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Sunday, 17 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Security: Updates, Android and Logging

Filed under
Security

UCS 4.3-1: First point release for UCS 4.3 available

Filed under
Debian

Univention is pleased to announce the availability of Univention Corporate Server (UCS) 4.3-1, the first point release of UCS 4.3. It includes all errata updates issued for UCS 4.3-0 and provides various improvements...

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Google Support for GNU/Linux, Microsoft Walks Away From Windows Users

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
  • Acer Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 to support Linux apps out of the box

    Along with a host of other high-end devices from other brands, the Acer Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 will support Linux apps at launch, according to a recent Chromium commit. Google has been working with a number of device makers on a new range of high-end Chromebooks with enterprise features. Nami is the umbrella codename for these devices.

  • Acer Chromebook 13 & Chromebook Spin 13 will apparently support Linux apps at launch

    Acer is one of the bigger players in the Chrome OS market, and last month the company debuted two new exciting laptops in the Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13. Now we’re finding out that these machines will apparently support Linux apps out of the box.

  • Microsoft will stop offering forum support for Windows 7, 8.1, RT, and more

    rom next month, the company will cease to operate forum support for Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows RT, Microsoft Security Essentials, Internet Explorer 10 and Office 2010 and 2013.

    Also being stopped is support for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, Surface RT, Surface 2, the Microsoft Band and (at long last) Zune.

  • Microsoft to stop offering support for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 in forums

    On the software front, the company says that it will also no longer provide support for Microsoft Security Essentials, Internet Explorer 10, Office 2010 and 2013 as of July. It is not just software that is affected. Microsoft is also stopping support for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, Surface RT, Surface 2, Microsoft Band and Zune. Some forums will be locked, preventing users from helping each other as well.

Winepak Could Make it Easier to Install Windows Apps on Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

It might soon be easier to install your favourite Windows apps on Linux, thanks to a fledgling new project.

It’s called Winepak and, as you might guess from the name, it’s focused on packaging Wine applications as Flatpak bundles for faster, fuss-free use.

So, rather than you having to head out and find, installer, open it with Wine, and jog through the various steps needed to install it correctly you’d simply install an application from Winepak.

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Intel in Linux 4.19 and MIPS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Begins Queuing Graphics Driver Improvements For Linux 4.19

    While the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window isn't even over until the end of the week followed by about eight weeks worth of testing before that kernel version will debut as stable, Intel open-source developers have already sent in their first pull request to DRM-Next of material they would like to begin staging for Linux 4.19.

    Intel's OTC developers are usually quite punctual in queuing up their tested work in DRM-Next for the next kernel cycle while even for their standards this is quite early with there being several days left to the current merge window.

  • Linux Kernel Patches Appear For A Line Of Intel MIPS SoCs

    It appears Intel is launching a line of SoCs based on the MIPS architecture.

    Hitting the kernel mailing list overnight is a set of kernel patches for bringing up the Intel GRX500 SoCs, which are based on the MIPS interAptiv design. MIPS interAptiv processor cores are based on a 32-bit, multi-core design and have been available the past few years. Background information on interAptiv is available from MIPS.com.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

curl survey 2018 analysis

Filed under
Software
Web

This year, 670 individuals spent some of their valuable time on our survey and filled in answers that help us guide what to do next. What's good, what's bad, what to remove and where to emphasize efforts more.

It's taken me a good while to write up this analysis but hopefully the results here can be used all through the year as a reminder what people actually think and how they use curl and libcurl.

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Trouble at CopperheadOS

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OS
Android

LWN reviewed CopperheadOS, a security-enhanced Android distribution, in 2016. Unfortunately, the company behind CopperheadOS appears to have run into internal trouble; we don't dare venture a guess as to the specifics, even after watching the situation for a few days, beyond the fact that there is clearly a dispute between the founders.

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More on Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0

Filed under
OS
  • systemd-free Debian-based Devuan 2.0 ASCII has been released

    Debian based Devuan 2.0 has been released. Devuan doesn’t use systemd and the new release allows you to choose between SysVinit and OpenRC init systems.

  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 "ASCII" Operating System Launches for Init Freedom Lovers

    Devuan, the open-source GNU/Linux distribution designed to offers users a stable, reliable, and free operating system that doesn't depend on the systemd init, has been updated to version 2.0.

    Continuing project's tradition to offer users alternatives to systemd and its components, Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 is dubbed "ASCII" and it's based on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series. It comes with a large variety of desktop environments, among which we can mention KDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, MATE, and LXQt.

    However, Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 ships with Xfce as default desktop environment. Many other desktop environments are available after installation, and Devuan GNU/Linux's expert install mode lets users choose between the SysVinit and OpenRC init systems instead of systemd.

KDE Plasma 5.13 Officially Released with Revamped Lock & Login Screens, Settings

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KDE

With a focus on stability and reliability, the KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment launches today with revamped lock and login screens, the former offering a slick fade-to-blur transition for displaying the controls, redesigned System Settings pages to make it easier for users to set up themes, fonts, screensavers, and more, as well as Plasma Browser Integration for downloads and media controls.

"Members of the Plasma team have been working hard to continue making Plasma a lightweight and responsive desktop which loads and runs quickly, but remains full-featured with a polished look and feel. We have spent the last four months optimizing startup and minimizing memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance and less memory consumption," reads today's announcement.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.13 Ships As The Best Plasma 5 Release Yet

Linux Kernel 4.17 Now Ready for Mass Deployments as First Point Release Is Out

Filed under
Linux

Even if it's a small one changing only 23 files, with 131 insertions and 68 deletions, the Linux kernel 4.17.1 point release marks the Linux 4.17 kernel series as ready for mass deployments, which means that OS vendors can now start compiling it for their supported architectures and GNU/Linux operating systems to distribute the new kernel version to their users.

"I'm announcing the release of the 4.17.1 kernel. All users of the 4.17 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.17.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.17.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux stable.git;a=summary," said Greg Kroah-Hartman in the mailing list announcement.

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Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

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Security
Ubuntu

The new kernel updates are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series and address a total of nine security vulnerabilities affecting the kernels for 64-bit, 32-bit, Raspberry Pi 2, AWS, and GCP systems, as well as cloud environments.

They address a security issue (CVE-2018-1092 and CVE-2018-1093) affecting the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 17.10, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS releases and discovered by Wen Xu in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service when mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

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Stable kernels 4.17.1, 4.16.15 and 4.14.49

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Linux

Zynthian Open Source Raspberry Pi Synthesiser

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Musicians may be interested in a new fully open source Raspberry Pi synthesiser aptly named the Zynthian which provides a “new class of machine” described as a “swiss army knife of synthesis, equipped with multiple engines, filters and effects”. The Raspberry Pi synthesiser is completely configurable and upgradable and offers an open platform for Sound Synthesis based on the awesome Raspberry Pi mini PC and Linux operating system making the synthesiser fully hackable.

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Kernel: Linux Kernel 4.17, Linux 4.18 and Mesa

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel 4.17 Now Ready for Mass Deployments as First Point Release Is Out

    Just a little over a week after the release of the Linux 4.17 kernel series, renowned kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced today the availability of the first point release, Linux kernel 4.17.1.

    Even if it's a small one changing only 23 files, with 131 insertions and 68 deletions, the Linux kernel 4.17.1 point release marks the Linux 4.17 kernel series as ready for mass deployments, which means that OS vendors can now start compiling it for their supported architectures and GNU/Linux operating systems to distribute the new kernel version to their users.

    "I'm announcing the release of the 4.17.1 kernel. All users of the 4.17 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.17.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.17.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux stable.git;a=summary," said Greg Kroah-Hartman in the mailing list announcement.

  • Linux 4.18 Supports The Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 & DT For NES Classic Edition, Steam Link

    The ARM SoC/platform changes have been submitted and already pulled into the merge window for the Linux 4.18 kernel.

    The ARM hardware support this time is quite exciting. With the Linux 4.18 kernel there is now initial mainline support for the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 high-end SoC and on the board front are the initial additions for supporting the Steam Link and the Nintendo NES Classic Edition.

  • DRM Leasing / Display Patches Updated For Mesa's Vulkan Drivers

    Keith Packard's patches for improving the Linux infrastructure around VR HMD devices have landed within the mainline Linux kernel as well as in X.Org Server 1.20, but for rounding out the work, there still are pending patches for the Mesa Vulkan drivers.

    Keith has spent more than one year working on allowing "DRM leasing", non-desktop handling for virtual reality head-mounted displays, and other related improvements to better embrace HMDs on the Linux graphics stack for optimal performance. The patches for the Vulkan DRM leasing though have yet to be merged into Mesa.

Security: Ubuntu, DragonFlyBSD, Apple Ban and Reproducible Builds

Filed under
Security
  • Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

    Canonical released new kernel security updates for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases to address several security vulnerabilities discovered by various security researchers in the upstream Linux kernel.

    The new kernel updates are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series and address a total of nine security vulnerabilities affecting the kernels for 64-bit, 32-bit, Raspberry Pi 2, AWS, and GCP systems, as well as cloud environments.

  • DragonFlyBSD Gets Better Hardened Against CPU Speculative Execution Bugs

    While the DragonFlyBSD kernel has already landed its mitigation for Spectre V1/V2 and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities, a fresh round of CPU bug hardening work was just merged into their kernel.

    This latest CPU bug hardening primarily revolves around a rumor that the contents of floating poiunt registers owned by another process could be speculatively detected when they are present for the running process. Intel hasn't communicated clarly over this FP register speculation, so OpenBSD already decided to rework some of their code as a safeguard and now DragonFlyBSD has too.

  • Apple Officially Bans Cryptocurrency Mining Apps For MacOS And iOS
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #163

Openwashing and Entryism by Facebook and Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • Facebook releases Sonar debugging tool to the open source community
  • Facebook open sources Sonar

    Facebook has announced it will be open sourcing its extensible debugging tool: Sonar. Sonar was originally created to help Facebook engineers manage the complexity of working with multiple different modules.

    According to the company, Sonar provides a framework where experts and developers can convey important information to users. It also provides engineers with an intuitive way for inspecting and understanding the structure and behavior of iOS and Android applications.

    When it was started three years ago, Sonar was built upon Stetho, which is an Android debugging bridge built in Chrome’s developer tools. It added new features, provided a richer user experience, and works across both iOS and Android. Facebook recommends the use of Sonar over Stetho for most use cases going forward.

  • Linux Foundation: Microsoft buying GitHub is 'good news' for open source, here's why [Ed: Maybe Zemlin will get a Microsoft job one day.]
  • Closed Source and Ethics: Good, Bad, Or Ugly? [iophk: "Jono is sure milking his earlier accidental appointment as Canonical's spinmeister to promote Microsoft."]

    A little while ago I had a discussion with someone who was grumbling about Microsoft. After poking around his opinion, what shook out was that his real issue was not with Microsoft’s open source work (he was supportive of this), but it was with the fact that they still produce proprietary software and use software patents in departments such as Windows and Office.

    Put bluntly, he believed Microsoft are ethically unfit as a company because of these reasons, and these reasons were significant enough to diminish their open source work almost entirely.

  • Why You Should Use Windows Subsystem for Linux [Ed: Microsoft-connected site says, as in this case, something along the lines of use GNU/Linux only as an 'app' for Vista 10]
  • What Microsoft's GitHub Deal Promises to Programmers [Ed: "Business Over Religion" says a section as if software freedom is superstition and we should submit to the business objectives of Microsoft]
  • Proposed Microsoft-GitHub buy confirms open source role in cloud [Ed: "Microsoft has not always been about the developer," it says. It still isn't. This it why it bribes officials, blackmails executives, lies  and cheats (to this date). Don't believe the PR campaign.]

Neovim, VMware Traps, and Proprietary Games

  • Neovim 0.3 Text Editor Released With Various Improvements

    Neovim, the fork of Vim focused on offering better extensibility and usability, has issued their v0.3 release.

    Neovim 0.3 features the new VimL expression parser, MSVC build support on Windows to complement their Cygwin support, etc. Neovim 0.3 also has a number of API additions, various Windows support improvements, almost two dozen known bug fixes, and a range of other changes.

  • Wavefront by VMware Extends Monitoring Reach

    The gap that exists between the DevOps tools typically made available to traditional enterprise IT sites that have standardized on VMware and what’s typically employed by web-scale companies continues to close.

  • inXile Entertainment are doing a remaster of the original Wasteland, should support Linux

    They're obviously not really giving out any details right now, apart from it having updated graphics which they say their aim is to maintain the spirit of the original. It will also run natively in current operating systems, at all current resolutions and offer other quality of life updates as well. It's being done by Krome Studios, the same team doing the remastering of The Bard’s Tale Trilogy.

  • Looks like Harebrained Schemes are working on the Linux build of BATTLETECH now

    Good news for all those waiting on the mech strategy game BATTLETECH [Official Site], as there's hints of it actually coming soon now.

A Better Menu Experience in Plasma and Kolorfill

Filed under
KDE
  • A Better Menu Experience in Plasma (PROPOSAL)

    Launchers in an OS have become the central point of access and interaction with system content. It is the main way that most people will interact with applications and files. In recent years, other OSs have become increasingly interested in beefing up their application menus. Plasma currently has 3 launchers integrated. Users are asked to select one or the other by right-clicking in the “start” menu button and switch a different launcher. The interaction is somewhat quirky but it is effective.

    I wanted to contrast our iteration with something that might be more interactive, more straightforward and help users find the desired content faster. Here is an idea about that.

  • Kirigaming – Kolorfill

    Last time, I was doing a recipe manager. This time I’ve been doing a game with javascript and QtQuick, and for the first time dipping my feet into the Kirigami framework.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.