Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 19 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Purism Successfully Runs KDE Plasma Mobile on Librem 5 Linux Phone's Test Boards

Filed under

The company, which is known for selling the most secure laptops powered a Linux-based operating system, said in a report that they worked closely with the KDE community to install, run, and enable a mobile network provider service on the Plasma Mobile graphical environment on top of the Debian-based PureOS distribution.

While their Librem 5 Linux phone is far from becoming a reality, Purism's initial enablement of KDE's Plasma Mobile was done on an i.MX 6 development board running their PureOS operating system installed, which is currently based on Debian Testing, and using a Wayland/Weston environment.

Read more

Also: Purism Gets Plasma Mobile Running On Their First Librem 5 Development Board

Review: Asus Tinker Board S – Single-Board Computer

Filed under

The Asus Tinker Board S is an ARM-based, single-board computer (SBC) with a quad-core CPU, 2GB RAM and support for 4K video and HD audio. It’s billed as a marvellous computer for DIY enthusiasts and makers.

SBCs are in their ascendancy, in part because of the wide variety of devices available and the unrivaled success of the Raspberry Pi (RPi), offering kids, teachers and hobbyists access to an inexpensive way to embrace computing. In April last year, Asus launched a competitor to the RPi. Their Tinker Board received a promising reception with plaudits given for its hardware specification, and it was generally regarded as a competent platform for building and tinkering.

Read more

Running DOS on the Raspberry Pi

Filed under

You may be familiar with The FreeDOS Project. FreeDOS is a complete, free, DOS-compatible operating system that you can use to play classic DOS games, run legacy business software, or develop embedded PC applications. Any program that works on MS-DOS should also run on FreeDOS.

As the founder and project coordinator of the FreeDOS Project, I'm often the go-to person when users ask questions. And one question I seem to get a lot lately is: "Can you run FreeDOS on the Raspberry Pi?"

Read more

Firefox 59 Prepped For Release: Nukes GTK2 Code, Still Prepping For Wayland

Filed under

Mozilla's Firefox 59.0 is now available to download from the FTP server ahead of the official announcement.

Firefox 59.0 can now be downloaded for all supported platforms. Firefox 59.0 does deliver on dropping GTK2 support in favor of the GTK3 tool-kit support that's now mature.

But what didn't make it for Firefox 59.0 is the Firefox 59 Wayland support that remains a work-in-progress and was diverted from being a target for mozilla59. While the Wayland support isn't yet squared away, there have been bug fixes and other improvements in working towards getting this native Wayland support ready by default for those not building your web-browser with the --enable-default-toolkit=cairo-gtk3-wayland switch.

Read more

Original: Version 59.0, first offered to Release channel users on March 13, 2018

Mozilla Firefox 59 Released with Faster Page Load Times, New Privacy Features

Open Source LimeSDR Mini Takes Off in Satellites

Filed under

The topic of 5G mobile networks dominated the recent Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, despite the expectation that widespread usage may be years away. While 5G’s mind-boggling bandwidth captivates our attention, another interesting angle is found in the potential integration with software defined radio (SDR), as seen in OpenAirInterface’s proposed Cloud-RAN (C-RAN) software-defined radio access network.

As the leading purveyor of open source SDR solutions, UK-based Lime Microsystems is well positioned to play a key role in the development of 5G SDR. SDR enables the generation and augmentation of just about any wireless protocol without swapping hardware, thereby affordably enabling complex networks across a range of standards and frequencies.

Read more

Games Leftovers

Filed under

A plan for rebooting an open source project

Filed under

Once in a while, you will have an open source project that needs care and feeding. Maybe you're just stepping into an existing project, and you need to figure out where the project is and where it needs to go. It needs a reboot. What do you do? How do you begin?

When I was in this situation, I was thrown into the deep end with a security issue. I spent a good eight months getting to know the community as we resolved that issue and other legacy infrastructure issues. After about a year, I finally felt like I had a good outline of the community and its challenges and strengths. I realized afterward that it would've been smarter if I had first invested time to review the project's status and create a strategy for how we tackled its needs.

Read more

Security: Slingshot, Symantec Certification Authorities, and DDoS Defense

Filed under
  • Potent malware that hid for six years spread through routers

    Slingshot—which gets its name from text found inside some of the recovered malware samples—is among the most advanced attack platforms ever discovered, which means it was likely developed on behalf of a well-resourced country, researchers with Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab reported Friday. The sophistication of the malware rivals that of Regin—the advanced backdoor that infected Belgian telecom Belgacom and other high-profile targets for years—and Project Sauron, a separate piece of malware suspected of being developed by a nation-state that also remained hidden for years.

  • Distrust of Symantec TLS Certificates

    A Certification Authority (CA) is an organization that browser vendors (like Mozilla) trust to issue certificates to websites. Last year, Mozilla published and discussed a set of issues with one of the oldest and largest CAs run by Symantec. The discussion resulted in the adoption of a consensus proposal to gradually remove trust in all Symantec TLS/SSL certificates from Firefox. The proposal includes a number of phases designed to minimize the impact of the change to Firefox users:

  • How Creative DDOS Attacks Still Slip Past Defenses

    Distributed denial of service attacks, in which hackers use a targeted hose of junk traffic to overwhelm a service or take a server offline, have been a digital menace for decades. But in just the last 18 months, the public picture of DDoS defense has evolved rapidly. In fall 2016, a rash of then-unprecedented attacks caused internet outages and other service disruptions at a series of internet infrastructure and telecom companies around the world. Those attacks walloped their victims with floods of malicious data measured up to 1.2 Tbps. And they gave the impression that massive, "volumetric" DDOS attacks can be nearly impossible to defend against.

Open Sourcing the Hunt for Exoplanets

Filed under

A Quick Look to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta 1

Filed under

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" Beta 1 released few days ago. This Beta 1 is the first pre-release version designed for testing to prepare the final release next April. I have installed Beta 1 and this short review covers where to download Bionic Beta 1, what applications available, how the desktop looks, how much RAM it takes, and more links and information about it. In short, Bionic Beta 1 brings GNOME 3.27 and Linux Kernel 4.15, with LibreOffice 6.0 and bunch of GNOME Applications, and with Firefox Quantum beside the improved Ubuntu Software. Finally, this article is for all of you wanting to know Bionic in brief without installing it. I hope you enjoy it!

Read more

Windows vs Linux in 2018

Filed under

Over the years, we've seen countless articles state that we're entering the fabled Year of the Linux Desktop. They cite the advantages of Linux. Other articles, still, have expressed that specific advantages don't matter – those who switch to Linux need to be motivated by a specific reason.

In any case, many of those switching will be migrating from Windows. So it's important to understand the core differences between Windows and Linux, now in 2018.

Read more

Also: Chromebooks with Touchscreen Will Soon Get a Brand-New, Android-Like Power Menu

Fedora 28 Release Date and New Features

Filed under

Here is Fedora 28 release date, features and everything important associated with it in one single article.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under

Linux, Microsoft, and Polls

Filed under
  • Linux 4.17 Will Be Another Exciting Kernel Cycle

    While the Linux 4.16 kernel release is still three weeks or so away, the Linux 4.17 kernel is already shaping up to be another exciting cycle.

  • Microsoft Helps Get A Computer Recycler Sentenced To 15 Months In Prison For Offering Unapproved Recovery Disks

    To ensure no good deed goes unpunished, Microsoft is trying to get a computer recycler tossed in prison because he almost provided Windows recovery disks to users who needed them. Eric Lundgren, who's made heroic efforts to prevent dangerous computer parts from filling landfills, is facing a 15-month sentence and a $50,000 fine for manufacturing 28,000 recovery disks. His sentence is based on two charges: conspiracy and copyright infringement.

    Tom Jackman has the whole story at the Washington Post and it's half-tragedy, half-farce. Lundgren runs a company that prevents tens of millions of pounds of harmful chemicals and metals from ending up in landfills. In return for doing more than his part to save the planet, he'll gets a chance to spend a year in jail and hand Microsoft $50,000 in compensation for sales it never "lost" from recovery discs he never got a chance to distribute.

  • Best Laptop

    The ThinkPad began life at IBM, but in 2005, it was purchased by Lenovo along with the rest of IBM's PC business. Lenovo evolved the line, and today the company is well known as a geek favorite. Lenovo's ThinkPads are quiet, fast and arguably have one of the best keyboards (fighting words!). Linux Journal readers say Lenovo's Linux support is excellent, leaving many to ponder why the company doesn't ship laptops with Linux installed.

  • Best Linux Desktop Environment

Software: IG:dm, GRV, Home Assistant, KEXI, Karton, GNOME 3.28 Imminent

Filed under
  • IG:dm – A Desktop Client for Sending Instagram Direct Messages

    Not too long ago we released an article on an unofficial Instagram desktop app for Linux, Ramme. Awesome app; except that you are still limited to sending direct messages with your phone’s Instagramm app. Today, we bring good news to you in the form of IG:dm.

    IG:dm is a free, unofficial Instagram desktop client with which you can send direct Instagram messages from your desktop.

  • GRV – A Tool for Viewing Git Repositories in Linux Terminal

    GRV (Git Repository Viewer) is a free open-source and simple terminal-based interface for viewing git repositories. It provides a way to view and search refs, commits, branches and diffs using Vi/Vim like key bindings. It’s behavior and style can be easily customized through a configuration file.

  • Home Assistant 0.65: Rename entities, new filter sensor, UpCloud and Channels

    Release 0.65 has arrived and oh boy, is it awesome. First off, in case you have missed the previous release notes and announcements: Starting with this release, Home Assistant has dropped support for Python 3.4. The minimum supported version is now Python 3.5.3. If you are on or Docker, you’ll automatically be running the latest and greatest. If you’re on an older Hassbian installation or did your own Linux setup you’ll need to upgrade to at least Python 3.5.3.


  • KEXI 3.1 Released As Open-Source/Free Alternative To Microsoft Access

    ...over 200 bug fixes and more comprising this new KDE software package release.

  • Karton 1.0 Released For Running Linux Programs on macOS & Other Distros/Architectures

    Karton is a Docker-based solution for running Linux programs on macOS or other Linux distributions as well as different architectures.

    Karton makes use of Docker in making it easy to deploy a Linux distribution and then what package(s) to install and then what directories to make available to the host operating system. Karton makes the containers semi-persistent and easy to handle for a smooth experience short of configuring Docker yourself.

  • Karton 1.0

    By using Docker, Karton manages semi-persistent containers with easy to use automatic folder sharing and lots of small details which make the experience smooth. You shouldn’t notice you are using command line programs from a different OS or distro.

  • GNOME 3.28 Is Being Released This Next Week With Many Features & Improvements

    Assuming no last minute snafu, the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment will see its official release happen on 14 March, incorporating the past six months worth of improvements to this open-source desktop stack.

    There have been many improvements to GNOME 3.28, many of the changes we find most exciting have been outlined below.

    - Improvements to the Wayland support have continued with the Mutter compositor becoming quite solid with its Wayland support with additions this cycle like the GTK text input protocol and XWayland keyboard grabbing. When Mutter is acting as a Wayland compositor, among other changes, it now supports GBM with modifiers to support tiling and compression of scanout surfaces.

Red Hat and Fedora: OpenShift, FIPS 140-2, Fedora 28 and More

Filed under
Red Hat
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

LG releases webOS Open Source Edition, looks to expand webOS usage

LG’s smart TVs ship with an operating system called webOS, which is the latest version of an operating system that was developed by Palm to run on phones, acquired by HP to use with tablets, and eventually sold to LG, which is still using it today. But now LG wants to expand the adoption of webOS and the company is working with the South Korean government to solicit business proposals from other companies interested in using webOS. LG has also released a webOS Open Source Edition version of the operating system. Read more

Test driving 4 open source music players and more

In my last article, I described my latest music problem: I need an additional stage of amplification to make proper use of my new phono cartridge. While my pre-amplifier contains a phono stage, its gain is only suitable for cartridges that output about 5mV, whereas my new cartridge has a nominal output of 0.4mV. Based on my investigation, I liked the looks of the Muffsy phono kits, so I ordered the head amplifier, the power supply, and the back panel. I also needed to obtain a case to hold the boards and the back panel, available online from many vendors. Muffsy does not sell the “wall wart” necessary to power the unit, so I ordered one of those from a supplier in California. Finally, inspecting my soldering iron, solder “sucker,” and solder, I’ve realized I need to do better—so a bit more shopping, online or local, is in order there. Finally, for those, like me, whose soldering skills may be rusty and perhaps were not all that great to begin with, Muffsy kindly offers links to two instructional videos. Read more

Today in Techrights