Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 13 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story iCEBreaker, The Open Source Development Board for FPGAs Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 3:14pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 1:27pm
Story Watchdog: IRS botched Linux migration Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 1:16pm
Story Graphics: Wayland's Weston, AMD, GitLab, NVIDIA Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 12:58pm
Story OpenSUSE/SUSE: 2018-2019 Elections Underway, SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4, and 'Making the Selection' (Storage) Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 12:43pm
Story Programming/Development: mental illness, newt, and more Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 12:38pm
Story Manjaro 18.0 Released – What’s New in Manjaro Illyria? Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 12:35pm
Story Audiocasts: Kubecon, The Linux Link Tech Show and FLOSS Weekly With YottaDB Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 12:33pm
Story LWN Articles About Linux (Kernel) Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 12:29pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2018 - 12:19pm

iCEBreaker, The Open Source Development Board for FPGAs

Filed under
Development
Hardware

The Hackaday Superconference is over, which is a shame, but one of the great things about our conference is the people who manage to trek out to Pasadena every year to show us all the cool stuff they’re working on. One of those people was [Piotr Esden-Tempski], founder of 1 Bit Squared, and he brought some goodies that would soon be launched on a few crowdfunding platforms. The coolest of these was the iCEBreaker, an FPGA development kit that makes it easy to learn FPGAs with an Open Source toolchain.

Read more

Watchdog: IRS botched Linux migration

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Poor IT governance prevented the IRS from making progress on a long-term effort to migrate 141 legacy applications from proprietary vendor software to open source Linux operating systems, according to an audit by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration.

Under a migration plan developed in 2014, two-thirds of targeted applications and databases were supposed to have been successfully migrated by December 2016.

However, only eight of the 141 applications targeted have successfully transitioned to Linux as of February 2018. More than one third have not even started.

Read more

Graphics: Wayland's Weston, AMD, GitLab, NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Wayland's Weston Switching Over To The Meson Build System

    Complementing the Meson build system support for Wayland itself, the Weston reference compositor now has been Meson-ized.

    Pekka Paalanen and Daniel Stone, both of Collabora, have landed the Meson build system support for the Weston compositor. At this stage the new build system should be fully working and correct.

  • AMDGPU DC Gets Polaris Corruption Fix, Some Code Refactoring

    AMD has published their latest batch of "DC" Display Core patches for the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver.

    This batch of 45 patches against this display code for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver has some code cleanups and refactoring, changes some error messages to just warnings, and has a display corruption fix affecting some Polaris hardware.

  • Investigating GitLab

    The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) kernel subsystem is a fairly small part of the kernel, he said. It is also a fairly small part of the open-source graphics stack, which is under the X.Org umbrella. DRM sits in the middle between the two, so the project has learned development tools and workflows from both of the larger projects.

    The kernel brought DRM into the Git world in 2006, which was just a year after Git came about; it was a "rough ride" back then, Vetter said. With Git came "proper commit messages". Prior to that, the X.org commit messages might just be a single, unhelpful line; now those messages explain why the change is being made and what it does. The idea of iterating on a patch series on the mailing list came from the kernel side as did the "benevolent dictator" model of maintainership. DRM, the X server, Wayland, and others all followed that model along the way.

    From the X.Org side came things like the committer model; in Mesa, every contributor had commit rights. That model has swept through the graphics community, so now DRM, the X server, and Wayland are all run using that scheme. Testing and continuous integration (CI) is something that DRM has adopted from X.Org; the kernel also does this, but DRM has adopted the X.Org approach, tooling, and test suites. For historical reasons, "almost everything" is under the MIT license, which comes from X.Org projects as well.

    There has been a lot of movement of tools and development strategies in both directions via the DRM subsystem. He thinks that using GitLab may be "the next big wave of changes" coming from the user-space side to kernel graphics, and maybe to the kernel itself eventually. This won't happen this year or next year, Vetter predicted, but over the next few years we will see GitLab being used more extensively.

  • AMDGPU For Linux 4.20 Gets The Final Radeon RX 590 Fix, Adds The New Vega PCI IDs

    With just over one week to go until the expected Linux 4.20 kernel release, Alex Deucher of AMD today sent in the latest batch of fixes to the DRM tree for landing at the end of this cycle.

    Notable about this latest set of "fixes" for the AMDGPU kernel graphics driver are:

    - The final Radeon RX 590 fix so this newer Polaris GPU no longer hangs under load. So once this Linux 4.20 material is merged to mainline, this month-old Polaris graphics card should now be happily running on Linux -- assuming you also have the latest Polaris firmware files and a recent version of Mesa. See our Radeon RX 590 benchmarks article for more details.

  • AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4 Driver Update Brings Performance Improvements, New Vulkan Bits

    AMD developers today outed their latest "AMDVLK" open-source Vulkan driver code drop dubbed AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4.

  • NVIDIA 415.23 Driver Fixes Build Issues Against Linux 4.20 Kernel

    The NVIDIA 415.23 driver was issued just to fix a build issue against the near-final Linux 4.20 kernels. In particular, there has been a build failure around the vm_insert_pfn function that is now worked around when building the NVIDIA proprietary driver's shim against the Linux 4.20 release candidates.

  • NVIDIA Now Shipping The Jetson AGX Xavier Module

    NVIDIA has been shipping the Jetson AGX Xavier Developer Kit the past few months while now they are beginning to ship the AGX Xavier Module intended for use in next-generation autonomous machines.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: 2018-2019 Elections Underway, SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4, and 'Making the Selection' (Storage)

Filed under
SUSE
  • 2018-2019 Elections Underway with Calls for Candidates and New Members

    Earlier this week, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Elections Committee posted the Schedule for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections, along with the announcement of a Membership Drive and a call for nominations and applications for Candidates to fill three vacant seats on the openSUSE Board.

    The annual Board Elections are normally expected to run in November and December, with ballots cast and results published in time for the newly-elected Board Members to take their seats on the Board at the beginning of January. However, some additional work needed to be completed for this election, and the elections were delayed in part to accommodate the additional work.

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is Generally Available

    SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is now generally available. Service Pack 4 marks the fourth generation of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, a major code stream and product foundation with a lifecycle from 2014 to 2024 plus Long Term Support (10+3 years).
    This release consolidates all fixes and updates introduced since SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3.

  • Making the Selection

    You’ve likely read or heard a lot about today’s data explosion and how it’s affecting enterprises. After combing through all the overexcited rhetoric about how quickly data is multiplying or how

    many petabytes you’ll soon have to handle, one thing remains clear: You need to find a new way to store and manage your data or you’ll get left behind.

    While that mandate puts pressure on your organization to act quickly, it’s also the catalyst to a whole new world of exciting opportunities. More data can mean deeper, more accurate insights into your operations and customer needs, which empowers you to streamline processes and personalize experiences like never before. More data can also lead to greater innovation and new sources of revenue.

Programming/Development: mental illness, newt, and more

Filed under
Development
  • One developer's road: Programming and mental illness

    The next year, I went to college and learned about SUSE Linux 6.1 and the Java SE 1.2 programming language. Another student introduced me to free software and the GNU GPL License and helped me install SuSE 7.1 on my new Compaq Evo N160c notebook.

    There was no more Microsoft software on my computer. The GNU/Linux operating system was exactly what I wanted, offering editors, compilers, and a command line that did auto-completion.

    Six months later, I installed Debian GNU/Linux. Since YaST2 was just a front end to configuration files, I had to use Debian Potato. My bootloader of choice was LILO, and the Second Extended File System was reliable—not buggy, like ReiserFS.

    In spring 2002, I read a book about the C programming language. I wanted to learn to do UIs like javax.swing, and a friend recommended Gtk+ 2.0, which was about to be released. At this point, I stopped using the KDE Desktop Environment. Gnome 2 was different and provided anti-aliased fonts with hinting. I used it to play Chromium B.S.U., and KNOPPIX did the magic.

  • newt

    I've been helping teach robotics programming to students in grades 5 and 6 for a number of years. The class uses Lego models for the mechanical bits, and a variety of development environments, including Robolab and Lego Logo on both Apple ][ and older Macintosh systems. Those environments are quite good, but when the Apple ][ equipment died, I decided to try exposing the students to an Arduino environment so that they could get another view of programming languages.

    The Arduino environment has produced mixed results. The general nature of a full C++ compiler and the standard Arduino libraries means that building even simple robots requires a considerable typing, including a lot of punctuation and upper case letters. Further, the edit/compile/test process is quite long making fixing errors slow. On the positive side, many of the students have gone on to use Arduinos in science research projects for middle and upper school (grades 7-12).

    In other environments, I've seen Python used as an effective teaching language; the direct interactive nature invites exploration and provides rapid feedback for the students. It seems like a pretty good language to consider for early education -- "real" enough to be useful in other projects, but simpler than C++/Arduino has been. However, I haven't found a version of Python that seems suitable for the smaller microcontrollers I'm comfortable building hardware with.

  • Preventing "Revenge of the Ancillaries" in DevOps
  • Wing Python IDE Version 7 Early Access
  • What's the future of the pandas library?

Manjaro 18.0 Released – What’s New in Manjaro Illyria?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Manjaro is an Arch Linux-based Operating System developed in Austria, Germany, and France with a focus on providing a beautiful user-friendly OS with the full power of Arch Linux to beginner computer users and experts at the same time.

If you are not already familiar with Manjaro Linux then the developers have recently given more reasons for you to by dropping its latest release, Manjaro 18.0, codenamed “Illyria“. This update brings both major and minor updates to the OS and makes its overall experience more pleasant.

It is fulfilling to see how well an OS that began as a hobby project has come this far with several UI scripts, support for NVIDIA’s Optimus technology, etc. right out of the box – features that come together to enhance its user experience.

For an overview of its features, check out the 10 Reasons to Use Manjaro Linux.

Read more

Audiocasts: Kubecon, The Linux Link Tech Show and FLOSS Weekly With YottaDB

Filed under
Interviews
  • Keeping up with Kubernetes | TechSNAP 392

    A security vulnerability in Kubernetes causes a big stir, but we’ll break it all down and explain what went wrong.

    Plus the biggest stories out of Kubecon, and serverless gets serious.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 787
  • FLOSS Weekly 510: YottaDB

    A lifelong hacker and geek, K.S. Bhaskar has been programming for almost half a century, and as a consequence of the technology gap between India and the US when he was an undergraduate, has programmed computers designed in the 1950s. He spent many years in the electronic test and measurement, and scientific computing worlds before moving to databases and the predecessor of YottaDB. He led GT.M, the predecessor of YottaDB from 1995 to 2017, before founding YottaDB in 2017 to take that code base – which by then felt to him like one of his children – to new markets and applications.

    Christopher is a true geek, and from a young start always wondered how the world works. He knew from a young age the computer field is where he was going to wind up working due to the infinite ways they could be used and cool things they could be made to do. Christopher has spent time in the healthcare industry working with YottaDB/GT.M/M and applying modern software development techniques to it. He also is a maker with more Raspberry Pis, Arduinos, other development boards, along with a 3d printer to keep himself busy.

LWN Articles About Linux (Kernel)

Filed under
Linux
  • Bounded loops in BPF programs

    The BPF verifier is charged with ensuring that any given BPF program is safe for the kernel to load and run. Programs that fail to terminate are clearly unsafe, as they present an opportunity for denial-of-service attacks. In current kernels, the verifier uses a heavy-handed technique to block such programs: it disallows any program containing loops. This works, but at the cost of disallowing a wide range of useful programs; if the verifier could determine whether any given loop would terminate within a bounded time, this restriction could be lifted. John Fastabend presented a plan for doing so during the BPF microconference at the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference.

    Fastabend started by noting that the lack of loops hurts; BPF developers are doing "crazy things" to work around their absence. He is working to enable the use of simple loops that can be modeled by the verifier. There is academic work on ways to verify more complex loops, but that is a problem for later. For now, the objective is to detect simple loops and verify that they will terminate; naturally, it's important that the verifier, too, is able to terminate in a reasonable amount of time.

  • Binary portability for BPF programs

    The BPF virtual machine is the same on all architectures where it is supported; architecture-specific code takes care of translating BPF to something the local processor can understand. So one might be tempted to think that BPF programs would be portable across architectures but, in many cases, that turns out not to be true. During the BPF microconference at the Linux Plumbers Conference, Alexei Starovoitov (assisted by Yonghong Song, who has done much of the work described) explained the problem and the work that has been done toward "compile once, run everywhere" BPF.

    Many BPF programs are indeed portable, in that they will load and execute properly on any type of processor. Packet-filtering programs, in particular, usually just work. But there is a significant class of exceptions in the form of tracing programs, which are one of the biggest growth areas for BPF. Most tracing tools have two components: a user-space program invoked by the user, and a BPF program that is loaded into the kernel to filter, acquire, and possibly boil down the needed data. Both programs are normally written in C.

  • Taming STIBP

    The Spectre class of hardware vulnerabilities was apparently so-named because it can be expected to haunt us for some time. One aspect of that haunting can be seen in the fact that, nearly one year after Spectre was disclosed, the kernel is still unable to prevent one user-space process from attacking another in some situations. An attempt to provide that protection using a new x86 microcode feature called STIBP has run into trouble once its performance impact was understood; now a more nuanced approach may succeed in providing protection where it is needed without slowing down everybody else.

    The Spectre variant 2 vulnerability works by polluting the CPU's branch-prediction buffer (BPB), which is used during speculative execution to make a guess about which branch(es) the code will take; see this article for a refresher on the Spectre vulnerabilities if needed. Closing this hole requires changes at a number of levels, but a fundamental part of the problem is preventing any code that may be targeted from running with a BPB that has been trained by an attacker.

  • The x32 subarchitecture may be removed

    The x32 subarchitecture is a software variant of x86-64; it runs the processor in the 64-bit mode, but uses 32-bit pointers and arithmetic. The idea is to get the advantages of x86-64 without the extra memory usage that goes along with it. It seems, though, that x32 is not much appreciated; few distributions support it and the number of users appears to be small.

GNOME 3.31.3 released

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.31.3 is now available.

This will be our last snapshop before the year is over. Try it out,
test it, improve it.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.31.3, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot.

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.31.3 Released As Another Step Towards GNOME 3.32

Linux on the Desktop: Are We Nearly There Yet?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The numbers are pretty stark: Linux might be the backbone of everything from embedded devices to mainframes and super computers. But it has just a 2% share of desktops and laptops.

It seems the only way to get most people to even touch it is to rip away everything you recognise as Linux to rebuild it as Android.

Until recently, I was in the 98%. I honestly wasn’t even conflicted. I used Linux most days both for work and for hobbies – but always in the cloud or on one of those handy little project boards that are everywhere now. For my daily driver, it was Windows all the way.

I guess what’s kept me with Windows so long is really that it’s just been good enough as a default option that I haven’t been prompted to even think about it. Which, to be fair, is a great quality in an operating system.

The last time I tried a dual boot Linux/Windows setup was about 15 years ago. I was using Unix at university, and was quite attracted to the idea of free and open source software, so I decided to give it a go.

This was back when, if you wanted to install Linux, you went to the newsagent and bought a magazine that had a CD-ROM on the front cover. I don’t exactly remember what distro it was – probably something like Slackware or Red Hat.

Read more

Mozilla Firefox 64 Is Now Available for All Supported Ubuntu Linux Releases

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Mozilla Firefox 64.0 continues the "Quantum" series with new features and improvements, including better recommendations for US users by showing suggestions about new and relevant Firefox features, services, and extensions based on their browsing habbits, enhanced tab management by allowing you to more easily and quickly close, move, pin, or bookmark tabs.

This release also makes it easier to manage performance via a new "Task Manager" accessible from the about:performance page, allowing users to view which tabs consume more CPU time so you can close them to conserve power, adds link time optimization (Clang LTO) for Linux and Mac users, as well as a new toolbar context menu option to remove add-ons.

Read more

Relax by the fire at your Linux terminal

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Welcome back. Here we are, just past the halfway mark at day 13 of our 24 days of Linux command-line toys. If this is your first visit to the series, see the link to the previous article at the bottom of this one, and take a look back to learn what it's all about. In short, our command-line toys are anything that's a fun diversion at the terminal.

Read more

FSF Licensing and Compliance Lab: 2018 and the future

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Legal

I am the current licensing and compliance manager for the FSF, though I've had several roles in my time here. The Lab handles all the free software licensing work for the FSF. Copyleft is the best legal tool we have for protecting the rights of users, and the Lab makes sure that tool is at full power by providing fundamental licensing education. From publishing articles and resources on free software licensing, to doing license compliance work for the GNU Project, to handling our certification programs like Respects Your Freedom, if there is a license involved, the Lab is on the case.

When I started working at the FSF part-time in 2008, the GNU General Public License version 3 (GPLv3) was only a year old. Our Respects Your Freedom certification program didn't yet exist. The Free Software Directory wasn't yet a wiki that could be updated by the community at large. Things have changed a lot over the years, as has our ability to help users to understand and share freely licensed works. I'd like to take just a moment as 2018 draws to a close to look back on some of the great work we accomplished.

Read more

Pantheon Desktop Makes Linux Elementary

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The more I use the multitasking feature, the more I like its click-and-go navigational style. Getting rid of workspaces or running apps is simple. Hover the mouse pointer over the multitasking bar and click the icon's circled X.

Elementary OS is a very solid Linux distro. Its uncluttered design is encouraged by not being able to place app icons on the desktop. There are no desklet programs to create distractions.

So far, the only real obstacle I've encountered in using Elementary OS is the need to adapt to having fewer power-user features. While basic installation was smooth and event free, not having preinstalled text editors, word processors or an alternative Web browser was an inconvenience.

New users who do not know what software they need to fill this void are at a big disadvantage. Want to Suggest a Review? Is there a Linux software application or distro you'd like to suggest for review? Something you love or would like to get to know?

Read more

leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • What is the preferred developer operating system?

    If you compare traditional OSes, the differences shouldn't be that significant for developers.

    We deploy most apps in the cloud now, where you can choose to host them on whichever developer operating system you want -- well, maybe not on macOS, but certainly Windows or Linux. And, even if you deploy your application locally, virtual machines (VMs) make it easy to set up whichever type of OS environment you need.

    Cross-platform portability is an explicit goal for most popular programming languages today, such as C, Java and Python. C was born in the early 1970s as a way to make Unix portable across different hardware platforms. The Java virtual machine greatly simplified cross-OS portability. And Python applications can run on virtually any OS.

    Modern programming languages still aren't entirely OS-agnostic, of course. Developers often have to address OS-specific dependencies when they write an application, and the installation process for most applications differs from one OS to the next.

    Still, by and large, the modern programmer doesn't have to think about the differences between various developer operating systems nearly as much as she did a decade ago. In some cases, you can drag and drop the same application from one OS to another without requiring any configuration changes at all.

  • Linux / UNIX: Check If File Is Empty Or Not Using Shell Script
  • How to install a TIG stack on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to install LDAP Account Manager on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to install Winbox on Ubuntu and Linux Mint
  • How to install Webmin on Ubuntu 18.04 /16.04 LTS server
  • MySQL GUI Tools for Windows and Ubuntu/Linux: Top 8 Free & open source
  • How to install MySQL workbench on Ubuntu
  • Christmas Maps

    It´s been ages since I last shared any Maps news, so it´s probably about time…
    Some things have happened since the stable 3.30.0 release in September.

    First off we have a new application icon, courtesy of Jakub Steiner using the icon style for the upcoming GNOME 3.32

  • Calamares seeking translators

    Calamares, the Linux system installer for boutique distro’s, is translated into 50 or so languages. It’s not a KDE project, but uses a bunch of KDE technology like the KDE Frameworks and KPMCore. It doesn’t use the KDE translation infrastructure, either, but Transifex.

  • ROOT histograms

    In one of the previous blogs we introduced the new capability of LabPlot to calculate and to draw histograms. Given a data set, the user can calculate the histogram using different binning methods and to visualize the calculated histogram in the new plot type “histogram”. A different workflow is given when the histogram was already calculated in another application and the application like LabPlot is just used to visualize the result of such a calculation and to adjust the final appearance of the plot.

    Couple of weeks ago Christoph Roick contributed a new input filter for ROOT histograms. ROOT is a computational environment developed at CERN that is used for data processing, statistical analysis and data visualization, mainly for purposes in the high energy physics community.

Debian and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Montreal Bug Squashing Party - Jan 19th & 20th 2019

    We are organising a BSP in Montréal in January! Unlike the one we organised for the Stretch release, this one will be over a whole weekend so hopefully folks from other provinces in Canada and from the USA can come.

  • Debian Cloud Sprint 2018

    Recently we have made progress supporting cloud usage cases; grub and kernel optimised for cloud images help with reducing boot time and required memory footprint. There is also growing interest in non-x86 images, and FAI can now build such images.

    Discussion of support for LTS images, which started at the sprint, has now moved to the debian-cloud mailing list). We also discussed providing many image variants, which requires a more advanced and automated workflow, especially regarding testing. Further discussion touched upon providing newer kernels and software like cloud-init from backports. As interest in using secure boot is increasing, we might cooperate with other team and use work on UEFI to provide images signed boot loader and kernel.

  • Third Point Release of Univention Corporate Server 4.3-3

    With UCS 4.3-3 the third point release for Univention Corporate Server (UCS) 4.3 is now available, which includes a number of important updates and various new features.

  • Canonical Launches MicroK8s

    Canonical, the parent company of Ubuntu, has announced MicroK8s, a snap package of Kubernetes that supports more than 42 flavors of Linux.

    MicroK8s further simplifies the deployment of Kubernetes with its small disk and memory footprint. Users can deploy Kubernetes in a few seconds. It can run on the desktop, the server, an edge cloud, or an IoT device.

    Snap is a self-contained app package solution created by Canonical that competes with Flatpak, which is backed by Red Hat and Fedora. Snap offers macOS and Windows-like packages with all dependencies bundled with it. A snap package of Kubernetes means any Linux distribution that supports Snap can benefit from MicroK8s

  • Compiz: Ubuntu Desktop's little known best friend
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland's Weston, AMD, GitLab, NVIDIA

  • Wayland's Weston Switching Over To The Meson Build System
    Complementing the Meson build system support for Wayland itself, the Weston reference compositor now has been Meson-ized. Pekka Paalanen and Daniel Stone, both of Collabora, have landed the Meson build system support for the Weston compositor. At this stage the new build system should be fully working and correct.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets Polaris Corruption Fix, Some Code Refactoring
    AMD has published their latest batch of "DC" Display Core patches for the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver. This batch of 45 patches against this display code for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver has some code cleanups and refactoring, changes some error messages to just warnings, and has a display corruption fix affecting some Polaris hardware.
  • Investigating GitLab
    The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) kernel subsystem is a fairly small part of the kernel, he said. It is also a fairly small part of the open-source graphics stack, which is under the X.Org umbrella. DRM sits in the middle between the two, so the project has learned development tools and workflows from both of the larger projects. The kernel brought DRM into the Git world in 2006, which was just a year after Git came about; it was a "rough ride" back then, Vetter said. With Git came "proper commit messages". Prior to that, the X.org commit messages might just be a single, unhelpful line; now those messages explain why the change is being made and what it does. The idea of iterating on a patch series on the mailing list came from the kernel side as did the "benevolent dictator" model of maintainership. DRM, the X server, Wayland, and others all followed that model along the way. From the X.Org side came things like the committer model; in Mesa, every contributor had commit rights. That model has swept through the graphics community, so now DRM, the X server, and Wayland are all run using that scheme. Testing and continuous integration (CI) is something that DRM has adopted from X.Org; the kernel also does this, but DRM has adopted the X.Org approach, tooling, and test suites. For historical reasons, "almost everything" is under the MIT license, which comes from X.Org projects as well. There has been a lot of movement of tools and development strategies in both directions via the DRM subsystem. He thinks that using GitLab may be "the next big wave of changes" coming from the user-space side to kernel graphics, and maybe to the kernel itself eventually. This won't happen this year or next year, Vetter predicted, but over the next few years we will see GitLab being used more extensively.
  • AMDGPU For Linux 4.20 Gets The Final Radeon RX 590 Fix, Adds The New Vega PCI IDs
    With just over one week to go until the expected Linux 4.20 kernel release, Alex Deucher of AMD today sent in the latest batch of fixes to the DRM tree for landing at the end of this cycle. Notable about this latest set of "fixes" for the AMDGPU kernel graphics driver are: - The final Radeon RX 590 fix so this newer Polaris GPU no longer hangs under load. So once this Linux 4.20 material is merged to mainline, this month-old Polaris graphics card should now be happily running on Linux -- assuming you also have the latest Polaris firmware files and a recent version of Mesa. See our Radeon RX 590 benchmarks article for more details.
  • AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4 Driver Update Brings Performance Improvements, New Vulkan Bits
    AMD developers today outed their latest "AMDVLK" open-source Vulkan driver code drop dubbed AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4.
  • NVIDIA 415.23 Driver Fixes Build Issues Against Linux 4.20 Kernel
    The NVIDIA 415.23 driver was issued just to fix a build issue against the near-final Linux 4.20 kernels. In particular, there has been a build failure around the vm_insert_pfn function that is now worked around when building the NVIDIA proprietary driver's shim against the Linux 4.20 release candidates.
  • NVIDIA Now Shipping The Jetson AGX Xavier Module
    NVIDIA has been shipping the Jetson AGX Xavier Developer Kit the past few months while now they are beginning to ship the AGX Xavier Module intended for use in next-generation autonomous machines.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: 2018-2019 Elections Underway, SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4, and 'Making the Selection' (Storage)

  • 2018-2019 Elections Underway with Calls for Candidates and New Members
    Earlier this week, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Elections Committee posted the Schedule for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections, along with the announcement of a Membership Drive and a call for nominations and applications for Candidates to fill three vacant seats on the openSUSE Board. The annual Board Elections are normally expected to run in November and December, with ballots cast and results published in time for the newly-elected Board Members to take their seats on the Board at the beginning of January. However, some additional work needed to be completed for this election, and the elections were delayed in part to accommodate the additional work.
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is Generally Available
    SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is now generally available. Service Pack 4 marks the fourth generation of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, a major code stream and product foundation with a lifecycle from 2014 to 2024 plus Long Term Support (10+3 years). This release consolidates all fixes and updates introduced since SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3.
  • Making the Selection
    You’ve likely read or heard a lot about today’s data explosion and how it’s affecting enterprises. After combing through all the overexcited rhetoric about how quickly data is multiplying or how many petabytes you’ll soon have to handle, one thing remains clear: You need to find a new way to store and manage your data or you’ll get left behind. While that mandate puts pressure on your organization to act quickly, it’s also the catalyst to a whole new world of exciting opportunities. More data can mean deeper, more accurate insights into your operations and customer needs, which empowers you to streamline processes and personalize experiences like never before. More data can also lead to greater innovation and new sources of revenue.

Programming/Development: mental illness, newt, and more

  • One developer's road: Programming and mental illness
    The next year, I went to college and learned about SUSE Linux 6.1 and the Java SE 1.2 programming language. Another student introduced me to free software and the GNU GPL License and helped me install SuSE 7.1 on my new Compaq Evo N160c notebook. There was no more Microsoft software on my computer. The GNU/Linux operating system was exactly what I wanted, offering editors, compilers, and a command line that did auto-completion. Six months later, I installed Debian GNU/Linux. Since YaST2 was just a front end to configuration files, I had to use Debian Potato. My bootloader of choice was LILO, and the Second Extended File System was reliable—not buggy, like ReiserFS. In spring 2002, I read a book about the C programming language. I wanted to learn to do UIs like javax.swing, and a friend recommended Gtk+ 2.0, which was about to be released. At this point, I stopped using the KDE Desktop Environment. Gnome 2 was different and provided anti-aliased fonts with hinting. I used it to play Chromium B.S.U., and KNOPPIX did the magic.
  • newt
    I've been helping teach robotics programming to students in grades 5 and 6 for a number of years. The class uses Lego models for the mechanical bits, and a variety of development environments, including Robolab and Lego Logo on both Apple ][ and older Macintosh systems. Those environments are quite good, but when the Apple ][ equipment died, I decided to try exposing the students to an Arduino environment so that they could get another view of programming languages. The Arduino environment has produced mixed results. The general nature of a full C++ compiler and the standard Arduino libraries means that building even simple robots requires a considerable typing, including a lot of punctuation and upper case letters. Further, the edit/compile/test process is quite long making fixing errors slow. On the positive side, many of the students have gone on to use Arduinos in science research projects for middle and upper school (grades 7-12). In other environments, I've seen Python used as an effective teaching language; the direct interactive nature invites exploration and provides rapid feedback for the students. It seems like a pretty good language to consider for early education -- "real" enough to be useful in other projects, but simpler than C++/Arduino has been. However, I haven't found a version of Python that seems suitable for the smaller microcontrollers I'm comfortable building hardware with.
  • Preventing "Revenge of the Ancillaries" in DevOps
  • Wing Python IDE Version 7 Early Access
  • What's the future of the pandas library?

Manjaro 18.0 Released – What’s New in Manjaro Illyria?

Manjaro is an Arch Linux-based Operating System developed in Austria, Germany, and France with a focus on providing a beautiful user-friendly OS with the full power of Arch Linux to beginner computer users and experts at the same time. If you are not already familiar with Manjaro Linux then the developers have recently given more reasons for you to by dropping its latest release, Manjaro 18.0, codenamed “Illyria“. This update brings both major and minor updates to the OS and makes its overall experience more pleasant. It is fulfilling to see how well an OS that began as a hobby project has come this far with several UI scripts, support for NVIDIA’s Optimus technology, etc. right out of the box – features that come together to enhance its user experience. For an overview of its features, check out the 10 Reasons to Use Manjaro Linux. Read more