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Saturday, 18 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LG V30 review: Good hardware design marred by bad camera, software Rianne Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 2:02pm
Story Deepin 15.5 Beta——Small and Beautiful Features Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 1:40pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 12:14pm
Story Tails 3.3 is out Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 8:45am
Story Linux Runs on All of the 500 Fastest Supercomputers itsfoss 15/11/2017 - 8:31am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:32am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:19am
Story Linux Mint 18.3 Betas Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:18am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:17am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/11/2017 - 5:12am

Games: Space Pirates And Zombies, Rec Center Tycoon and More

Filed under
Gaming

Security: Fancy Bear, MINIX, WikiLeaks Vault 8, Face ID

Filed under
Security
  • New Microsoft Word attacks infect PCs sans macros

    Fancy Bear, the advanced hacking group researchers say is tied to the Russian government, is actively exploiting a newly revived technique that gives attackers a stealthy means of infecting computers using Microsoft Office documents, security researchers said this week.

    Fancy Bear is one of two Russian-sponsored hacking outfits researchers say breached Democratic National Committee networks ahead of last year's presidential election. The group was recently caught sending a Word document that abuses a feature known as Dynamic Data Exchange. DDE allows a file to execute code stored in another file and allows applications to send updates as new data becomes available.

  • Minix Inside!

    Everything was find but in May a major security flaw was discovered and the fix required an update data to the AMT code. An update that many machines are unlikely to get. Since then various security researchers, mostly Google-based, have been looking into the hardware and the software and have made the discovery that there is an additional layer in the hardware that Intel doesn't talk about. Ring 3 is user land, Ring 0 is OS land and Ring -1 is for hypervisors. These we know about, but in addition there is Ring -2, used for the secure UEFI kernel and Ring -3, which is where the management OS runs. Guess what the management OS is Minix 3 - or rather a closed commercial version of Minix 3.

  • WikiLeaks: CIA impersonated Kaspersky Labs as a cover for its malware operations

    WikiLeaks, under its new Vault 8 series of released documents, has rolled out what it says is the source code to a previously noted CIA tool, called Hive, that is used to help hide espionage actions when the Agency implants malware.
    Hive supposedly allows the CIA to covertly communicate with its software by making it hard or impossible to trace the malware back to the spy organization by utilizing a cover domain. Part of this, WikiLeaks said, is using fake digital certificates that impersonate other legitimate web groups, including Kaspersky Labs.

  • My Younger Brother Can Access My iPhone X: Face ID Is Not Secure

    What this means is family members, who are probably the people you don’t want accessing your device, can now potentially access your iPhone. Especially your younger brother, or Mom… or Grandma.

KDE Frameworks 5.40 Software Stack Brings OpenSSL 1.1 Support, over 80 Changes

Filed under
KDE

KDE Frameworks 5.40.0 is here as the latest stable release of the software stack used in Linux-based operating systems that want to offer their users support for KDE apps, and it looks like it brings over 80 bug fixes and improvements across various of the included components.

Among the highlights, we can mention that KDELibs 4 support was enhanced with support for OpenSSL 1.1.0 in the KSSL library, HTTPS support is now used for all KDE URLs, improved recognition of WPS Office presentations, support for categories in KfilesPlacesView, as well as better support for the Wayland display server.

Read more

Also: KDE Frameworks 5.40 Brings Kirigami Improvements, Wayland Foreign Protocol

Samsung’s Linux on Galaxy software will bring full-fledged Ubuntu desktop to your phone (with an external display)

Filed under
Ubuntu

Samsung’s DeX dock lets you connect one of the company’s recent phones to an external display, mouse, and keyboard to use your phone like a desktop PC… assuming you’re comfortable with a desktop PC that runs Android.

But soon you may also be able to use your Android phone as a Linux PC. Samsung recently unveiled plans for “Linux on Galaxy,” promising that you’d be able to run a full-fledged Linux environment on a phone hooked up to a DeX dock.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Audio/Video: Unleaded Hangout, Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

Linux Bugs and Features

Filed under
Linux
  • Fixes MIA for Many Linux Kernel Flaws [Ed: But these are not very severe bugs as they require physical access to the machine to exploit]

    A Google code security researcher's recent discovery of 14 flaws in Linux kernel USB drivers led to last-minute fixes in the Linux 4.14 release candidate code set for distribution on Sunday.

    The flaws, which Google researcher Andrey Konovalov disclosed earlier this week, affect the Linux kernel before version 4.13.8.

    All 14 have available fixes. However, they are part of a much larger group of 79 flaws affecting the Linux kernel's USB drivers, some of which remain unpatched.

    Within this larger group of coding flaws, 22 now have a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures number, and fixes are available for them.

  • We Could See WireGuard Upstreamed In The Linux Kernel In 2018

    WireGuard is the effort led by Jason Donenfeld to provide a next-gen secure network tunnel for the Linux kernel. Jason has laid out plans and next steps for getting this interesting project merged into the upstream Linux kernel.

Software: Kdenlive, ucaresystem, FFmpeg, Calibre, NetworkManager

Filed under
Software
  • Kdenlive 17.08.3 released

    The last dot release of the 17.08 series is out with minor fixes. We continue focus on the refactoring branch with steady progress towards a stable release.

  • ucaresystem core 4.2.3 : One installer for Ubuntu and Debian based distributions

    I am pleased to announce that ucaresystem core version 4.2.3 has been released with some cool features. Now either you have an Ubuntu or Debian based distribution, you just need only one deb package installer.

  • FFmpeg Lands NVDEC-Accelerated H.264 Decoding

    NVIDIA has been shifting their focus from VDPAU for GPU-accelerated video decoding to instead the NVIDIA Video Codec SDK that offers NVENC for encoding and NVDEC for video decoding. FFmpeg has landed initial NVDEC support.

    NVIDIA has been transitioning their focus with Linux video acceleration from using the Video Decode and Presentation API for Unix (VDPAU) to the cross-platform, CUDA-based Video Codec SDK with NVENC/NVDEC while VDPAU continues to be supported for the time being.

  • Calibre Open-Source eBook Management App Now Supports the New Nook Glowlight 3

    A new update of the open-source and cross-platform Calibre ebook management software is now available for download, and it brings support for the new Nook Glowlight 3 e-reader.

    Calibre 3.12 is out, and it introduces a driver for the new Nook Glowlight 3, a 6-inch e-reader with a Carta E-ink screen with touchscreen and color-changing front light. This means that you'll be able to connect your Nook Glowlight 3 e-reader to Calibre to sync e-books.

    Furthermore, Calibre 3.12 now lets users specify extra file formats that the application doesn't support by default for wireless sending in the wireless driver, as well as to configure metadata fields that are displayed in the Book Details pop-up window by clicking on the "Configure" link at the bottom.

  • NetworkManager 1.10 Released With OpenVSwitch & WPS Connection Support

    NetworkManager 1.10 was released today as the newest version of this commonly used Linux network management utility.

Games: Cattails, Devader, Far-Out, DRM, Games for the Brain, Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • What are you playing this weekend?

    There's been a lot of really great releases for Linux lately, it's getting incredibly hard to choose what to play.

  • Like cats? Cattails is a 2D RPG with light survival elements where you're a feral cat

    I was just casually browsing through my long list of things to cover, when I came across Cattails [Steam, Official Site] and the whole idea instantly caught my interest

  • Devader is an absolutely nuts shooter coming to Linux early next year

    Get ready to defend a dying civilization in Devader [Steam, Official Site], as this absolutely nuts shooter is coming to Linux early next year.

    The game was originally made for a game-jam back in December 2015 and has ended up turning into a full game. Interestingly, it seems the developer is using Javascript to develop it. If you're interested in seeing how the game has progressed, the developer put up a bunch of albums on imgur.

  • Hardcore retro-futuristic adventure game Far-Out looks awesome, coming to Linux

    Continuing my search for Linux games to come next year, I came across Far-Out [Steam, Official Site], a hardcore retro-futuristic adventure game and damn it looks good. It's being developed by one person, so I'm quite eager to see what they've been able to achieve.

    In this classic mix of horror and adventure, you play as geneticist Zack Paterson, the lone survivor of the Selene. Find out what happened to the ship and the crew and possibly escape. The developer said they've been inspired by games like The Dig, Space Quest, Full Throttle, Blade Runner and more.

  • DRM Strikes Again: Sonic Forces Just Plain Broken Thanks To Denuvo

    You may recall that Sega released its title Sonic Mania earlier this year, without bothering to inform anyone that the game came laden with Denuvo DRM and an always-online requirement. While Sega eventually patched the always-online requirement out, Denuvo remained, as did a hefty number of viciously negative Steam reviews from gamers that couldn't play the game as they intended or who were simply pissed off that DRM like Denuvo was included without mention to the public.

  • PSA: Sonic Forces' PC port is a hot mess

    Sonic Forces has already had a bit of an uphill battle to face releasing after Sonic Mania, but it looks like PC users are going to have an even rougher time of it. Thanks to the magic of Denuvo DRM, most users can't even progress past the second level in the game. Upon reaching the first mission with your custom avatar, the game promptly crashes with little explanation. Sega has been diligent in quickly issuing a patch, at least.

    Another big problem comes from some messed up calculations with the framerate limiter. For some reason, capping the framerate at 60 results in the game playing at half speed, around roughly 32 FPS. Using the 30 FPS cap results in 22 frames per second, which is what the cutscenes are locked to. As you can clearly tell from just a numerical standpoint, this is making things look ultra weird for a lot of people. At least Forces has an unlocked framerate option, but cutscenes are pretty much busted for the time being.

  • Simon Tatham’s Portable Puzzle Collection – Games for the Brain

    I recently published an article identifying 13 fun open source puzzle games. Each game is worth downloading. As a reader pointed out, the article didn’t include an exquisite puzzle collection. That’s Simon Tatham’s Portable Puzzle Collection. Let’s call it the Puzzle Collection for brevity.

    Every game in this Puzzle Collection is published under an open source license. And the collection is portable. What does that mean? Well, the games run on almost every modern operating system. Besides Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, you can play the games on anything that supports Java, or JavaScript. They can also be played on the web.

  • Wine 2.21 is out with Direct 3D indirect draws support, also fixes for The Witcher 3 and NieR:Automata

    The latest and greatest from the Wine development team is now available with Wine 2.21 which include support for Direct 3D indirect draws.

GNOME: Builder, LibreOffice, Outreachy 2017

Filed under
GNOME
  • Code indexing in Builder

    Anoop, one of Builder’s GSoC students this past summer, put together a code-index engine built upon Builder’s fuzzy search algorithm. It shipped with support for C and C++. Shortly after the 3.27 cycle started, Patrick added support for GJS. Today I added support for Vala which was rather easy given the other code we have in Builder.

  • Simplifying contributions

    Every release of both GNOME and Builder, we try to lower the barrier a bit more for new contributions. Bastian mentioned to me at GUADEC that we could make things even simpler from the Builder side of things. After a few mockups, I finally found some time to start implementing it.

  • gtk3 + broadway + libreoffice

    Out of the box in Fedora 26 I see that our gtk3 version of LibreOffice mostly works under broadway so here's libreoffice displaying through firefox. Toolbar is toast, but dialogs and menus work.

  • Outreachy 2017 Participants Selected For Winter 2017 Open-Source Work

    The Outreachy participants for the Winter 2017 internship program for "underrepresented people in tech" have been named.

    There are 42 interns that were selected for the internship period running from December to March. The selected women and other underrepresented groups in the Linux/open-source world will be working on items including...

Devices: Linux-based Ethernet Gear, Tizen, Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

A look at Arch Linux based Antergos

Filed under
Reviews

So, I’ve mentioned a few times for my love of Arch Linux and Manjaro, but there is another player in the mix that deserves due diligence, and has actually won over my personal use vote as well; Antergos.

The main difference between Antergos and Manjaro is updates and repositories. Manjaro holds updates for further testing, Antergos does not, and Antergos uses the Arch repos directly.

That said, when you are finished installing Antergos, you are essentially left with an Arch Linux system that has a few extra bells and whistles installed, where as Manjaro is Manjaro, based on Arch. This is over-simplifying, but the essential core difference.

Antergos can be downloaded from the homepage, and comes in either a minimal ISO or a live ISO. Both are graphically bootable and use graphical installers, it’s just that one will allow you to boot into a live system and try things first, the other will not.

The installation tool is very simple to use, and anyone with prior installation experience will have absolutely no problems using it.

Read more

Also: Arch Linux Ends Support for 32-Bit Systems

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.5 and Intel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.2.5 Released

    The fifth point release to Mesa 17.2 is now available with the latest fixes while the Mesa 17.3 official release is imminent.

  • mesa 17.2.5

    Mesa 17.2.5 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    In Mesa Core a GL error related to the ARB_ES3_1_compatibility spec
    noticed with the GFXBench 5 Aztec Ruins has been corrected.

    The GLSL compiler is not giving a linker error for mismatching uniform
    precision with GLSL ES 1.00 any more. This enables, specially, several
    Android applications which violate this rule, like Forge of Empires,
    for example.

  • Intel Posts Patches For SPIR-V Generation From Mesa's GLSL Compiler

    Longtime Intel open-source graphics driver developer Ian Romanick has posted his initial set of patches for what he calls "the first of the real SPIR-V work."

  • Intel Begins Testing Early Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 4.16

    Linux 4.14 isn't even out the door yet but with the DRM-Next feature period over in preparation for the Linux 4.15 merge window, Intel open-source developers are already prepping code improvements that will in turn target Linux 4.16.

    Rodrigo Vivi announced the updated drm-intel-testing code today as the start of new feature material that will eventually find its way into the Linux 4.16 kernel next year.

Wine 2.21 Released

Filed under
Software
  • Wine 2.21 Released

    The Wine development release 2.21 is now available.

  • Wine 2.21 Supports Direct3D Indirect Draws, More ARM Work

    Alexandre Julliard has released the latest bi-weekly development snapshot of Wine as this project approaches its Wine 3.0 release around the end of the year.

  • Wine 2.21 Fixes More Witcher 3 Issues, Improves Serial Port Detection on Linux

    Wine, the open-source compatibility layer for running Windows apps and games on Linux-based and UNIX-like operating systems, has been updated today to version 2.21.

    Wine 2.21 is a development release coming eleven days after the previous milestone, Wine 2.20, to add a bunch of enhancements, such as indirect draws support in Direct 3D, better serial port detection on GNU/Linux systems, as well as better DPI scaling in the Shell Explorer.

12-Way Graphics Card OpenCL Comparison With AMDGPU-PRO 17.40 ROCm, NVIDIA 384.98

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the recent testing of the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti being our new graphics card up for Linux benchmarking as well as having a new NVIDIA Linux graphics driver release, hare are OpenCL benchmarks of 12 graphics cards using the latest AMDGPU-PRO 17.40 and NVIDIA 384.98 Linux drivers on Ubuntu x86_64.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Security: New Release of HardenedBSD, Windows Leaks Details of Windows Back Doors

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 11-STABLE v1100054
  • Kaspersky blames NSA hack on infected Microsoft software
    Embattled computer security firm Kaspersky Lab said Thursday that malware-infected Microsoft Office software and not its own was to blame for the hacking theft of top-secret US intelligence materials. Adding tantalizing new details to the cyber-espionage mystery that has rocked the US intelligence community, Kaspersky also said there was a China link to the hack.
  • Investigation Report for the September 2014 Equation malware detection incident in the US
    In early October, a story was published by the Wall Street Journal alleging Kaspersky Lab software was used to siphon classified data from an NSA employee’s home computer system. Given that Kaspersky Lab has been at the forefront of fighting cyberespionage and cybercriminal activities on the Internet for over 20 years now, these allegations were treated very seriously. To assist any independent investigators and all the people who have been asking us questions whether those allegations were true, we decided to conduct an internal investigation to attempt to answer a few questions we had related to the article and some others that followed it:
  • Kaspersky: Clumsy NSA leak snoop's PC was packed with malware
    Kaspersky Lab, the US government's least favorite computer security outfit, has published its full technical report into claims Russian intelligence used its antivirus tools to steal NSA secrets. Last month, anonymous sources alleged that in 2015, an NSA engineer took home a big bunch of the agency's cyber-weapons to work on them on his home Windows PC, which was running the Russian biz's antimalware software – kind of a compliment when you think about it. The classified exploit code and associated documents on the personal system were then slurped by Kremlin spies via his copy of Kaspersky antivirus, it was claimed.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source Networking Days: Think Globally, Collaborate Locally
    Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.
  • The Open-Source Driving Simulator That Trains Autonomous Vehicles
    Self-driving cars are set to revolutionize transport systems the world over. If the hype is to be believed, entirely autonomous vehicles are about to hit the open road. The truth is more complex. The most advanced self-driving technologies work only in an extremely limited set of environments and weather conditions. And while most new cars will have some form of driver assistance in the coming years, autonomous cars that drive in all conditions without human oversight are still many years away. One of the main problems is that it is hard to train vehicles to cope in all situations. And the most challenging situations are often the rarest. There is a huge variety of tricky circumstances that drivers rarely come across: a child running into the road, a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the street, an accident immediately ahead, and so on.
  • Fun with Le Potato
    At Linux Plumbers, I ended up with a Le Potato SBC. I hadn't really had time to actually boot it up until now. They support a couple of distributions which seem to work fine if you flash them on. I mostly like SBCs for having actual hardware to test on so my interest tends to be how easily can I get my own kernel running. Most of the support is not upstream right now but it's headed there. The good folks at BayLibre have been working on getting the kernel support upstream and have a tree available for use until then.
  • PyConf Hyderabad 2017
    In the beginning of October, I attended a new PyCon in India, PyConf Hyderabad (no worries, they are working on the name for the next year). I was super excited about this conference, the main reason is being able to meet more Python developers from India. We are a large country, and we certainly need more local conferences :)
  • First Basilisk version released!
    This is the first public version of the Basilisk web browser, building on the new platform in development: UXP (code-named Möbius).
  • Pale Moon Project Rolls Out The Basilisk Browser Project
    The developers behind the Pale Moon web-browser that's been a long standing fork of Firefox have rolled out their first public beta release of their new "Basilisk" browser technology. Basilisk is their new development platform based on their (Gecko-forked) Goanna layout engine and the Unified UXL Platform (UXP) that is a fork of the Mozilla code-base pre-Servo/Rust... Basically for those not liking the direction of Firefox with v57 rolling out the Quantum changes, etc.
  • Best word processor for Mac [iophk: "whole article fails to mention OpenDocument Format"]
  • WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!
    WordPress 4.9 has debuted, and this time the world's most popular content management system has given developers plenty to like. Some of the changes are arguably overdue: syntax highlighting and error checking for CSS editing and cutting custom HTML are neither scarce nor innovative. They'll be welcomed arrival will likely be welcomed anyway, as will newly-granular roles and permissions for developers. The new release has also added version 4.2.6 of MediaElement.js, an upgrade that WordPress.org's release notes stated has removed dependency on jQuery, improves accessibility, modernizes the UI, and fixes many bugs.”
  • New projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Cilk Plus Is Being Dropped From GCC
    Intel deprecated Cilk Plus multi-threading support with GCC 7 and now for GCC 8 they are looking to abandon this support entirely. Cilk Plus only had full support introduced in GCC 5 while now for the GCC 8 release early next year it's looking like it will be dropped entirely.
  • Software Freedom Law Center vs. Software Freedom Conservancy

    On November 3rd, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) wrote a blog post to let people know that the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) had begun legal action against them (the SFC) over the trademark for their name.

  • What Is Teletype For Atom? How To Code With Fellow Developers In Real Time?
    In a short period of three years, GitHub’s open source code editor has become one of the most popular options around. In our list of top text editors for Linux, Atom was featured at #2. From time to time, GitHub keeps adding new features to this tool to make it even better. Just recently, with the help of Facebook, GitHub turned Atom into a full-fledged IDE. As GitHub is known to host some of the world’s biggest open source collaborative projects, it makes perfect sense to add the collaborative coding ability to Atom. To make this possible, “Teletype for Atom” has just been announced.
  • Microsoft Is Trying To Make Windows Subsystem For Linux Faster (WSL)
  • Microsoft and GitHub team up to take Git virtual file system to macOS, Linux

Ubuntu: New Users, Unity Remix, 18.04 LTS News

  • How to Get Started With the Ubuntu Linux Distro
    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we’ll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)
  • An ‘Ubuntu Unity Remix’ Might Be on the Way…
    A new Ubuntu flavor that uses the Unity 7 desktop by default is under discussion. The plans have already won backing from a former Unity developer.
  • Ubuntu News: Get Firefox Quantum Update Now; Ubuntu 18.04 New Icon Theme Confirmed
    Earlier this week, Mozilla earned big praises in the tech world for launching its next-generation Firefox Quantum 57.0 web browser. The browser claims to be faster and better than market leader Google Chrome. Now, Firefox Quantum is available for all supported Ubuntu versions from the official repositories. The Firefox Quantum Update is also now available.
  • New Icon Theme Confirmed for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    ‘Suru’ is (apparently) going to be the default icon theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. That’s Suru, the rebooted community icon theme and not Suru, the Canonical-created icon theme that shipped on the Ubuntu Phone (and was created by Matthieu James, who recently left Canonical).

OnePlus 5T Launched

  • OnePlus 5T Keeps the Headphone Jack, Introduces Face Unlock and Parallel Apps
    Five months after it launched its OnePlus 5 flagship Android smartphone, OnePlus unveiled today its successor, the OnePlus 5T, running the latest Android 8.0 (Oreo) mobile OS. OnePlus held a live event today in New York City to tell us all about the new features it implemented in the OnePlus 5T, and they don't disappoint as the smartphone features a gorgeous and bright 6.0-inches Optic AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with multitouch, a 1080x2160 pixels resolution, 18:9 ratio, and approximately 402 PPI density. The design has been changed a bit as well for OnePlus 5T, which is made of anodized aluminum.
  • OnePlus 5T Launched: Comes With Bigger Screen, Better Dual Camera, And Face Unlock
    Whenever costly phones like iPhone X or Google Pixel 2 are bashed (here and here) and their alternatives are discussed, OnePlus is always mentioned. In the past few years, the company has amassed a fan base that has found the concept of “Never Settle” impressive.
  •