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Monday, 24 Nov 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Running XFCE on Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

I know what you are thinking. Big deal. Folks have been running Crouton, Chrubuntu, and even Xubuntu for some time now on their Chromebooks. Yes, but what about running XFCE straight from the cloud itself. A webapp, if you may, without an offline mode.

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GeForce GTX 970/980 Linux Benchmarks With NVIDIA 346.16 Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This week NVIDIA introduced the 346 Linux driver beta with a huge amount of changes and new features -- from GPU over-volting to NVENC and VP8 support. Curiosity got the best of me so I've now ran some GeForce GTX 970 and GTX 980 Linux benchmarks to see if the performance of these new, high-end Maxwell GPUs have changed at all with this latest proprietary driver release.

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Popcorn Time: The rocky road of 0.3.5

Filed under
Software

Yes, it really is that time again! Time for a fresh new release of Popcorn Time with it's own bugs, quirks and new features. You've probably noticed over the past week we've released Popcorn Time 0.3.5, and the few hotfixes that followed it as well.

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Ubuntu Governance: Empower It

Filed under
Ubuntu

I was really saddened to see Jono Bacon’s post today because it really seems like he still doesn’t get the Ubuntu Community that he managed for years. In fact, the things he is talking about are problems that the Community Council and Governance Boards really have no influence over because Canonical and Mark Shuttleworth limit the Community’s ability to participate in those kind of issues.

[...]

Honestly, if this is the way Jono felt then I think he should have been going to bat for the Community and Ubuntu Governance when he was Community Manager because right now the Community and Governance cannot be inspirational leaders because Canonical controls the future of Ubuntu and the Community Council, Governance Boards and Ubuntu Members have very little say in the direction of the project.

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Trisquel 7.0 LTS Belenos

Filed under
Reviews

I was very pleased with Trisquel 7.0 while I was using it. I found it to be incredibly stable and also very fast while I was opening and using applications. I did not experience any crashes or other overt indications of stability problems.

For me Trisquel 7.0 is pretty much what a desktop Linux distribution should be in terms of usability, software selection and stability. I had pretty much everything I needed right after my install was completed. And I had the satisfaction of knowing that I was using free software the entire time I used Trisquel 7.0.

I highly recommend that you check out Trisquel 7.0, even if you’re not a free software aficionado. It’s well worth a download. And once you get a taste of it, it may end up being your preferred desktop distribution.

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CAINE Provides Sturdy Support for Forensic Specialists

Filed under
Linux

Eye candy and fancy screen effects have little place in the strictly business routine of forensic techs and IT pros. The CAINE and MATE combination contribute to the smooth interface and straightforward desktop. The default setting for full panel bar transparency blends it right into the desktop's background. This further extends the uncluttered appearance of the desktop.

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AMD's "AMDKFD" HSA Driver Is Ready For Pulling In Linux 3.19

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Oded Gabbay of AMD sent out the pull request to David Airlie for trying to land the AMDKFD driver in Linux 3.19. The difference between this driver and AMDGPU is that it's already been public for a while where we're still waiting for the AMDGPU graphics driver to be published that's the new DRM driver to be shared with the Catalyst Linux user-space for supporting the AMD Radeon R9 285 and newer GPUs.

While the AMDKFD driver hasn't yet been pulled by Airlie at the time of writing, this driver has already undergone review from upstream developers and in fact revised six times through the public process. Given that the drm-next merge window is still open for a few more days, this driver stands good chances of being merged then as a new Linux 3.19 driver. Friday's sixth version contains just minor changes to the driver compared to last week.

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Pigs Flying, Popular Licenses, and LibreOffice 4.3.4

Filed under
-s

Jon maddog Hall today said that it'd be "when pigs fly" when Microsoft really embraces Open Source. In other news, Rob Zwetsloot is back with Part 2 of his top 10 Linux desktops and Jim Lynch reviewed Trisquel 7.0. LibreOffice 4.3.4 was released and Stephen O'Grady looks at the most popular Open Source licenses. Phoronix is reporting that Ubuntu will probably adopt systemd next release and Carla Schroder has some tips for KDE 4 productivity.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

New Wine

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
HowTos

As open source goes mainstream, institutions collaborate differently

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this week, I saw what the future of building government services may look like when I stumbled upon a simple dashboard of projects-in-progress. The dashboard is hosted by 18F, the new development unit within the US General Services Administration.

18F, which explicitly seeks to tap into the success of the UK's Government Digital Services unit, is pursuing a similar strategy, trying to lure developers from Silicon Valley and the ranks of civic developers all over the country with a daunting mission: change how federal technology gets done, at a time when bad government websites now damage public faith in government. Behind the dashboard is 18F's GitHub account, which exemplifies a quietly revolutionary idea that the UK has been pursuing with great success: build beautiful digital services for the public, in public.

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Ten operating systems for the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi single board computer has become incredibly popular with hobbyists, academics, educators and OEMs. It’s tiny, it’s cheap, it has great performance and it’s extremely versatile. Even better, you have a surprisingly wide choice of operating systems to help you tackle whatever project you take on. What? You thought there was only Raspbian? If so, read on. We’ll look at Raspbian first, but wait to you see what else you can run …

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DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC3 Is Out, Faster DRM Drivers Coming

Filed under
BSD

The third release candidate is out for the upcoming DragonFlyBSD 4.0 operating system release.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 has been in an RC state since last month and uploaded last night was now the third release candidate that brings more updates to the popular BSD derivative.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC2 was released just earlier this week to add procctl() support. The RC3 release has just a few changes around the procctl() system call, a segmentation fault fix, and updating time zone data.

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KDE4 Productivity Tips and Tricks

Filed under
KDE

Time is money, so I set up my main PC for maximum productivity. Everything I use the most is no more than a click away, and I have a batch of fave useful CLI and keyboard shortcuts and commands. Life is too short to wade through inefficient GUIs. I like all Linux graphical environments, and the one I keep coming back to the most is KDE. I loved it when it was pixely and not very pretty and had tons of customizability, and now it is sleek and gorgeous and has tons of customizability.

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Ubuntu Developers Devise New Terminal & Calculator Apps

Filed under
Ubuntu

Among the "Ubuntu Apps" being discussed for development today during the final day of this first Ubuntu 15.04 Online Summit is the planned improvements to the calculator and terminal applications.

While an Ubuntu Tablet could come next month and Ubuntu Phones are coming soon too, Ubuntu developers still have a long way to go to mature their default applications that ship for Ubuntu Touch as part of the Unity 8 user experience. On Wednesday I wrote about the many improvements needed to the Ubuntu File Manager and being discussed today were improvements still needed to their new terminal and calculator apps. Like the file manager, the calculator and terminal are being custom written for Unity 8 in Qt/QML and to fit in with Canonical's converged vision with these apps ultimately hitting the desktop -- likely in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

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Ubuntu Governance: Reboot?

Filed under
Ubuntu

The vast majority of these boards are populated by predominantly non-Canonical folks. I think this is a true testament to the openness and accessibility of governance in Ubuntu. There is no “Canonical needs to have people on half the board” shenanigans…if you are a good leader in the Ubuntu community, you could be on these boards if you work hard.

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Intel Sends In More Graphics Code For Linux 3.19

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Intel has sent in another round of graphics driver changes to be queued up in DRM-Next for the Linux 3.19 kernel.

The Intel DRM driver for Linux 3.19 already has initial Intel Skylake graphics support and numerous other changes. Daniel Vetter today sent in yet another drm-next pull request and he says the Intel team will have one more pull request in the coming days once it clears their QA/validation process.

Today's "drm-intel-next-2014-11-07" pull request has Skylake watermark code, reworked audio codec/ELD handling code, Skylake force-wake support, Cherryview support improvements, golden context support for Skylake, and tons of other fixes and improvements.

Find out the full list of these exciting Intel open-source Linux kernel graphics driver improvements via the mailing list pull request. The Linux 3.19 kernel cycle will get underway officially next month once Linux 3.18 has been christened.

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LibreOffice 4.3.4 Released With 60 Bug Fixes, v4.4 Shaping Up Nicely

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice 4.3.4, the fourth such minor release in the ‘fresh’ series, is composed solely of bug fixes, which is par for the course in these point releases.

Adding to the sense of deja vu is the number of bugs the foundation say have been caught in the developers’ butterfly net: around 60 or so.

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