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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Best Open Source Accounting Software

Filed under
OSS

Researching the best open source accounting software isn't as simple as one might think. There are a number of important variables you must consider before taking the leap. This is especially important for those businesses that already have an accounting/bookkeeping solution in place. Making sure you can achieve the same level of control and functionality is very important when switching to a Linux-centric accounting application.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

Definitely, check this distribution out whenever you get the chance. It doesn’t have all of the bells, whistles, and gimmicks that are found in other distros, but this one is still a very usable solid operating system. Installing it in VirtualBox wasn’t all smooth sailing; however, if you wish to install PCLinuxOS on a physical computer, you should have a positive experience with this Linux. Installing and updating packages to keep the system up to date is easy and straightforward, so is configuring your Plasma desktop.

The only major thing that occurred was not being able to enter the password when installing the bootloader. Minor issues did present themselves, but nothing that would greatly impact the overall experience with the system. So, PCLinuxOS isn’t perfect (well, what is?), but quite a solid distribution worth trying.

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Using Linux on the GPD Win 2 (so far)

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Since Steam already works (with full game controller support) on Windows 10, I didn’t bother trying to install Steam or any heavier-duty games in Linux.

Overall I’d say that for now Linux on the GPD Win 2 is a bit of a mixed bag, at least for the prototype I’m testing. It’s usable, but I can’t think of a lot of reasons why you would really choose it over Windows 10 on this particular device… unless you either really hate Windows or really know what you’re doing and think you might be able to get the non-working hardware to function properly.

That said, there is a way to have the best of both worlds. The GPD Win 10 ships with the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update pre-installed, which means you can use the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) to install Ubuntu or OpenSUSE from the Windows Store.

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The most popular Linux desktop programs are...

Filed under
Linux

LinuxQuestions, one of the largest internet Linux groups with 550,000 members, has just posted the results from its latest survey of desktop Linux users. With approximately 10,000 voters in the survey, the desktop Linux distribution pick was: Ubuntu.

While Ubuntu has long a been popular Linux distro, it hasn't been flying as high as it once was. Now it seems to be gathering more fans again. For years, people never warmed up to Ubuntu's default Unity desktop. Then, in April 2017, Ubuntu returned to GNOME for its default desktop. It appears this move has brought back some old friends and added some new ones.

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Security: Equifax, Australian, and KDE Plasma Panic

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Security

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.43.0

Filed under
KDE

KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.43.0.

KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.43 Released With KHolidays Module, glTF/Coillada Highlighting

Add-on board brings BACnet building control to the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Contemporary Controls is launching a “BASpi” Raspberry Pi add-on that supports the BACnet building control standard and Sedona Framework, and provides 6x relay outputs and 6x inputs, including analog, temp, contact closure, pulse, and resistance inputs.

Home automation is a new phenomenon compared to more established building automation technology, which largely follows the BACnet (Building Automation Control network) standard. We have seen various Linux-ready IoT products that offer some BACnet support, including Echelon’s IzoT Router. However, Contemporary Controls’ new BASpi Raspberry Pi 3 add-on board is the first product we’ve seen that is specifically designed for the standard.

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You Can Now Run Android 8.1 on Your PC with Apps from Google Play Store

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

A new update of the AndEX Oreo 8.1 computer operating system, a clone of the Android-x86 project, has been released, promising to let users install Android apps from the Google Play Store.

Previous releases of AndEX Oreo 8.1, which lets you install Google's latest Android 8.1 Oreo mobile operating system on your personal computer, didn't actually let users install Android apps from Google Play Store, but using a third-party package manager called Aptoide App Manager.

Developer Arne Exton has recently informed us about the availability of a new AndEX Oreo 8.1, build 180202, which apparently makes the Google Play store works as intended, allowing users to install their favorite Android apps without relying on a third-party application management tool.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Proprietary Software and DRM

Filed under
Software
  • Beware the looming Google Chrome HTTPS certificate apocalypse!

    Thanks to a decision in September by Google to stop trusting Symantec-issued SSL/TLS certs, from mid-April Chrome browser users visiting websites using a certificate from the security biz issued before June 1, 2016 or after December 1, 2017 will be warned that their connection is not private and someone may be trying to steal their information. They will have to click past the warning to get to the website.

    This will also affect certs that use Symantec as their root of trust even if they were issued by an intermediate organization. For example, certificates handed out by Thawte, GeoTrust, and RapidSSL that rely on Symantec will be hit by Google's crackdown. If in doubt, check your cert's root certificate authority to see if it's Symantec or not.

  • Watch Netflix in 1080p on Linux and unsupported browsers

    In fact, the only browsers that support 1080p playback on Netflix officially are Safari on Mac OS X, Internet Explorer on Windows, and Google Chrome on Chrome OS. That's bad news if you don't use any of the operating systems or prefer to use a different browser.

  • Station – A Smart Workstation for All Your Apps

    Today, we bring you a similar app and this one is bold enough to tag itself the “first smart workstation for busy people“. It goes by the name of Station, a free web app that combines all your web apps in one neat & productive User Interface.

  • Skype Now Easier To Install On Linux Desktop

Coding: Python 3.0, Java EE, and Licence Compliance

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Development
  • A Look Back At Python 3.0 After 10 Years

    This year marks one decade since the release of Python 3. Red Hat's Victor Stinner who is also a CPython core developer provided a retrospective on Python 3 at last week's FOSDEM conference.

    It's been 10 years since Python 3 came about with its language changes and in 2018, there are still programs being made compatible with Python 3. Python 2.7 continues to be maintained until 2020.

  • Due to Oracle being Oracle, Eclipse holds poll to rename Java EE (No, it won't be Java McJava Face)

    Unable to convince Oracle to allow the use of its trademarked term "Java" to refer to the open source version of Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE), the Eclipse Foundation is asking those who care about such things to vote on proposed names for the software project.

    Last summer, Oracle said it had begun working with the Eclipse Foundation and the Java EE community to transfer its Java EE code and governance responsibilities to the foundation.

    But Oracle is not giving up its intellectual property rights in the name "Java." And so for the past few months, the Java EE community has been puzzling over how to refer to the open source version of Java EE.

  • Open Source Audits in Merger and Acquisition Transactions: Get the Free Ebook

    Haddad also notes that open source audits can expose obligations. “Open source licenses usually impose certain obligations that must be fulfilled when code is distributed,” he notes. “One example is the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL), which requires derivatives or combinations to be made available under the same license as well. Other licenses require certain notices in documentation or have restrictions for how the product is promoted.”

FOSS: VideoLAN, GNOME, pgpcontrol, Mozilla and EOH

Filed under
OSS
  • VideoLAN: VLC 3.0's huge update brings Chromecast support, 360-degree video

    VideoLAN and the developers of the open-source VLC media player have unveiled its first major release in three years, dubbed Vetinari.

    VLC 3.0.0 is available today for Linux, Windows, iOS, macOS, and Android, and brings support for streaming to Chromecast devices, 360-degree video and 3D audio, and hardware acceleration for 4K and 8K playback.

    The update also enables browsing local network drives to access content, and improved support for Blu-ray movies.

  • GNOME Tweaks 3.28 Progress Report 2

    GNOME 3.28 has reached its 3.27.90 milestone. This milestone is important because it means that GNOME is now at API Freeze, Feature Freeze, and UI Freeze. From this point on, GNOME shouldn’t change much, but that’s good because it allows for distros, translators, and documentation writers to prepare for the 3.28 release. It also gives time to ensure that new feature are working correctly and as many important bugs as possible are fixed. GNOME 3.28 will be released in approximately one month.

  • pgpcontrol 2.6

    This is the legacy bundle of Usenet control message signing and verification tools, distributed primarily via ftp.isc.org (which hasn't updated yet as I write this). You can see the files for the current release at archives.eyrie.org.

    This release adds support for using gpg for signature verification, provided by Thomas Hochstein, since gpgv may no longer support insecure digest algorithms.

  • Lars and the Real Internet of Things - Part 2
  • EOH acquires LSD IT to lead open source works in Africa

    JSE-listed information and communication technology (ICT) multinational EOH has acquired Linux-focused enterprise open-source technology company LSD Information Technology (IT) to lead its open-source offerings in Africa.

Kubernetes News

Filed under
Server
  • The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

    TL;DR - Unabated 1.xx major “minor” releases of “vanilla” upstream Kubernetes every three months could continue forever. You have to keep up, while also paying close attention to Kubernetes API object versioning. This relentless pace is the key ingredient in Kubernetes’ domination of the distributed infrastructure world.

  • Correctly integrating containers

    Kubernetes supports different ways of making containers and microservices contact each other, from connections with the hardware in the data center to the configuration of load balancers. To ensure communication, the Kubernetes network model does not use Network Address Translation (NAT). All containers receive an IP address for communication with nodes and with each other, without the use of NAT.

    Therefore, you cannot simply set up two Docker hosts with Kubernetes: The network is a distinct layer that you need to configure for Kubernetes. Several solutions currently undergoing rapid development, like Kubernetes itself, are candidates for this job. In addition to bandwidth and latency, integration with existing solutions and security also play a central role. Kubernetes pulls out all stops with the protocols and solutions implemented in Linux.

  • Heptio's Craig McLuckie On Kubernetes Orchestration's Start at Google

    Heptio's co-founder and CEO sits down with ITPro Today and talks about how the Kubernetes orchestration platform got started at Google.

Openwashing and Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Security: Browsealoud, Updates, Apple, and Linux Patches

Filed under
Security
  • U.S., UK government websites infected with crypto-mining malware: report

    Thousands of websites, including ones run by U.S. and UK government agencies, were infected for several hours on Sunday with code that causes web browsers to secretly mine digital currencies, technology news site The Register reported.

    More than 4,200 sites were infected with a malicious version of a widely used tool known as Browsealoud from British software maker Texthelp, which reads out webpages for people with vision problems, according to The Register.

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Apple's top-secret iBoot firmware source code spills onto GitHub for some insane reason

    The confidential source code to Apple's iBoot firmware in iPhones, iPads and other iOS devices has leaked into a public GitHub repo.

  • Linux Meltdown patch: 'Up to 800 percent CPU overhead', Netflix tests show

    The Linux mitigation for Meltdown known as kernel page table isolation (KPTI) can cause a massive drain on CPU performance, according to an analysis by Brendan Gregg, a senior performance architect at Netflix.

    While Intel's Spectre mitigations have attracted the most attention for causing performance and stability problems, Gregg finds that KPTI causes the "largest kernel performance regressions I've ever seen".

  • KPTI/KAISER Meltdown Initial Performance Regressions

    The recently revealed Meltdown and Spectre bugs are not just extraordinary issues of security, but also performance. The patches that workaround Meltdown introduce the largest kernel performance regressions I've ever seen. Many thanks to the engineers working hard to develop workarounds to these processor bugs.

Graphics: OpenGL ES 2.0, Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0, Xorgproto 2018.2, AMDGPU, Freedreno Gallium3D, Vega

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Google & Collabora Working On OpenGL ES 2.0 Virtualized GPU Access For Containers

    Robert Foss of Collabora has shared some work they are engaged in with Google for virtualizing GPU access and allowing for OpenGL ES 2.0 acceleration for containers.

  • Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Now Planned For Release In April

    Wayland 1.15 and the Weston 4.0 compositor had been planned for release in February but Wayland developers decided there was still enough material on the verge of landing that they decided to delay the release. A new release schedule has now been put forward for getting these updates out in April.

    Derek Foreman of the Samsung OSG has stepped up to manage this revised Wayland 1.15 / Weston 4.0 release. Now that the "high priority" work has been merged, Derek is ready to move on with wrangling the release.

  • Xorgproto 2018.2 Released To Fix The Fallout Of This New X.Org Package

    Last week marked the inaugural release of Xorgproto, a new package consisting of all the X.Org protocol headers rather than being in standalone packages now that X.Org Server development is slowing down and that many of these protocol headers wind up getting updated at the same time. Today marks the Xorgproto 2018.2 release.

  • 34 More Patches Roll Out For AMDGPU DC With Raven Ridge Fixes Plus Color Management

    Open-source AMD Linux driver developers have started off the week by posting 34 more patches for the "DC" display code stack that was mainlined in Linux 4.15 and further improved with Linux 4.16. With these latest patches that begin the queue for Linux 4.17 there are yet more AMDGPU DC improvements and in particular Raven Ridge fixes.

  • Freedreno Gallium3D Tackling NIR Optimizations & More In 2018

    Freedreno project leader Rob Clark who is employed by Red Hat has provided a status update on his activities around this reverse-engineered, open-source Qualcomm Adreno graphics driver.

  • AMD's first Ryzen Desktop APUs with Vega graphics are now available

    AMD has announced today the worldwide release of their first Ryzen Desktop APUs with Vega graphics, could be an interesting choice for low-cost Linux gaming.

19-Way CPU Comparison On Ubuntu With Linux 4.15

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Following the release of the Linux 4.15 kernel with KPTI and Retpoline introduction, many Phoronix readers were interested in seeing a fresh Linux CPU performance comparison. For those reasons plus in preparing for the Raven Ridge testing, here are benchmarks of 19 different systems when using Ubuntu x86_64 with the Linux 4.15 stable kernel.

An assortment of 19 different systems from old to new and from low-end to high-end were tested, ranging from old AMD A10 Kaveri APUs to the high-end AMD EPYC 7601 server processor, with a similar breadth of CPUs tested on the Intel side. Again, these tests are mostly being done for reference purposes. And in the days ahead will be a larger low-end-focused CPU comparison for the upcoming Ryzen 3 2200G / Ryzen 5 2400G Linux benchmarking.

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Also: Ryzen 3 2200G + Ryzen 5 2400G Linux Benchmarks Coming Tomorrow

Oracle Still Working On DTrace For Linux In 2018

Filed under
Linux

A decade ago Linux users were clamoring for Sun Microsystems to bring Solaris' DTrace and ZFS to Linux. While there are still petitions for Oracle to more liberally license ZFS so it could see mainline Linux support, it's been years since hearing much interest in DTrace for Linux. Over time other dynamic tracing implementations have come about and improved in comparison to DTrace, but for those still wanting this dynamic tracing framework that originated at Sun Microsystems, Oracle remains working on the Linux port.

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Also: Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Linux 4.16 Development with More Spectre/Meltdown Fixes

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Nouveau, Mesa and VESA

  • Nouveau Gets ARB_bindless_texture Support For Maxwell & Newer
    Back for Mesa 18.0 there was OpenGL bindless textures for Kepler GPUs on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver while now for Mesa 18.1 that support is in place for Maxwell GPUs and newer. Bindless texture support is important for "AZDO" purposes for approaching zero driver overhead with OpenGL. ARB_bindless_texture reduces the API/GL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing textures without needing to first bind/re-bind them.
  • Marek Working Towards Even Lower SGPR Register Usage
    Yesterday well known open-source AMD developer Marek Olšák landed his RadeonSI 32-bit pointers support for freeing up some scalar general purpose registers (SGPRs) and he's continued with a new patch series to alleviate register usage even more.
  • Libdrm 2.4.90 Released With Meson Build System, AMDGPU & Intel Improvements
    Marek Olšák on Saturday released the big libdrm 2.4.90 DRM library update that sits between Mesa and other GPU user-space components and the kernel's Direct Rendering Manager code.
  • Mesa Git Lands RadeonSI 32-bit Pointers Support
    At the start of the new year Marek Olšák of AMD posted a set of patches for 32-bit GPU pointers in RadeonSI. That work has now landed in mainline Mesa Git.
  • xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0
    Nothing terribly exciting, but enough bug fixes to justify a release.
  • VESA X.Org Driver Sees First Update In Three Years
    Should you find yourself using the xf86-video-vesa DDX for one reason or another, a new release is now available and it's the first in three years. The xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0 X.Org driver was released this week with the handful of commits that came in since v2.3.4 was tagged three years ago, it's been eight years already since xf86-video-vesa 2.3.0. For most users, xf86-video-vesa is just used in select fallback instances when your main DDX driver fails but even still these days KMS is pretty solid with xf86-video-modesetting, fbdev and other DDX drivers working well, etc.

Kernel: VGA_Switcheroo, Con Kolivas/MuQSS, and KPTI Protection

Ubuntu: Unity, Mir, and Snapd

  • Ubuntu Touch Q&A 23
    The developers have been hard at work on Xenial! ARM64 now working on Ubuntu Touch, and applications launch! As many modern CPUs don't include 32-bit compatibility mode, ARM64 native mode on UT can start to make use of more modern CPUs.
  • UBports Continues Working On Unity 8, Developer ISO Coming
    While Canonical is no longer involved in Unity 8 development, the community-driven UBports team continues working on their "Unity 8" and "Ubuntu Touch" efforts with a hope to deliver a developer ISO soon. Sadly the Yunit project that also forked Unity 8's code-base doesn't seem to be active at least not regularly anymore, but the UBports team is working on delivering. In their latest Q&A session they share that Unity 8 on the desktop is coming together. One of the developers commented, "While it's both good and pretty, it's not 'pretty good'."
  • This Week In Mir (16th Feb, 2018)
  • Snapd 2.31 Better Supports Wayland Via Mir, Canonical Hires Another Mir Developer
    Besides Mir 0.30 being released this week, other Mir progress was also made by these Canonical developers working on forging Mir into a viable Wayland compositor. Gerry Boland of Canonical's Mir team has shared that Snapd 2.31 now supports any Snap implementing the Wayland interface. This allows for Mir to be shipped as a Snap and support Wayland clients using Canonical's app sandboxing approach alternative to Flatpaks.

Debian: The SysVinit Migration, Debian Debates, and package-hosting repository,

  • The SysVinit upstream project just migrated to git
    Surprising as it might sound, there are still computers using the traditional Sys V init system, and there probably will be until systemd start working on Hurd and FreeBSD. The upstream project still exist, though, and up until today, the upstream source was available from Savannah via subversion. I am happy to report that this just changed.
  • futures of distributions
    Seems Debian is talking about why they are unable to package whole categories of modern software, such as anything using npm. It's good they're having a conversation about that, and I want to give a broader perspective.
  • What is Debian all about, really? Or: friction, packaging complex applications
    This weekend, those interested in Debian development have been having a discussion on the debian-devel mailing list about "What can Debian do to provide complex applications to its users?". I'm commenting on that in my blog rather than the mailing list, since this got a bit too long to be usefully done in an email.
  • Updated my package-repository
    Yesterday I overhauled my Debian package-hosting repository, in response to user-complaints.