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Sunday, 25 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games: Deep Sixed, Streets of Rogue, Shroud of the Avatar: Forsaken Virtues and More Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2018 - 2:03am
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 7:51pm
Story Graphics: Radeon and Mesa Roy Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 7:46pm
Story Chrome OS may soon be able to run Linux applications in a container Roy Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 7:45pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 5:11pm
Story GNOME Shell vs. KDE Plasma Graphics Tests On Wayland vs. X.Org Server Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 5:07pm
Story Stable kernels 4.15.6, 4.14.22, 4.9.84, 4.4.118 and 3.18.96 Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 5:04pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 7:49am
Story Three essential tools for the GNU/Linux Photographer Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 7:43am
Story Remembering Tom Wallis, The System Administrator That Made The World Better Roy Schestowitz 25/02/2018 - 4:46am

Games: Deep Sixed, Streets of Rogue, Shroud of the Avatar: Forsaken Virtues and More

Filed under
Gaming

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Tactical RPG Ash of Gods set to release in March

    Following a successful crowdfunding campaign last year, this beautiful RPG with hand-drawn animation is nearing release. We should be getting our hands on it sometime in March.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Improvements Coming For Wolfenstein 2 On Wine

    Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus makes use of the Vulkan graphics API on the id Tech 6 engine but sadly remains Windows-only aside from the consoles. While it runs with Wine, there are some bugs when using the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver but fortunately one of Valve's Linux developers is working on some improvements.

  • Nintendo finally catches up to other console makers, allows user game reviews

    To those who may wonder why this is news in an era where user reviews are commonplace, this is a significant detour from Nintendo's long-held attitude about user-created content. The company has traditionally restricted its fans' ability to post and share content in or about its games to other users—at least, without exchanging friend codes. The company's last major exception was Miiverse, a platform that debuted with the Wii U and allowed players to share stylus-authored drawings to the entire world should they receive moderators' approval. Some dubious users still came up with creative ways to get suggestive and inappropriate drawings past Nintendo moderators' eyes (and Miiverse has since been discontinued).

Graphics: Radeon and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Wattman's "Automan" Being Enabled For Vega On Linux

    With the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle there is initial support for Radeon Wattman with the AMDGPU kernel driver and modern Radeon graphics processors. "Automan" is now the latest being worked on for Vega GPUs.

    Automan as implied by the name is automatic Wattman handling for Linux. There was already automatic Wattman support via earlier AMDGPU patches for Polaris GPUs and can be enabled via the pp_power_profile_mode sysfs node to auto, but now there are patches for supporting newer Vega graphics processors.

  • UVD-Based HEVC Video Encoding Main Now Supported In Mesa 18.1

    Earlier this month AMD developers landed VCN-powered video encode support for the HEVC main format while now this has come to the UVD engine so it will work with pre-Raven GPUs.

    VCN "Video Core Next" is the new unified video encode/decode block found so far just on Raven Ridge APUs. That VCN support has been getting into Mesa while AMD's James Zhu this week enabled UVD-based encode for the HEVC main profile.

Chrome OS may soon be able to run Linux applications in a container

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Even though Chrome OS is based on Linux (Gentoo Linux, to be exact), you can't run traditional desktop Linux applications. One solution to this problem is Crouton, a script that sets up a chroot of Ubuntu or Debian Linux on top of Chrome OS. While this does allow many people to use Chrome OS who otherwise couldn't, it's a hacky solution and requires enabling Developer Mode (which turns off most of Chrome OS' security features).

A new commit on the Chromium Gerrit has come to light, with the name "New device policy to allow Linux VMs on Chrome OS." The specific code adds a 'Better Together' menu in the Chrome OS settings, and allows IT administrators to turn the feature on or off.

Of course, the big news is that Chrome OS will almost certainly support running Linux applications at some point. That opens up a huge range of software, from open-source favorites like GIMP and LibreOffice, to Linux-compatible Steam games like Civilization V and Rocket League. Potentially, users could even install Wine to run some Windows programs.

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GNOME Shell vs. KDE Plasma Graphics Tests On Wayland vs. X.Org Server

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

A premium member this week had requested some benchmarks of openSUSE Tumbleweed when looking at the performance of KDE Plasma vs. GNOME Shell in some open-source graphics/gaming tests while also looking at the Wayland vs. X.Org Server performance.

With KDE Plasma 5.12 that openSUSE Tumbleweed has picked up, there is much better Wayland session support compared to previous releases. While KDE developers aren't yet ready to declare their Wayland session the default, in my experience so far it's been working out very well but still routinely will find application crashes in Kate and the like when testing under the KWin's Wayland compositor.

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Stable kernels 4.15.6, 4.14.22, 4.9.84, 4.4.118 and 3.18.96

Filed under
Linux

Three essential tools for the GNU/Linux Photographer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As a Journalist by day, and awesome cave dwelling Linux nerd by night, I take a lot of photographs with my Nikon D3300.

That said, there are the obvious tools by Adobe that one can use, such as Photoshop, but there are some pretty awesome tools available for free to GNU/Linux users I thought I might share.

With the three together, I’ve got basically everything I have needed.

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Remembering Tom Wallis, The System Administrator That Made The World Better

Filed under
Debian
Obits

So it was a shock to get an email this week that Tom had married for the first time at age 54, and passed away four days later due to a boating accident while on his honeymoon.

Tom was a man with a big laugh and an even bigger heart. When I started a Linux Users Group (LUG) on campus, there was Tom – helping to arrange a place to meet, Internet access when we needed it, and gave his evenings to simply be present and a supporter.

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Introducing the potential new Ubuntu Studio Council

Filed under
Ubuntu

Back in 2016, Set Hallström was elected as the new Team Lead for Ubuntu Studio, just in time for the 16.04 Xenial Long Term Support (LTS) release. It was intended that Ubuntu Studio would be able to utilise Set’s leadership skills at least up until the next LTS release in April 2018. Unfortunately, as happens occasionally in the world of volunteer work, Set’s personal circumstances changed and he is no longer able to devote as much time to Ubuntu Studio as he would like. Therefore, an IRC meeting was held between interested Ubuntu Studio contributors on 21st May 2017 to agree on how to fill the void. We decided to follow the lead of Xubuntu and create a Council to take care of Ubuntu Studio, rather than continuing to place the burden of leadership on the shoulder of one particular person. Unfortunately, although the result was an agreement to form the first Ubuntu Studio Council from the meeting participants, we all got busy and the council was never set up.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • My Experience with MailSpring on Linux

    On the Linux Desktop, there are quite a few choices for email applications. Each of these has their own pros and cons which should be weighed depending on one’s needs. Some clients will have MS Exchange support. Others do not. In general, because email is reasonably close to free (and yes, we can thank Hotmail for that) it has been a difficult place to make money. Without a cash flow to encourage developers, development has trickled at best.

  • Useful FFMPEG Commands for Managing Audio and Video Files
  • Set Up A Python Django Development Environment on Debian 9 Stretch Linux
  • How To Run A Command For A Specific Time In Linux
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 7
  •  

  • Why Oppo and Vivo are losing steam in Chinese smartphone market

    China’s smartphone market has seen intense competition over the past few years with four local brands capturing more than 60 percent of sales in 2017.

    Huawei Technologies, Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi Technology recorded strong shipment growth on a year-on-year basis. But some market experts warned that Oppo and Vivo may see the growth of their shipments slow this year as users become more discriminating.

  • iPhones Blamed for More than 1,600 Accidental 911 Calls Since October

    The new Emergency SOS feature released by Apple for the iPhone is the one to blame for no less than 1,600 false calls to 911 since October, according to dispatchers.

    And surprisingly, emergency teams in Elk Grove and Sacramento County in California say they receive at least 20 such 911 calls every day from what appears to be an Apple service center.

    While it’s not exactly clear why the iPhones that are probably brought in for repairs end up dialing 911, dispatchers told CBS that the false calls were first noticed in the fall of the last year. Apple launched new iPhones in September 2017 and they went on sale later the same month and in November, but it’s not clear if these new devices are in any way related to the increasing number of accidental calls to 911.

  • Game Studio Found To Install Malware DRM On Customers' Machines, Defends Itself, Then Apologizes

    The thin line that exists between entertainment industry DRM software and plain malware has been pointed out both recently and in the past. There are many layers to this onion, ranging from Sony's rootkit fiasco, to performance hits on machines thanks to DRM installed by video games, up to and including the insane idea that copyright holders ought to be able to use malware payloads to "hack back" against accused infringers.

    What is different in more recent times is the public awareness regarding DRM, computer security, and an overall fear of malware. This is a natural kind of progression, as the public becomes more connected and reliant on computer systems and the internet, they likewise become more concerned about those systems. That may likely explain the swift public backlash to a small game-modding studio seemingly installing something akin to malware in every installation of its software, whether from a legitimate purchase or piracy.

Server: Benchmarks, IBM and Red Hat

Filed under
Server
  • 36-Way Comparison Of Amazon EC2 / Google Compute Engine / Microsoft Azure Cloud Instances vs. Intel/AMD CPUs

    Earlier this week I delivered a number of benchmarks comparing Amazon EC2 instances to bare metal Intel/AMD systems. Due to interest from that, here is a larger selection of cloud instance types from the leading public clouds of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.

  • IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History

    Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.

  • Red Hat CSA Mike Bursell on 'managed degradation' and open data

    As part of Red Hat's CTO office chief security architect Mike Bursell has to be informed of security threats past, present and yet to come – as many as 10 years into the future.

    The open source company has access to a wealth of customers in verticals including health, finance, defence, the public sector and more. So how do these insights inform the company's understanding of the future threat landscape?

  • Red Hat Offers New Decision Management Tech Platform

    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has released a platform that will work to support information technology applications and streamline the deployment of rules-based tools in efforts to automate processes for business decision management, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

Vulkan Anniversary and Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan Turns Two Years Old, What Do You Hope For Next?

    This last week marked two years since the debut of Vulkan 1.0, you can see our our original launch article. My overworked memory missed realizing it by a few days, but it's been a pretty miraculous two years for this high-performance graphics and compute API.

  • Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers

    Noralf Trønnes has spent the past few months working on generic FBDEV emulation for Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) drivers and this week he volleyed his third revision of these patches, which now includes a new in-kernel API along with some clients like a bootsplash system, VT console, and fbdev implementation.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation

    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?

  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources

    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks.

    Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state.

    David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More

    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."

  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo

    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.

  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations

    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access

    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.

  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal

    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Discover, part 7

    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.

  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support

    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.

  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline

    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make.

    Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.

  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2

    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.

GNU: GLIBC and GCC News

Filed under
GNU
  • Recent GNU* C library improvements

    As technology advancements continue, the core technology must be updated with new ideas that break paradigms and enable innovation. Linux* systems are based on two main core technologies: the Linux Kernel project and the GNU C Library (GLIBC) project. The GLIBC project provides the core libraries for the GNU system and GNU/Linux systems, as well as many other systems that use Linux as the kernel. These libraries provide interfaces that allow programs to manipulate and manage files, memory, threads and other operating system objects. The release of GLIBC version 2.27 marks a new step on the Linux technology roadmap, with major new features that will allow Linux developers to create and enhance applications. This blog post describes several key new features and how to use them.

  • What Makes GLIBC 2.27 Exciting To The Clear Linux Folks

    Released at the beginning of February was Glibc 2.27 and it's comprised of a lot of new features and performance improvements. But what's the best of Glibc 2.27?

    One of the Clear Linux developers at Intel, Victor Rodriguez Bahena, put out a blog post this week outlining some of the most exciting features for this GNU C Library update. While most Linux distributions tend to be conservative in rolling out new GLIBC updates, Clear Linux is already on v2.27 and even had back-ported some of the performance patches prior to the official 2.27 debut.

  • GCC 8 Will Let You -march=native Correctly On ARM/AArch64

    Linux developers and enthusiasts on x86_64 have long enjoyed the ability to use the -march=native option for having the GCC compiler attempt to auto-detect the CPU and set the appropriate microarchitecture flags. That support is finally being offered up for ARM with GCC 8.

    This week -march=native now works on AArch64 as well as for ARM in general too.

Open Source Color Management is broken

Filed under
OSS

Since I am now in the business of photography and image processing (see my travel photography blog here), I thought it was time to finally get proper monitors and calibrate them. I wanted to do this with Open Source tools and use the calibration data for my Linux desktop, so I ordered a ColorHug2 colorimeter, which is Open Hardware compliant and all the tools are FOSS licensed. And from then on everything just went downhill.

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