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Wednesday, 23 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE Plasma 5.13 Looks Like an Awesome Update Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 4:00am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2018 - 3:31am
Story Introduction To VPS Or Virtual Private Server Mohd Sohail 20/05/2018 - 8:31pm
Story Raspberry Pi Series Part 4: Ten Raspberry Pi Linux Distributions To Get You Going In 2018 Mohd Sohail 20/05/2018 - 6:38pm
Story Linux 4.16.10, 4.14.42, and 4.9.101 Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 2:03pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 12:16pm
Story Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:40am
Story Video of AsteroidOS Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:38am
Story KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:24am
Story FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux itsfoss 20/05/2018 - 8:35am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The desktop belongs to Electron

    I’ve been using a Pixelbook over the past week, checking out the new Linux application functionality. It’s not ready for prime time, but it’s a billion times better than the last time I tried to run Linux apps on Chrome OS.

  • P-State Powersave Improvements May Help Boost I/O Performance

    Those running Intel Skylake servers may soon see better I/O performance if using the P-State powersave governor that is often the default on many Linux distributions.

  • Free Webinar on Community-Driven Governance for Open Source Projects

    Topics such as licensing and governance are complex but nonetheless critical considerations for open source projects. And, understanding and implementing the requirements in a strategic way are key to a project’s long-term health and success. In an upcoming webinar — “Governance Models of Community-Driven Open Source Projects” — The Linux Foundation’s Scott Nicholas will examine various approaches for structuring open source projects with these requirements in mind.

  • Google Summer of Code, Porting Keyboard KCM to Qt Quick!

    I am Gun Park, and I’m excited to finally join the wonderful KDE community through this amazing opportunity called Google Summer of Code 2018. Thanks for all the people that have supported and led me to this journey!

  • Google Summer of Code with KDE
  • Announcing Board of Directors Elections 2018

    From 2016 to 2017, I was a director on the GNOME Foundation Board of Directors. This is a great opportunity for anyone working on the GNOME project. And because Board elections are coming up, I wanted to share the news.

  • How to connect Ubuntu 18.04 to your Google account
  • Have a Release Party, Promote openSUSE’s Newest Version

    There are just 9 days left for the release of openSUSE Leap 15 and the community can help spread the word of the release by having a release party and promoting the newest version of Leap.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2018

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Truth is More Important Than Harmony

    Today I did a very silly thing, because it was the right moment and the right audience…

    No, it probably wasn’t! But I figured it was probably as close as it would get to one. Of course it will brand me further as a troublemaker, but that’s not entirely fair– I really wasn’t the one who started the trouble.

    Devuan’s structure is clearly built on the bazaar– when they find something unofficial that can help Devuan more than hurt it, they just offer the opportunity to be official.

    This is based on observation and it may not be true as a solid rule, but it happened with Devuan-live (and it’s one the best moves Devuan made– it helped me to believe they can make timely, great decisions) and it appeared to be happening eventually with vdev (unfortunately abandoned by its author) and it appears to have happened with the now-official Devuan forum: https://devuan.org/

  • Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 32 released

    We've just released Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 32. It's available from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2045311.1, or via 'pkg update' from the support repository at https://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/support .

  • Solaris 11.3 SRU 32 Released With Package Updates

    While waiting for Solaris 11.4 to be released, Oracle has today rolled out its thirty-second stable release update to Solaris 11.3.

    With this latest SRU to the two-year-old Solaris 11.3 is now Apache 2.4.33, OpenSSL 1.0.2o, Wireshark 2.4.6, Perl 5.22, Python 2.7.14, and a wealth of other package updates. There are also some new system calls for yielding better network performance, netstat providing more UDP socket statistics, and various other minor enhancements.

  • Telenav Open Sources Its AI Map-Making Technology to Improve OpenStreetMap and Announces $10,000-Prize Contest
  • Open source HarperDB database solution studio launched

    “With the release of the HarperDB studio, we are providing tools that the industry expects while at the same time taking it a step further and including analytical capabilities to shorten the data value chain and provide accessible, real-time actionability on big data for IoT and HTAP use cases,” said HarperDB CEO Stephen Goldberg.

Software and Games Leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • How to speak Linux [Ed: she actually means GNU]

    I didn’t even stop to imagine that people pronounced Linux commands differently until many years ago when I heard a co-worker use the word “vie” (as in "The teams will vie for the title") for what I’d always pronounced “vee I.” It was a moment I’ll never forget.

  • Ksnip And Flameshot: Qt5 Shutter Screenshot Tool Alternatives

    Shutter is a great application for taking screenshots in Linux, but it has only received bug fixes for years. The application continues to use Gtk+ 2 and doesn't seem to be getting anywhere as far as Gtk+ 3 is concerned.

    Furthermore, the Shutter image editor (which allows adding text, annotations, etc.) now requires installing old libraries to get it to work in recent Linux distributions.

    This article presents 2 Shutter alternatives for taking screenshots on Linux desktops, that are actively developed: Ksnip and Flameshot. Both applications use Qt 5.

    As a side note, I considered the following features to be required in order to compete with Shutter: the ability to upload an image directly from the screenshot tool to some image host, and support for drawing / annotations.

  • Will ‘Htop’ Replace Default ‘Top’ Monitoring Tool in Linux?

    top is a traditional command-line tool for monitoring real-time processes in a Unix/Linux systems, it’s comes preinstalled on most if not all Linux distributions and shows a useful summary of system information including uptime, total number of processes (and number of: running, sleeping, stopped and zombie processes), CPU and RAM usage, and a list of processes or threads currently being managed by the kernel.

  • Cockpit 168

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 168.

  • FOSS game community slump and question about getting images in palepeli

    There is a thread in freegamedev.net which I have been following for the past few weeks.

    In the back-and-forth argument, there I believe most of the arguments shared were somewhat wrong.

    While we have AAA projects like 0ad and others, the mainstay of our games should be ones which doesn’t need any high-quality textures and still does the work.

    I have been looking at a Let’s play playlist of an indie gem called ‘Dead in Vinland’

  • Release GCompris 0.91

    Here is GCompris 0.91, a new bugfix release to correct some issues in previous version and improve a few things.

    Every GNU/Linux distribution shipping 0.90 should update to 0.91.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Audiocasts/Shows: Cooking with Linux and This Week in Linux

Filed under
Misc
  • Cooking with Linux (Without a Net)

    It's Tuesday, and it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net) where I do some live Linuxy and open source stuff, live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. Today, we're going back to WSL and trying to run X Windows and we're going to take a Linux distribution most people have never heard of out for a spin.

  • Episode 28 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, check out some big distro release news from Fedora, CentOS, CoreOS, KaOS and more. There’s new versions of Firefox, Kdenlive, GNOME and Cinnamon available. Lubuntu announces their switch to LXQt by default. If you’re interested in learning Python, Humble Bundle has a great Python Development bundle available. Ubuntu 18.10’s codename was announced and some of the Ubuntu Flavours might be dropping support for 32bit ISOs in the 18.10 cycle. Google confirmed that Linux Apps are coming to ChromeOS. Then later in the show we’ll look at some gaming news from Atari and Valve, also some mobile news from Puri.sm and Android. All that and much more!

Gadgets With Linux or Modding

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets
  • Open-source WearOS alternative “AsteroidOS” now available for several smartwatches
  • AsteroidOS 1.0 released: Open source smartwatch operating system (for Wear OS devices)
  • AsteroidOS 1.0, an open source smartwatch OS, released for certain Android Wear watches
  • Building a DIY amp kit that's great for vinyl records

    About a week after I wrapped up my last article where I talked about needing another stage of amplification to take advantage of my new 0.4mV phono cartridge, all the remaining bits and pieces I had ordered online to build the Muffsy phono head amplifier kit arrived. I had the amplifier kit, the power supply kit, the back-panel kit (all from Muffsy), the case (from a very efficient supplier in China), the temperature-controlled soldering station, and the wall wart (from a very efficient supplier in California).

    I watched the entertaining "how to solder" videos linked on Muffsy's site and realized I needed a few more things—like the thin solder mentioned on those videos and some solder wick. So, on an unusually bright and sunny Saturday morning, I visited a local electronics supply store, picked up the last items, and started building.

    [...]

    I contacted "the person behind Muffsy," Håvard Skrodahl, with some questions. He responded very quickly, and we ended up having a most delightful conversation. Moreover, it turns out Håvard is a system administrator and does this "kit thing" as a side gig. We discussed (or maybe lamented) that "back in the good old days" it was possible to buy all sorts of electronics kits, from Heathkit, Dynaco, David Hafler, and others. Today, there are still audio kits available, but it seems to be of lesser interest. Too bad! I am very grateful to Håvard for open sourcing so much of his materials.

  • UP Core SBC begins shipments

    Aaeon has begun shipping its community-backed “UP Core” SBC starting at $99, featuring a quad-core Atom x5-Z8350, up to 4GB RAM and 64GB eMMC, plus WiFi, BT, HDMI, USB 3.0, and RPi HAT compatibility.

    Aaeon has achieved volume production for its UP Core SBC, a smaller (66 x 56.5mm) version of the UP board. The UP Core supports the same OSes as the UP — Android 6.0, Ubuntu, Ubilinux, and Yocto based Linux, as well as Windows 10 and Windows IoT Core — running on the same quad-core, up to 1.84GHz Intel Atom x5-Z8350 from the Cherry Trail family.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Helping enterprises adapt to open source switching

    Enterprise adoption of open source switching hasn't kept pace with cloud providers and telcos. What are some of the barriers blocking the use of disaggregation?

    [...]

    Today, there are a number of NOSes available from vendors both large and small -- suitable for use in a variety of ways, including top of rack, where the Open Compute Project (OCP) has provided the underlying open source switching design standard.

    [...]

    Disaggregated NOS often requires Linux knowledge, rather than the familiar command-line interfaces known by conventional network engineers. Its deployment may rely on an automation-based Agile process, such as NetOps, which differs from predictable IT processes, like IT service management.

  • Summer of Code: Quick Update

    I noticed that my blog posting frequency is substantially higher than last year. For that reason I’ll try to keep this post shorter.

    Yesterday I implemented my first prototype code to encrypt and decrypt XEP-0374 messages! It can process incoming PubkeyElements (the published OpenPGP keys of other users) and create SigncryptElements which contain a signed and encrypted payload. On the receiving side it can also decrypt those messages and verify the signature.

    I’m still puzzled about why I’m unable to dump the keys I generate using pgpdump. David Hook from Bouncycastle used my code to generate a key and it worked flawlessly on his machine, so I’m stumped for an answer…

    I created a bug report about the issue on the pgpdump repository. I hope that we will get to the cause of the issue soon.

  • BCE Panel: Open Source Makes Telcos 'Nimble'

    Big Communications Event -- Open source can help telcos become "nimble," and shed their history of "wait and see," James Feger, CenturyLink VP of network virtualization, said here Tuesday at Light Reading's Big Communications Event (BCE).

    "The power of open source is it allows telcos to be more nimble, rather than the wait-and-see attitude we've traditionally been viewed with," CenturyLink Inc. (NYSE: CTL)'s Feger said, speaking on a panel about open source in telecom.

    Indeed, innovation rather than cost savings are the main reason to adopt open source, noted Csaba Kiss Kallo, head of connectivity, mobility and security portfolio at Vodafone Ireland. "'Free' is not the main reason we go after open source. The reason is agility -- the benefits you get from an ecosystem and development, those thousands of software developers who've put their knowledge together and developed something that can be used by everyone in the community," he said. (See Vodafone Prioritizes Automation as Efficiency Bolsters Margins.)

  • OpenFin contributes FCD3 program to Fintech Open Source Foundation

    The Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), a nonprofit foundation promoting open innovation in financial services, together with OpenFin, the operating system powering digital transformation on financial desktops, today announced the contribution by OpenFin of the FCD3 program into the Foundation’s open source governance framework.

    Financial applications are often difficult or impossible to connect to one another, requiring users to continuously re-key information, hampering productivity and creating operational risk. The Financial Desktop Connectivity and Collaboration Consortium (FDC3) solves the problem by providing industry standards for desktop application interoperability.

  • App development tool provider Fuse joins open source community

    Fuse is joining the open-source world with the release of Fuse Open. Fuse is a cross platform mobile app development tool suite that supports Android and iOS applications. that aims to reduce development times and resources.

  • Ceph Day London 2018 Recap

    Some days since the Ceph and CloudStack Day in London last month now. It was a great event, great presentations and a lot of networking with the local community.

  • New in Firefox 61: Developer Edition

    Firefox 61: Developer Edition is available now, and contains a ton of great new features and under-the-hood improvements.

  • Zerocat Chipflasher "board-edition-1" now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom

    This is the first device under The Zerocat Label to receive RYF certification. The Chipflasher enables users to flash devices such as laptops, allowing them to replace proprietary software with free software like Libreboot. While users are able to purchase RYF-certified laptops that already come with Libreboot pre-loaded, for the first time ever they are capable of freeing their own laptops using an RYF-certified device. The Zerocat Chipflasher board-edition-1 is now available for purchase as a limited edition at http://www.zerocat.org/shop-en.html. These first ten limited edition boards are signed by Kai Mertens, chief developer of The Zerocat Label, and will help to fund additional production and future development of RYF-certified devices.

    "The certification of the Zerocat Chipflasher is a big step forward for the Respects Your Freedom program. Replacing proprietary boot firmware is one of the first tasks for creating a laptop that meets RYF's criteria, and now anyone can do so for their own devices with a flasher that is itself RYF-certified," said the FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

    An RYF-certified flashing device could also help to grow the number of laptops available via the RYF program.

    "When someone sets out to start their own business selling RYF-certified devices, they now have a piece of hardware they can trust to help them with that process. We hope to see even more laptops made available under the program, and having those laptops flashed with a freedom-respecting device will help to set those retailers on the right path from the start," said the FSF's licensing & compliance manager, Donald Robertson, III.

  • Searching Open Source Material in the Age of Information

    Intelligence analysts are thought to be commensurate experts in writing, research, and analysis, but does the next generation of analysts have the skills necessary to be successful in the intelligence field? One of the greatest challenges for an analyst today is that the amount of information—as well as the means in which it’s shared—is growing exponentially.

    Intelligence analysts must be able to gather, correlate, analyze, and evaluate information from a wide variety of sources. These sources can include law enforcement portals and databases, surveillance systems, intelligence networks (various disciplines), geographic information systems (GIS), and private data-mining databases (subscription-based).

  • Global Nonprofit Patientory Stiftung Unveils And Launches Open-Source Blockchain Network, 'HealthNet,' At Inagural Blockchain In Healthcare Summit
  • Lemonade launches an open source insurance policy that anyone can edit

    According to a news release, the policy is open to editing from the ‘wisdom of the crowd’, turning the traditional way of crafting an insurance policy on its head. Because the policy is open source, it’s not copyrighted, which means the community can edit it on Github it and all of Lemonade’s competitors have access to it. The policy is also written in English and is intended for US renters, but the company plans to expand it to cover other lines, languages, and legal jurisdictions.

  • Lemonade Launches World’s First ‘Open Source’ Insurance Policy
  • Lemonade wants to rewrite the insurance policy itself
  • Insurtech Lemonade Posts “Open Source Insurance Policy,” Seeks Feedback on Github
  • Lemonade unveils open source policies

Qt 3D Studio 2.0 Beta Available

Filed under
Development
  • Qt 3D Studio 2.0 Beta Available

    We are getting close to releasing the Qt 3D Studio 2.0 and the first Beta is released today. First beta packages are now available through the Qt online installer & Qt download. Let’s have a quick summary of the changes & new features we are introducing. For detailed information about the Qt 3D Studio please visit our web pages at: https://www.qt.io/3d-studio

  • Qt 3D Studio 2.0 Reaches Beta

    Qt 3D Studio, the 3D focused user-interface IDE born out of NVIDIA's big code contribution to Qt, is now in beta for its version 2.0 update.

    The big focus for Qt 3D Studio 2.0 has been on developing a new runtime based upon Qt 3D. That is happening and Qt 3D Studio is still on track for releasing around June while the Qt 3D Studio 2.1 release is expected in September and Qt 3D Studio 2.2 in December, per earlier communication.

GNOME: Endless OS 3.4, Flatpak 1.8 and Lots of Hackfesting

Filed under
GNOME
  • Endless OS 3.4 Released With New Features, Linux 4.15, And Phone Companion App

    Founded in 2011, Endless Mobile, Inc. develops Linux-based Endless OS and hardware running the same. The firm has recently shipped Endless OS 3.4, the latest and major release of the operating system.

  • Flatpak 1.8 FreeDesktop.org Runtime Is Yocto-Free, Powered By BuildStream

    The current Flatpak runtimes are based upon the 1.6 FreeDesktop.org runtime but a major new version is in the works.

    Unlike the current Freedesktop runtime where the lower-layer is built using Yocto and the upper-layer built with Flatpak-Builder, the new 1.8 Freedesktop runtime is making use of BuildStream.

  • Introducing the 1.8 freedesktop runtime in the gnome nightly builds

    All the current Flatpak runtimes in wide use are based on the 1.6 Freedesktop runtime. This is a two-layered beast where the lower layer is built using Yocto and the upper layer is built using flatpak-builder.

  • GNOME's 2018 Performance Hackfest Wraps Up In Cambridge

    GNOME's 2018 Performance Hackfest is wrapping up today in Cambridge, UK after spending the past few days focusing on how to better optimize the desktop stack for RAM/CPU/GPU/power efficiency. The fruits of this hackfest will hopefully become apparent with the GNOME 3.30 release due out this September.

    The GNOME Foundation and Raspberry Pi Foundation put on this latest developer gathering to focus on improving GNOME's performance. Among their work was looking at how to improve the graphics performance of GNOME Shell, reducing system memory usage, looking at slow I/O issues, and more.

  • Fractal Hackfest in Strasbourg

    Last week we had an intense 4-day hackfest in Strasbourg to map out the future of Fractal, a native GNOME Matrix messaging app. The event was held at Epitech in Strasbourg’s old town, and organized by Alexandre Franke. Among the attendees were core Fractal contributors Daniel, Alexandre, Eisha, and Julian, as well as Dorota, Adrien, and Francois from Purism. Special thanks go to Matthew from the Matrix core team for joining us on the first two days.

  • Internationalization of Fractal (part 2)

    For my investigations, I first tried to write a textual program that works with gettext. I spent quite some time to figure out how all of this works but I finally was able to make it work. And that means that we should be able to implement i18n for Fractal using gettext!

  • GNOME Performance Hackfest

    We’re about to finish the three days long first GNOME Performance Hackfest here in Cambridge.

    We started covering a few topics, there are three major areas we’ve covered and in each one of those there has been a bunch of initiatives.

  • GIMP 2.10.0 is out!

    So we are a bit late to announce it, since this happened on April 27, during Libre Graphics Meeting 2018 (by the way, can you spot ZeMarmot team, Aryeom and Jehan, in the goodbye photo of the meeting?), but yeah after 6 years of hard work, GIMP 2.10.0 is finally out!

    This is a huge release. You can read the release notes which are scrolling like forever and that is still not actually the full deal. We had so many awesome changes and cool new features in this release that we had to cut down the release notes contents when writing it.

Security: Updates, Russia, RHEL, Thunderbird and More

Filed under
Security

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Review: The Perfect Blend of Ubuntu and Budgie Desktop

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Solus Linux is loved for many reasons. Its flagship desktop environment Budgie, in my opinion, is the biggest reason to love Solus. While there was no shortage of desktop environments in the Linux domain, the arrival and the acceptance of Budgie desktop environment by a widespread audience, clearly showed that there was a huge scope (or even a need?) for a modern, intuitive and non-intrusive desktop environment.

But all is not well in Solus land. Solus unlike a majority of Linux distros is not based on any other parent distro. Solus is written from scratch and has it’s own package management system and software repository. I loved Solus 3. But as an ardent Linux user, I need the latest packages and support from newer software, which, at the moment is not that good on Solus. The software repository is not as vast as that of Ubuntu. Also, the package manager itself needs to evolve.

Read more

Benchmarks and Phoronix Test Suite

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Xubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver - Middle ground

Filed under
Reviews

Year 2016 was the year of Xfce. Year 2017 belongs to Plasma. This year, so far, it seems MATE is the innovative beast, and Xfce is sort of stagnated, without pushing the initiative. I think secretly the projects are afraid to make things better, because that will break the neverending cycle of development. After all, for devs, the only thing that matters is coding. User experience is an alien concept. And inside this gap, Xubuntu 18.04 fits perfectly. Which means not that well.

The distro did the basics okay - media, phones, apps. Package management can be better, battery life can be better, network support can be better, the visual side of things can be a whole lot better. There were way too many inconsistencies, and the distro lacks the love and fun that it used to have only a year ago. Is it apathy, exhaustion, mere luck? I don't know. But Xubuntu Beaver feels like a product of habit rather than love and passion. And it is not LTS solid. Plus very little actual innovation, which can sort of be excused, but then why all them bugs? Overall, Bionic behaves something like 6.5/10. Worth checking, but for the time being, the other lightweight option - Ubuntu MATE - seems more mature and fun ready. It will be quite interesting to see how things evolve over the coming months. Check it, don't expect any miracles.

Read more

Also:

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 15 May 2018
  • Top Snaps in April 2018

    In case you missed it, here are some of the snaps we featured during April 2018. Here you’ll find snaps to enhance your productivity, tools for creatives, IDEs for developers and games for the weekend.

    You can stay up to date with our editorial picks by following @snapcraftio on Twitter where we share three new and interesting snaps a week. We’d also love to hear what your favourite snaps are, perhaps you’ve found something we’ve missed.

Creating Virtual Disks Using Linux Command Line

Filed under
Linux

​Linux is indeed a great system with excellent tools at our disposal. There are lots of things that can be achieved using the terminal. One such activity is creating virtual hard drives. Your Linux system should already have the tools required to do this without the need for virtual machine software.

Read<br />
more

Red Hat: 'Serverless' and Women

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Summit: Functions as a Service with OpenWhisk and OpenShift

    Serverless computing (often called Functions-as-a-Service, or FaaS) is one of the hottest emerging technologies today. The OpenWhisk project, currently in incubation at Apache, is an open-source implementation of FaaS that lets you create functions that are invoked in response to events. Our own Brendan McAdams gave a presentation and demo that explained the basics of serverless, how the OpenWhisk project works, and how to run OpenWhisk in OpenShift.

  • Next DevNation Live: Serverless and Servicefull Applications: Where Microservices Complements Serverless, May 17th, 12pm EDT
  • CRN names four Red Hat leaders to its 2018 Women of the Channel list

    We are excited to share that four of Red Hat’s channel leaders have been named to CRN’s 2018 Women of the Channel list. Margaret-Ann Bolton, senior director of Global Partner Marketing; Terri Hall, vice president of Global Cloud and ISV Partners and Alliances; Petra Heinrich, vice president of EMEA Partners and Alliances; and Kim Leavitt, director of Global Partner Marketing, were recognized by CRN for their outstanding work in the channel. Their dedication, leadership and effort has helped to lead to another year of partner successes and innovation for Red Hat. This is the sixth consecutive year that Margaret-Ann has been recognized, third consecutive year for Terri, and the first time for both Petra and Kim.

  • Video: Women and Open Source

    In this video from the Red Hat Summit, Mary Cochran from Red Hat leads a panel discussion on Women in Open Source.

DOSBox Part 1: Introduction, Startup Scripts and The Keymapper

Filed under
Linux

DOSBox is a great piece of software that allows users to run a huge collection of very old PC software dating back to the 1980s and 1990s on your Linux system. Versions for Windows, MacOS, and others exist as well.

Read<br />
more

Red Eclipse: A Fast Paced First Person Shooter Game

Filed under
Linux

​Red Eclipse is a fast-paced casual arena shooter game based on Cube 2 engine. Players can play against drones in offline mode or play against other players through networking. Slightly blending to Sci-fi, Red Eclipse features rich environment and fun gameplay.

Read more

Graphics: NVIDIA, AMD/Vega and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 390.59 Linux Driver Brings New GPU Support, X.Org Server 1.20 Compatibility

    For those using the long-lived NVIDIA 390 driver series rather than the latest NVIDIA 396 short-lived series (or happen to be stuck on 390 like for Fermi GPU support), the NVIDIA 390.59 Linux driver was released minutes ago.

    Most notable for existing NVIDIA 390 driver series is there is now xorg-server 1.20 compatibility. There is X.Org Server 1.20 support on the NVIDIA 396 series already, but for those using this long-lived driver branch, there is back-ported 1.20 server compatibility.

  • AMDGPU Feature Updates Submitted For Linux 4.18, Bringing Vega M & More

    Alex Deucher of AMD today submitted the initial batch of Radeon/AMDGPU DRM driver feature updates to DRM-Next that in turn are slated to land in the Linux 4.18 merge window in June. There's a fair amount of notable feature work this round for Radeon Linux users.

  • AMD Publishes Open-Source Driver Support For Vega 20

    AMD today published their big set of patches bringing open-source Linux kernel support for the "Vega 20" graphics processor.

    Vega 20 is the rumored 7nm AMD graphics processor that is said to be up to 70% faster than the current leading RX Vega 64 graphics card, according to some reported leaks. Vega 20 is expected to offer up to 32GB of HBM2 memory and be announced this calendar year, but there is some belief that it might just be a deep learning accelerator and not focused as a gaming graphics card or at least not initially.

  • Gallium3D's HUD Gets A Frametime Graph Capability

    In addition to being able to plot the frames per second, CPU usage, and many other possible sensor outputs, the Gallium3D Heads-Up Display (HUD) is now capable of showing the frametime while gaming.

  • Mesa 18.0.4 Coming This Week With More Fixes

    While Mesa 18.1 is expected for release this week, those riding the Mesa 18.0 stable series will also have an 18.0.4 point release coming in the next few days.

    Mesa 18.0.4 is expected for release this Thursday or Friday as the newest point release for this Q1'2018 Mesa series. Mesa 18.0.4 release candidate 1 was issued today with just over two dozen fixes.

  • Mesa 18.0.4 Linux Graphics Stack to Squash Rendering Bugs in Trine & The Witcher

    The Mesa graphics stack for Linux-based operating systems will soon receive a new maintenance update that addresses a few important bugs in some games and improves various of the included open-source graphics drivers.

    Mesa 18.0.4 is expected to arrive this week as the fourth maintenance update to the Mesa 18 series, bringing improvements to the r600 graphics driver for ATI/Radeon GPUs that fix some rendering bugs in the Trine and The Witcher video games, as well as several bug fixes for the Radeon RADV Vulkan driver.

    The Intel ANV Vulkan and Intel i965 OpenGL graphics drivers have been improved as well in this Mesa 18.0.4, which patches a leak in Intel's BLORP code for 4th Generation and 5th Generation Intel Core processors, and adds a few fixes to code emission around 16-bit integers and Image Signal Processor (ISP).

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Computer vision is a way to use artificial intelligence to automate image recognition—that is, to use computers to identify what's in a photograph, video, or another image type. The latest version of Luminoth (v. 0.1), an open source computer vision toolkit built in Python and using Tensorflow and Sonnet, offers several improvements over its predecessor. Read more

AsteroidOS and OpenWatch Aim to Open Up Smartwatch Market

The AsteroidOS project has released version 1.0 of its open source, Linux-based smartwatch distribution. Designed for after-market installation on “Wear OS by Google” (formerly Android Wear) watches, AsteroidOS can now be dual booted on seven different models. The release follows the late March announcement of an OpenWatch Project for building Android based open source custom ROMs on Wear OS watches. Read more

Best Linux Laptops of 2018

There was a time, not so long ago, when Linux was seen as an outcast operating system, and indeed one that was labelled as a ‘cancer’ by Microsoft’s former CEO Steve Ballmer. Times have now changed as the operating system - which launched in September 1991, has made some serious inroads in the server market, then in the cloud – not forgetting that it underpins the most popular ecosystem out there: Android on smartphones. Because none of the main notebook vendors – bar Dell – offer Linux as an OS option, this leaves other smaller companies the ability to carve a niche for themselves. Read more

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