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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Mesa 13.0.4, Update Now Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 3:55pm
Story A Few Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux OpenGL Benchmarks With A Core i7 7700K Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 3:54pm
Story Top 10 FOSS legal stories in 2016 Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 3:50pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 3:44pm
Story Linux/FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:13am
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:12am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:10am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:07am
Story Linux and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:06am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2017 - 10:03am

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Security News

Filed under
Security

Development News: RcppTOML, Rust, NetSurf

Filed under
Development
  • RcppTOML 0.1.1

    Following up on the somewhat important RcppTOML 0.1.0 releaseas which brought RcppTOML to Windows, we have a first minor update 0.1.1. Two things changed: once again updated upstream code from Chase Geigle's cpptoml which now supports Date types too, and we added the ability to parse TOML from strings as opposed to only from files.

  • The Next Big Blue-Collar Job Is Coding

    When I ask people to picture a coder, they usually imagine someone like Mark Zuckerberg: a hoodied college dropout who builds an app in a feverish 72-hour programming jag—with the goal of getting insanely rich and, as they say, “changing the world.”

  • Looking into what Rust can do that other languages can't ... or can they
  • The minority yields to the majority!

    As previously mentioned I contribute to the NetSurf project and the browser natively supports numerous toolkits for numerous platforms. This produces many challenges in development to obtain the benefits of a more diverse user base. As part of the recent NetSurf developer weekend we took the opportunity to review all the frontends to make a decision on their future sustainability.

TheSSS 21.0 Live Linux Server OS Arrives with MariaDB 10.1.21 and Apache 2.4.25

Filed under
Linux

Softpedia was informed today by 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki about the immediate availability of version 21.0 of his TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) Linux-based server-oriented operating system.

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10 Open Source Challenges

For the open source movement, things seem to be going better than ever. Desktop Linux still hasn't caught on the way advocates had hoped, but within the enterprise, open source is becoming the norm.A Black Duck survey found that 65 percent of enterprises increased their use of open source software in 2016, and open source software is dominating in areas like big data analytics, containerization, development tools, cloud infrastructure, the Internet of things (IoT) and others.

However, if the community is going to continue to thrive, it will need to find a way to deal with some very big challenges.

As open source usage has increased, projects have sometimes struggled to scale with demand. And as enterprise developers incorporate more open source code into their own applications, their organizations face headaches related to security, compatibility, licensing and more.

This slideshow highlights ten open source challenges that could pose an existential threat to the movement itself.

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This Custom Compiled Chromium OS Is Designed for Desktop and Laptop Computers

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OS

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton informs us about the availability of the second build of his custom compiled Chromium OS distribution, ChromX, an open-source alternative to Google's Chrome OS for Chromebooks.

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GNOME Software 3.24 to Handle APT & Snap URLs for Easy Installation of Packages

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GNOME

The GNOME developers are currently preparing to unleash the first Beta milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, due for release on February 15, 2017.

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Best Linux Email Clients

Filed under
Linux

Finding the best Linux email client is largely a matter of taste. That said, there are specific email clients for Linux that are better than others. In this article, I'll share some of the best Linux email clients available.

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Linux Lite 3.4 to Revamp Lite Welcome to Help Windows Users Accommodate Faster

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Linux

Jerry Bezencon, the creator of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distro, announced today that a new version of the Lite Welcome tool is coming soon for all users with exciting new features.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" Gets First Point Release to Improve Skylake Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Just days after its official release, the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system received its first point release, which brings new, up-to-date components and fixes critical issues.

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Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Gaming Performance With NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060/1080

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It's been a while since last testing Windows 10 vs. Linux on different, newer Linux game ports with a variety of GPUs, but that changed this week. As mentioned this weekend, I've been working on a large, fresh Windows vs. Linux gaming performance comparison. The results available today are for NVIDIA with testing a GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 on Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.10 x86_64 with the latest drivers and using a variety of newer Direct3D 11/12 / OpenGL / Vulkan games.

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What is Open Source?

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OSS

Open source software is everywhere. It underpins virtually the entire technology sector, with every single element of IT relying on at least one open source component.

For those who aren't aware, free and open source software (commonly abbreviated to FOSS) is software and tools that are made freely available online. Not only are they free to download, install and use, the creators also publish the source code for these programs - their 'DNA'. This means anyone can recreate, tweak, improve or modify them as they see fit.

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Review: KDE neon 5.9.1

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KDE
Reviews

It has been a while since I've done a review of a Linux distribution. Lately, I've seen a few reviews of KDE neon (the second word being intentionally written in lowercase), and some of them have praised it as being much better than Kubuntu (the traditionally KDE spin of Ubuntu). That got my attention, so I figured I should check it out.

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Growing Your Open Source Community With Twitter

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Engagement in an open source community leads to collaboration, says Jason Hibbets, community evangelist at Red Hat. And social media is one good tool that projects can use to help increase engagement in their communities, he adds, “because you can reach a broad audience at pretty much no-to-low costs.”

Hibbets will discuss how Red Hat has increased engagement with one such social media tool, Twitter chats, in his talk at Open Source Leadership Summit in Lake Tahoe on Feb. 16, 2017. Here, he shares with us some of his reasoning behind why engagement is important, some best practices for increasing engagement, and a few lessons learned from Red Hat’s Twitter chats.

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Open source human body simulator trains future doctors

Filed under
OSS

SOFA an open source human body simulator used for training medical students and for preparing medical interventions, is being used by an increasing number of research centres and companies, says Hugo Talbot, coordinator of the SOFA consortium. He demonstrated SOFA (Simulation Open Framework Architecture) last week at Fosdem, Europe’s largest free software conference, in Brussels (Belgium).

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Industrial controller builds on Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Linux

Janz Tec has released an industrial controller built around the Raspberry Pi 3, with WiFi, Bluetooth, CANbus, and CODESYS compatibility.

Saelig launched North American distribution for the latest in Janz Tec’s emPC-A/RPI line of Raspberry Pi based industrial controllers. The Raspberry Pi 3 derived emPC-A/RPI3 follows the almost identical, RPi 2 based emPC-A/RPI2, which was called the emPC-A/RPI when we covered it back in Aug. 2015.

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Open Access

Filed under
OSS
  • A $100,000 grant would help the University System of Maryland promote open-source textbooks

    Some students spend hundreds of dollars on textbooks every semester, but the Textbook Cost Savings Act of 2017, sponsored by Maryland state Sen. Jim Rosapepe, could help students save a lot of that money.

    The bill would provide a $100,000 grant to the University System of Maryland's William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation to promote the use of open source materials in place of traditional textbooks. The money would be used to foster the use of open education resources, or OERs, among the system's 12 institutions, said MJ Bishop, director of the Kirwan Center.

  • The Met Goes Public Domain With CC0, But It Shouldn't Have To

    The ongoing digitization of the vast wealth of material sitting in museums and archives around the world is one of the greatest projects of the digital age — a full realization of the internet's ability to spread knowledge and culture to all. Or it would be, if it weren't for copyfraud: for every museum genuinely embracing open content and the public domain, there's another claiming copyright on public domain images and being backed up by terrible court rulings.

    And so it's fantastic to see The Metropolitan Museum of Art joining the former camp with a new Open Access policy that is putting images of 375,000 works online with a CC0 public domain declaration. The Met actually partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Pinterest and others to help make this happen, and has even announced its first Wikimedian-in-residence who will head up the project to get these images into Wikimedia Commons and onto Wikipedia.

    This is all great, but here's the annoying thing: it should be totally unnecessary. These are digitizations of public domain works, and there's no reasonable basis for granting them any copyright protection that would need to be divested with a CC0 mark in the first place. They are not creative transformative works, and in fact they are the opposite: attempts to capture the original as faithfully and accurately as possible, with no detectable changes in the transfer from one medium to another. It might take a lot of work, but sweat of the brow does not establish copyright, and allowing such images to be re-copyrighted (in some cases hundreds or even thousands of years after their original creation) would be pointless and disastrous.

  • The Met Makes 375,000 Public Domain Images Available

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced Tuesday that more than 375,000 of the Museum's "public-domain artworks" are now available for unrestricted use.

    "We have been working toward the goal of sharing our images with the public for a number of years," said Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Met, in a statement. "Our comprehensive and diverse museum collection spans 5,000 years of world culture and our core mission is to be open and accessible for all who wish to study and enjoy the works of art in our care."

    The image collection covers photographs, paintings, and sculptures, among other works. Images now available for both scholarly and commercial purposes include Emanuel Leutze's famous painting Washington Crossing the Delaware; photographs by Walker Evans, Alfred Steiglitz, and Dorothea Lange; and even some Vincent van Gogh paintings.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • Clangd: LLVM's Clang Gets A Server
  • GhostBSD 11.0 to Ship with Whisker Menu as Default Application Menu for Xfce

    The GhostBSD developers have announced this past weekend the availability of the first Alpha development release of the upcoming GhostBSD 11.0 open-source, BSD-based operating system.

    GhostBSD 11.0 development is ongoing, and a first Alpha build is now ready for public testing, for early adopters and anyone else who wants to help the GhostBSD developers polish the final release of the operating system by fixing the remaining bugs. This Alpha adds the missing Xfce .xinitrc configuration file and theme engine.

Linux FAQs(Frequently Asked Questions) From A Newbie Perspective

Filed under
Linux

Linux distros are wonderful operating systems. But when you are new to it, you’re probably gonna have some questions in your mind. It’s normal, I too had many questions at first. So, here I’m gonna list out 10 frequently asked questions about Linux.

Read<br />
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Unvanquished Open-Source Shooter Game Prepares For An Exciting 2017
    The Unvanquished open-source first person shooter game had been very promising and issuing monthly alpha releases all the way up to 48 alpha versions while they ended that one year ago without any new releases. The project is still ongoing and they are preparing for a great 2017. The Unvanquished team posted a teaser to their project site this weekend. They have been working on some "much bigger" changes. They aren't saying what the next release will be, but most will know what generally follows alpha builds... I'm a big supporter of Unvanquished, and have heard from their project lead and look forward to what's next ;)
  • OSS: RPG Maker MV CoreScript
    "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is a game engine player for 2D games that runs on the browser. "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is designed as a game engine dedicated to "RPG Maker MV", the latest work of "RPG Maker" series of 2DRPG world number one software with more than 20 years history, and more than 1000 games are running. (February 2017)
  • HITMAN released for Linux, initial port report and two gameplay videos
    HITMAN [Steam, Feral Store] is the brand new Linux port from Feral Interactive and what a game it is! This is some serious fun to keep you occupied for many hours!
  • Hitman is Coming to Your Home
  • Castle Game Engine 6.0 Released
    Castle Game Engine is yet another open-source cross-platform game engine. What separates this game engine from others is that interestingly it's written in Object Pascal. Up until seeing this Castle Game Engine 6.0 release, I hadn't thought of Object Pascal in a few years and interesting it's being used by this game engine. Castle Engine 6.0 continues to be fitted for both 2D and 3D games and this latest release incorporates about one year of development work.

Fedora: The Latest

  • Anaconda Install Banners get a Makeover!
    A redesign/ update for Anaconda install banners has been an ongoing project for me since the summer and has recently, in the passed month or so, had a fair amount of conversation on its Pagure ticket. I have done multiple series of iterations for these banners, and in the couple of weeks have established a design that represents the Fedora vibe. There are three, sort of, sub-categories for the banners: Common Banners, Server-specific Banners, and Desktop-specific Banners. At this point I have completed drafts of the Common banners (available on all editions) and the Desktop-specific banners (available in addition to Common for Desktop editions).
  • This is why I drink: a discussion of Fedora's legal state
    Tom Callaway seems to be a very nice person who has been overclocked to about 140% normal human speed. In only 20 minutes he gave an interesting and highly-amusing talk that could have filled a 45-minute slot on the legal principles that underpin Fedora, how they got that way, and how they work out in practice. In the old days, Callaway said, Red Hat made Red Hat Linux, entirely in-house. What the company didn't make was any money; sales of hats generated more profit than sales of Red Hat box sets, which apparently were sold at a loss. It was felt that this plan wouldn't work out in the long term, so Red Hat changed to making Enterprise Linux. It didn't want to stop doing a hobbyist Linux, however, so Fedora Core was launched. Red Hat also wanted the community to have input into what Fedora was, and how it looked, but the company couldn't just drop the reins and let the community take over, because it was still legally the distributor.
  • Modularity & Generational Core: The future of Fedora?
  • Fedora 25: running Geekbench.