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6 Best Free Linux Web Caches

Filed under
Linux

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is considered to be the fundamental protocol of the web. This simple request/response protocol is used for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information systems. The web consumes a large portion of internet traffic.

With HTTP, a client makes a request for a resource to a server, and the server delivers messages with additional content such as images, style sheets and JavaScript. HTTP dictates how these messages are displayed and transmitted, and how web servers and browsers should respond to various commands.

The developers of the HTTP protocol realized at an early stage that there was going to be rapid growth in web traffic. This continues to be the case.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.20 Beta is out. Final Release Next Month.

Filed under
KDE

The next installment of the Plasma desktop environment, KDE Plasma 5.20 Beta released. The final release is expected on October 13, 2020.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
HowTos
  • Submit a KSyntaxHighlighting Color Theme

    The KSyntaxHighlighting framework provides support for color themes.

    These color themes specify all colors (text/background/selection/…) and font style roles (italic/bold/…) that are used for the highlighting. The definition happens in some easy to understand JSON file format.

    Starting with the upcoming KDE Frameworks 5.75 release, all KTextEditor framework based application will support these color themes for their embedded editors.

    This includes Kate & KWrite, but naturally a lot more, like for example KDevelop, Kile and RKWard.

    [...]

    With the recent additions we already cover some more well known text editor color themes. But if you just search a bit around the internet or look what other text editors ship per default, we still lack a lot of well known ones.

    For example even our GitLab instance provides the Monokai theme in the configuration for its web highlighting that we still lack.

    Therefore, we are eager to get submissions for more MIT licensed color themes we can bundle with KSyntaxHighlighting.

    All users of applications using this framework will enjoy to be able to choose between more themes with ease if you help us!

    Therefore, take the chance and help us out, provide some more themes as merge request.

    License must be MIT, this seems to be no problem for most themes out there, at least it seems most of the ones I stumbled over are MIT licensed.

  • FreeBSD Instant-workstation 2020

    A little over a year ago I published an instant-workstation script for FreeBSD. The idea is to have an installed FreeBSD system, then run a shell script that uses only base-system utilities and installs and configures a workstation setup for you.

    [...]

    The script is updated intermittently when new PRs come in, or when I have to reinstall a machine and things do not behave the way I think they should. If you want a quick live KDE Plasma experience with FreeBSD, head on over to FuryBSD which does live ISO images with a variety of environments.

  • Three tips to implement Kubernetes with open standards

    The technologies chosen by enterprise IT departments today will have a long-term impact on their performance, operations and overall strategy. Sometimes it can take well over a decade to realize the full implications of a technology solution.

    This can put a great deal of weight on the shoulders of IT management, especially when it comes to emergent technologies whose utility, importance and trajectory may not yet be fully known. Placing a bad bet on new software can lead to difficult integrations and disruptions across an organisation’s entire tech stack, which in the long-term can lead to lost productivity, wasted budgets, and the likelihood of losing ground to competitors.

    Kubernetes, the open source container orchestration platform, was until recently regarded in the same way, with IT departments struggling to fully appraise its long-term value. However, with Kubernetes now running 86 per cent of container clusters, it has emerged as the de facto standard for cloud-native infrastructure. This means that the main concern for IT departments is not whether Kubernetes has a future, but how to ensure that their implementation of Kubernetes has a future which doesn't present a bottleneck to integrations, industry practices and use cases.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/38

    An average week, with an average number of 5 snapshots (0910, 0914, 0915, 0916, and 0917 – with 0917 just being synced out). The content of these snapshots included:

    KDE Applications 20.08.1
    Qt 5.15.1
    PackageKit 1.2.1
    Systemd 246.4
    Virt-Manager 3.0.0

  • Whonix 15.0.1.5.1 - for VirtualBox - Point Release!
  • The Expandables – snapcraft extensions and the secret code

    If you’re a snap developer, you know that snap development is terribly easy. Or rather complex and difficult. Depending on your application code and requirements, it can take a lot of effort putting together the snapcraft.yaml file from which you will build your snap. One of our goals is to make snap development practically easier and more predictable for everyone. To that end, we created a framework of snap extensions, designed to make the snap journey simpler and more fun.

    In a nutshell, extensions abstract away a range of common code declarations you would normally put in your snapcraft.yaml file. They help developers avoid repetitive tasks, reduce the knowledge barrier needed to successfully build snaps, offer a common template for application builds, and most importantly, save time and effort. But what if you want – or need – to know what is behind the abstraction?

  • DeskProto® releases free CAM software for Linux

    Delft Spline Systems announces that the DeskProto CAM software now also is available for Linux users, as native 64 bits AppImage file that will work on various Linux distributions. Projects made on Linux, on Mac and Windows are interchangeable. Licenses for DeskProto V7 can be used to activate DeskProto on all three platforms, so existing users can switch to a Linux without extra cost.

  •      

  • Tor’s Bug Smash Fund, Year 2: $106,709 Raised!

           

             

    Let’s start this post with a rousing THANK YOU to the Tor community!

             

    This August, we asked you to help us fundraise for our second annual Bug Smash Fund campaign. This fund is designed to grow a healthy reserve earmarked for maintenance work, finding bugs, and smashing them—all tasks necessary to keep Tor Browser, the Tor network, and the many tools that rely on Tor strong, safe, and running smoothly.

  •        

  • Researchers were able to figure out which American phone numbers use Signal

           

             

    Privacy flaws in contact discovery have led to a research team being able to enumerate all American Signal users. Enumeration means that using the contact discovery built into the Signal app, researchers were able to perform a large-scale crawling attack and figure out which American phone numbers were attached to a Signal account. The new research paper was released by Christoph Hagen, Christian Weinert, Christoph Sendner, Alexandra Dmitrienko, and Thomas Schneider. It is titled: “All the Numbers are US: Large-scale Abuse of Contact Discovery in Mobile Messengers.”

  • The ’90s are back: Gateway laptops have been resurrected as Walmart exclusives

    Remember Gateway laptops? If you grew up in the ’90s, they were probably the brand of your first laptop. Like a revival of your favorite childhood television show, the Gateway brand has been raised from the dead — cow imagery and all. The brand, which is owned by computer maker Acer, is making its own comeback with a line of new laptops, tablets, and convertibles that will be exclusive to Walmart.

    So, what’s forcing these cows out of hibernation? For Gateway parent Acer, its about new silicon from Intel and AMD, including the successsul new mobile Ryzen 4000 processors.

The Top 50 Programming Languages to Learn Coding

Filed under
Development

Gone are the days when a handful of people were considered as top computer programmers and developers. The dawn of the digital age has now made it possible to everyone to play with codes and write a computer program. What all this need is to have a solid grasp of emerging technology and programming languages. However, it is not as easy as it seems since there are a large number of programming languages out there and choosing one and master in it might be challenging. Thus, before getting started into the world of coding, you must make the right choice and come up with the one that best suited for you.

Read more

Also: How to use C++ Pointers

Free Software and OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Benefits Of Using Odoo For Small Businesses

    In this tutorial, we will be showing you how using Odoo can benefit a small or medium-sized business.

    As times have progressed, businesses big and small have become more complex in their operations. With several departments having to function and share information to one another, the need for an integrated system has grown by leaps and bounds.

    More and more small business are implementing ERP systems. In fact, once an ERP system is implemented, it often becomes the backbone of many corporate-scale businesses. Such systems can seamlessly integrate business lifecycles, such as production, inventory management, order processes, and more. An example of this system would be Odoo, one of the most popular ERP systems currently available.

  • Best WordPress Backup Plugins 2020

    It is at most important to keep multiple backups of your WordPress site. In case the website is compromised or any plugin update breaks your site, WordPress backups can help you restore it quickly.

    Mainly, a WordPress site consists of three important parts, the database, user-created files such as plugins, themes, and uploaded files, and finally the WordPress core files.

    If anyone of these three parts is missing or corrupted, the website will not function properly or will not function at all. When we create a backup, we create a backup of the site database and the user-created files. WordPress core files can be downloaded and installed separately.

  • FSF: Volunteers needed: Help maintain our webmail page

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) needs your help! We are looking for several reliable volunteers to keep our Free Software Webmail Systems page up to date, and respond to community questions about webmail programs as they come in. Between 1,000 and 2,000 visitors check out this resource every month, and we want to make sure our recommendations are accurate! If you're interested, please contact us at campaigns@fsf.org.

    Our Free Software Webmail Systems page is used to share resources for people interested in using their email over the Web without compromising their freedom. Many webmail systems meet at least some of our standards for respecting users, including compliance with GNU LibreJS standards, but they're constantly changing, and new services are popping up every day. When sites listed on this page change their services for the better or the worse, they don't tend to notify us, which means that some vigilance is required to make sure that this resource stays useful.

  • Parsing PAN-OS logs using syslog-ng

    Version 3.29 of syslog-ng was released recently including a user-contributed feature: the panos-parser(). It is parsing log messages from PAN-OS (Palo Alto Networks Operating System). Unlike some other networking devices, the message headers of PAN-OS syslog messages are standards-compliant. However, if you want to act on your messages (filtering, alerting), you still need to parse the message part. The panos-parser() helps you create name-value pairs from the message part of the logs.

    From this blog you can learn why it is useful to parse PAN-OS log messages and how to use the panos-parser().

  • Intel Releases HAXM 7.6.5 Execution Manager

    Intel has debuted a new version of HAXM, its Hardware-Accelerated Execution Manager that serves as an accelerator for the Android Emulator and QEMU via Intel VT enabled CPUs.

  • Update devices remotely with this open source tool

    The ability to access, connect, and manage multiple devices remotely through a single account is important. Going a step further, being able to completely update devices remotely is another way for sysadmins to reduce effort and minimize headaches.

    UpdateHub is an open source solution that allows you to do complete device updates, including firmware and bootloaders, remotely. Its goal is to make it easier to do device updates and reduce rework and risk, whether you're updating thousands of devices or managing small deployments. UpdateHub handles all aspects of over-the-air (OTA) updates, including package integrity and authenticity, while you take care of your other work.

  • Daniel Stenberg: My first 15,000 curl commits

    I’ve long maintained that persistence is one of the main qualities you need in order to succeed with your (software) project. In order to manage to ship a product that truly conquers the world. By continuously and never-ending keeping at it: polishing away flaws and adding good features. On and on and on.

Graphics: Taiwins 0.2, Etnaviv, V3DV, Libre-SOC, X.Org/FreeDesktop.org and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Taiwins 0.2 is out
    Hi all,
    
    A long while ago [1]. I introduced the Taiwins wayland compositor. It was
    built upon libweston. It turned out despite my attempts, I couldn't get my
    patches to merge in libweston. Libweston has quite a few bugs and missing
    features to fit the role of a daily driver.
    
    These past few months, Taiwins was going through a long refactoring process
    in migrating from libweston. Today, taiwins uses a very thin layer of
    wlroots for hardware abstraction, the next release will target on removing
    the reliance of wlroots as well. Today it has the features of:
    
    - dynamic window management.
    - extensible and easy configuration through lua.
    - very efficient GL renderer, updates only the damages.
    - a widget system and you can create widgets through lua as well.
    - built-in shell and application launcher.
    - configurable theme.
    - emacs-like key sequence based binding system.
    - built-in profiler and rendering debugger.
    
    Along the way, I developed Twobjects [2], a backend agnostic wayland object
    implementation for compositors. This library implements basic wayland
    protocols as well as various other wayland protocols like 'xdg-shell' and
    many more. Using twobjects, you can focus on building your own unique
    features for the compositor and let it handle the most tedious protocol
    implementations.It doesn't expose everything as `wl_signals` like wlroots
    does, so you don't need to write additional glue code for it.
    
    Taiwins is still in development but missing features are getting less and
    less, you can check out its website https://taiwins.org or if you would
    like to help, check out the project page https://github.com/taiwins/taiwins
    for getting started.
    
    Thanks,
    Xichen
    
    
  • Taiwins 0.2 Released As Modular Wayland Compositor That Supports Lua Scripting

    Back in May the Taiwins Wayland compositor was announced as a compact compositor based on Libweston while Thursday marked its second release.

    With Taiwins 0.2 the switch was made from using libweston as a basis for the compositor to now using Sway's WLROOTS library. Libweston was dropped over open bugs and other issues and in part the ability to get patches easily merged back into upstream libweston. So with the shortcomings of the Weston library, Taiwins 0.2 is now running on WLROOTS. However, by the next release they hope to have their thin layer over WLROOTS removed so that library isn't needed either.

  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Adds On-Disk Shader Cache Support

    Etnaviv as the open-source, reverse-engineered OpenGL graphics driver for Vivante graphics IP now has support for an on-disk shader cache.

  • V3DV Developers Lay Out Plans For Upstreaming The Raspberry Pi 4 Vulkan Driver In Mesa

    Building off the V3DV driver talk at XDC2020 about this open-source Vulkan driver for the Raspberry Pi 4 driver, the Igalia developers responsible for this creation have laid out their plans on getting this driver upstream within Mesa.

    In a mailing list post today they note they are down to just 18 test cases failing for the Vulkan CTS while 106,776 tests are passing for this Vulkan Conformance Test Suite. Vulkan games like the respun versions of Quake 1-3 and OpenArena are working along with various game emulators. Various Vulkan demos also run well too.

  • Libre-SOC Still Persevering To Be A Hybrid CPU/GPU That's 100% Open-Source

    The project that started off as Libre-RISC-V with aims to be a Vulkan accelerator but then decided on the OpenPOWER ISA rather than RISC-V is still moving ahead under the "Libre-SOC" branding.

    Libre-SOC continues to be led by Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton and this week he presented both at the OpenPOWER Summit and X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2020) on his Libre-SOC dreams of having a 100% fully open SoC on both the software and hardware sides while being a hybrid CPU/GPU. Similar to the original plans when targeting RISC-V that it would effectively be a SoC but with new vector instructions optimized for graphics workloads, that's still the plan albeit now using OpenPOWER as a base.

  • X.Org Is Getting Their Cloud / Continuous Integration Costs Under Control

    You may recall from earlier this year that the X.Org/FreeDesktop.org cloud costs were growing out of control primarily due to their continuous integration setup. They were seeking sponsorships to help out with these costs but ultimately they've attracted new sponsors while also better configuring/optimizing their CI configuration in order to get those costs back at more manageable levels.

  • Intel Submits More Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 5.10

    Building off their earlier Intel graphics driver pull request of new material queuing ahead of the Linux 5.10 cycle, another round of updates were submitted on Friday.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Long Week

    Once again, I ended up not blogging for most of the week. When this happens, there’s one of two possibilities: I’m either taking a break or I’m so deep into some code that I’ve forgotten about everything else in my life including sleep.

    This time was the latter. I delved into the deepest parts of zink and discovered that the driver is, in fact, functioning only through a combination of sheer luck and a truly unbelievable amount of driver stalls that provide enough forced synchronization and slow things down enough that we don’t explode into a flaming mess every other frame.

    Oops.

    I’ve fixed all of the crazy things I found, and, in the process, made some sizable performance gains that I’m planning to spend a while blogging about in considerable depth next week.

    And when I say sizable, I’m talking in the range of 50-100% fps gains.

  • Watch the ACO shader compiler and Vulkan Ray Tracing talks from XDC 2020

    With XDC 2020 (X.Org Developers Conference) in full swing, we've been going over the various presentations to gather some interesting bits for you. Here's more on the ACO shader compiler and Vulkan Ray Tracing.

    You can find more info on XDC 2020 in the previous article, and be sure not to miss our round-up of Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais talk about Gamescope.

    More talks were done across yesterday, with the first one we're mentioning here being from Timur Kristóf who is currently a contractor for Valve who talked about ACO (the newer Mesa shader compiler for AMD graphics). The idea behind ACO which Valve announced back in 2019, for those not aware, is to give a smoother Linux gaming experience with less (or no) stuttering with Vulkan with faster compile times for shaders. Kristóf goes over lots of intricate details from being in the experimental stages to eventually the default in Mesa with it now having support across 5 different generations of AMD GPUs.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Zerologon – hacking Windows servers with a bunch of zeros

    The big, bad bug of the week is called Zerologon.

    As you can probably tell from the name, it involves Windows – everyone else talks about logging in, but on Windows you’ve always very definitely logged on – and it is an authentication bypass, because it lets you get away with using a zero-length password.

    You’ll also see it referred to as CVE-2020-1472, and the good news is that it was patched in Microsoft’s August 2020 update.

  • Rethinking Security on Linux: evaluating Antivirus & Password Manager solutions

    Recently I had an experience that let me re-evaluate my approach to Security on Linux. I had updated my Desktop computer to the latest openSUSE Leap (15.2) version. I also installed the proprietary Nvidia drivers. At random points during the day I experienced a freeze of my KDE desktop. I cannot move my mouse or type on my keyboard. It probably involves Firefox, because I always have Firefox open during these moments. So for a couple of days, I try to see in my logs what is going on. In /var/log/messages (there is a very nice YaST module for that) you can see the latest messages.

    Suddenly I see messages that I cannot explain. Below, I have copied some sample log lines that give you an impression of what was happening. I have excluded the lines with personal information. But to give you an impression: I could read line for line the names, surnames, addresses and e-mail addresses of all my family members in the /var/log/messsages file.

    [...]

    I needed to find out what was happening. I needed to know if a trojan / mallware was trying to steal my personal information. So I tried searching for the ZIP archive which was referenced. This might still be stored somewhere on my PC. I used KFind to lookup all files which were created in the last 8 hours. And then I found a lot of thumbnail files which were created by… Gwenview. Stored in a temp folder.

    I started to realize that it might not be a hack, but something that was rendering previews, just like in Gwenview. I checked Dolphin and detected that I had the preview function enabled. I checked the log files again. Indeed, whenever I had opened a folder with Dolphin, all Word and Excel files in that folder were ‘processed’. I browsed several folders after deleting Calligra and there were no more log lines added. I re-installed the Calligra suite and noticed the calligra-extras-dolphin package. I browsed the same folders and indeed, the log lines started appearing all over again. I had found the culprit. It wasn’t a hack.

  • New vulnerabilities allow hackers to bypass MFA for Microsoft 365

    Critical vulnerabilities in multi-factor authentication (MFA) implementation in cloud environments where WS-Trust is enabled could allow attackers to bypass MFA and access cloud applications such as Microsoft 365 which use the protocol according to new research from Proofpoint.

    As a result of the way Microsoft 365 session login is designed, an attacker could gain full access to a target's account including their mail, files, contacts, data and more. At the same time though, these vulnerabilities could also be leveraged to gain access to other cloud services from Microsoft including production and development environments such as Azure and Visual Studio.

    Proofpoint first disclosed the these vulnerabilities publicly at its virtual user conference Proofpoint Protect but they have like existed for years. The firm's researchers tested several Identity Provider (IDP) solutions, identified those that were susceptible and resolved the security issues.

  • NIST Password Guidelines

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defines security parameters for Government Institutions. NIST assists organizations for consistent administrative necessities. In recent years, NIST has revised the password guidelines. Account Takeover (ATO) attacks have become a rewarding business for cybercriminals. One of the members of the top management of NIST expressed his views about traditional guidelines, in an interview “producing passwords that are easy to guess for bad guys are hard to guess for legitimate users.” (https://spycloud.com/new-nist-guidelines). This implies that the art of picking the most secure passwords involves a number of human and psychological factors. NIST has developed the Cybersecurity Framework (CSF) to manage and overcome security risks more effectively.

  • Steps of the cyber kill chain

    The cyber kill chain (CKC) is a traditional security model that describes an old-school scenario, an external attacker taking steps to penetrate a network and steal its data-breaking down the attack steps to help organizations prepare. CKC is developed by a team known as the computer security response team. The cyber kill chain describes an attack by an external attacker trying to get access to data within the perimeter of the security

    Each stage of the cyber kill chain shows a specific goal along with that of the attacker Way. Design your Cyber Model killing chain surveillance and response plan is an effective method, as it focuses on how the attacks happen. Stages include,

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium and netbeans), Oracle (mysql:8.0 and thunderbird), SUSE (rubygem-rack and samba), and Ubuntu (apng2gif, gnupg2, libemail-address-list-perl, libproxy, pulseaudio, pure-ftpd, samba, and xawtv).

  • The new BLESA Bluetooth security flaw can keep billions of devices vulnerable

    Billions of smartphones, tablets, laptops, and Linux-based IoT devices are now using Bluetooth software stacks that are potentially susceptible a new security flaw. Titled as BLESA (Bluetooth Low Energy Spoofing Attack), the vulnerability impacts devices running the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) protocol.

  • Are you backing up ransomware with your data?
  •              

  • German Hospital Hacked, Patient Taken to Another City Dies

                     

                       

    German authorities said Thursday that what appears to have been a misdirected hacker attack caused the failure of IT systems at a major hospital in Duesseldorf, and a woman who needed urgent admission died after she had to be taken to another city for treatment.

  •  

  • Woman dies during a ransomware attack on a German hospital [iophk: Windows kills]

                     

                       

    The cyberattack was not intended for the hospital, according to a report from the German news outlet RTL. The ransom note was addressed to a nearby university. The attackers stopped the attack after authorities told them it had actually shut down a hospital.

  •                

  • Windows Exploit Released For Microsoft ‘Zerologon’ Flaw

                     

                       

    Proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit code has been released for a Windows flaw, which could allow attackers to infiltrate enterprises by gaining administrative privileges, giving them access to companies’ Active Directory domain controllers (DCs).

                       

    The vulnerability, dubbed “Zerologon,” is a privilege-escalation glitch (CVE-2020-1472) with a CVSS score of 10 out of 10, making it critical in severity. The flaw was addressed in Microsoft’s August 2020 security updates. However, this week at least four public PoC exploits for the flaw were released on Github, and on Friday, researchers with Secura (who discovered the flaw) published technical details of the vulnerability.

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • Preparing for the realtime future

    Unlike many of the previous gatherings of the Linux realtime developers, their microconference at the virtual 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference had a different feel about it. Instead of being about when and how to get the feature into the mainline, the microconference had two sessions that looked at what happens after the realtime patches are upstream. That has not quite happened yet, but is likely for the 5.10 kernel, so the developers were looking to the future of the stable realtime trees and, relatedly, plans for continuous-integration (CI) testing for realtime kernels.

  • Profile-guided optimization for the kernel

    One of the many unfortunate consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic was the cancellation of the 2020 GNU Tools Cauldron. That loss turned out to be a gain for the Linux Plumbers Conference, which was able to add a GNU Tools track to host many of the discussions that would have otherwise occurred at Cauldron. In that track, Ian Bearman presented his group's work using profile-guided optimization with the Linux kernel. This technique, which he often referred to as "pogo", is not straightforward to apply to the kernel, but the benefits would appear to justify the effort.

    Bearman is the leader of Microsoft's GNU/Linux development-tools team, which is charged with supporting those tools for the rest of the company. The team's responsibilities include ensuring the correctness, performance, and security of those tools (and the programs generated by them). Once upon a time, the idea of Microsoft having a GNU tools team would have raised eyebrows. Now, he said, about half of the instances in the Microsoft cloud are running Linux, making Linux a big deal for the company; it is thus not surprising that the company's cloud group is his team's biggest customer.

    There was recently, he said, an internal customer working on a new Linux-based service that asked his team for performance help. After some brainstorming, the group concluded that this would be a good opportunity to use profile-guided optimization; the customer would have control of the whole machine running the service and was willing to build a custom kernel, making it possible to chase performance gains at any level of the system. But there was a small problem in that the customer was unable to provide any code to allow workload-specific testing.

  • Conventions for extensible system calls

    The kernel does not have just one system call to rename a file; instead, there are three of them: rename(), renameat(), and renameat2(). Each was added when the previous one proved unable to support a new feature. A similar story has played out with a number of system calls: a feature is needed that doesn't fit into the existing interfaces, so a new one is created — again. At the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference, Christian Brauner and Aleksa Sarai ran a pair of sessions focused on the creation of future-proof system calls that can be extended when the need for new features arises.

    Brauner started by noting that the problem of system-call extensibility has been discussed repeatedly on the mailing lists. The same arguments tend to come up for each new system call. Usually, developers try to follow one of two patterns: a full-blown multiplexer that handles multiple functions behind a single system call, or creating a range of new, single-purpose system calls. We have burned ourselves and user space with both, he said. There are no good guidelines to follow; it would be better to establish some conventions and come to an agreement on how future kernel APIs should be designed.

    The requirements for system calls should be stronger, and they should be well documented. There should be a minimal level of extensibility built into every new call, so that there is never again a need to create a renameat2(). The baseline, he said, is a flags argument; that convention is arguably observed for new system calls today. This led to a brief side discussion on why the type of the flags parameter should be unsigned int; in short, signed types can be sign extended, possibly leading to the setting of a lot of unintended flags.

    Sarai took over to discuss the various ways that exist now to deal with system-call extensions. One of those is to add a new system call, which works, but it puts a big burden on user-space code, which must change to make use of this call. That includes checking to see whether the new call is supported at all on the current system and falling back to some other solution in its absence. The other extreme, he said, is multiplexers, which have significant problems of their own.

  • Lua in the kernel?

    BPF is, of course, the language used for network (and other) customization in the Linux kernel, but some people have been using the Lua language for the networking side of that equation. Two developers from Ring-0 Networks, Lourival Vieira Neto and Victor Nogueira, came to the virtual Netdev 0x14 to present that work. It consists of a framework to allow the injection of Lua scripts into the running kernel as well as two projects aimed at routers, one of which is deployed on 20 million devices.

    Neto introduced the talk by saying that it was also based on work from Ana Lúcia de Moura and Roberto Ierusalimschy of the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), which is the home organization of the Lua language. They have been working on kernel scripting since 2008, Neto said, developing the Lunatik framework for Linux. It allows kernel developers to make their subsystems scriptable with Lua and also allows users to load and run their Lua scripts in the kernel.

  • OpenZFS 2.0-RC2 Released With Dozens Of Fixes

    Nearly one month ago OpenZFS 2.0 saw its first release candidate while now it's been succeeded by another test candidate in time for some weekend exposure.

    OpenZFS 2.0 is a huge update for this open-source ZFS file-system implementation in that it mainlines FreeBSD support alongside Linux, there is Zstd compression support, many performance optimizations, fast clone deletion, sequential resilvering, and a lot of other improvements and new features.

  • New /dev/random Implementation Hits 35th Revision

    Going on for more than four years now has been creating a new /dev/random implementation and this Friday marks the 35th revision to this big set of patches that aim for better performance and security.

    The code has been through many changes over the years for this new "Linux Random Number Generator" (LRNG).

  • Linux 5.10 To Support AMD SME Hardware-Enforced Cache Coherency

    Linux 5.10 is set to support a new feature of AMD Secure Memory Encryption (SME) as part of the Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV).

  • Linux 5.9 To Allow Controlling Page Lock Unfairness In Addressing Performance Regression

    Following the Linux 5.0 to 5.9 kernel benchmarks on AMD EPYC and it showing the in-development Linux 5.9 kernel regressing in some workloads, bisecting that issue, and that bringing up the issue of the performance regression over page lock fairness a solution for Linux 5.9 has now landed.

    [...]

    Long-term Linus Torvalds and other upstream developers will be looking at further improving the page lock behavior, but merged today for Linux 5.9 was a short-term solution. The change is allowing a controlled amount of unfairness in the page lock.

  • Notes from an online free-software conference

    An online event requires an online platform to host it. The Linux Foundation, which supports LPC in a number of ways, offered a handful of possibilities, all of which were proprietary and expensive. One cannot blame the Linux Foundation for this; the events group there was under great pressure with numerous large events going up in flames. In such a situation, one has to grasp at whatever straws present themselves. We, though, had a bit more time and a strong desire to avoid forcing our attendees onto a proprietary platform, even if the alternative required us to build and support a platform ourselves.

    Research done in those early days concluded that there were two well-established, free-software systems to choose from: Jitsi and BigBlueButton. Either could have been made to work for this purpose. In the end, we chose BigBlueButton for a number of reasons, including better-integrated presentation tools, a more flexible moderation system, and a more capable front-end system (though, as will be seen, we didn't use that part).

    BigBlueButton worked out well for LPC, but it must be said that this system is not perfect. It's a mixture of highly complex components from different projects glued together under a common interface; its configuration spans literally hundreds of XML files (and some in other formats). It only runs on the ancient Ubuntu 16.04 distribution. Many features are hard to discover, and some are outright footguns: for moderators, the options to exit a meeting (leaving it running) and to end the meeting (thus kicking everybody else out, disposing of the chat session, and more) are adjacent to each other on the menu and look almost identical. Most worryingly, BigBlueButton has a number of built-in scalability limitations.

    The FAQ says that no BigBlueButton session should have more than 100 users — a limitation that is certain to get the attention of a conference that normally draws around 600 people. A lot of work was done to try to find out what the real limitations of the platform were; these included automated testing and running a couple of "town hall" events ahead of the conference. In the end, we concluded that BigBlueButton would do the job if we took care not to stress it too hard.

  • September 2020 Linux Foundation Newsletter
  •        

  • Open Source Collaboration is a Global Endeavor, Part 2

    The Linux Foundation would like to reiterate its statements and analysis of the application of US Export Control regulations to public, open collaboration projects (for example, open source software, open standards, open hardware, and open data) and the importance of open collaboration in the successful, global development of the world’s most important technologies.
    Today’s announcement of prohibited transactions by the Department of Commerce regarding WeChat and TikTok in the United States confirms our initial impact analysis for open source collaboration. Nothing in the orders prevents or impacts our communities’ ability to openly collaborate with two valued members of our open source ecosystem, Tencent and ByteDance. From around the world, our members and participants engage in open collaboration because it is open and transparent, and those participants are clear that they desire to continue collaborating with their peers around the world.

  • Linux Foundation Certified IT Administrator Exam To Be Launched Soon
  • Linux Foundation launches new entry-level IT certification

    If you're Linus Torvalds, you don't need a certification to get a job. People know who you are. But most of us trying to get a start in technology need a certification. Now, The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit, open-source powerhouse organization, and Certiverse, a certification testing startup, have announced they're working on a new entry-level IT certification offering: The Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate (LFCA).

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Named a Leader by Independent Research Firm in Multicloud Container Development Platforms Evaluation

    Red Hat was evaluated for The Forrester Wave™ based on 29 criteria across three categories: Current Offering, Strategy and Market Presence. Red Hat OpenShift received the highest scores among evaluated products in each of these categories, with the maximum possible score in both the Strategy and Market Presence categories.

    According to Forrester’s evaluation, "OpenShift is the most widely deployed multicloud container platform and boasts powerful development and unified operations experiences across many public and on-premises platforms. Red Hat pioneered the ‘operator’ model for infrastructure and application management and provides a rich partner ecosystem and popular marketplace. Red Hat and IBM aim to make ‘build once, deploy anywhere’ a reality; both companies’ deep commitment to Kubernetes-powered modernization has paid off, moving OpenShift further ahead of the market since Forrester’s last evaluation."

  • In the Clouds with Red Hat Leadership: Joe Fernandes

    Red Hat’s senior leadership is having to execute at an ever-increasing pace. This episode of In the Clouds provides host Chris Short inviting thoughtful and candid discussions with the one and only Joe Fernandes, VP & GM Core Cloud Platforms.

  • IBM Publishes Quantum Computing Roadmap

    IBM has published a roadmap for the future of its quantum computing hardware, which indicates that the company is on its way to building a quantum processor with more than 1,000 qubits—and somewhere between 10 and 50 logical qubits—by the end of 2023.

    IBM’s Dario Gil believes that 2023 will be an inflection point in the industry, with the road to the 1,121-qubit machine driving improvements across the stack.

  • How emotionally intelligent leaders handle 6 difficult situations during the pandemic

    Emotional intelligence, or EQ, has always been an important component of effective leadership. However, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has both heightened the awareness of EQ in the workplace and also tested it. What’s more, the pandemic is just one of multiple stressors IT leaders and their employees may be dealing with right now. There’s also a divisive upcoming election. High levels of unemployment. Civil unrest. Any of a number of natural disasters. And then the normal day-to-day stress of work.

    “Essentially, when we are tired, or sick, or stressed, we don’t have the same ability to manage our reactions. So we might not react in a way that’s consistent with who we want to be as a leader, manager, or team player. Right now, we’re dealing with a lot of different stressors at once,” says Janele Lynn, owner of the Lynn Leadership Group, who helps leaders build trusting relationships through emotional intelligence.

  • Justin W. Flory: A reflection: Gabriele Trombini (mailga)

    Two years passed since we last met in Bolzano. I remember you traveled in for a day to join the 2018 Fedora Mindshare FAD. You came many hours from your home to see us, and share your experiences and wisdom from both the global and Italian Fedora Community. And this week, I learned that you, Gabriele Trombini, passed away from a heart attack. To act like the news didn’t affect me denies my humanity. In 2020, a year that feels like it has taken away so much already, we are greeted by another heart-breaking loss.

    But to succumb to the despair and sadness of this year would deny the warm, happy memories we shared together. We shared goals of supporting the Fedora Project but also learning from each other.

    So, this post is a brief reflection of your life as I knew you. A final celebration of the great memories we shared together, that I only wish I could have shared with you while you were still here.

  • Remi Collet: PHP version 7.3.23RC1 and 7.4.11RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.4.11RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 32-33 or remi-php74-test repository for Fedora 31 and Enterprise Linux 7-8.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.23RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 31 or remi-php73-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Man-DB Brings Documentation to IBM i

    IBM i developers who have a question about how a particular command or feature works in open source packages now have an easy way to look up documentations, thanks to the addition of support for the Man-DB utility in IBM i, which IBM unveiled in late July.

    Man-DB is an open source implementation of the standard Unix documentation system. It provides a mechanism for easily accessing the documentation that exists for open source packages, such as the Node.js language, or even for commands, like Curl.

    The software, which can be installed via YUM, only works with open source software on IBM i at the moment; it doesn’t support native programs or commands.

  • Open Mainframe Project Announces Record Growth with the Launch of Four New Projects, a COBOL Working Group and Micro Focus as a New Member
  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 228

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from Cockpit version 228.

  • Managing the security of your Red Hat Enterprise Linux environment with Red Hat Insights

    When it comes to managing security risks, enterprises face an increasing number of challenges. One of these challenges is managing the security health of the IT infrastructure and this is a critical, ongoing, constantly evolving need. As an enterprise, managing the security risks on your infrastructure without any disruption to the business has become a critical exercise.

    The security of your infrastructure is no longer a concern only for the security roles in your organization. Security topics are repeatedly brought up in the C-suite and in board discussions. When the stakes are high and the health or your business depends on it, you need to have a game plan to stay ahead of these risks while keeping the operational costs in check.

  • Supporting the touchless banking customer experience

    In this new-experience economy, banks are going to need to not only meet, but exceed customer expectations. What are financial institutions going to do to ensure that their customers can have the experience that they desire while feeling safe when visiting a branch, interacting with an advisor, or conducting routine and complex financial transactions?

    Supporting the touchless customer experience will require the right amount of technology and acceptable in-person interactions to ensure that the financial institution is providing the necessary level of empathy while ensuring that the customers and employees remain safe. While handshakes will need to be put on hold, there are ways banks can safely engage with customers from the time that they enter the branch or reach out through digital channels.

  • Kubeflow 1.0 monitoring and enhanced JupyterHub builds in Open Data Hub 0.8

    The new Open Data Hub version 0.8 (ODH) release includes many new features, continuous integration (CI) additions, and documentation updates. For this release, we focused on enhancing JupyterHub image builds, enabling more mixing of Open Data Hub and Kubeflow components, and designing our comprehensive end-to-end continuous integration and continuous deployment and delivery (CI/CD) process. In this article, we introduce the highlights of this newest release.

    [...]

    In an effort to allow data scientists to turn their notebooks into Argo Workflows or Kubeflow pipelines, we’ve added an exciting new tool called Elyra to Open Data Hub 0.8. The process of converting all of the work that a data scientist has created in notebooks to a production-level pipeline is cumbersome and usually manual. Elyra lets you execute this process from the JupyterLab portal with just a few clicks. As shown in Figure 1, Elyra is now included in a JupyterHub notebook image.

    [...]

    As part of our effort to make Kubeflow and Open Data Hub components interchangeable, we’ve added monitoring capabilities to Kubeflow. With ODH 0.8, users can add Prometheus and Grafana for Kubeflow component monitoring. Currently, not all Kubeflow components support a Prometheus endpoint. We did turn on the Prometheus endpoint in Argo, and we’ve provided the example dashboard shown in Figure 3, which lets users monitor their pipelines.

  • Call for Code Daily: regional finalists, problem solvers, and Kode With Klossy

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of September 14.

    [...]

    In precarious times like the ones we are dealing with right now, it’s important to recognize that everyone is feeling the repercussions. While COVID-19 impacted corporations, schools, and retailers at scale, it also impacted young children around the world who are adjusting to their new normal. In an effort to engage this community and provide an outlet to relieve stress and anxiety for those that fall into this category, the TravelQuest team, comprised of Kode With Klossy Scholars, developed an app that blends gamification with educational entertainment to boost the emotional states for all its users.

  • Why go with agile integration?

    You probably have heard about agile integrations, and you may wonder why should you adopt it anyways? Well, technology today is becoming smarter than ever. This is the time to not only trust the technology, but also to rethink of how you can modernize your applications in a distributed, hybrid and multicloud world.

    Data is growing dramatically over the years, and enterprises are challenged to derive rich insights and knowledge from the huge amounts of data. However, enterprises face many challenges and bottlenecks when connecting various systems or applications within heterogeneous environments, due to portability and interoperability limitations. In addition, there is an increasing demand for continuous integration and continuous delivery and continuous deployment (CI/CD). Businesses today acquire the agility and rapid response to changing business demands in a continuous manner. In such scenarios, a centralized traditional integration might not be the best idea. Comparatively, an agile integration perfectly fits and helps to reduce the costs and increase the speed, and additionally allows a room of innovation.

  • Q&A: Unleashing the Beast—Bringing Linux to IBM Z

    Bringing Linux to IBM Z was an important moment in IBM’s history. What was it like to start your career at such an exciting moment?

    Betzler: When I started at IBM, we were looking at green screens—quite different from the IBM Z user experience today. But what I really saw behind the screen was the potential to innovate. How could I get more access to this amazing computer? How could we unleash the beast of Linux on Z?

    Adlung: We knew there was a need for a smart way to bring Unix back to the mainframe. The answer was open source and Boas proposed using Linux for it—and I was ready to be among the first to attempt it.

    Betzler: I knew if we could get Java onto the mainframe, we needed an operating system. If we could use open and modern technology and code that was available as open source, I knew we could innovate. We started on what was supposed to be a fun project. But it quickly turned into an overnight and weekend activity.

    Adlung: People often asked us “Why are you doing this?” And 20 years earlier I’d always say, “because we can.”

    We had a vision—not just programming for the sake of programming. We wanted to bring the Linux experience to the mainframe, which implied embracing open source programming, which was unheard at that time. And with a spirited team working at 3 a.m. in our spare time, we had the potential to go from a skunkworks project to a strategic imperative for the company. We were pushing the envelope at every turn.

MagicMirror: a versatile home information hub

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Back in 2014, a Raspberry Pi enthusiast by the name of Michael Teeuw shared his build of a "magic mirror" with the world in a six-part series. The system consisted of a Raspberry Pi and monitor running a web browser in kiosk mode, with a web server that provided a dashboard interface — all stored in a custom-built case with a one-way mirror. Since his post, others around the world have built these devices for their home (including myself), forming both a community and an interesting open-source project. The recent release of MagicMirror2 (MM2) version 2.12.0 gives us an opportunity to learn more about where the project started and where it is today.

The MM2 project provides the software to convert what would otherwise be a normal household mirror into a valuable source of information. This information could take the form of drive times, train schedules, daily news, server loads, sports scores, or even the feed from the doorbell when someone is at the door. With the right know-how, the surface can even become interactive through the use of hand gestures or as a touchscreen.

Read more

Kali Linux: Win-KeX Version 2.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

We have been humbled by the amazing response to our recent launch of Win-KeX. After its initial release, we asked ourselves if that is truly the limit of what we can achieve or could we pull off something incredible to mark the 25th anniversary of Hackers? What about “a second concurrent session as root”, “seamless desktop integration with Windows”, or – dare we dream – “sound”?

Read more

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • SDF record walkthrough

    In this essay I'll walk through the major parts of a simple V2000 SDFile record.

    Richard Apodaca summarized the SDfile format a few months ago, with details I won't cover here. You should read it for more background.

    Bear in mind that the variety of names for this format name leads to some confusion. It's often called an SDF file, which technically means structure-data file file, in the same way that PIN number technically means personal identification number number. I tend to write SD file, but the term in the documentation is SDFile.

  • I Want to Learn Programming but I Don’t Know Where to Start

    Software development is a challenging and lucrative career option. Our daily utility items — light bulbs, televisions, cars, banking, shopping — everything is driven by intelligent pieces of codes.

    If you want to learn programming but do not know where to start, you have come to the right blog. I have compiled a step-by-step guide that will get you started on your software development journey and eliminate your apprehensions.

  • Handling the SDF record delimiter

    In this essay I'll point out a common difficulty people have when trying to identify the end of an SDFile record.

  • Stack Abuse: Kernel Density Estimation in Python Using Scikit-Learn

    This article is an introduction to kernel density estimation using Python's machine learning library scikit-learn.

    Kernel density estimation (KDE) is a non-parametric method for estimating the probability density function of a given random variable. It is also referred to by its traditional name, the Parzen-Rosenblatt Window method, after its discoverers.

  • How to Create a Python Hello World Program

    There is a major difference between python 2 and python 3. For instance, one difference is the print statement. In python 2, the print statement is not a function. It is considered as a simple statement. Whenever we use the print statement in python 2, we do not use the parenthesis. On the other hand in python 3, print is a function and it is followed by the parenthesis.

    In any programming language, the simplest “Hello World” program is used to demonstrate the syntax of the programming language. In this article, we create the “Hello World” program in python 3. Spyder3 editor is used to creating and running the python script.

Mozilla: PGP in Thunderbird, Departures, Firefox Send and Firefox Notes

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Thunderbird implements PGP crypto feature requested 21 years ago

    Mozilla's mail reader Thunderbird has implemented a feature first requested 21 years ago.

    The somewhat garbled request – "I'd appreciate a plugin for PGP to ede and encrypt PGP crypted messages directly in Mozilla" [sic] – appears to have gone unimplemented due to concerns about US laws that bar export of encryption, debate about whether PGP was the right way to do crypto, and other matters besides.

    Thunderbird eventually chose to use Enigmail and its implementation of OpenPGP public key email encryption. However, it was an add-on rather than integrated. Commenters in the Bugzilla thread stemming from the request kept the dream of an integrated solution alive, though.

    Then in October 2019, the Thunderbird blog announced that Thunderbird 78 "will add built-in functionality for email encryption and digital signatures using the OpenPGP standard."

    Thunderbird 78 emerged in July 2020, and late in August Thunderbird contributor Kai Engert (:KaiE:) posted: "We have released support for OpenPGP email in Thunderbird version 78.2.1. Marking fixed."

  • Upcoming US Holidays (for Mike Taylor)

    This is my last full week at Mozilla, with my last day being Monday, September 21. It’s been just over 7 years since I joined (some of them were really great, and others were fine, I guess).

  • Update on Firefox Send and Firefox Notes

    As Mozilla tightens and refines its product focus in 2020, today we are announcing the end of life for two legacy services that grew out of the Firefox Test Pilot program: Firefox Send and Firefox Notes. Both services are being decommissioned and will no longer be a part of our product family. Details and timelines are discussed below.

    Firefox Send was a promising tool for encrypted file sharing. Send garnered good reach, a loyal audience, and real signs of value throughout its life. Unfortunately, some abusive users were beginning to use Send to ship malware and conduct spear phishing attacks. This summer we took Firefox Send offline to address this challenge.

    In the intervening period, as we weighed the cost of our overall portfolio and strategic focus, we made the decision not to relaunch the service. Because the service is already offline, no major changes in status are expected. You can read more here.

  • Mozilla Browser Extension to Track YouTube Recommendations

    It’s easy to get caught up in YouTube as it recommends an endless array of videos, with each one offering you more of the same type of content. But it’s not always the same content. Sometimes the process gets convoluted, and you wind up watching something you have no interest in. Mozilla is curious why this happens and created a browser extension to track YouTube recommendations.

10 Best Open-source Self-hosted Collaborative Text Editors Alternative to Google Docs

Filed under
Server
OSS

Collaborative writing is a term referred to team and group of writers involving in writing and editing the same document or writing project.

The project can be an essay, a technical documentation, a book or a research paper.

When groups and teams members join together in a writing project, They often face the challenge of choosing a tool.

Are you a researcher, book writer or a novelist? Maybe you are a technical writer or a software developer who works with a team. It's essential for you and your team to choose the right tool for the job. So according to your use-case what's your best option? That's what we are trying to answer in this article.

Read more

GNU/Linux-Compatible Devices and Open Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Microchip SAMD21 Machine Learning Evaluation Kits Work with Cartesiam, Edge Impulse and Motion Gestures Solutions

    While it all started in the cloud Artificial Intelligence is now moving at the very edge is ultra-low power nodes, and Microchip has launched two SAMD21 Arm Cortex-M0+ machine learning evaluation kits that now work with AI/ML solutions from Cartesiam, Edge Impulse, and Motion Gestures.

    Bot machine learning evaluation kits come with SAMD21G18 Arm Cortex-M0+ 32-bit MCU, an on-board debugger (nEDBG), an ATECC608A CryptoAuthentication secure element, ATWINC1510 Wi-Fi network controller, as well as Microchip MCP9808 high accuracy temperature sensor and a light sensor. But EV45Y33A development kit is equipped with an add-on board featuring Bosch’s BMI160 low-power Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), while EV18H79A features an add-on board with TDK InvenSense ICM-42688-P 6-axis MEMS.

  • 3µA/MHz Ambiq Apollo 4 MCU Targets Battery-powered IoT Devices with Voice Processing

    Ambiq Micro is using sub-threshold voltages under 0.5V to offer ultra-low-power Arm microcontrollers. In 2015, the company launch the Apollo Cortex-M4F MCU with 30µA/MHz power consumption in active mode, which was followed in 2016 by Apollo 2 in consuming just 10µA/MHz, and Apollo 3 (Blue) dropped power consumption to as low as 6µA/MHz against using a Cortex-M4F @ 48 MHz in active mode.

  • SBC and HMI starter kit run Linux on i.MX6 ULL

    Artila’s “SBC-7530” runs Linux 5.4 on an i.MX6 ULL with WiFi, 2x 10/100 LAN, 3x USB, 2x RS-485, 2x CAN, mini-PCIe with micro-SIM, and an optional starter kit with 7-inch touchscreen.

    Taiwan-based Artila Electronics, which is known for its Matrix line of low-power, compact IoT gateways, has launched its first SBC in 12 years. The i.MX6 ULL-equipped SBC-7530 follows its circa-2008 M-508 SBC, which is based on an ARM9-based Atmel (now Microchip) AT91RM9200.

  • Industrial panel PC is an IP69 neat freak

    Adlink’s IP69-protected “Titan-AL” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on Apollo Lake and is available with 15.6-, 21.5-, and 23.8-inch HD capacitive touchscreens in either VESA with M12 or pipe-mount configurations.

    Adlink has added an Intel Apollo Lake based panel PC to its Titan Panel Computer series that adheres to IP69 water and dust-proofing protections. The Titan-AL follows Adlink’s similarly IP69-protected Penta Food-C15/C17/C19 IP69K, which is aimed specifically at food processing operations and runs on an older Atom D2550. Other IP69 protected panel PCs include TechNexion’s i.MX6 based, 10.1-inch TWP-1010-IMX6 and Wincomm’s Skylake-based, 15-, 19-, and 22-inch WTP-9E66.

  • Compact module runs on Ryzen V1000

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready “CEM130” COM Express Compact Type 6 module provides a Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC with up to 32GB DDR4 and support for quad displays, 2x SATA, 7x PCIe, 9x USB, and -20 to 60°C operation.

    Axiomtek, which has previously tapped AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC in a 3.5-inch CAPA13R SBC and DSP600-211 signage player, has now returned with a COM Express Compact Type 6 module. The CEM130 joins other V1000-equipped, 95 x 95mm Compact Type 6 modules such as Arbor’s EmETXe-a10M0 and Kontron’s COMe-cVR6.

  • New COM Express Type 6 Compact Module Compatible with Windows 10 and Linux Operating Systems
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  • Monitor water quality anywhere in the world with WaterAid

    Clean water is one of our most precious resources, but identifying sources of pollution often means expensive equipment. This can also mean taking multiple water quality readings and somehow aggregating them together to be easily usable. As a solution to both problems, Andrei Florian has developed WaterAid — which was recently named a finalist in this year’s Hackaday Prize.

    WaterAid consists of a measurement unit that senses water pH, turbidity, and temperature, as well as atmospheric temperature and humidity. Data is relayed to the system’s backend via a cellular connection, using an onboard MKR GSM 1400. Collected information from one or more devices is then displayed on a Soracom Lagoon dashboard for water monitoring from anywhere in the world!

    Not only can a fleet of WaterAids be used to continuously track a river, lake, or any other body of water, but individuals looking to get immediate feedback on quality can utilize the portable tool’s NeoPixel ring for color-coded judgement.

  •        

  • A MKR ZERO-based volume controller for your PC

    While some keyboards provide media keys or even knobs to adjust your overall computer sound up and down, often what you really want is the ability to tune program volumes separately. To make this extremely easy, SNR Tech Bytes has come up with a beautifully-designed controller, which runs on the MKR ZERO.

    The device features five encoders to individually tune the master volume, Discord, Chrome, gaming, and Spotify, with the help of software on the PC itself. Encoder button mutes each channel as needed, using NeoPixels below to indicate each status.

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  • How is computing taught in schools around the world?

             

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  • Build an arcade cabinet | Hackspace 35

             

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    nut – testing shutdown and startup

                     

                       

    Based on this, I’m confident the rack will properly shutdown when the power fails. Just as important, it will come back when the power returns.

Adventures of porting postmarketOS to the Librem 5

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

I’ve been longing to drop the shackles of Android ever since I made the decision to stop using my Nokia N900. Nokia had given up on Linux phones, and it was clear that there would be no further security patches for my favorite smartphone of all time. Shaking Google out of Android had been my mission for years, and I had resorted to running my own builds of “de-Googled” LineageOS. I was longing for something better. I was out of the country when I first read about postmarketOS (“pmOS”) in May 2017. postmarketOS is a Linux distribution based on Alpine Linux, that strives to provide a Linux distribution running the mainline Linux kernel, as a means to revive old smartphones long forgotten by their manufacturers. My beloved N900 was one device with (rough) support! I quickly jumped on eBay to order a second N900 to meet me at home when I arrived back, because obviously two are needed. Obviously… Thus began my relationship with postmarketOS, one that continues to this day.

Things were not all rosy though… After some time it became clear that the older N900 CPU wasn’t going to get any faster for running “modern” applications and that there would never be a free userspace graphics driver for its GPU, so I was quite excited when I first learned about the Librem 5. Sure, it didn’t have a physical slide-out keyboard, but the promise of a device from a company that would treat Linux support as a first-class citizen was too good to pass up. I promptly pre-ordered a developer kit (“devkit”) and phone, with the full intention of porting postmarketOS to the device and eventually using it full time to replace the heaping pile of Android in my pocket.

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LibreOffice: Yaru, Promotion and Locale-independent Writer Templates

Filed under
LibO
  • The best LibreOffice extensions. Yaru icon theme

    Paul Kepinski made a new nice LibreOffice icon theme. Its name is Yaru. He wanted include it into LibreOffice source code, but then he made an extension and now you can download it by the link. Just enjoy!

  • Spread the word – add LibreOffice to your email signature!

    Love LibreOffice? Want to let more people know about it? An effective (and easy) way is to add a mention of the software to your email signature. This is the piece of text that’s automatically added to emails that you send, and typically includes some information about your job, or other contact details.

    Many people also use their email signatures (aka “sigs”) to spread the word about causes they support – such as free and open source software projects. So, you could use your signature to raise awareness about LibreOffice, for instance! When people read your emails, if they also check out the signature, they’ll learn something.

  • Locale-independent Writer templates

    Users create new documents in various ways. When they do so in Online or via Windows Explorer’s context menu (New → …) then actual templates are not involved in the process, technically. What happens instead is that there is a plain empty Writer (or Calc, Impress) document that gets copied. The reason for this is that by the time the document gets created, the WOPI-like protocol or Windows Explorer doesn’t have a running soffice process to create a document instance from a template: it’ll just copy a file.

Screencasts and Audiocasts/Shows

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Manjaro 20.1 XFCE Edition overview | #FREE OPERATING SYSTEM.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Manjaro 20.1 XFCE Edition and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • The Real Python Podcast – Episode #27: Preparing for an Interview With Python Practice Problems

    What is an effective way to prepare for a Python interview? Would you like a set of problems that increase in difficulty to practice and hone your Python skills? This week on the show, we have Jim Anderson to talk about his new Real Python article, “Python Practice Problems: Get Ready for Your Next Interview.” This article provides several problems, which include skeleton code, unit tests, and solutions for you to compare your work.

    David Amos also joins us this week, and he has brought another batch of PyCoder’s Weekly articles and projects from the Python community. We cover these topics: Structural Pattern Matching, Common Python Data Structures, A Tax Attorney Uses Python, Discover the Role of Python in Space Exploration, and Five Pairs of Magic Methods in Python That You Should Know.

  • Force Students To Run Spyware To Stop Cheating In Online Exams

    Ever since everyone started working remotely more of these online exam proctoring tools and monitoring tools have been popping up and I thought wouldn't it be fun to go and see how they plan to stop cheating and even better how fundamentally flawed this plan actually is. Almost 100% of people who do an online exam will cheat, and cheating should be expected if you don't like that then don't hold an online exam.

  • Normalizing Surveillance

    Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, and Petros Koutoupis talk about Amazon's Alexa for landlords program.

    Show notes:

    00:00:23 For starters, let's begin with Normalization of Surveillance.
    00:50:00 Amazon Alexa for landlords.
    00:10:15 Is this really jus another way to discover new markets?
    00:19:03 Doc the mechanic?!
    00:27:49 If you're young do you really not care about privacy?
    00:30:49 A couple of things that will clue people on privacy, are: Health data, and political issues

  • "Hey, DT. You Need A Better Studio!" (Plus Other Comments I Get)

    In this lengthy rant video, I address a few questions and comments that I've been receiving from viewers. I discuss alternatives to the Ubuntu Software Center, alternatives to the term "proprietary garbage", what software you should install alongside your window managers in Arch Linux, VirtualBox versus Virt-Manager, and my recording setup and why I need a proper studio.

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