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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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GNOME: Outreachy, World Clocks, UX Hackfest London

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GNOME
  • Outreachy's finally here !

    It’s been a month since the Outreachy Round 15 results were announced . Yay! my proposal for adding a network panel to GNOME Usage was selected. I am glad to be working on something I personally have been longing for. Moreover, I finally have something to cut down on my Xbox addiction and channelize it into bringing the network panel to life.

  • UTC and Anywhere on Earth support

    A quick post to tell you that we finally added UTC support to Clocks' and the Shell's World Clocks section. And if you're into it, there's also Anywhere on Earth support.

    You will need to have git master versions of libgweather (our cities and timezones database), and gnome-clocks. This feature will land in GNOME 3.28.

  • UX Hackfest London

    Last week I took part in the GNOME Shell UX Hackfest in London, along with other designers and developers from GNOME and adjacent communities such as Endless, Pop!, and elementary. We talked about big, fundamental things, like app launching and the lock/login screen, as well as some smaller items, like the first-run experience and legacy window decorations.

Ubuntu History: Linux Evolves

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Linux
Ubuntu

For many Linux users, it’s easy to forget what the Linux landscape looked like before Ubuntu. Back then, newbie centric distros didn’t have Ubuntu as their core. Instead, they relied exclusively on, with the exception of Mandriva (Mandrake). In this spirit of remembrance, I want to take a look back at Ubuntu through the years. With Ubuntu’s shift from the desktop into more of an enterprise future, the timing is fitting to see that at one time Ubuntu was very much a desktop focused experience. In the interest of keeping this article focused, I will be touching on Ubuntu releases that offered something unique and interesting to Ubuntu’s features.

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CoreOS Tectonic 1.8 unites container management across clouds

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OS

Kubernetes is now -- no question about it -- the dominant cloud orchestration program. With Amazon Web Services (AWS) giving Kubernetes native support, all major clouds now support Kubernetes. This means more than just you can use the same program to manage your containers on different clouds. It also means you can use Kubernetes to manage all your containers on all your clouds in a single, cohesive fashion. This is what CoreOS brings to the table, with its latest release of Tectonic.

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Open source, Rockchip-based SBC offers up to 4GB DDR4

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Android
Linux
OSS
Ubuntu

Libre Computer’s open source, $35-and-up “Renegade” SBC is a Raspberry Pi clone that runs Linux or Android 7.1 on a Rockchip RK3328 with up to 4GB DDR4.

Earlier this year, Libre Computer went to Kickstarter to fund its quad -A53 Amlogic S905X based Le Potato SBC, and it’s a third the way toward its $100K KS goal for its Allwinner-based Tritium board with 37 days left. Now the Shenzhen-based company has shifted over to Indiegogo to launch the Renegade, the company’s first Rockchip-based SBC, and the first Raspberry Pi clone we’ve seen that ships with up to 4GB of speedy DDR4 RAM.

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2018: The year of the open source desktop, browser, and office suite

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Linux
OSS

It was last year, around this same time, that I predicted a monumental year for open source in 2017. I even went so far as to say open source would finally pass the 5% market share on the desktop. There was a moment when it looked like that was actually going to happen, only to find out it was a bit of false reporting. Even without hitting that magic number, Linux and open source had a stellar year.

Will that success hold over to the upcoming year? I believe it will, and then some. Let's gaze into that always questionable crystal ball and see what kind of predictions we can come up with for Linux and open source.

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Kubernetes in Storage, Bitnami

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Server
  • Running storage services on Kubernetes

    If you are looking to adopt the benefits of containers, introduce and support a DevOps culture in your organization, run micro-services or in general try to get corporate IT to provide more immediate value to the business by shortening the time to market, you will at least evaluate Kubernetes. When you adopt it, it won't be long until stateful applications find their way into the cluster—and with that the need for robust, persistent storage. Will databases be among those applications? Very likely. Or workloads, that share large content repositories or such that consume object storage? In either of those cases, you should definitely take a look at gluster-kubernetes.

  • Bitnami Introduces Kubeapps for Click and Deploy Kubernetes Containers

    At KubeCon, Bitnami demonstrated a tool for deploying pre-packaged Kubernetes containers with the click of a mouse.

Security: Andromeda (Windows), NSA Leak (Also Windows), Blockchain in Security

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Security
  • Global law enforcement operation decimates giant Andromeda botnet

    Developed in September 2011, Andromeda, aka Gamarue or Wauchos, is known for stealing credentials from victims as well as downloading and installing up to 80 different secondary malware programs onto users' systems, including spam bots. Over the last half-year, it has been detected or blocked on an average of more than 1 million machines per month, Europol added.

  • Ex-NSA Worker Pleads Guilty to Taking Classified Data

    Pho worked for the NSA's Tailored Access Operations Unit from 2006 until 2016 and had access to data and documents that included classified and top secret national defense information. "According to the plea agreement, beginning in 2010 and continuing through March 2015, Pho removed and retained U.S. government documents and writings that contained national defense information, including information classified as Top Secret and Sensitive Compartmented Information," the DOJ stated.

  • Is blockchain a security topic?

    What's really interesting is that, if you're thinking about moving to a permissioned blockchain or distributed ledger with permissioned actors, then you're going to have to spend some time thinking about trust. You're unlikely to be using a proof-of-work system for making blocks—there's little point in a permissioned system—so who decides what comprises a "valid" block that the rest of the system should agree on? Well, you can rotate around some (or all) of the entities, or you can have a random choice, or you can elect a small number of über-trusted entities. Combinations of these schemes may also work.

Opera-Inspired Otter and Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Otter RC3 Released As The Browser Inspired By Opera 12 & Implemented Using Qt5

    At the end of 2013 we wrote about a new Qt5 web-browser inspired by Opera and in 2014 it entered alpha form. But since then we hadn't heard much of that browser, Otter, until a Phoronix reader brought it up in our forums today.

    It turns out that the Otter web browser is nearing its hard feature freeze for their first major release and the latest release candidate was made available this week. The goal of Otter remains to "recreate the best aspects of the classic Opera (12.x)" while making use of the Qt5 tool-kit and offering packages for Windows, macOS, and Linux (including AppImage support).

  • Raspberry Pi, Linux on Arm users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

    Raspberry Pi users now have one more browser to choose from besides Chromium, Firefox and Midori, with the newly announced availability of an experimental version of power-user focused Vivaldi.

    The Blink-based browser from former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner is expanding beyond Windows, macOS and Linux PCs to a range of Arm-based developer boards, including the Raspberry Pi, CubieBoard, Asus Tinker Board, and more.

    Vivaldi doesn't yet have a mobile browser but it was its work on one that helped spawn the build for Raspberry Pi, according to the company. It also points to Samsung's DeX project as a potential new platform for Vivaldi. DeX aims to run full Linux on a Galaxy phone connected to a display.

Graphics: Intel, Mesa, OpenCL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Wants You To Help Test The i965 Mesa Shader Cache, Not Yet Enabled By Default

    Back in early November Intel finally landed its shader cache support for allowing GLSL shaders to be cached on-disk similar to the RadeonSI shader caching that has been present since earlier in the year. But this functionality isn't yet enabled by default as it still needs more testing.

    Last month I covered some early test results of this Intel i965 Mesa shader on-disk cache within Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times. In my experiences thus far it's been working out well but currently isn't used by the Intel driver unless the MESA_GLSL_CACHE_DISABLE=0 environment variable is set.

  • 16-Bit Storage, variablePointers Land For ANV Vulkan Driver

    It's always great waking up to new features landing in Mesa Git.

    For the past several months Igalia developers have been working on SPV_KHR_16bit_storage and VK_KHR_16bit_storage support for the Intel ANV Vulkan driver. As implied by the name, this is about supporting 16-bit data types in shader input/output interfaces and push constant blocks. This Vulkan "half float" support has now landed in Mesa Git across a number of patches affecting NIR, ANV, and the Intel shader compiler.

  • POCL 1.0 RC1 Adds Experimental CUDA Backend, Full OpenCL 1.2 Support

    One of the most exciting open-source OpenCL projects we have been following in recent years is POCL as "Portable C" for having an LLVM-based portable OpenCL implementation to run on CPUs as well as GPUs now via AMD HSA back-end and a new experimental NVIDIA CUDA back-end. The POCL 1.0 release is finally near.

ReactOS 0.4.7

Filed under
OS
  • ReactOS 0.4.7 released!

    The ReactOS Project is pleased to announce the release of version 0.4.7 as we continue to work on releasing every three months.

    We’re especially pleased to present this release as the very first one that’s been developed in our new Git/GitHub repository. Moving from Subversion to GitHub has proven to be an invaluable way to reach new testers, users and improve the overall awareness of the ReactOS project.

  • ReactOS 0.4.7 Released As The Latest For "Open-Source Windows"

    At the end of October ReactOS 0.4.7-RC1 was released as the newest test release for this open-source operating system project continuing to work on re-implementing the Windows APIs. That official v0.4.7 release is now available.

POP!_OS - Ubuntu, bang, curtain

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Reviews

POP!_OS is a rather average Gnome spin of a Gnome-based Ubuntu, which itself is a pale shadow of its former self. System76 did create their own operating system, but it is not drastic enough to warrant a special place in the charts as an independent entry - this is true for 94% of all distros - and not good enough in the first place. It does somewhat improve Aardvark, but it's still a weak offering.

We had hardware issues before we ever got into the live session, all sorts of hardware problems in the installed system, the ergonomics are awful, Samba performance is flaky, overall system responsiveness is average. Package management and updates are rather robust and good and so is smartphone support, but then you need Gnome extensions and codecs to really experience the desktop as it's meant to be. All in all, you can accomplish all of this on your own in any which Gnome, or use something that actually has a sane layout and offers genuine productivity, like Plasma or Windows.

This is an interesting experiment, but ultimately, I can't see a reason why anyone would prefer this over stock Ubuntu (with Unity, a good ole 14.04 LTS), Plasma or even any other tailored Debian-based Gnome system. The differences aren't large or important enough, and there are way too many bugs and issues, making it an even more difficult choice. Overall, POP!_OS deserves something like its 4/10 for its debut. There's only so much you can do with a broken foundation. Well, let's see how this one evolves. For now, skip.

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Games: Bridge Constructor, Empires of the Undergrowth, Pizza Connection, The Escapists

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Gaming

Linux Kernel Developer: Kees Cook

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Security is paramount these days for any computer system, including those running on Linux. Thus, part of the ongoing Linux development work involves hardening the kernel against attack, according to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report.

This work, according to report authors Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman, involves the addition of several new technologies, many of which have their origin in the grsecurity and PaX patch sets. “New hardening features include virtually mapped kernel stacks, the use of the GCC plugin mechanism for structure-layout randomization, the hardened usercopy mechanism, and a new reference-count mechanism that detects and defuses reference-count overflows. Each of these features makes the kernel more resistant to attack,” the report states.

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Linux then, and why you should learn it now

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GNU
Linux

It started back in 1983 with another operating system known as UNIX, first released in 1971. In 1983, the GNU Project was started to create a complete UNIX-compatible operating system, but the project was stalled and had a missing kernel. Around 1987, a UNIX-like operating system for students was released called MINIX, but its licensing prevented it from being distributed freely. Irritated by the licensing of MINIX, Linus Torvalds at the University of Helsinki began working on his own operating system kernel. His kernel was released in 1991, and when combined with the GNU components and open source licensing, it became the Linux operating system we know today.

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Kali Linux Review: Not Everyone’s Cup of Tea

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Reviews

In this review of Kali Linux, we try to answer regular questions like what is Kali Linux, what is the use of Kali Linux and whether beginners should use Kali Linux or not?
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Getting started with Turtl, an open source alternative to Evernote

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

Just about everyone I know takes notes, and many people use an online note-taking application like Evernote, Simplenote, or Google Keep. Those are all good tools, but you have to wonder about the security and privacy of your information—especially in light of Evernote's privacy flip-flop of 2016. If you want more control over your notes and your data, you really need to turn to an open source tool.

Whatever your reasons for moving away from Evernote, there are open source alternatives out there. Let's look at one of those alternatives: Turtl.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Mining cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi and Storj

I'm always looking for ways to map hot technologies to fun, educational classroom use. One of the most interesting, and potentially disruptive, technologies over the past few years is cryptocurrencies. In the early days, one could profitably mine some of the most popular cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, using a home PC. But as cryptocurrency mining has become more popular, thanks in part to dedicated mining hardware, the algorithms governing it have boosted computational complexity, making home PC mining often impractical, unprofitable, and environmentally unwise. Read more

Latest Openwashing and Attacks on FOSS

Systemd, Devuan, and Debian; FOSS at the Back End

  • Systemd, Devuan, and Debian
  • Devuan ASCII sprint -- 15-16-17 Dec. 2017
  • This open-source, multicloud serverless framework claims faster-than-bare-metal speed
    The move toward fast, serverless computing technology got a boost this month from Iguazio Systems Ltd. The data platform company (named from the Iguazu waterfalls in South America) announced the release of Nuclio, an open-source, multicloud serverless framework that claims faster-than-bare-metal speed. “We provide one platform, all the data services that Amazon has, or at least the ones that are interesting, serverless functions, which are 100 times faster, and a few more tricks that they don’t have,” said Yaron Haviv (pictured), founder and chief technology officer of Iguazio Systems. “We do fewer services, but each one kicks ass; each one is much faster and better engineered.”
  • CORD Says It’s the De Facto Choice for Edge Computing
    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) today released 4.1 of its Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD) code. CORD has only been around as an independent project within ONF for about a year and a half, but with this release a couple of things have gelled for the project. First, it has merged its residential-CORD, mobile-CORD, and enterprise-CORD into one overarching project. Secondly, the ONF has realized CORD’s relevance in edge computing and edge cloud data centers.