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Tuesday, 30 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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My free software will respect users or it will be bullshit

Filed under
Security

The four freedoms are only meaningful if they result in real-world benefits to the entire population, not a privileged minority. If your approach to releasing free software is merely to ensure that it has an approved license and throw it over the wall, you're doing it wrong. We need to design software from the ground up in such a way that those freedoms provide immediate and real benefits to our users. Anything else is a failure.

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ACPI On ARM: Good Or Bad For Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Matthew was pessimistic about the prospects of ACPI for ARM. Matthew explained that now Linux (Android) is the dominant platform on ARM rather than Microsoft Windows, we could run into problems, "Software development is hard, and firmware development is software development with worse compilers. Firmware is inevitably going to rely on undefined behaviour. It's going to make assumptions about ordering. It's going to mishandle some cases. And it's the operating system's job to handle that. On x86 we know that systems are tested against Windows, and so we simply implement that behaviour. On ARM, we don't have that convenient reference. We are the reference. And that means that systems will end up accidentally depending on Linux-specific behaviour. Which means that if we ever change that behaviour, those systems will break. So far we've resisted calls for Linux to provide a contract to the firmware in the way that Windows does, simply because there's been no need to - we can just implement the same contract as Windows. How are we going to manage this on ARM? The worst case scenario is that a system is tested against, say, Linux 3.19 and works fine. We make a change in 3.21 that breaks this system, but nobody notices at the time. Another system is tested against 3.21 and works fine. A few months later somebody finally notices that 3.21 broke their system and the change gets reverted, but oh no! Reverting it breaks the other system. What do we do now? The systems aren't telling us which behaviour they expect, so we're left with the prospect of adding machine-specific quirks. This isn't scalable."

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Towns in Umbria region switch to LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
OSS

The public administrations of the Italian cities Todi and Terni are switching to LibreOffice, announces LibreUmbria. The regional project is assisting the Umbria region's public administrations to use this free software suite of office productivity tools.

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Tor Challenge hits it out of the park

Filed under
OSS
Security

If you need to be anonymous online, or evade digital censorship and surveillance, the Tor network has your back. And it's more than a little bit stronger now than it was this spring, thanks to the Tor Challenge.

Tor is a publicly accessible, free software-based system for anonymizing Internet traffic. It relies on thousands of computers around the world called relays, which route traffic in tricky ways to dodge spying. The more relays, the stronger and faster the network.

We'd like to warmly thank our allies at the Electronic Frontier Foundation for organizing the Tor Challenge and inviting us to join them in promoting it. And most of all, thanks to the 1,635 of you who started a relay! (The FSF would have started one too, but we've already been running ours for a while.)

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SymphonyOS Review, Debian's Desktop, and Fedora 21 Alpha

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news, Debian has reportedly changed their default desktop again, this time back to GNOME. Fedora 21 Alpha made to release and Phoronix posted their first impressions. Jessie Smith reviews SymphonyOS 14.1 and Scott Nesbitt discusses scanning tools. And finally today, Softpedia covers new Plasma 5 update and Qt 5.4 will be the first to feature Wayland support.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Can Marten Mickos make 'Linux for the cloud' work for HP?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Hewlett-Packard didn’t just buy cloudy startup Eucalyptus Systems to build its fledgling OpenStack cloud biz, it also bought Marten Mickos, the firm’s Finnish CEO.

HP isn’t the first to pay for Mickos' expertise - that was Sun Microsystems, when it acquired his venture previous venture, MySQL AB, for $1bn in 2008.

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50 Noteworthy New Open Source Projects

Filed under
OSS

The list also includes a potpourri of projects from other categories, including Web content management, software-defined networking, desktop publishing, games, IT management, electronic health records, operating systems and more. All of these apps were released for the first time within the last couple of years and most of them haven't been featured on our lists in the past.

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Salix Fluxbox 14.1 Is a Lightweight Modular Distro Based on Slackware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Slack

Along with the Openbox version of Salix, the Fluxbox edition is one of the lightest iterations available in the series. Unfortunately, it's not exactly on the list of priorities for the developer and it's been trailing a little behind, but now it's ready.

Salix is one the few very active distributions based on Slackware, which is a famous and very stable operating system that has been around for quite a while. It's rather different from what everyone else is doing because it is a modular system and it has a rolling release model.

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Oracle and Canonical collaborate on support for Oracle Linux on Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

As part of this collaboration, Canonical will support Ubuntu as a guest OS on Oracle Linux OpenStack, and Oracle will support Oracle Linux as a guest OS on Ubuntu OpenStack. Canonical will test Oracle Linux as a guest OS in its OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL) program. This gives customers the assurance the configuration is tested and supported by both organisations.

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Debian Switches Back To GNOME As Its Default Desktop

Filed under
GNOME
Debian

There still though is the chance for change as Hess explains, "Some desired data is not yet available, but at this point I'm around 80% sure that gnome is coming out ahead in the process. This is particularly based on accessibility and to some extent systemd integration... The only single factor that I think could outweigh the above is media size, if there was a strong desire by Debian to see a single CD with a standalone usable desktop. However, the Debian live team doesn't care about fitting on a traditional CD; and while the Debian CD team hasn't made a statement, my impression as a member is that this is not something we care enough about any more to make it a hard blocker on the default desktop."

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3 tools that make scanning on the Linux desktop quick and easy

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Whether you're moving to a paperless lifestyle, need to scan a document to back it up or email it, want to scan an old photo, or whatever reason you have for making the physical electronic, a scanner comes in handy. In fact, a scanner is essential.

But the catch is that most scanner makers don't have Linux versions of the software that they bundle with their devices. For the most part, that doesn't matter. Why? Because there are good scanning applications available for the Linux desktop. They work with a variety of scanners, and do a good job.

Let's take a look at a three simple but flexible Linux scanning tools. Keep in mind that the software discussed below is hardly an exhaustive list of the scanner software that's available for the Linux desktop. It's what I've used extensively and found useful.

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Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Enters Final Beta Freeze

Filed under
Ubuntu

"As of nowish, the archive is frozen for 14.10 Final Beta preparation, and will continue to be frozen from here until Final release next month. As with the previous release, we have a bot in place that will accept uploads that are unseeded and don't affect images. Don't take this as an open invitation to break Feature Freeze on those components, this is just to reduce the burden on the release team, so we only review the uploads that need very serious consideration," notes Canonical's Adam Conrad.

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Second Bugfix Release for KDE Plasma 5 Arrives with Lots of Changes

Filed under
KDE

"This release, versioned plasma-5.0.2, adds a month's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important such as fixing text which couldn't be translated, using the correct icons and fixing overlapping files with KDELibs 4 software. It also adds a month's hard work of translations to make support in other languages even more complete," reads the announcement.

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Qt 5.4 Will Support Applications Under A Wayland Compositor

Filed under
Development
KDE

The QtWayland support for Qt 5.4 is considered a technical preview with support of QWidget-based apps being less than ideal, the QtCompositor API in QtWayland not seeing a release for Qt 5.4, and other work still needs to be pursued. The QtCompositor API for the QtWayland module is what's needed for those out there wishing to write their own Wayland compositors using Qt. Qt's support for XDG-Shell is also less than complete and there's also not any official sub-surface protocol support for QtWayland.

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Run anywhere again: Java hooks up with Docker

Filed under
Server
OSS

Applications can more easily be redeployed on servers or made available on public clouds using Docker. "You configure it once, and once it's configured, it's very easy to [roll it out] in multiple places," Azul President/CEO Scott Sellers said in an interview. Although others have offered Java via Docker, Azul says its open source Zulu JVM is the first Docker-based Java offering to be officially certified as Java-compliant and fully supported. "This is really needed in order for enterprises to deploy Java on Docker in real production environments," Sellers said.

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Automated language detection

Filed under
KDE

First, it looks at all the characters in the sentence it wants to guess the language for. Thanks to QChar, we can easily find which writing system/script the characters belong to, and that allows us to filter out a bunch of languages. The list of possible languages from this is sorted by longest substring; this means that if you write a sentence in one script (for example latin), and then have a single word in for example cyrillic, it will consider latin languages first.

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Wink adds touchscreen-based home automation hub

Filed under
Android

The Relay runs a version of Android on an unstated processor, and duplicates the Wink Android app on its 4.3-inch multi-touch display. Wink lists only WiFi, Bluetooth, and ZigBee as supported protocols, with no mention of Z-Wave or other wireless radios. However, Wink suggests the Relay replaces all features of the Hub, stating that “Relay will automatically connect with all Wink App Ready products, from light bulbs to garage door openers, as well as Wink App Compatible products that use the Wink Hub to connect.” The company also says that Relay supports 100 products from 15 trusted brands that already work with Wink.

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