0.63 Introduces Global Priority Support

    Vulkan 1.0.63 is now available as the latest minor update to this high performance graphics/compute API.

    As usual, Vulkan 1.0.63 is mostly made up of document corrections and clarifications. There is though one new extension.

  • Humble Bundle has been acquired by IGN

    This is rather unsettling to see, Humble Bundle has now officially joined with the massive media site IGN.

Haiku OS Is Still Chugging Along To Get Its First Official Release Out

Filed under
OS

The BeOS-inspired Haiku OS has been around since 2002 and its alpha release came out five years ago while the beta and first "R1" stable release are still being pursued.

This week the open-source operating system project published a new report entitled Where is Haiku R1?

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Microsoft Breaking the Law and Computer Security Woes

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Mozilla 'Freemium' and Visual Impairment Simulator

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla might offer Freemium services in the future

    The whole idea seems to be in an early stage and it is quite possible that it won't come to fruition after careful examination. When asked what kind of services Mozilla was considering, Beard answered that the organization was exploring that. This is all the information that is available at this point in time.

  • Mozilla CEO says new Firefox browser delivers 'a big bang'

    There's another side as we start to look at products that we could potentially offer. Some of them start to look like services, exploring the freemium models. There'd be a free level always, but also some premium services offering.

  • NoCoffee: Visual Impairment Simulator

    Four years ago, on a snowy February day, Aaron Leventhal huddled in his unheated home and created a Chrome extension called NoCoffee. This extension allows users to experience web content through different lenses of visual impairments*.

Nokia and Apple Lost in Android Era

Filed under
Android

10 open source Linux robots from car-bots to humanoids

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linux robots come in all shapes and sizes from rovers to chatty humanoids. Here are 10 intriguing terrestrial robot kits with open software and hardware.

Back in 2014, we struggled to fill out our top 10 roundup of Linux-based robots and padded the list with conceptually similar autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In addition, many of those robots were proprietary or open source only on the software side. Today, however, it’s easy to fill out a top 10 list of Linux-based terrestrial robots that are open source in both software and hardware. In fact, we were forced to leave a number of worthy projects waiting in the wings.

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How do you dump the firmware from a "secure" voting machine? With a $15 open source hardware board

Filed under
Hardware
Security

One of the highlights of this year's Defcon conference in Vegas was the Voting Machine Hacking Village, where security researchers tore apart the "secure" voting machines America trusts its democracy to.

The Voting Machine Hacking Village just released its master report on the vulnerabilities they found, and the participants are talking about it on Twitter, including Joe Fitz's note that he dumped the firmware off a Accuvote TSX with one of Adafruit's $15 open source hardware FT232h breakout boards.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Tiny Box PCs and DeX

  • Linux Tiny Box PCs: Quad-core i.MX6 Dual Lite
    Kingdy's new ultra-compact tiny embedded platform for space limited solution, based on the ARM Cortex-A9TM iMX6 Dual Lite / Quad Core processor, delivers optimum I/O design for maximum connectivity with Pre-install Yocto 1.8 on eMMC.
  • Samsung to Give Linux Desktop Experience to Smartphone Users
    Samsung on Thursday announced a new app, Linux on Galaxy, designed to work with its DeX docking station to bring a full Linux desktop experience to Galaxy Note8, Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphone users. Samsung earlier this year introduced DeX, a docking station that connects to a monitor to give Galaxy smartphone users a desktop experience.

Fedora: Fedora Workstation and Fedora Council

  • Looking back at Fedora Workstation so far
    So I have over the last few years blogged regularly about upcoming features in Fedora Workstation. Well I thought as we putting the finishing touches on Fedora Workstation 27 I should try to look back at everything we have achieved since Fedora Workstation was launched with Fedora 21. The efforts I highlight here are efforts where we have done significant or most development. There are of course a lot of other big changes that has happened over the last few years by the wider community that we leveraged and offer in Fedora Workstation, examples here include things like Meson and Rust. This post is not about those, but that said I do want to write a post just talking about the achievements of the wider community at some point, because they are very important and crucial too. And along the same line this post will not be speaking about the large number of improvements and bugfixes that we contributed to a long list of projects, like to GNOME itself. This blog is about taking stock and taking some pride in what we achieved so far and major hurdles we past on our way to improving the Linux desktop experience.
  • Resigning from Fedora Council for Fedora 27
    Since I became a Fedora contributor in August 2015, I’ve spent a lot of time in the community. One of the great things about a big community like Fedora is that there are several different things to try out. I’ve always tried to do the most help in Fedora with my contributions. I prefer to make long-term, in-depth contributions than short-term, “quick fix”-style work. However, like many others, Fedora is a project I contribute to in my free time. Over the last month, I’ve come to a difficult realization.

KDE Events: Akademy 2017 and KDE Edu Sprint

  • Hey Mycroft, Drive Me to our Goals!
    Almost three months after Akademy 2017, I finally found the time to write a blog post about how I experienced it. Akademy is where I learn again about all the amazing things happening in our community, where I connect the dots and see the big picture of where all the effort in the various projects together can lead. And of course, I meet all the wonderful people, all the individual reasons why being in KDE is so amazing. This year was no different. Some people voiced their concern during the event that those who are not at Akademy and see only pictures of it on social media might get the feeling that it is mostly about hanging out on the beach and drinking beer, instead of actually being productive. Everyone who was ever at Akademy of course knows this impression couldn’t be further from the truth, but I’ll still take it as a reason to not talk about any of the things that were “just” fun, and focus instead on those that were both fun and productive.
  •  
  • KDE Edu sprint 2017 in Berlin
    I had the privilege to attend the KDE Edu sprint in Berlin that happened from the 6th to the 9th of October.

Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger

  • Introducing Narabu, part 2: Meet the GPU
    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You may or may not want to read part 1 first. The GPU, despite being extremely more flexible than it was fifteen years ago, is still a very different beast from your CPU, and not all problems map well to it performance-wise. Thus, before designing a codec, it's useful to know what our platform looks like.
  • ucaresystem Core v4.0 : Added option to upgrade Ubuntu to the next release
    Since Ubuntu 17.10 has just been released, I have added new feature to the ucaresystem Core that can be used by the user to upgrade his distribution to the next stable version or optionally to the next development version of Ubuntu. For those who are not familiar with the ucaresystem app it is an automation script that automatically and without asking for your intervention performs some crucial Ubuntu maintenance processes, which otherwise would be done one by one and pressing Y / N each time.
  • 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger
    Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself. Because Telegram is not just an app, it is an entire communication platform. It is not bound by restrictions or limitations like other apps.