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Saturday, 21 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Audiocasts/Shows

  • LHS Episode #303: The Weekender XXXIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 09/20/2019 | Linux Headlines

    The first Open Core Summit, an activist programmer takes aim at Chef, a French court disagrees with Valve’s licensing model, and Lennart Poettering wants to rethink the Home directory.

  • Too Good To Be True | TechSNAP 412

    It's TechSNAP story time as we head out into the field with Jim and put Sure-Fi technology to the test. Plus an update on Wifi 6, an enlightening Chromebook bug, and some not-quite-quantum key distribution.

Graphics: AMD, GNOME Shell on Wayland and NVIDIA Nsight Graphics

  • AMD Pushes Back 3rd Gen Threadripper & Ryzen 9 3950X Until November

    While the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper processors were reportedly on track for launching in October with updates as of a few weeks ago, today AMD announced a slight delay in launching these new processors.

  • AMD have delayed the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd generation Threadripper until November

    Today, AMD sent out a brief statement about a delay in their 16 core Ryzen 9 3950X and the 3rd generation Threadripper. [...] So if you were looking to grab either, keep an eye out in November. Will share any more news when they send it about the expected date and pricing.

  • AMD Sends In Initial Batch Of Fixes To Linux 5.4 - Includes Dali Support

    While just yesterday the big DRM feature pull was sent in for Linux 5.4, AMD has also volleyed out their initial batch of fixes for this next version of the kernel. This new AMDGPU pull isn't strictly fixes but as anticipated does include the recently reported Dali APU support. Dali along with Renoir -- also newly-supported in Linux 5.4 -- are some of AMD's 2020 APUs. Dali will be targeting the lower-end of the spectrum it's expected for value mobile/embedded. From the driver code, Dali looks like a newer revved version of the current-gen Picasso APUs. Both Dali and Renoir are based on the Vega architecture.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2019, part 2

    Pain points and missing pieces with Wayland, or specifically GNOME Shell: GNOME Shell is slower Synergy doesn't work(?) - needs to be in the compositor With Nvidia proprietary driver, mutter and native Wayland clients get GPU acceleration but X clients don't No equivalent to ssh -X. Pipewire goes some way to the solution. The whole desktop can be remoted over RDP which can be tunnelled over SSH. No remote login protocol like XDMCP No Xvfb equivalent Various X utilities that grab hot-keys don't have equivalents for Wayland Not sure if all X's video acceleration features are implemented. Colour format conversion and hardware scaling are implemented. Pointer movement becomes sluggish after a while (maybe related to GC in GNOME Shell?) Performance, in general. GNOME Shell currently has to work as both a Wayland server and an X compositor, which limits the ability to optimise for Wayland.

  • NVIDIA's Nsight Graphics 2019.5 Released With Better Vulkan Coverage

    NVIDIA this week released Nsight Graphics 2019.5 as the newest feature update to their proprietary developer tool for graphics profiling and debugging across multiple APIs. The Nsight Graphics 2019.5 release brings support for more than a dozen new Vulkan extensions, a variety of user-interface improvements, compatibility enhancements, and better syntax highlighting.

Ubuntu: Video Encoder Performance, Ubuntu Touch, LZ4 Compression

  • Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 19.10 Video Encoder Performance On The Core i9 9900K

    Often when doing cross-distribution benchmarks, readers often comment on the performance of Clear Linux particularly for video encoding use-cases as surprisingly different from other distributions. Some argue that it's just over the default CPU frequency scaling governor or compiler flag defaults, so here is a look at that with Ubuntu 19.10 daily benchmarked against Clear Linux. On the same Core i9 9900K system I recently ran some benchmarks looking at Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 19.10 and then Ubuntu 19.10 with various common tunables to make it more akin to Clear Linux. Ubuntu 19.10 was used due to its recent software components being at similar versions to Intel's rolling-release distribution.

  • Serge Hallyn: First experience with Ubuntu Touch

    For the past few weeks I’ve been using a nexus 4 running ubuntu touch as, mostly, my daily driver. I’ve enjoyed it quite a bit. In part that’s just the awesome size of the nexus 4. In part, it’s the ubuntu touch interface itself. If you haven’t tried it, you really should. (Sailfish ambiances are so much prettier, but ubuntu touch is much nicer to use – the quick switch to switch between two apps, for instance. Would that I could have both.). And in part it’s just the fact that it really feels like – is – a regular ubuntu system.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 to use LZ4 compression to boot even faster

    anonical’s Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” will boot even faster than its predecessor, Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” according to Ubuntu’s kernel team. After extensive testing on a variety of compression options on the Ubuntu installation image, Canonical engineers determined that the LZ4 decompression method provided a most appreciable gain in speed.

The Vivaldi 2.8 Release (Proprietary)

  • Vivaldi 2.8 Released with Unified Sync Support for Desktop and Android

    Vivaldi Technologies released today the Vivaldi 2.8 web browser for desktop platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows, an incremental update that adds significant improvements. With Vivaldi 2.8, Vivaldi Technologies continues to give desktop users full control over their browsing experience by adding various improvements across the board, starting with Vivaldi Sync, which now lets you sync bookmarks, passwords, history, notes, and autofill information across desktop and mobile. That's right, starting with Vivaldi 2.8, all your browsing data will be automatically synchronized between your installations of Vivaldi on desktop platforms, such as Linux, Mac, or Windows, and your mobile device where Vivaldi for Android is installed if you use Vivaldi Sync.

  • New Version Vivaldi Web Browser Has Been Released, Install in Ubuntu/Linux

    Vivaldi is the new web browser compare to other famous browsers, the initial release of Vivaldi was in January, 2015. It has improved a lot and evolved since the first release. Basically it is based on the open-source frameworks of Chromium, Blink and Google's V8 JavaScript engine and has a lot of great feature which I will table later. It is known to be the most customizable browser for power users, debuts features that make browsing more personal than ever before. Do we really need another browser? Since we already have a lot of them such as mostly used Firefox, Chrome, Opera and so on. The former CEO of Opera Software Jon Von Tetzchner didn't liked the direction of Opera Web Browser and said "Sadly, it is no longer serving its community of users and contributors - who helped build the browser in the first place." Then created a web browser which has to be fast, rich feature, highly flexible and puts the user first, so Vivaldi was born.

  • Vivaldi 2.8: Inspires new desktop and mobile experiences

    Today we are launching a new upgrade to our desktop version – Vivaldi 2.8. We’re always focused on giving you complete control over your desktop experience, while also making sure to protect your privacy and security online. Vivaldi on the desktop has been our foundation. And now – our inspiration. It continuously pushes us forward to deliver a browser that is made for you.

  • Privacy and the rise of the alternative search engine

    Over the summer we opened our blog to guest bloggers eager to share their perspectives on privacy. In this story, Finn Brownbill explains how we can put an end to tracking in search for the purpose of data collection.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Maintainer wanted: gnome-directory-thumbnailer

    I’m giving up maintaining gnome-directory-thumbnailer as it no longer scratches my itch — it’s yours if you want it.

    gnome-directory-thumbnailer is a little project I started a while ago for creating thumbnails for directories (rather than showing a plain directory icon for them in the file manager). Times change, I no longer have the itch that it was developed to scratch, and so I’m giving up maintenance of it after making the 0.1.11 release.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-38

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Ubucon Europe 2019: Partnership with “Chalet 12”: coworking space and Ubucon Europe warm-up party!

    Have you still not finished your presentation for Ubucon Europe and need a quiet place to work on the slides?

    Perhaps you need to push some code to your favorite opensource projects and you need a place to focus?

    We are happy to announce that we have got some sweet deals with “Chalet 12” to provide a shared co-working space within a 5 minutes walk from the Ubucon Europe event.

    “Chalet 12” is a romantic chalet from the early XX century, it provides meeting and event rooms, private offices, kitchen and dining room, several living rooms, a makerspace, a garden, and terraces, are spread over 4 floors, overlooking the palace and castle that are part of the Unesco World Heritage Site of Sintra.

  • 2019.3 EAP 2

    We have a new Early Access Program (EAP) version of PyCharm that can be now downloaded from our website.

Microsoft Distrust, Lock-in, and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
  • [Old] Microsoft, there is a way to win our trust

    The purpose of this post is to explain why I think it's both justified and crucial to be very skeptical of these claims from Microsoft, and what Microsoft can do to allay our well-warranted doubts. And Microsoft, in keeping with the open source tradition from which it arises, I hope you take this unsolicited tunking in the way it's intended.

  • Why not GitHub?

    GitHub has investors who do not care a whit for free software principles, and eventually the company will get acquired—maybe tomorrow, maybe next year—and as we all know, money changes everything.

    Don’t leave your project’s nerve center—its primary address, its means of contribution, its issue tracker, its website, its primary documentation, its continuous integration, everything—in a way you can’t redirect!—at the mercy of people who merely want a return on their investment, and do not care about the principles of a minority of angry nerds.

    Using Git does not require GitHub!

  • Introducing Microsoft’s AirSim, an open-source simulator for autonomous vehicles built on Unreal Engine

Mirrors for Speedier Downloads

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

To put it briefly, PureOS provides ISO images and packages for download. Recently, we’ve seen increased traffic on our download site, and we expect that traffic to grow. We’re hoping to address increased traffic with mirrors for both package updates and downloads.

We’re very happy to announce that Sonic, a highly-ranked and privacy-respecting ISP, has offered to host a mirror for PureOS. This will alleviate some of the traffic, especially for those in North America, without compromising security. The security of the packages remains guaranteed by our signatures; the mirror simply holds another, identical set of packages, signed with Purism’s key.

The mirror is easy to use. For example, if you’d like to use the mirrors for downloading an image, simply use this URL: https://mirrors.sonic.net/pureos/downloads/. And here’s the link to the most recent GNOME Live build.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #303: The Weekender XXXIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 09/20/2019 | Linux Headlines

    The first Open Core Summit, an activist programmer takes aim at Chef, a French court disagrees with Valve’s licensing model, and Lennart Poettering wants to rethink the Home directory.

  • Too Good To Be True | TechSNAP 412

    It's TechSNAP story time as we head out into the field with Jim and put Sure-Fi technology to the test.

    Plus an update on Wifi 6, an enlightening Chromebook bug, and some not-quite-quantum key distribution.

Graphics: AMD, GNOME Shell on Wayland and NVIDIA Nsight Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Pushes Back 3rd Gen Threadripper & Ryzen 9 3950X Until November

    While the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper processors were reportedly on track for launching in October with updates as of a few weeks ago, today AMD announced a slight delay in launching these new processors.

  • AMD have delayed the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd generation Threadripper until November

    Today, AMD sent out a brief statement about a delay in their 16 core Ryzen 9 3950X and the 3rd generation Threadripper.

    [...]

    So if you were looking to grab either, keep an eye out in November. Will share any more news when they send it about the expected date and pricing.

  • AMD Sends In Initial Batch Of Fixes To Linux 5.4 - Includes Dali Support

    While just yesterday the big DRM feature pull was sent in for Linux 5.4, AMD has also volleyed out their initial batch of fixes for this next version of the kernel.

    This new AMDGPU pull isn't strictly fixes but as anticipated does include the recently reported Dali APU support. Dali along with Renoir -- also newly-supported in Linux 5.4 -- are some of AMD's 2020 APUs. Dali will be targeting the lower-end of the spectrum it's expected for value mobile/embedded. From the driver code, Dali looks like a newer revved version of the current-gen Picasso APUs. Both Dali and Renoir are based on the Vega architecture.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2019, part 2

    Pain points and missing pieces with Wayland, or specifically GNOME Shell:

    GNOME Shell is slower
    Synergy doesn't work(?) - needs to be in the compositor
    With Nvidia proprietary driver, mutter and native Wayland clients get GPU acceleration but X clients don't
    No equivalent to ssh -X. Pipewire goes some way to the solution. The whole desktop can be remoted over RDP which can be tunnelled over SSH.
    No remote login protocol like XDMCP
    No Xvfb equivalent
    Various X utilities that grab hot-keys don't have equivalents for Wayland
    Not sure if all X's video acceleration features are implemented. Colour format conversion and hardware scaling are implemented.
    Pointer movement becomes sluggish after a while (maybe related to GC in GNOME Shell?)
    Performance, in general. GNOME Shell currently has to work as both a Wayland server and an X compositor, which limits the ability to optimise for Wayland.

  • NVIDIA's Nsight Graphics 2019.5 Released With Better Vulkan Coverage

    NVIDIA this week released Nsight Graphics 2019.5 as the newest feature update to their proprietary developer tool for graphics profiling and debugging across multiple APIs.

    The Nsight Graphics 2019.5 release brings support for more than a dozen new Vulkan extensions, a variety of user-interface improvements, compatibility enhancements, and better syntax highlighting.

Ubuntu: Video Encoder Performance, Ubuntu Touch, LZ4 Compression

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 19.10 Video Encoder Performance On The Core i9 9900K

    Often when doing cross-distribution benchmarks, readers often comment on the performance of Clear Linux particularly for video encoding use-cases as surprisingly different from other distributions. Some argue that it's just over the default CPU frequency scaling governor or compiler flag defaults, so here is a look at that with Ubuntu 19.10 daily benchmarked against Clear Linux.

    On the same Core i9 9900K system I recently ran some benchmarks looking at Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 19.10 and then Ubuntu 19.10 with various common tunables to make it more akin to Clear Linux. Ubuntu 19.10 was used due to its recent software components being at similar versions to Intel's rolling-release distribution.

  • Serge Hallyn: First experience with Ubuntu Touch

    For the past few weeks I’ve been using a nexus 4 running ubuntu touch as, mostly, my daily driver. I’ve enjoyed it quite a bit. In part that’s just the awesome size of the nexus 4. In part, it’s the ubuntu touch interface itself. If you haven’t tried it, you really should. (Sailfish ambiances are so much prettier, but ubuntu touch is much nicer to use – the quick switch to switch between two apps, for instance. Would that I could have both.). And in part it’s just the fact that it really feels like – is – a regular ubuntu system.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 to use LZ4 compression to boot even faster

    anonical’s Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” will boot even faster than its predecessor, Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” according to Ubuntu’s kernel team.

    After extensive testing on a variety of compression options on the Ubuntu installation image, Canonical engineers determined that the LZ4 decompression method provided a most appreciable gain in speed.

The Vivaldi 2.8 Release (Proprietary)

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Vivaldi 2.8 Released with Unified Sync Support for Desktop and Android

    Vivaldi Technologies released today the Vivaldi 2.8 web browser for desktop platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows, an incremental update that adds significant improvements.
    With Vivaldi 2.8, Vivaldi Technologies continues to give desktop users full control over their browsing experience by adding various improvements across the board, starting with Vivaldi Sync, which now lets you sync bookmarks, passwords, history, notes, and autofill information across desktop and mobile.

    That's right, starting with Vivaldi 2.8, all your browsing data will be automatically synchronized between your installations of Vivaldi on desktop platforms, such as Linux, Mac, or Windows, and your mobile device where Vivaldi for Android is installed if you use Vivaldi Sync.

  • New Version Vivaldi Web Browser Has Been Released, Install in Ubuntu/Linux

    Vivaldi is the new web browser compare to other famous browsers, the initial release of Vivaldi was in January, 2015. It has improved a lot and evolved since the first release. Basically it is based on the open-source frameworks of Chromium, Blink and Google's V8 JavaScript engine and has a lot of great feature which I will table later. It is known to be the most customizable browser for power users, debuts features that make browsing more personal than ever before.
    Do we really need another browser? Since we already have a lot of them such as mostly used Firefox, Chrome, Opera and so on. The former CEO of Opera Software Jon Von Tetzchner didn't liked the direction of Opera Web Browser and said "Sadly, it is no longer serving its community of users and contributors - who helped build the browser in the first place." Then created a web browser which has to be fast, rich feature, highly flexible and puts the user first, so Vivaldi was born.

  • Vivaldi 2.8: Inspires new desktop and mobile experiences

    Today we are launching a new upgrade to our desktop version – Vivaldi 2.8.

    We’re always focused on giving you complete control over your desktop experience, while also making sure to protect your privacy and security online.

    Vivaldi on the desktop has been our foundation. And now – our inspiration. It continuously pushes us forward to deliver a browser that is made for you.

  • Privacy and the rise of the alternative search engine

    Over the summer we opened our blog to guest bloggers eager to share their perspectives on privacy. In this story, Finn Brownbill explains how we can put an end to tracking in search for the purpose of data collection.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (bird, opendmarc, php7.3, and qemu), Fedora (bird, dino, nbdkit, and openconnect), Oracle (nginx:1.14, patch, and thunderbird), Red Hat (dovecot, kernel, kernel-alt, and kernel-rt), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), and SUSE (kernel, openssl, openssl-1_1, python-SQLAlchemy, and python-Werkzeug).

  • Skidmap malware drops LKMs on Linux machines to enable cryptojacking, backdoor access [Ed: This is not a "Linux" issue any more than Adobe Photoshop malicious files are a "Windows" issue ]

    Researchers have discovered a sophisticated cryptomining program that uses loadable kernel modules (LKMs) to help infiltrate Linux machines, and hides its malicious activity by displaying fake network traffic stats.

    Dubbed Skidmap, the malware can also grant attackers backdoor access to affected systems by setting up a secret master password that offers access to any user account in the system, according to Trend Micro threat analysts Augusto Remillano II and Jakub Urbanec in a company blog post.

  • Linux for ethical hackers 101

    In order to familiarize yourself with the full range of ethical hacking tools, it is important to be conversant with the Linux OS. As the systems engineer Yasser Ibrahim said in a post on Quora: “In Linux you need to understand from the basics to the advanced, learn the console commands and how to navigate and do everything from your console, also shell programming (not a must, but always preferable), know what a kernel is and how it works, understand the Linux file systems, how to network on Linux.”

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Traders Who Can’t Code May Become Extinct, Goldman’s Tech Pioneer Warns

    Chavez, 55, outlined strengths that can help humans stay relevant, such as their relationship skills and ability to assess risks. Yet he predicted that longstanding career dichotomies on Wall Street, like trader versus engineer, will go away. To keep working, people will need both of those skills. Even money is going digital, a shift that goes far beyond cryptocurrencies, he said, pointing to the success of Stripe Inc. as an example of creating new ways to move funds.

    Stripe, for its part, has become one of the most valuable companies in Silicon Valley.

  • The use of open source software in DevOps has become strategic for organizations of all sizes

    The 2019 Accelerate State of DevOps Report showed that elite and high performing teams report strong use of open source software. This echoes findings from earlier research, showing that elite performers were 1.75 times more likely to make extensive use of open source than low performers, and were 1.5 times more likely to plan to expand their use of open source software.

  • What's Wrong with the Tech Interview Process?

    [...] The issues seem to boil down to three things:

    1. Coding tests are arbitrary, needlessly difficult and disconnected from the skills actually required for the job.

    2. The number of rounds and the time demands of interviewing are difficult to manage.

    3. Hiring decisions often seem arbitrary and communication about why someone failed a stage are often poorly communicated, when they are communicated at all.

    Let’s take a closer look at each of these.

  • [Old] Codes of Conduct and Hypocrisy

    It is generally accepted that leaders of modern organizations should act to prevent lynchings and mobbings in their organizations. Yet in recent cases in both Debian and Wikimedia, it appears that the leaders have been the instigators, using the lynching to turn opinion against their victims before there is any time to analyse evidence or give people a fair hearing.

    What's more, many people have formed the impression that Molly de Blanc's talks on this subject are not only encouraging these practices but also trolling the victims. She is becoming a trauma trigger for anybody who has ever been bullied.

    Looking over the debian-project mailing list since December 2018, it appears all the most abusive messages, such as the call for dirt on another member, or the public announcement that a member is on probation, have been written by people in a position of leadership or authority, past or present. These people control the infrastructure, they know the messages will reach a lot of people and they intend to preserve them publicly for eternity. That is remarkably similar to the mindset of the men who perpetrate acid attacks on women they can't control.

    Therefore, if the leader of an organization repeatedly indulges himself, telling volunteers they are not real developers, has he really made them less of a developer, or has he simply become less of a leader, demoting himself to become one of the despots Lord Denning refers to?

  • Best text editors in 2019: For macOS, Windows, Linux coders and programmers
  • How to compare strings in Java

    String comparison is a fundamental operation in programming and is often quizzed during interviews. These strings are a sequence of characters that are immutable which means unchanging over time or unable to be changed.

    Java has a number of methods for comparing strings; this article will teach you the primary operation of how to compare strings in Java.

6 Best Linux Distros for Programmers and Developers

Filed under
Linux

Let's discuss why Linux is a great OS for software encoders, followed by our hand-picked list of best Linux distros for developers and programmers. Read on.

Let's discuss why Linux is a great OS for software encoders, followed by our hand-picked list of best Linux distros for developers and programmers. Read on.

Before we delve into the nitty-gritty of best Linux Distro for developers to use in their day-to-day coding endeavors, let’s first list reasons for Linux being an excellent OS choice for developers.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Wisconsin Broadcasters Clinic Preview: Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The Raspberry Pi is a single board SOC (system on a chip) computer that is about the size of a deck of cards. It runs a ARMCore version of Debian Linux in a standard configuration but can also run Ubuntu Linux, several other more obscure OSes, and Windows 10 IOT (If you like the Microsoft [non]security model). The basic Raspberry Pi model lists at $35 US so it is a very cost effective solution for those broadcast applications that would normally require a full blown PC to just loaf along and do one thing.

I have implemented several applications for the Raspberry Pi for our studios and transmitters for Cumulus Chicago. We will be showing, hands-on, several of these applications at the “Nuts and Bolts” session of the Wisconsin Broadcasters fall show. My first application was porting Anthony Eden’s Livewire Simple Delegation Switcher to the Pi. At that point it only ran on Windows in a windowed configuration. I needed a border-less configuration with large buttons to use as a monitor routing panel to select which audio went to overhead speakers in Sales, Promotions, and common areas. Since the code is open source, I modified it to fit my needs. Since that time, Anthony has posted Raspberry Pi configuration instructions on his GIT repository web site.

Read more

AMD EPYC 7642 Benchmarks: The Rome 48 Core CPU That Easily Takes On Intel's Xeon Platinum 8280

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the AMD EPYC 7002 series "Rome" launch at the beginning of August, it's been known how AMD's top-end (aside from the newly-announced EPYC 7H12) EPYC 7742 easily outperforms the Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 in most real-world benchmarks. The EPYC 7742 not only outperforms the Xeon Platinum 8280 in raw performance but also at a significantly lower cost and it gets even better with the EPYC 7642. We have been testing the EPYC 7642 48-core processors and even there the performance is generally ahead of a Xeon Platinum 8280 while being about half the cost of that flagship non-AP Intel Xeon Scalable Cascadelake processor.

Complementing our recent EPYC 7302 and EPYC 7402 benchmarks, today we are focused on the EPYC 7642 as the Rome 48-core / 96-thread processor. This 48 core processor has a 2.3GHz base clock and 3.3GHz boost clock while having 256MB of L3 cache, eight DDR4-3200 memory channels, 128 PCIe 4.0 lanes, and other features in common with the EPYC 7742 and other Rome processors. The EPYC 7642 carries a 50MHz base clock speed advantage over the 64 core EPYC 7742 but a 100MHz lower boost clock speed as the principal differences aside from the core/thread count. Both of these CPUs carry a 225 Watt TDP.

Read more

Plasma 5.16.90 (Plasma 5.17 Beta) Available for Testing

Filed under
KDE

Are you using Kubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo, our current Stable release? Or are you already running our development builds of the upcoming 19.10 Eoan Ermine?

We currently have Plasma 5.16.90 (Plasma 5.17 Beta) available in our Beta PPA for Kubuntu 19.04 and 19.10.

This is a Beta Plasma release, so testers should be aware that bugs and issues may exist.

Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 getting hot? A closer look

Filed under
Linux

I hope that will all arrive in time for me to try it out over the weekend, so I can pass along some more information about temperatures, and about what pieces fit together in which cases, if any.

Finally, the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that they are working on several software and firmware changes that should help bring the temperature of the Pi 4 down.

Hopefully those will be released soon - but even if they are, I don't expect that they will improve the situation by more than 5 degrees or so, and given how hot the Pi 4 runs, that is not enough to eliminate the need for the kind of hardware measures I am looking at now.

Read more

Top Open Source Video Players for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS

You can watch Hulu, Prime Video and/or Netflix on Linux. You can also download videos from YouTube and watch them later or if you are in a country where you cannot get Netflix and other streaming services, you may have to rely on torrent services like Popcorn Time in Linux.

Watching movies/TV series or other video contents on computers is not an ‘ancient tradition’ yet. Usually, you go with the default video player that comes baked in with your Linux distribution (that could be anything).

You won’t have an issue utilizing the default player – however, if you specifically want more open-source video player choices (or alternatives to the default one), you should keep reading.

Read more

Manjaro 18.1: Goes Arch One Better

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Manjaro Linux's in-house system tools, easy installation application and better range of software packages make it a better Arch-based distro than Arch Linux itself. Manjaro offers much more than a pure Arch Linux environment.

Regardless of which desktop style you select, the welcome screen introduces Manjaro tools and get-acquainted details such as documentation, support tips, and links to the project site.

You can get a full experience in using the live session ISOs without making any changes to the computer's hard drive. That is another advantage to running Manjaro Linux over a true Arch distro. Arch distros usually do not provide live session environments. Most that do lack any automatic installation launcher from within the live session.

Read more

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