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Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Foundation: Ads, Events, and Memberships Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:08pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:05pm
Story Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:04pm
Story Devices: New Raspberry Pi 3 Model, Arduino, RISC-V and Android Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 10:54pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 10:52pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 10:40pm
Story Linux Mint 18.3 KDE Edition Review – For The Record Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 10:23pm
Story MATE 1.20 review - Are you all right, mate? Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 10:21pm
Story Security: AMD, Updates, Reproducible Builds and More Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 9:34pm
Story Mozilla Development/News Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 9:29pm

Debian-Based Netrunner Linux OS Gets New Stable Release with KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS

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Netrunner currently offers to branches, Stable and Rolling, the latter being based on Arch Linux and allowing users to install once and receive updates forever, which means that's designed more for bleeding-edge users than those who prefer to use a very stable and reliable operating system on their personal computers.

Dubbed "Idolon," Netrunner 18.03 comes as an upgrade to last year's Netrunner 17.10 "Voyager" release and brings up-to-date components, including the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel, KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop environment, LibreOffice 6.0.2 office suite, Firefox 58.0.1 "Quantum" web browser, and Thunderbird 52.6.0 email client

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New Ubuntu Installs Could Be Speed Up by 10% with the Zstd Compression Algorithm

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Developed by Yann Collet at Facebook, zstd is an open-source lossless data compression algorithm designed to offer fast real-time compression and decompression speeds, even faster than xz or gzip. Zstd supports up to 19 compression levels, offering a 2.877 compression ratio with up to 430 MB/s compression and 1110 MB/s decompression speeds.

Julian Andres Klode and Balint Reczey report that they managed to increase the speed of a standard Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) 64-bit installation by about 10 percent with a zstd configuration set at max level 19. Even better, the install speed was increased by about 40 percent when the "eatmydata" library designed to disable fsync and related packages was involved.

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Security: Mac Malware, Spectre and Meltdown, Open Source Security Podcast, Kodi FUD and Sofacy

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  • Steep rise in malware threats to Mac: report

    Malware targeting Mac operating systems more than doubled from 2016 to 2017, according to a new report which reveals that in 2017 alone, Mac threats increased more than 270%.

  • Are Spectre and Meltdown just hype? [Ed: No!]

    Often, it’s the dramatic things that get our attention and what we see as a risk. We’re more scared of flying than of driving, and terrified of snakes and spiders when we’re more at risk from the common cold. So, do our fears lie in the right place?

    There has been much hype around the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities that emerged in January, a huge impact in the world of software vulnerabilities. While some of this is justified by the fact that those vulnerabilities affected a majority of all processors in the market, the reality is that this was just another vulnerability on top of all the others in the market, which security professionals need to assess and manage every day.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 87 - Chat with Let's Encrypt co-founder Josh Aas
  • McAfee Security Experts Weigh-in Weirdly With “Fresh Kodi Warning”

    Something is not right in Tabloid Land. An article published this week in the The Express cites experts from McAfee talking about a "fresh Kodi warning" that "might stop you streaming illegally FOREVER." Not only is no new threat even touched upon in the piece, but one of the McAfee experts thinks that Kodi "is a streaming site".

  • Security firm says Sofacy is starting to target organizations in Middle East, Central Asia

    Kaspersky Lab researchers say that a hacking group widely believed to be linked to the Russian government has been executing cyberattacks against a new set of targets in the Far East, including military, defense and diplomatic organizations, according to a new report.

  • Masha and these Bears

    Sofacy, also known as APT28, Fancy Bear, and Tsar Team, is a prolific, well resourced, and persistent adversary. They are sometimes portrayed as wild and reckless, but as seen under our visibility, the group can be pragmatic, measured, and agile. Our previous post on their 2017 activity stepped away from the previously covered headline buzz presenting their association with previously known political hacks and interest in Europe and the US, and examines their under-reported ongoing activity in middle east, central asia, and now a shift in targeting further east, including China, along with an overlap surprise. There is much understated activity that can be clustered within this set and overlap in APT activity. Here, we examine current deployment, code, cryptography, and targeting.

Make a digital camera from a 1950s Kodak Brownie with a Raspberry Pi

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The inexpensive Kodak Brownie was the first camera to bring photography to the masses. The simplicity of its design meant anyone could figure out how to use it with little difficulty. Because it has essentially no controls to learn—there's just a shutter button, viewfinder, and film winder—it's even easy to use in comparison to today's cameras.

Millions of Kodak Brownies were made over the course of its 60-year lifespan beginning in 1900, and its build quality means many of them survive in good working order. A Kodak Brownie is also a good option for custom modifications—it's easily available on eBay or at tag sales, it's simple to hack, and it's cheap enough that it doesn't matter if things go wrong.

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4 Linux-forward schools

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It's well known that there's a shortage of qualified candidates to fill IT jobs. Employers are urgently looking for people to fill DevOps, development, sysadmin, and other IT roles—especially employees with experience in the cloud, web technologies, and Linux—to manage the infrastructure powering their businesses.

According to the Linux Foundation, more than 1 million courses in Linux and open source software have been taken by aspiring IT pros through its partnership with EdX. But to meet the IT workforce's demands for skilled employees now and in the future, we need to start preparing people a lot earlier in life—in pre-K through 12th grade (PK-12) schools

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Also: Chromebooks Get Better Support for External Displays, Floating Virtual Keyboard

Rant launches Eric Raymond's next project: open-source the UPS

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In February, Eric S Raymond ranted that the Uninterruptible Power Supply market was overdue for open source disruption, and touch so many nerves around the world that the rant has become a project.

Last week, ESR opened up the work-in-progress on GitLab: the Upside project is currently defining requirements and developing a specification for a “high quality UPS that can be built from off-the-shelf arts in any reasonably well-equipped makerspace or home electronics shop”.

ESR's original post, “UPSes suck and need to be disrupted”, set down his own complaints about what's sold to consumer/SOHO users: batteries with “so little deep-cycle endurance” that they can't last beyond a few years, and whose dwell-time is oversold by vendors.

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Nordic Free Software Award, foss-north, and CoderGals Hackathon

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  • Nordic Free Software Award reborn

    Remember the glorious year 2009 when I won the Nordic Free Software Award?

  • foss-north – the count down

    This is the last day left of the Call for Papers for foss-north 2018. With the help of our great sponsors we have the opportunity to transport you to our conference if you are selected to speak. Make sure to make your submission before March 11 and you are in the race.

  • CoderGals Hackathon

    CoderGals Hackathon was organized for the first time in my country. This event took place in the beautiful city of Prizren. This hackathon held for 24 to 48 hours, was an idea which started from two girls majoring in Computer Science, Qendresa and Albiona Hoti.

KDE: Evolving KDE and Kate Update

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  • Evolving KDE – IRC office hour for your questions and ideas

    KDE has set the focus on 3 goals around improved usability and productivity, privacy and easier onboarding of new contributors to KDE. On Thursday (15. March 2018) we are going to hold an office hour. During the office hour you can ask all your questions around these goals and tell us about your ideas for pushing them forward. We will be meeting in the channel #kde on freenode IRC at 16:00 UTC. We hope to see many of you there.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 9

    KDE contributors continue to polish up KDE software! In addition to our recent work on Discover, KDE Plasma and other apps got a lot of love too, especially Konsole. See for yourself!

  • Improving Syntax Highlighting Files

    When building the KSyntaxHighlighting framework, the syntax highlighting xml files are compiled into the KSyntaxHighlighting library. I order to do so, we have a small little helper program that generates an index of all xml files. This indexer also validates the xml files against the XML Schema, and performs some more sanity checks.

Review: Sabayon and Antergos

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Sabayon is a Gentoo-based distribution which is available in many desktop editions as well as a server edition. Sabayon strives to provide a working system out-of-the-box, saving the user a lot of time when it comes to configuring the operating system. Sabayon provides several categories of installation media. The project uses a rolling release model and the distribution's many editions are provided in Stable, Monthly and Daily snapshots. It has been about a year since the last Stable set of installation media was produced and so I decided to explore one of the monthly snapshots.

I began with the MATE edition of Sabayon's Monthly snapshot, a 2GB download which I confirmed downloaded properly using the distribution's checksums. Booting from the live media brought up a menu asking if we would like to start a live desktop environment, launch a text-based installer, start in safe mode or launch a live text console. I was surprised when taking the live desktop option booted the distribution to a text console and showed me a login prompt.

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Linux 4.16-rc5

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  • Linux 4.16-rc5

    This continue to be pretty normal - this rc is slightly larger than
    rc4 was, but that looks like one of the normal fluctuations due to
    timing of pull requests, not due to anything distressing. In
    particular, this past week we had both a networking pull and a drm
    pull, which accounts for a fait chunk of it all.

    In addition to the networking updates (both drivers and core
    networking) and the drm stuff (mainly some amdgpu display handling
    updates), there's the usual arch fixes (mostly x86 this time -
    microcode handling and some syscall cleanups) and various random
    driver fixes (rdma, md, scsi, watchdog). Plus some misc stuff:
    filesystems (overlayfs, xfs) some core kernel code, and tooling
    (mainly perf and selftests).

    Nothing particular stands out, the appended shortlog gives a flavor of
    the details.


  • Linux 4.16-rc5 Kernel Released

    Development on the Linux 4.16 kernel continues moving along smoothly and tonight the 4.16-rc5 kernel is released.

  • The Big AMDKFD Change Set For Linux 4.17 Has Been Submitted

    Oded Gabbay sent in his pull request today of the AMDKFD driver updates targeting the Linux 4.17 kernel. Notably this includes the long-awaited dGPU support in inching AMD/GPUOpen ROCm compute support with OpenCL off a mainline kernel for select discrete GPUs.

    Most significant with this AMDKFD (AMD Kernel Fusion Driver) changes for Linux 4.17 is the discrete Radeon GPU support for initialization and queue handling. Unfortunately though it ended up being incomplete as the GPUVM support is still missing due to that code still being discussed by developers. Additionally, Vega compute support isn't yet ready for mainline AMDKFD.

Stable kernels 4.15.9, 4.14.26, 4.9.87, 4.4.121 and 3.18.99

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Debian: Chris Lamb as Debian Project Leader, webkitgtk in Debian Stretch: Report Card

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  • Debian Project Leader Elections 2018: Candidate

    We're now into the campaigning period. We have 1 candidates this year: Chris Lamb

  • Debian Project Leader Elections 2018 Has One Candidate

    The nomination period for the Debian Project Leader 2018 elections is now over and Chris Lamb is the only one nominated this year after having nominated himself this weekend. The campaign period is now active through the end of the month while the DPL voting will take place for the first two weeks of April.

  • webkitgtk in Debian Stretch: Report Card

    webkitgtk is the GTK+ port of WebKit. webkitgtk provides web functionality for many things including GNOME Online Accounts’ login panels; Evolution’s HTML email editor and viewer; and the engine for the Epiphany web browser (also known as GNOME Web).

    Last year, I announced here that Debian 9 “Stretch” included the latest version of webkitgtk (Debian’s package is named webkit2gtk). At the time, I hoped that Debian 9 would get periodic security and bugfix updates. Nine months later, let’s see how we’ve been doing.

Netrunner 18.03 Idolon Released

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  • Netrunner 18.03 Idolon

    Netrunner 18.03 ships the latest packages from Debian’s Testing Snapshot repository.

    From 18.03 onwards, we also decided to include even more packages directly from upstream, so it will be most compatible when enabling the continously updating testing repo.

  • KDE-Focused Netrunner 18.03 Linux Distribution Released

    Netrunner 18.03 "Idolon" has been released as the latest version of this KDE-focused desktop Linux distribution derived from Debian's testing repository.

Microsoft headlined a major Linux conference

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Earlier today (March 10th, 2018), Microsoft delivered the headlining keynote of the Southern California Linux Expo — one of the largest Linux and Free Software conferences in the world. I repeat: Microsoft. Headlined. A Linux Festival. It was confusing to many. And Microsoft did not disappoint… they managed to say some distinctly anti-Open Source things in their 1 hour on stage.

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Things you’ll need when seeking GNU/Linux support online

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You broke something. Congratulations! You’re one of the millions of people across the globe, who have broken their system, perhaps without having any clue whatsoever about how you even did it...

Okay, so, you’ve tried some searches online, you’ve asked your other computer savvy friends, and you’ve also dug out your favourite hammer – just incase you need to break something. Being real though, there’s many times where you may need to seek out help online using forums, IRC, or mailing lists.

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today's leftovers

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Android: Android-x86, Android beats iOS, Android P

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lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

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KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.