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Sunday, 27 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Announce: OpenSSH 8.4 released Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2020 - 5:04am
Story Tiny Rock Pi S and Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2020 - 4:10am
Story Audiocasts/Shows/YouTube Videos: Linux Action News, GNU World Order and More Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2020 - 2:52am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2020 - 2:51am
Story Lenovo Launches ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Marius Nestor 9 28/09/2020 - 1:57am
Story Review: Linuxfx 10.6 Roy Schestowitz 28/09/2020 - 1:50am
Story LibreOffice 10th Anniversary Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2020 - 11:55pm
Story Linux 5.9 RC7 Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2020 - 11:49pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2020 - 11:09pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2020 - 10:59pm

Announce: OpenSSH 8.4 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

It is now possible[1] to perform chosen-prefix attacks against the SHA-1 algorithm for less than USD$50K. For this reason, we will be disabling the "ssh-rsa" public key signature algorithm by default in a near-future release.

This algorithm is unfortunately still used widely despite the existence of better alternatives, being the only remaining public key signature algorithm specified by the original SSH RFCs.

The better alternatives include: [...]

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Tiny Rock Pi S and Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Tiny Rock Pi S SBC gets 802.3af PoE & audio HAT add-on board

    Powered by a Rockchip RK3308 quad-core Cortex-A35 processor, Radxa Rock Pi S single board computer was launched with specifications listing PoE support via an add-on board. Just one little problem though: it was not available for sale.

    The good news is that Radxa has now launched a PoE HAT for the Linux SBC adding support for 802.3af PoE up to 10W input, making it one of the smallest single board computers with PoE support in the world, and adding audio features with a 3.5mm audio jack, and an FPC connector for a microphone array. It can be purchased on Seeed Studio for $13.00.

  •   

  • Raspberry Pi: Five handy home office projects to try

    Initially designed as a low-cost computing board for teaching kids to code, the Raspberry Pi has since evolved into a fully fledged PC comfortably capable of replacing your desktop setup. At the same time, the board's legions of dedicated fans have ensured a steady stream of ingenious open-source projects: media center, weather station, virtual assistant, Lego-powered book scanner – if you can imagine it, the chances are it's been done.

    [...]

    Cybersecurity has become a major concern for companies while their employees are working from home, who now have far less visibility on the devices being used to access corporate data. While a Raspberry Pi won't provide the solution for IT admins, it can be modified into a handy network-monitoring tool that will allow you to keep an eye on devices and data connecting to your home network.

  •  

  • Iain R. Learmonth: Multicast IPTV

    For almost a decade, I’ve been very slowly making progress on a multicast IPTV system. Recently I’ve made a significant leap forward in this project, and I wanted to write a little on the topic so I’ll have something to look at when I pick this up next. I was aspiring to have a useable system by the end of today, but for a couple of reasons, it wasn’t possible.

    [...]

    The Raspberry Pi devices will run DVBlast, an open-source DVB demultiplexer and streaming server. Each of the tuners will be tuned to a different transponder giving me the ability to stream any combination of available channels simultaneously. This is everything that would be needed to watch TV on PCs on the home network with VLC.

    I’ve not yet worked out if Kodi will accept multicast streams as a TV source, but I do know that Tvheadend will. Tvheadend can also act as a PVR to record programmes for later playback so is useful even if the multicast streams can be viewed directly.

    So how far did I get? I have built two Raspberry Pis in cases with the DVB-T hats on. They need to sit in the lounge as that’s where the antenna comes down from the roof. There’s no wired network connection in the lounge. I planned to use an OpenBSD box as a gateway, bridging the wireless network to a wired network.

Audiocasts/Shows/YouTube Videos: Linux Action News, GNU World Order and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Action News 156

    Lenovo expands its Linux lineup in a big way, with 30 Ubuntu systems. And why Microsoft Edge on Linux might be more significant than you think.

    Plus, the latest Mozilla project being spun-out, and how Timescale might have a solution for a self-sustaining open-source business in the cloud era.

  • GNU World Order 373

    **madplay**, **abxtest**, and the **man** package of the **ap** Slackware package set.

  • Deepin 20: Big Sur? - Deepin v20 Review

    There is widespread adoption of a certain macOS design trend in the latest release of deepin. This desktop OS is beautiful in its latest iteration, but is the beauty only skin deep?

  • Why Choose Manjaro KDE Plasma 20.1?

    Manjaro 20.1 Mikah is one of the main players in desktop Linux. With the 20.1 release, I boot up the KDE Plasma edition to explore why you should consider this distribution if you value choice in your Linux OS.

  • Wait, there's a GNOME OS now?

    Yep, and now YOU can try it! With the new release of @GNOME 3.38, the developers also released something called GNOME OS. What's this all about? Jason has used it, and he fills you in on this cool initiative that aims to further improve one of the most popular Linux desktop environments.

  • Linux Laptops Have A Price Problem

    Want to see more Linux laptops built and priced for the average PC user? It needs to happen, but the people covering Linux are part of the problem. And that includes me! So how do we solve this?

  • JC's Top 5 Linux Myths

Review: Linuxfx 10.6

Filed under
Reviews

The Linuxfx distribution, which is sometimes referred to as "Windowsfx" on the project's website and in various applications, is based on Linux Mint and appears to one have overarching goal: to look and act as much like Microsoft Windows 10 as possible. The distribution does this by adjusting the desktop, theme, icons, and settings panel to look as much like Microsoft's operating system as possible. The project then adds in WINE, a virtual assistant application, and adjusts application launchers to resemble those used by Windows. Under the hood though Linuxfx is still very much running Linux Mint packages as its base with the Cinnamon desktop environment.

I was surprised to find the distribution's recent stable release, 10.5, has been removed from the project's download mirrors. The only edition available to me was a new version labablled 10.6 which runs on 64-bit (x86_64) machines exclusively. The download for this live media is 3.8GB in size.

Note: Following writing this review, just before publication, the Linuxfx team removed the free downloads for version 10.6 (and earlier versions of the distribution) from their website. The distribution is now a commercial offering.

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LibreOffice 10th Anniversary

Filed under
LibO

Today is LibreOffice 10th Anniversary: it is a significant achievement for the project, and a date to remember for all community members.

We have created a video based on pictures of community members and a few events, in two versions: a long one, for blogs and websites, and a short version for social media.

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Linux 5.9 RC7

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.9-rc7
    So we finally have all the issues I know about sorted out - the fix
    for the VM issue I mentioned in the rc6 announcement is here, as is
    the fix for the slab corruption issue that was separately discussed,
    along with another silly page locking bug one-liner fix.
    
    But while I do now know of any remaining gating issues any more, the
    fixes came in fairly late. So unless I feel insanely optimistic and/or
    a burning bush tells me that everything is bug-free, my plan right now
    is that I'll do another rc next Sunday rather than the final 5.9
    release. And btw, please no more burning bushes. We're kind of
    sensitive about those on the West coast right now.
    
    Anyway, while the MM side is what kept me on my toes last week, most
    of the changes here are actually drivers and networking. And
    networking drivers. With a small smattering of documentation and
    filesystem fixes and other noise thrown in.
    
    Shortlog appended, but what I really hope you all will do is to give
    it a nice good testing. One extra week or rc kernels will help, but
    only if people actually try this out.
    
    So.. Please?
    
                  Linus
    
  • Kernel prepatch 5.9-rc7

    The 5.9-rc7 kernel prepatch is out for testing. "But while I do now know of any remaining gating issues any more, the fixes came in fairly late. So unless I feel insanely optimistic and/or a burning bush tells me that everything is bug-free, my plan right now is that I'll do another rc next Sunday rather than the final 5.9 release. And btw, please no more burning bushes. We're kind of sensitive about those on the West coast right now."

  • Linux 5.9 Stable Expected In Two Weeks, But For Now Is Linux 5.9-rc7

    Linus Torvalds just released Linux 5.9-rc7 as the newest weekly test candidate for Linux 5.9. Due to the regressions encountered this cycle and prominent issues being resolved late, he's looking at releasing Linux 5.9 in two weeks time rather than next week.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Joachim Breitner: Learn Haskell on CodeWorld writing Sokoban

    Two years ago, I held the CIS194 minicourse on Haskell at the University of Pennsylvania. In that installment of the course, I changed the first four weeks to teach the basics of Haskell using the online Haskell environment CodeWorld, and lead the students towards implementing the game Sokoban.

    As it is customary for CIS194, I put my lecture notes and exercises online, and this has been used as a learning resources by people from all over the world. But since I have left the University of Pennsylvania, I lost the ability to update the text, and as the CodeWorld API has evolved, some of the examples and exercises no longer work.

  • SiFive Begins Adding RISC-V "Bullet" Microarchitecture Code To LLVM

    On Friday night patches began to appear for "RISC-V Bullet" in the LLVM compiler code-base.

    The initial work is on the scheduler being added for the RISC-V Bullet. The initial scheduler is in place for the RISC-V Bullet microarchitecture and bullet-rv32 / bullet-rv64 naming.

  • Pho 1.0, Belated Release

    I was doing some disk housekeeping and noticed that my venerable image viewer, Pho, was at version 1.0pre1, and had been since 2017. It's had only very minimal changes since that time. I guess maybe it's been long enough that it's time to remove that -pre1 moniker, huh?

  • GammaRay 2.11.2

    We have released version 2.11.2 of our Qt application introspection tool GammaRay, bringing support for Qt 5.15 and improved Qt Quick item picking.

    GammaRay is a software introspection tool for Qt applications developed by KDAB. Leveraging the QObject introspection mechanism it allows you to observe and manipulate your application at runtime. This works both locally on your workstation and remotely on an embedded target.

  • A meta issue for modules: bug tracking

    I was reading a module on meta::cpan when I spied a small issue. I went up to the Issues link, clicked, and was sent to rt.cpan. I know that many module authors now have their modules on sites like GitHub, GitLab, or Bitbucket. Before I posted the issue on rt.cpan, I checked the author's profile for a linked account to one of the other sites. I found the module on GitHub and read the CONTRIBUTING.md to find the author does want issues reported there and not rt.cpan. I did not report my original issue, I reported the link issue instead as it seemed more important.

    Today is not the first time I noticed this issue with a module's bug tracking.

    Before continuing, I have not released a module to CPAN and am still learning all that goes into releasing one. Please be gentle if I am wrong or stating an obvious well known fact.

  • Gisle Aas's CPAN distributions are available for adoption

    Gisle Aas (GAAS on CPAN) is a well-known CPAN author, who made his first releases back in 1995. Over the years he has developed and maintained a number of keystone modules that most of us have relied on, whether we realised it or not. Gisle has informed the PAUSE admins that he will no longer be maintaining his CPAN distributions, and is open to responsible adoption. In this blog post we'll summarise what distributions are available, and our interpretation of responsible adoption.

    If you're interested, please read this post, and if you still would like to adopt a distribution, contact the PAUSE admins (modules at perl dot org) and not Gisle.

  • Firefox Nightly Flips On New JIT "Warp" Code For Greater JavaScript Performance

    Mozilla's SpiderMonkey JavaScript engine team have been working on a big update to their just-in-time compiler code. This big update called "Warp" is now enabled in the latest Firefox Nightly builds for offering big speed-ups.

    Warp aims to improve the Firefox JavaScript performance by reducing the amount of internal type information that is tracked along with other optimizations. Warp can lead to greater responsiveness and faster page load speed. Numbers cited by Warm developers are normally in the 5~15% range.

Hardware: Linux on Snapdragon and Raspberry Pi 4

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Graphics: Zink, DP-HDMI2.1, Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

New YouTube Videos About GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Tmux Is Bloat: Use Abduco If You Want Terminal Sessions

    Terminal sessions are obviously useful but Tmux is not the only way that you can make use of them, in fact if all you want is sessions running Tmux is a terrible idea but there is a much better solution. Abduco is a standalone terminal session manager that has everything you need from a session manager without also cramming in a terminal multiplexer.

  • Linux that Works and Looks like Windows

    Well, this is weird... what kind of madman would put Metro UI and Cortana in this thing? Let's run some Windows setup programs on this.

  • So Much Turns Out To Be The Opposite Of What You Expected

    Today, I spotted another boomer walking around in my yard. This boomer had some rather incoherent thoughts on how so much of the things he has gotten into, he went into them expecting one thing and instead got the opposite.

  • Should You Run Arch Linux on Your Servers?

    I've decided to run Arch Linux for all my side projects (old and new). Here's my experiences and advice. TL;DR: There are some real advantages: package management, minimalism, and pay-as-you-go tech debt plans, among other things. If you're trying to use Arch Linux in your company's infrastructure, make sure you have a good image-building (and testing) process before proceeding

  • If Linux Ricing Is The Goal, Efficiency May Not Be Important

    There's a lot of Linux software out their that doesn't seem like it has much of a use but if you reframe how you look at the software you start to realize that maybe that's not a bad thing. If your intention is linux ricing maybe it's not really an issue that's it's not the most productive way to do a task and I feel like it's important for me to cover that sort of content on that channel.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • How to Convert a Float Array to an Integer Array in Python with NumPy

    In this short NumPy tutorial, we are going to learn how to convert a float array to an integer array in Python. Specifically, here we are going to learn by example how to carry out this rather simple conversion task. First, we are going to change the data type from float to integer in a 1-dimensional array. Second, we are going to convert float to integer in a 2-dimensional array.
    Now, sometimes we may want to round the numbers before we change the data type. Thus, we are going through a couple of examples, as well, in which we 1) round the numbers with the round() method, 2) round the numbers to the nearest largest in with the ceil() method, 3) round the float numbers to the nearest smallest numbers with floor() method. Note, all code can be found in a Jupyter Notebook.

  • How to Find the Length of a List in Python

    Lists are one of the most commonly used data types in Python and are used to store collections of items of the same type.

  • Python Import Command

    The import command in Python is used to get access to other modules. Modules are the same as a code library in Java, C, C++, or C#. A module typically involves a set of functions and variables. When we need to include or use these functions of modules in our code, we can simply import the module by using the import command and we can easily invoke the module functions and variables. The import command is the simplest and common way of including modules into your code.

    Python comes up with many built-in modules that we can include in our code easily. We can also create our module by just saving the Python code file with the .py extension.

    In this article, we will learn that how we can import our own and built-in modules in Python. Spyder3 editor is used to creating and running the Python scripts.

  • Python List Index

    In this post, we will learn about how to index lists in Python.

    The index() method returns the index of an item in Python list.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxliii) stackoverflow python report

Kid3 Audio Tagger 3.8.4 Released with Usability Improvements & Flatpak Support

Filed under
Software

Kid3 audio tag editor 3.8.4 was released a day ago with bug-fixes and usability improvements. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, and Ubuntu 20.04.

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Stable Kernels: 5.8.12, 5.4.68, and 4.19.148

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.8.12 kernel.

All users of the 5.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.8.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

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Also: Linux 5.4.68

Linux 4.19.148

KaOS Linux 2020.09 Released with KDE Plasma 5.19.5, Improved Installer

Filed under
Linux

Coming two months after KaOS Linux 2020.07, the September 2020 release is here to further improve the Calamares installer by moving more modules to QML. The KaOS development team is well known for their contributions to the Calamares universal graphical installer used by numerous GNU/Linux distributions.

The Calamares installer in KaOS Linux 2020.09 ships with a completely rewritten Locale QML module that features an accurate and live world map. Moreover, the Keyboard QML module has been improved in this release with better visibility.

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Changelog: Nitrux 1.3.3

Filed under
KDE

We are pleased to announce the launch of Nitrux 1.3.3. This new version brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, performance improvements, and ready-to-use hardware support.

Nitrux 1.3.3 is available for immediate download.

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