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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 12 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Open Source Group to Focus on Apps srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 3:16pm
Story UnixODBC CLI Install and Configuration srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 3:15pm
Story Where Can SUSE Linux Be Used? srlinuxx 1 07/02/2007 - 12:35pm
Story Free Works in Africa srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 11:09am
Story Testing RAID-1 on OpenSUSE srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 11:07am
Story Debian release may slip to March srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 10:30am
Story ROX Desktop provides light, quirky alternative to GNOME and KDE srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 10:28am
Story Faking the FOSS srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 10:25am
Story Work arounds for the mysterious openSuse 10.2 lock-up on Dell srlinuxx 1 07/02/2007 - 10:20am
Story WINE Gaming: Steam, Half-Life, Half-Life 2, Counter Strike Source And 1.6 srlinuxx 07/02/2007 - 8:12am

Diamonds are a girl's best friend

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Oh man, an astronomer at Princeston states that some planets in our galaxy may have a thick layer of diamonds just below the surface. Woohoo! Where's my spacesuit? Oh, none in our solar system though. Figures. Story at Reuters.

New Slack is Out

Filed under
Slack

Despite recent health issues for Patrick, Slackware Linux 10.1 has been release with mostly bug fixes and a few updates. Details and changelog on Slackware.com.

On a related note, here's a nice little summary.

More Summit Notes

Filed under
OSS

Information Week has another story covering last weeks Open Source Summit with quotes from Linus and others on the future plans for the kernel, the patent issues, and standards. A nice read.

Night that the Lights went Out in TN

Filed under
Sci/Tech
-s

We had about an hours down time this morning due to a fight between a 97 Ford Explorer and one of our old power poles. The pole lost. Well, actually you should have seen the other guy too - what a mess. There were splinters and glass everywhere. But our greedy electric company was their usual prompt self and got us back online in record time with little loss of revenue. I apologize for any inconvenience this must have caused. Big Grin Thanks.

Did SCO end up helping Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Here's a real nice article by Stuart Cohen on Businessweek Online exclaiming that SCO's legal maneuvers only made Linux stronger. It states SCO's litigation seemed to bring developers and the community together fighting for the cause. He says "we can thank SCO for helping to move Linux even faster from the fringe of the computer network to the heart of the data center."

Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This story kinda hits home for me as I now work on a computer all day for cingular wireless (formerly AT&T in our branch). I guess this is why call volume has been increasing steadily lately. Here's the full story on Reuter's slow ass site.

Linux Kernel Security is Lacking?

Filed under
Linux

Seems Jason Miller is finding fault in the Linux kernel security bug fix procedure. He goes on and on about security and how security vulnerabilities are handled. Although he mentioned that Gentoo had an accessible security contact, that really didn't apply to things like the underlying kernel. You can read the rest of his article including his thoughts on how to improve the situation here on securityfocus.

ATI has released 64-Bit drivers

Filed under
Software

According to AMDZone and ATI's own site, ATI has released 64-bit drivers for XFree86 and Xorg. Here's a link the download page.

No Case - No Problem

Filed under
Hardware
Humor
-s

Just mount every thing on the wall! LOL Here's the discussion thread with pictures. Too funny.

2004 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

Browser of the Year - Firefox (77.12%)

Distribution of the Year - Slackware (19.36%)

LiveCD Distribution of the Year - Knoppix (57.69%)

Database of the Year - MySQL (53.51%)

Desktop Environment of the Year - KDE (58.25%)

I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that an update to the acclaimed PCLinuxOS Preview 8 is in the works and possibly due out next week. Details are a bit sketchy at this time, but it seems Tom has been hard at work updating the hardware detection and mklivecd scripts. Now don't get your hopes up, but I hear it might sport a newer 2.6.10 kernel, including patches to fix a little kvm switch problem. Of course it will include all kinds of application updates and other goodies. More on this as it develops.

Mandrake's Clustering Again

Filed under
MDV

Mandrake is apparently joining a consortium to help the advancement of what I think of as distributed computing to the point of and what they are terming clustering. Mandrake has a some previous experience in that arena so maybe they can prove to be an asset. Here's a more in depth article on the subject. They want to harness our cpu cycles, and it sounds like for commercial purposes. Show me the money then I say. Until then, I'm looking for aliens.

This months Cosmo

Woo hoo Gals, this months Cosmopolitan magazine is chocked full of nice tips and tricks to tantalize even the most frigid of geeks. Big Grin It looks like Ashley Simpson on the cover, but more importantly are the words: The Power of Pre-sex, Beyond Kama Sutra, His Butt, and 50 Ways to Have Fun With Your Man. I can't wait to try some of this stuff on my man!!!

50 gmail invites?

Filed under
Google
Software

Has anyone else noticed they now have 50 gmail invites to get rid of? I couldn't even get rid of the original 5 or 6! Well, here's a summary of this weeks google wars.

Moooore Spam!

Filed under
Security

Spam has new way to evade security

E-mails via service providers clogging system

Yep, just what we need, more spam. Apparently they aren't as concerned with hiding from their isps as getting the mail out as they are now just sending it through their isps servers. Read the gory details here.

Linux leaders at open-source summit

Filed under
OSS

Here's a long borin^H^Hserious story on how Linux was represented at last weeks open-source summit. I didn't read too much of it, but it might interest you hard core advocates.

Vin Diesel going soft on us?

Filed under
Movies
-s

Have you seen the previews for Vin Diesels's new movie? He is starring in a soon to be released Walt Disney production co-starring five children! I hope all those tattoos in XXX were stick ons! Well, here's a summary of the flick and here's a shot of the promotional poster. Heck anything with Vin Diesel has got be good!

Doom3 for those with little or no PC!

Filed under
Gaming
-s

Here's a story on a board game based on and entitled Doom: The Board Game. This is apparently not breaking news, but I just heard about and got a chuckle over it a few days ago. But hey, I think it might make a neato gift for those diehard doom series lovers, or those who wished they could have played doom3 but couldn't swing the hardware upgrade! Get yours here!

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel and Graphics: Linux I/O Schedulers, Btrfs, Intel, Mesa 18.3.1 and More

  • Linux I/O Schedulers
    The Linux kernel I/O schedulers attempt to balance the need to get the best possible I/O performance while also trying to ensure the I/O requests are "fairly" shared among the I/O consumers.  There are several I/O schedulers in Linux, each try to solve the I/O scheduling issues using different mechanisms/heuristics and each has their own set of strengths and weaknesses. For traditional spinning media it makes sense to try and order I/O operations so that they are close together to reduce read/write head movement and hence decrease latency.  However, this reordering means that some I/O requests may get delayed, and the usual solution is to schedule these delayed requests after a specific time.   Faster non-volatile memory devices can generally handle random I/O requests very easily and hence do not require reordering.
  • Btrfs Restoring Support For Swap Files With Linux 4.21
    The Btrfs file-system hasn't supported Swap files on it in early a decade, but that support will be restored again with the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel.  Btrfs hasn't supported Swap files on it since 2009 thus making swap partitions necessary unless having a mix of file-systems on your box (or not caring about any swap capabilities), but now with Linux 4.21 that support will be restored for allowing swap files to be reside on Btrfs.
  • Intel's IWD Linux Wireless Daemon 0.13 Adds Opportunistic Wireless Encryption
    Intel's promising IWD open-source wireless daemon continues picking up additional functionality in its trek towards potentially replacing wpa_supplicant. Out this week is IWD 0.13.  With the IWD 0.13 release there are fixes as well as support for Opportunistic Wireless Encryption and support for the common EAP-TLS framework.
  • Intel Developing "oneAPI" For Optimized Code Across CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs & More
    Intel's 2018 Architecture Day was primarily focused on the company's hardware architecture road-map, but one of the software (pre)announcements was their oneAPI software stack. 
  • Intel Working On Open-Sourcing The FSP - Would Be Huge Win For Coreboot & Security
    Intel's Architecture Day on Tuesday was delightfully filled with an overwhelming amount of valuable hardware information, but Intel's software efforts were also briefly touched on too. In fact, Raja Koduri reinforced how software is a big part of Intel technology and goes in-hand with their security, interconnect, memory, architecture, and process pillars and that's where their new oneAPI initiative will fit in. But what learning afterwards was most exciting on the software front.
  • Linux Is Already In Good Shape For The New Features Of Intel Gen11 Graphics & Icelake
    Besides seeing Icelake demos at the Intel Architecture Day that were running on Ubuntu, with closely tracking the Linux kernel's development most of the new features presented for Sunny Cove and Gen11 graphics have already been merged or at least available in patch form for some months within the Linux ecosystem. Here's a look at the features talked about yesterday and their state on Linux.
  • Intel Details Gen11 Graphics & Sunny Cove For Icelake
    At Intel's architecture day, the company finally detailed their "Gen 11" graphics that we've been seeing open-source Linux graphics driver patches for many months (Intel OTC posted their initial open-source display driver code in early January and has continued the enablement work since) albeit elusive in substantive user details and hardware until Icelake. But today at least we can share more about the significant improvements with Gen11 graphics.
  • mesa 18.3.1
    This version disables the VK_EXT_pci_bus_info extension due to last minute issues spotted in the specification.
  • Mesa 18.3.1 Released To Disable Botched Vulkan Extension
    Mesa 18.3 was released less than a week ago while today Mesa 18.3.1 was issued due to an error in the Vulkan specification. The motivating factor for this quick Mesa 18.3.1 release was to disable the VK_EXT_pci_bus_info extension that had just been introduced weeks ago. The Vulkan working group mistakenly assumed that PCI domains are 16-bit even though they could potentially be 32-bit values. The next Vulkan spec update will change the relevant structure to be 32-bit, which is a backwards-incompatible change.
  • High resolution wheel scrolling on Linux v4.21
    Most wheel mice have a physical feature to stop the wheel from spinning freely. That feature is called detents, notches, wheel clicks, stops, or something like that. On your average mouse that is 24 wheel clicks per full rotation, resulting in the wheel rotating by 15 degrees before its motion is arrested. On some other mice that angle is 18 degrees, so you get 20 clicks per full rotation. Of course, the world wouldn't be complete without fancy hardware features. Over the last 10 or so years devices have added free-wheeling scroll wheels or scroll wheels without distinct stops. In many cases wheel behaviour can be configured on the device, e.g. with Logitech's HID++ protocol. A few weeks back, Harry Cutts from the chromium team sent patches to enable Logitech high-resolution wheel scrolling in the kernel. Succinctly, these patches added another axis next to the existing REL_WHEEL named REL_WHEEL_HI_RES. Where available, the latter axis would provide finer-grained scroll information than the click-by-click REL_WHEEL. At the same time I accidentally stumbled across the documentation for the HID Resolution Multiplier Feature. A few patch revisions later and we now have everything queued up for v4.21. Below is a summary of the new behaviour. The kernel will continue to provide REL_WHEEL as axis for "wheel clicks", just as before. This axis provides the logical wheel clicks, (almost) nothing changes here. In addition, a REL_WHEEL_HI_RES axis is available which allows for finer-grained resolution. On this axis, the magic value 120 represents one logical traditional wheel click but a device may send a fraction of 120 for a smaller motion. Userspace can either accumulate the values until it hits a full 120 for one wheel click or it can scroll by a few pixels on each event for a smoother experience. The same principle is applied to REL_HWHEEL and REL_HWHEEL_HI_RES for horizontal scroll wheels (which these days is just tilting the wheel). The REL_WHEEL axis is now emulated by the kernel and simply sent out whenever we have accumulated 120.
  • Nouveau Lands Initial Open-Source NVIDIA Turing Support - But No GPU Acceleration
    Just in time for the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel, the developers working on the reverse-engineered, open-source support for NVIDIA GeForce RTX "Turing" GPUs have published their preliminary code. But before getting too excited, there isn't GPU hardware acceleration working yet. Ben Skeggs of Red Hat spearheaded this enablement work. He's got the initial support working right now for the TU104 and TU106 chipsets, but not yet TU102 due to hardware access. The TU106 is the RTX 2060/2070 series while the TU104 is the GeForce RTX 2080 and the TU102 is the RTX 2080 Ti and TITAN RTX. Back on launch day the Nouveau community crew started their Turing reverse-engineering work. NVIDIA doesn't support nor hinder the Nouveau driver work, though these days do sample hardware to the developers and are occasionally able to answer technical questions for them.

today's howtos

Programming: Rust, 7 Programming Languages Your Developers Need to Know and Python Aplenty

Linux Foundation: Open Source Compliance, Hyperledger and Joint Development Foundation

  • New Ebook Offers Comprehensive Guide to Open Source Compliance
    The Linux Foundation has released the second edition of Open Source Compliance in the Enterprise by Ibrahim Haddad, which offers organizations a practical guide to using open source code and participating in open source communities while complying with both the spirit and the letter of open source licensing. This fully updated ebook — with new contributions from Shane Coughlan and Kate Stewart — provides detailed information on issues related to the licensing, development, and reuse of open source software. The new edition also includes all new chapters on OpenChain, which focuses on increasing open source compliance in the supply chain, and SPDX, which is a set of standard formats for communicating the components, licenses, and copyrights of software packages. “Open source compliance is the process by which users, integrators, and developers of open source observe copyright notices and satisfy license obligations for their open source software components,” Haddad states in the book.
  • Inaugural Hyperledger Global Forum Showcases Strong Community Momentum
    Hyperledger, an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, today kicked off the first day of its Hyperledger Global Forum. The event has drawn more than 650 attendees from as far as Australia and Argentina for an extended conversation about the state of open source enterprise blockchain and vision for the Hyperledger community and technologies. Headlined by keynotes like Leanne Kemp, CEO of Everledger, Hyperledger Global Forum addresses a wide range of business and technical topics. Key topics include use cases, production blockchain deployments and live demos of Hyperledger in a range of new systems. Hands-on workshops and technical talks will serve as fuel for the community development at the core of Hyperledger.
  • Hyperledger Adds Alibaba Cloud, Citi, Deutsche Telekom, we.trade and 12 more New Members at Hyperledger Global Forum
    Hyperledger, an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, today announced Alibaba Cloud, Citi, Deutsche Telekom, we.trade and 12 more organizations have joined the project. This news came during day one of the inaugural Hyperledger Global Forum in Basel, Switzerland. “We are starting Global Forum off with a bang with this impressive line-up of new members,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger. “The growing Hyperledger community reflects the increasing importance of open source efforts to build enterprise blockchain technologies across industries and markets. The latest members showcase the widening interest in and impact of DLT and Hyperledger.”
  • Firefox 64 Now Available, SoftMaker Office Announces "Load and Help" Fundraising Campaign, the Joint Development Foundation Has Joined The Linux Foundation, Google+ to End in April 2019 and Valve Releases Proton 3.16 (Beta)
    The Joint Development Foundation has joined The Linux Foundation family to "make it easier to collaborate through both open source and standards development". The press release quotes Executive Director of The Linux Foundation Jim Zemlin: "Leveraging the capabilities of the Joint Development Foundation will enable us to provide open source projects with another path to standardization, driving greater industry adoption of standards and specifications to speed adoption."