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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2016 - 7:57am
Story Red Hat News (Financial Results, 3scale Takeover) Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2016 - 6:25am
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2016 - 6:18am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 11:10pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 11:08pm
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 11:07pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 11:06pm
Story GCC and GNU Parallel Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 11:04pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 11:01pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2016 - 10:47pm

Why You Should Use Ubuntu LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the most common issues I see among newer Linux users is the desire to upgrade their distribution needlessly to a new bleeding-edge version. This is especially true with those who use Ubuntu and its derivatives. In this article, I'll explain why most people would be much better off sticking to stable distribution releases that have been "in the wild" for six months or longer.

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PowerPC gains an Android 4.4 port with Big Endian support

Filed under
Android

eInfochips has ported Android 4.4 to the PowerPC architecture on behalf of an avionics customer that will use it for an HMI that monitors engine health.

eInfochips has developed the first Android port to the PowerPC CPU architecture using a modern Android build and featuring Big Endian support. The port is based on Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code for Android 4.4 (KitKat) and features Kernel 3.12.19.

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Linux kernel 4.5.7, Plasma 5.6.5, Applications 16.04.2 and Frameworks 5.23.0 available in Chakra

Filed under
KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users, together with other package updates,

Plasma 5.6.5 includes a month's worth of bugfixes and new translations, with most changes being related to plasma desktop, plasma workspace and kwin.

Applications 16.04.2 include more than 25 recorded bugfixes and improvements to 'akonadi, ark, artikulate, dolphin. kdenlive, kdepim, among others'.

Frameworks 5.23.0 include bugfixes and improvements to breeze icons, plasma framework, kio and ktexteditor, among others.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux 4.7-rc4 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds announced the release of the Linux 4.7-rc4 kernel on Sunday night.

    Linus explained in the announcement, "It's been a fairly normal week, and rc4 is out. Go test. The statistics look very normal: about two thirds drivers, with the rest being half architecture updates and half 'misc' (small filesystem updates,. some documentation, and a smattering of patches elsewhere). The bulk of the driver updates are usb and gpu, but there's iio, leds, platform drivers, dma etc)."

  • Oracle Releases Third Beta of VirtualBox 5.1 with 64-Bit Solaris and Qt5 Fixes

    Simon Coter, Principal Product Manager Oracle VM and VirtualBox, has announced the release of the third Beta build of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.1 open-source and cross-platform virtualization software.

    VirtualBox 5.1 promises to be a major release that will introduce a significant number of new features and improvements, among which we can mention a revamped installer based on the latest Qt5 technologies, and the ability to rebuild kernel modules without the Dynamic Kernel Module Support (DKMS) framework.

  • Monitor Linux With Netdata

    Netdata is a real-time resource monitoring tool with a friendly web front-end developed and maintained by FireHOL. With this tool, you can read charts representing resource utilization of things like CPUs, RAM, disks, network, Apache, Postfix and more. It is similar to other monitoring software like Nagios; however, Netdata is only for real-time monitoring via a web interface.

  • SoftMaker FreeOffice
  • RDO Triple0 QuickStart HA Setup - Work in progress
  • Qt 5.7 Consolidates Open Source, Commercial Versions Under New Licensing

    The Qt Company has released a new version of its namesake C++ cross-platform app dev tool, featuring new licensing that consolidates the open source and commercial versions of its Qt for Application Development offering.

  • KDE Desktop project finally fixes 13-year-old bug

    A bug in the KDE Desktop Environment, a popular desktop for Linux users, has been fixed after 13 years, according a post from one developer for the project.

  • GTK's Roadmap Updated, Here's What Is Coming For GNOME 3.22

    This past week the GTK+ road-map was updated during the GTK hackfest with more plans for the future, on top of their new vision for GTK+ 4.0 and beyond.

    The work that remains on the GTK roadmap for the GNOME 3.22 release this fall includes the (already completed) Wayland graphics tablet support along with plans for an image viewing widget, merging GSK, an image viewing widget, moving menu placement to GDK for Mir/Wayland, cleaning up display/screen/monitor code, GtkPathBar improvements, and more.

  • Progress so far
  • Solus 1.2 Linux Distribution Released
  • Solus 1.2 "Shannon" Officially Released, First OS to Ship with Arc Icon Theme

    Softpedia has been informed today, June 20, 2016, by Solus Project's Ikey Doherty, about the release and immediate availability for download of the Solus 1.2 "Shannon" operating system.

    We've talked a lot lately about Solus 1.2 and the fact that it is coming soon. Well, today is that day, the day when you can finally enjoy all the goodies that the great Ikey Doherty and the skillful team of developers behind the Solus Project have prepared for you during the past three months, since the release of Solus 1.1.

  • Handy 2.5 Screenshot Tour
  • Zenwalk 8.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Final Release Candidate Out for Testing

    Zenwalk developer Jean-Philippe Guillemin has informed users of the Slackware-based operating system that the final Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Zenwalk 8.0 release is now available for public testing.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat, Inc. Stock Momentum Hits Strength
  • Zacks Growth Score On Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Plex Media Server on Fedora 24 weird SELinux issue

    Recently I upgraded my Plex Media Server from Fedora 23 to Fedora 24, and upon restart my Plex Media Server service was not starting.

  • Fedora 24 and CentOS/RHEL 7 repositories

    Fedora 24 repositories have been available for quite some time now, but here is the official statement that everything should be supported out of the box.

    As part of the repository availability, I would like to say that starting from Fedora 24, the repositories are self-sustained and do not require RPMFusion to be enabled. I try to preserve compatibility between the two, so if you step into any problem just open an issue to the specific package on Github, send me an email or drop a message in the comment section of the various pages. Please note that “compatible” means that actually you shouldn’t get any conflict when installing packages, and not that I will not overwrite/obsolete the packages provided in the other repositories.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • How to find out if you have the latest Android security patch
  • The OnePlus 3 Review

    In 2014 OnePlus was a company that was basically unheard of. Despite that, there was great anticipation in the Android enthusiast community about a new smartphone coming from this new company. Their first smartphone ended up being called the OnePlus One, and it was arguably the first device in a trend of smartphones that tried to bring flagship specifications to devices with prices much lower than what the big players in the smartphone market demanded for their best smartphones. The OnePlus One certainly wasn't perfect, but it showed that it was possible to produce a high spec smartphone for hundreds of dollars less than Android flagships, and what OnePlus needed to improve on was their execution.

  • Being open source is killing Android [Ed: Full journey back to the 90s, where FOSS is supposedly doom and will crash and burn even Android (FUD)]

    I'm betting that you said little can be done. After all, Android is all about being open, which means that once Google has released a new version, the OEMs and carriers are free to tinker with it to their heart's content. That then results in both the fragmentation (OEMs loading the code onto any and every device form factor they can think of), and the problems with updates (Google can't push Android direct to devices because heavens knows what modifications and tinkering have been done, both cosmetic and structural, to the code).

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Under new management, SourceForge moves to put badness in past

    It has been six months since the company formerly known as Dice (DHI Group) sold off Slashdot Media—the business unit that runs Slashdot and SourceForge—to BIZX, LLC, a San Diego-based digital media company. Since then, the new management has been moving to erase some of the mistakes made under the previous regime—mistakes that led to the site becoming a bit of a pariah among open source and free software developers.

    In an e-mail to Ars, Logan Abbott—the new president of Slashdot and SourceForge—said, "SourceForge was in the media a lot last year due to several transgressions, which we have addressed since the acquisition. Unfortunately, the media has thus far elected not to cover the improvements (probably because bad press is more popular)." In the conversation that followed, Abbott emphasized the transformation underway at SourceForge.

    Abbott has an uphill climb, to be sure. The shifting nature of the software development world has made repositories such as GitHub a go-to for open source projects of all sorts, while the focus on application downloads has shifted heavily toward the mobile world. But Abbott said he believes SourceForge is still "a great distribution channel," and that developers will come back to host with the repository "when end users see us as a trusted destination once again."

  • Can SourceForge regain credibility with Linux users and developers?
  • How cloud, open source enable new digital experience government

    Government agencies have been on the web since the 1990s, but today’s digital government strategies look very different. Far from the static sites of past years, great government sites today must be less agency-centric and more reflective of the needs of citizens and others. Sites need to be engaging, easy to navigate, available on any device and make it easier than ever for citizens, businesses and other stakeholders to access. Re-imagining digital for citizen engagement is a major investment, but the payoff is a more efficient, accessible and responsive government.

  • Open Source 2.0

    The open source movement is typically portrayed as an egalitarian response to the constraints imposed on software development by the entities that previously “controlled” software evolutions. The general principles espoused by open source, however, have a much longer history.

  • What Employers Want in an Open Source Applications Developer

    In the end, whichever method(s) you choose to brush up on or expand your skills base doesn’t really matter. What matters is that you are continuously learning and keeping current on what’s trending in tech. As a problem solver, you need to have a keen familiarity with the latest platforms and skills in order to offer up the best solutions.

  • Breathing Games Joins Open Source Initiative

    The Open Source Initiative welcomes unique community of heath care professionals and open source developers collaborating to transform breathing therapy into games.

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), recognized globally for promoting and protecting open source software and development communities, announced today that Breathing Games has become an affiliate member. Breathing Games is an international, multidisciplinary community working to improve the quality of health care and life expectancy for people with respiratory disease through therapeutic, science-based-and fun-games.

  • Netflix Open Sources New Machine Learning Tool

    While open source machine learning tools make headlines nearly every day now, it's still a young science. Los Gatos, Calif.-based Netflix is one of the many companies that has been making extensive use of machine learning tools for years, and we've reported on Netflix open sourcing a series of interesting "Monkey" cloud tools that it has deployed as satellite utilities orbiting its central cloud platform.

    Now, Netflix is open sourcing a machine learning system it built to orchestrate the workflows that improve recommendations to users on what to watch next. Here are details on this tested and hardened offering.

  • Firefox Containers Allow You to Browse with Separate Personas

    When it comes to browsers, you don't see as many truly innovative features arrive as often they did years ago. Mozilla, however, has a new idea that it is testing with the Firefox browser that does qualify as innovative.

    A new Containers Feature in Firefox lets users browse with separate personas. Here are the details.

    Containers is an experimental feature in Firefox that caters to the idea that as we browse the web we take on different personas, such as shopper, reader, communicator, etc.

  • Deutsche OpenStack Tage 2016
  • Arduino Open Source Self-Reconfigurable Modular Robot (video)

    Arduino enthusiasts and makers with access to a 3D printer might be interested in a new open source self reconfigurable modular robot that has been created and powered by an Arduino Nano development board.

    Check out the video below to see the Dtto modular robot in action, and how it can both self assemble and disassemble itself and has been built as an entry for the 2016 Hackaday Prize.

  • Masterwork Tools' amazing collection of 3D printable open source tabletop gaming scenery

    It’s no secret that 3D printing technology provides a fantastic opportunity for spicing up your gaming nights. Nothing quite takes the fun out of an evening of tabletop gaming as fighting over the same cardboard constructions every time, but you don’t have to bankrupt yourself to change that. Thanks to Masterwork Tools’ excellent OpenForge 2.0 project, you can now easily 3D print amazing scenery pieces free-of-charge, from fantastic wall sections for D&D dungeon crawls, to castle walls, gothic crypts fantastic Egyptian-style monuments and a lot more.

Snappy vs flatpak

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Snappy vs flatpak

    There is fierce debate brewing in the Linux community right now. Here we have two rival formats for packaging software. which one will be victorious and become the standard across all Linux desktops ? The answer in our opinion is that both will find a strong following for various reasons. Both will serve the common user, but one will reign supreme for industrial use. From as security viewpoint, at least for now, Flatpak has the advantage.

  • Linux Snap Package Format Goes Multi-Distro

    Snapcraft -- the Linux package format Canonical developed for Ubuntu -- now works on multiple Linux distros, including Arch, Debian, Fedora and various flavors of Ubuntu, Canonical announced last week.

    They're being validated on CentOS, Elementary, Gentoo, Mint, OpenSUSE, OpenWrt and RHEL.

    "Distributing applications on Linux is not always easy," said Canonical's Manik Taneja, product manager for Snappy Ubuntu Core.

  • Goodbye to other packages (rpm & deb), Say Hello to Snaps

    Multiple Linux distributions and companies announced collaboration on the “snap” universal Linux package format, enabling a single binary package to work perfectly and securely on any Linux desktop, server, cloud or device.

Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Security expert Appelbaum no longer part of Debian

    Well-known privacy advocate and developer Jacob Appelbaum is no longer a member of the Debian GNU/Linux project, with his status as developer having been revoked as of 18 June.

  • Go Debian!

    As some of the world knows full well by now, I've been noodling with Go for a few years, working through its pros, its cons, and thinking a lot about how humans use code to express thoughts and ideas. Go's got a lot of neat use cases, suited to particular problems, and used in the right place, you can see some clear massive wins.

  • Wheezy LTS and the switch to OpenJDK 7

    Wheezy's LTS period started a few weeks ago and the LTS team had to make an early support decision concerning the Java eco-system since Wheezy ships two Java runtime environments OpenJDK 6 and OpenJDK 7. (To be fair, there are actually three but gcj has been superseded by OpenJDK a long time ago and the latter should be preferred whenever possible.)

    OpenJDK 6 is currently maintained by Red Hat and we mostly rely on their upstream work as well as on package updates from Debian's maintainer Matthias Klose and Tiago Stürmer Daitx from Ubuntu. We already knew that both intend to support OpenJDK 6 until April 2017 when Ubuntu 12.04 will reach its end-of-life. Thus we had basically two options, supporting OpenJDK 6 for another twelve months or dropping support right from the start. One of my first steps was to ask for feedback and advice on debian-java since supporting only one JDK seemed to be the more reasonable solution. We agreed on warning users via various channels about the intended change, especially about possible incompatibilities with OpenJDK 7. Even Andrew Haley, OpenJDK 6 project lead, participated in the discussion and confirmed that, while still supported, OpenJDK 6 security releases are "always the last in the queue when there is urgent work to be done".

  • Weekly Report for GSoC16-week 1 and week2

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Trying The Intel Vulkan Driver On Skylake With Dota 2 + Talos Principle

    With the recent report that Intel's Vulkan Linux driver should now work with Dota 2, I was curious to test out the game -- and Talos Principle -- with the latest Mesa Git code that houses this open-source "Anvil" Vulkan driver.

    With the Padoka PPA now shipping the Intel Vulkan driver by default, it's super easy on Ubuntu-based Linux systems to fetch a Mesa Git snapshot within the past day or two that does have the Vulkan driver for Intel hardware built and enabled. So that's what I went with for trying Mesa 12.1-dev state of the Intel Vulkan driver as of today on a Core i5 6600K "Skylake" box running Ubuntu 16.04.

  • Why The R9 290 & Other Select Radeon GPUs Are Performing Miserably On Linux 4.7

    With this weekend's 5-Way Mesa 12.1-dev + Linux 4.7 Git Radeon Comparison and other tests I've done on Linux 4.7 Git with Radeon hardware, the R9 290 has regressed to the point of performing noticeably worse than other AMD GCN GPUs... Many other Phoronix readers with different Rx 200/300 graphics cards have also confirmed their graphics cards performing poorly on Linux 4.7.

  • NVIDIA Launches Tesla P100 PCI-E Card
  • Mesa Lands Support For GL_EXT_window_rectangles

    The newest OpenGL extension now supported by Mesa is GL_EXT_window_rectangles.

    GL_EXT_window_rectangles is a newer OpenGL extension and explained via the OpenGL.org registry, "this extension provides additional orthogonally aligned 'window rectangles' specified in window-space coordinates that restrict rasterization of all primitive types (geometry, images, paths) and framebuffer clears."

Qt News

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • The Qt Company Is Still Aiming To Get Qt 5.8 Out This Year

    This year has already encountered the releases of the much-delayed Qt 5.6 followed quite quickly by Qt 5.7.

  • QtWebKit Technology Preview 2
  • New Technology Preview Of QtWebKit

    There's a new technology preview release of QtWebKit for those wanting to use this formerly retired WebKit-based module instead of the newer QtWebEngine that makes use of Chromium's Blink engine.

    As covered earlier this month, QtWebKit has been aiming for a return by interested developers wishing to continue to leverage WebKit in Qt applications rather than moving over to Qt WebEngine. Konstantin Tokarev who has been leading the revival on QtWebKit announced the release of its second technology preview release.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

qBittorrent’s Advanced Saving Management explained

Filed under
Software

Today's update to qBittorrent 3.3.5 introduced a feature called Torrent Management Mode to the Bittorrent client to improve torrent organization.

The program offers two options when it comes to the saving of torrents which it calls Simple Saving Management and Advanced Saving Management.

Read more

Also: qBittorrent 3.3.5 Open-Source BitTorrent Client Adds Torrent Management Mode

Development News

Filed under
Development

Samsung to increase use of Tizen OS in its products, less Android

Filed under
OS
Linux

According to a Samsung source, the Tizen Operating System could be utilised in all company devices in an effort to cut its heavy reliance on the Android platform. The source, that wished not to be named, confirmed to the Korean herald publication the importance of owning your own ecosystem:

Read more

Devil-Linux 1.8.0 Distro to Add Google Authenticator for PAM, Moves to SquashFS

Filed under
OS
Linux

Devil-Linux developer Heiko Zuerker has announced that the Devil-Linux 1.8.0 operating system is now open for development, and a Release Candidate is ready for public testing.

Read more

Rockstor 3.8-14 Linux-Based NAS Solution Gets New Interface to Power Down HDDs

Filed under
Linux

Softpedia has been informed today, June 20, 2016, by Suman Chakravartula about the immediate availability for download of the Linux kernel-based Rockstor 3.8-14 NAS-oriented operating system.

Read more

Fedora 24: Comparing Gnome, KDE Plasma, Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, LXDE

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

It is interesting to look at the gaps in this table - for example, the KDE spin doesn't include digiKam, which seems very odd, and please don't try to tell me that Gwenview should count as a photo management application! Why does the Cinnamon spin not have a music player? Perhaps I overlooked it... but I don't think so. Also, even though LXDE is expected to be a lightweight distribution, the lack of any kind of PDF viewer seems rather extreme.

So that's the whole family -- six different desktops, ranging from the most fully equipped to the most leanly stripped. They will all be available starting Tuesday, 21 July from the Fedora Downloads page. Get it while it's hot!

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today's howtos

KaOS 2016.06 Moves the Distro to Linux Kernel 4.6, Adds Full-Disk Encryption

The developers of the KaOS Linux operating system have had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the KaOS 2016.06 ISO image with some very exciting goodies. First and foremost, the devs have decided to move the distribution from the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series to Linux kernel 4.6, which makes it possible to fully automate the early microcode update. Furthermore, the default desktop environment has been migrated to the Beta of the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.7. Read more

Tiny Core Linux 7.2 Enters Development, First Release Candidate Is Out Now

The developers of one of the smallest GNU/Linux operating systems, Tiny Core, have announced that the next point release in the Tiny Core Linux 7 series, version 7.2, is now open for development. Tiny Core Linux 7.2 RC1 (Release Candidate 1) has been released today, June 25, 2016, and it lets early adopters and public testers get an early taste of what's coming to the final Tiny Core Linux 7.2 operating system in the coming weeks. Read more

Huawei CEO: Will keep using Android as long as it's open

He made the said comment in a Weibo post, where-in he also noted that Google's mobile OS has promoted the development of smartphones, which in turn has benefited consumers. Interestingly, he didn't say anything about whether or not Huawei is developing an in-house mobile OS - said to be called Kirin OS. His silence on the matter, though, can be taken as a confirmation of sorts, especially when his comment reflects the possibility of Google restricting the companies’ freedom with Android in future. Read more Also: Huawei CEO Comments On Rumors about its Independent OS