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Thursday, 22 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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KDE ISO Image Writer – Release Announcement

Filed under
KDE

My GSoC project comes to an end and I am going to conclude this series of articles by announcing the release of a beta version of KDE ISO Image Writer.

Read more

Also: How I got a project in Labplot KDE

Linux Foundation: Automotive Grade Linux Announcement and Calling Surveillance Operations "Confidential Computing"

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Security
  • Automotive Grade Linux Announces New Instrument Cluster Expert Group and UCB 8.0 Code Release

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), an open source project developing a shared software platform for in-vehicle technology, today announced a new working group focused on Instrument Cluster solutions, as well as the latest code release of the AGL platform, the UCB 8.0.

    The AGL Instrument Cluster Expert Group (EG) is working to reduce the footprint of AGL and optimize the platform for use in lower performance processors and low-cost vehicles that do not require an entire infotainment software stack. Formed earlier this year, the group plans to release design specifications later this year with an initial code release in early 2020.

    “AGL is now supported by nine major automotive manufacturers, including the top three producers by worldwide volume, and is currently being used in production for a range of economy and luxury vehicles” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “The new Instrument Cluster Expert Group, supported by several of these automakers, will expand the use cases for AGL by enabling the UCB platform to support solutions for lower-cost vehicles, including motorcycles.”

  • Shhh! Microsoft, Intel, Google and more sign up to the Confidential Computing Consortium

    The Linux Foundation has signed up the likes of Microsoft and Google for its Confidential Computing Consortium, a group with the laudable goal of securing sensitive data.

    The group – which also includes Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent – will be working on open-source technologies and standards to speed the adoption of confidential computing.

    The theory goes that while approaches to encrypting data at rest and in transit have supposedly been dealt with, assuming one ignores the depressingly relentless splurts of user information from careless vendors, keeping it safe while in use is quite a bit more challenging. Particularly as workloads spread to the cloud and IoT devices.

  • Tech giants come together to form cloud security watchdog

    Some of the world’s biggest technology companies are joining forces to improve the security of files in the cloud. This includes Google, IBM, Microsoft, Intel, and many others.

    The news first popped up on the Linux Foundation, where it was said that the Confidential Computing Consortium will work to bring industry standards and identify the proper tools to encrypt data used by apps, devices and online services.

    At the moment, cloud security solutions focus to protect data that’s either resting, or is in transit. However, when the data is being used is “the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data.”

  • Tech firms join forces to boost cloud security

    Founding members of the group – which unites hardware suppliers, cloud providers, developers, open source experts and academics – include Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent.

    [...]

    “The earliest work on technologies that have the ability to transform an industry is often done in collaboration across the industry and with open source technologies,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation.

    “The Confidential Computing Consortium is a leading indicator of what is to come for security in computing and will help define and build open technologies to support this trust infrastructure for data in use.”

  • Google, Intel and Microsoft form data protection consortium
  • Intel Editorial: Intel Joins Industry Consortium to Accelerate Confidential Computing

    Leaders in information and infrastructure security are well versed in protecting data at-rest or in-flight through a variety of methods. However, data being actively processed in memory is another matter. Whether running on your own servers on-prem, in an edge deployment, or in the heart of a cloud service provider’s data center, this “in-use” data is almost always unencrypted and potentially vulnerable.

  • Confidential Computing: How Big Tech Companies Are Coming Together To Secure Data At All Levels

    Data today moves constantly from on-premises to public cloud and the edge, which is why it is quite challenging to protect. While there are standards available that aim to protect data when it is in rest and transit, standards related to protecting it when in use do not exist. Protecting data while in use is called confidential computing, which the Confidential Computing Consortium is aiming to create across the industry.

    The Confidential Computing Consortium, created under the Linux Foundation, will work to build up guidelines, systems and tools to ensure data is encrypted when it’s being used by applications, devices and online services. The consortium says that encrypting data when in use is “the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data.” Members focused on the undertaking are Alibaba, ARM, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent.

  • IT giants join forces for full-system data security

    Apple is conspiciously missing from the consortium, despite using both Intel hardware and inhouse designed ARM-based processors.

    Of the first set of commitments, Intel will release its Software Guard Extensions (SGX) software development kit as open source through the CCC.

  • Google, Intel, and Microsoft partner to improve cloud security

    Some of the biggest names in tech have banded together in an effort to promote industry-wide security standards for protecting data in use.

  • Alibaba, Baidu, Google, Microsoft, Others Back Confidential Computing Consortium

    The Confidential Computing Consortium aims to help define and accelerate open-source technology that keeps data in use secure. Data typically gets encrypted by service providers, but not when it’s in use. This consortium will focus on encrypting and processing the data “in memory” to reduce the exposure of the data to the rest of the system. It aims to provide greater control and transparency for users.

  • Microsoft, Intel and others are doubling down on open source Linux security

    In other words, the operating system could be compromised by some kind of malware, but the data being used in a program would still be encrypted, and therefore safe from an attacker.

  • Microsoft, Intel, and Red Hat Back Confidential Computing

    The Linux Foundation’s latest project tackles confidential computing with a group of companies that reads like a who’s who of cloud providers, chipmakers, telecom operators, and other tech giants.

    Today at the Open Source Summit the Linux Foundation said it will form a new group called the Confidential Computing Consortium. Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom, and Tencent all committed to work on the project, which aims to accelerate the adoption of confidential computing.

IBM/Red Hat: OpenShift, CUDA, Jim Whitehurst, VMworld and RHELvolution

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Launches OpenShift Service Mesh to Accelerate Adoption of Microservices and Cloud-Native Applications

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh to connect, observe and simplify service-to-service communication of Kubernetes applications on Red Hat OpenShift 4, the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform. Based on the Istio, Kiali and Jaeger projects and enhanced with Kubernetes Operators, OpenShift Service Mesh is designed to deliver a more efficient, end-to-end developer experience around microservices-based application architectures. This helps to free developer teams from the complex tasks of having to implement bespoke networking services for their applications and business logic.

  • CUDA 10.1 U2 Adds RHEL8 Support, Nsight Compute Tools For POWER

    NVIDIA last week quietly released a second update to CUDA 10.1.

    CUDA 10.1 Update 2 brings Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 support, continued POWER architecture support improvements, and other additions.

  • IBM Stock and Jim Whitehurst’s Toughest Test

    What analysts say they want from IBM stock is Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst in current CEO Virginia Rometty’s chair. They want Red Hat running IBM.

    That wasn’t the promise when this deal was put together. The promise was that Red Hat would get autonomy from IBM, not that IBM would lose its autonomy to Red Hat. But Whitehurst’s concept of an Open Organization has excited analysts who don’t even know what it is.

    If IBM became an Open Organization, these analysts think, it would replace the top-down structure IBM has used for a century with an organic system in which employees and customers are part of the product design process. Instead of selling gear or even solutions, IBM would become a corporate change agent.

  • Going to VMWorld? Learn to help data scientists and application developers accelerate AI/ML initiatives

    IT experts from around the world are headed to VMworld 2019 in San Francisco to learn how they can leverage emerging technologies from VMware and ecosystem partners (e.g. Red Hat, NVIDIA, etc.) to help achieve the digital transformation for their organizations. Artificial Intelligence (AI)/Machine Learning (ML) is a very popular technology trend, with Red Hat OpenShift customers like HCA Healthcare, BMW, Emirates NBD, and several more are offering differentiated value to their customers. Investments are ramping up across many industries to develop intelligent digital services that help improve customer satisfaction, and gain competitive business advantages. Early deployment trends indicate AI/ML solution architectures are spanning across edge, data center, and public clouds.

  • RHELvolution 2: A brief history of Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases from RHEL 6 to today

    In the previous post, we looked at the history of Red Hat Enterprise Linux from pre-RHEL days through the rise of virtualization. In this one we'll take a look at RHEL's evolution from early days of public cloud to the release of RHEL 8 and beyond.

Programming: Jupyter, Python, Django and Git

Filed under
Development
  • Jupyter Notebook for Beginners: A Tutorial

    The Jupyter Notebook is an incredibly powerful tool for interactively developing and presenting data science projects. This article will walk you through how to set up Jupyter Notebooks on your local machine and how to start using it to do data science projects.

    First, though: what is a “notebook”? A notebook integrates code and its output into a single document that combines visualizations, narrative text, mathematical equations, and other rich media. This intuitive workflow promotes iterative and rapid development, making notebooks an increasingly popular choice at the heart of contemporary data science, analysis, and increasingly science at large.

    Best of all, as part of the open source Project Jupyter, they are completely free.

    The Jupyter project is the successor to the earlier IPython Notebook, which was first published as a prototype in 2010. Although it is possible to use many different programming languages within Jupyter Notebooks, this article will focus on Python as it is the most common use case. (Among R users, R Studio tends to be a more popular choice).

  • Python for NLP: Creating Multi-Data-Type Classification Models with Keras

    This is the 18th article in my series of articles on Python for NLP. In my previous article, I explained how to create a deep learning-based movie sentiment analysis model using Python's Keras library. In that article, we saw how we can perform sentiment analysis of user reviews regarding different movies on IMDB. We used the text of the review the review to predict the sentiment.

    However, in text classification tasks, we can also make use of the non-textual information to classify the text. For instance, gender may have an impact on the sentiment of the review. Furthermore, nationalities may affect the public opinion about a particular movie. Therefore, this associated info, also known as meta data can also be used to improve accuracy of statistical model.

    In this article, we will build upon the concepts that we studied in the last two articles and will see how to create a text classification system that classifies user reviews regarding different business, into one of the three predefined categories i.e. "good", "bad", and "average". However, in addition to the text of the review, we will use the associated meta data of the review to perform classifcation. Since we have two different types of inputs i.e. textual input and numerical input, we need to create a multiple inputs model. We will be using Keras Functional API since it supports multiple inputs and multiple output models.

  • Django Template Fiddle Launched !!!!

    This is not an article. We just want to inform you that we have launched our new platform where you can experiment, play or fiddle with Django Templates.

  • Python Script 16: Generating word cloud image of a text using python

    Word cloud is an image composed of words used in a particular text or subject, in which the size of each word indicates its frequency or importance.

  • Python 3.7.3 : Using the inotify.
  • Git is eating the world

    The inception of Git (2005) is more or less the halfway point between the inception of Linux (1991) and today (2019). A lot has happened since. One thing is clear however: software is eating the world and Git is the fork with which it is being eaten. (Yes, pun intended).

CoreCtrl: A Radeon Settings Alternative For Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Software

It’s a frustrating reality for Linux users that Windows software counterparts tend to be better. They may offer greater functionality, better design, and be easier-to-use. There are some exceptions, such as with the NVIDIA Linux GPU driver, which offers two features the Windows version doesn’t: temperature monitoring, and fan control. For the most part, though, things like driver control panels are a scarcity in Linux.

Read more

Also: New Intel Lightning Mountain SoC Appears in Linux Code

Total War: THREE KINGDOMS Comes to GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Security: One More Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day, New FOSS Patches, Major Metapackage Makeover in Kali and Securing Crypto Wallets

Filed under
Security
  • One more Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day

    Not long ago I published an article about Steam vulnerability. I received a lot of feedback. But Valve didn’t say a single word, HackerOne sent a huge letter and, mostly, kept silence. Eventually things escalated with Valve and I got banned by them on HackerOne — I can no longer participate in their vulnerability rejection program (the rest of H1 is still available though).

    You can read the story in more detail in previous article, here is a couple of words about current situation.

    And it’s sad and simple — Valve keeps failing. Last patch, that should have solved the problem, can be easily bypassed (https://twitter.com/general_nfs/status/1162067274443833344) so the vulnerability still exists. Yes, I’ve checked, it works like a charm.

    But this article is not about an old vulnerability, it’s about new one. Since Valve decided to read a public report instead of private report one more time, I won’t take that pleasure away from them.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (nginx), openSUSE (ImageMagick and putty), Red Hat (Ansible, atomic-openshift-web-console, ceph, and qemu-kvm-rhev), SUSE (kvm, libssh2_org, postgresql96, qemu, and wavpack), and Ubuntu (libzstd and openjpeg2).

  • Major Metapackage Makeover

    With our 2019.3 Kali release imminent, we wanted to take a quick moment to discuss one of our more significant upcoming changes: our selection of metapackages. These alterations are designed to optimize Kali, reduce ISO size, and better organize metapackages as we continue to grow.

    Before we get into what’s new, let’s briefly recap what a metapackage is. A metapackage is a package that does not contain any tools itself, but rather is a dependency list of normal packages (or other metapackages). This allows us to group related tools together. For instance, if you want to be able to access every wireless tool, simply install the kali-tools-wireless metapackage.

  • Securing Your Crypto Wallet

    When it came time to create my CryptocurrencyOS, based on Linux Mint I wanted to solve some practical user and security issues. The end result was for people to have their own crypto wallets in a secure, opensource, environment and encourage more adoption of cryptocurrency. I applied some of my experience with some of the products I developed for compevo and Techrich.

    The first problem is that a lot of people don’t even know how to find or download a wallet (at least safely, since there are a lot of fake / malware wallets that steal people’s coins). If they don’t know how to avoid the above, then how would they be able to secure their computer?

GPD Micro PC: Can a 6-inch Ubuntu Laptop Really Be Usable?

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

It’s not that GPD, a China-based hardware outfit, aren’t skilled at creating diminutive devices that appeal to gadget heads like myself as, clearly they are: both the GPD Win 2 and the GPD Pocket 2 were warmly reviewed by many.

It’s just that I thought that a laptop this small simply wouldn’t be usable.

6-inch screen? What a squint fest! Blackberry phone-style keyboard? Typo city! Intel Celeron processor? What is this, a Chromebook?!

And yet…

After a week of using the GPD MicroPC (with Ubuntu MATE) as a companion device alongside my regular, full-sized computers, I have to say that I totally get it.

This thing is nuts.

Read more

'No Man's Sky Beyond' Just Got Patched For Linux, Even Though It's A Windows-Only PC Game

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

Yep, it's right there in the notes for Beyond Patch 2.08a: "Fixed Steam VR in Linux."

The game was recently treated to a massive update which makes it almost resemble an MMO. There are new social hubs, 16-32 player multiplayer, the addition of virtual reality, Vulkan API support and quite a bit more of everything.

As you probably know, Hello Games is a fairly small indie game studio, and it never developed a native Linux version of No Man's Sky. But that's OK, because the game proudly bears a "Gold" rating on ProtonDB, a website that tracks Steam Play compatibility with Windows games.

Because Proton translates Windows-exclusive game APIs like DirectX to Vulkan (an API that Linux understands), this allows thousands of games that never appeared on Linux to work anyway, simply by installing it on the Steam for Linux client. Proton also has support for SteamVR, meaning many VR titles also run well.

Read more

Also: Zombie apocalypse action RPG Zombasite has a big update and a big sale to match

Fedora Switching To The BFQ I/O Scheduler For Better Responsiveness & Throughput

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Following Chromebooks switching to BFQ and other distributions weighing this I/O scheduler for better responsiveness while maintaining good throughput capabilities, beginning with Fedora 31 there will be BFQ used as well.

In-step with today's systemd 243 RC2 update, the Fedora packages in Rawhide and F31 have switched to using BFQ.

Read more

Gammy: Adaptive Screen Brightness Tool For Linux

Filed under
Software

Gammy, an adaptive screen brightness GUI tool that that was originally only available for Microsoft Windows, was ported to Linux (X11 only) recently.

The Qt5 application takes a screenshot periodically, then gradually adjusts the pixel brightness based on the screen (screenshot) contents, dimming the screen if its content is too bright, or brightening the screen if its content is too dark. This is especially useful for reducing eye strain when switching between dark and light windows.

The Gammy settings allows setting a minimum and maximum brightness, and an offset (the offset adds to the screen brightness, with a higher value meaning a brighter image). Also, because it conflicts with Redshift, the Gammy developer decided to add basic temperature control, which you'll also find in the application settings.

Read more

Top 3 Video Players for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

There are a lot of free and open-source video players available for Ubuntu. Most of them do the basic job pretty well and you do not miss anything from Windows that you could use on Ubuntu. However, some players provide additional features and you can pick which one would suit you best depending on the feature list. In this article, we will give you an introduction to some famous video players for Ubuntu. We will also tell you where to find their websites and how to install them on Ubuntu. All of these players can be reliably downloaded graphically from the Ubuntu Software but we will also explain other methods of installation for educational purposes. Also, some methods let you install the latest available version of the software from the Internet so we will not miss out on those.

Read more

Also: Translatium – Simply Yet Powerful Translation Tool For Linux

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS 6 Receive Important Kernel Security Update

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Security

The new Linux kernel security update is marked by the Red Hat Product Security team as having an "Important" security impact due to the fact that it patches several critical flaws, including the Spectre SWAPGS gadget vulnerability (CVE-2019-1125) affecting x86 processors.

Also patched are a security vulnerability (CVE-2019-5489) leading to page cache side-channel attacks, an issue in the Salsa20 encryption algorithm that could allow local attackers to cause a denial of service (CVE-2017-17805), and a flaw (CVE-2018-17972) that let unprivileged users inspect kernel stacks of arbitrary tasks.

Read more

Meet the GNOMEies: Max Huang

Filed under
Interviews
GNOME

Max Huang has been GNOME since 2010, starting with forming a GNOME users group in Taiwan. Max has a story you may understand: being a user, meeting the right person, and slowly finding yourself more and more deeply involved with a community in terms of working together and making friends.

Read more

Review: Raspberry Pi 4

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

The Raspberry Pi began life as a hacker's dream: a cheap, low-power, highly extendable, hackable PC that shipped as a bare circuit board. Intended as one part educational device, one part tinkering tool, it became something of a phenomenon that has been used to power everything from scaled-down Mars rovers to millions of science and hackday experiments in schools around the world.

Read more

Debian: No longer a “Universal” operating system

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project has removed support for the MIPS architecture. This is the latest CPU architecture to be removed from Debian, betraying their tagline of being “The Universal Operating System”.

I take issue not only with their removal of the MIPS architecture, but of their reasoning for doing it.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Jupyter, Python, Django and Git

  • Jupyter Notebook for Beginners: A Tutorial

    The Jupyter Notebook is an incredibly powerful tool for interactively developing and presenting data science projects. This article will walk you through how to set up Jupyter Notebooks on your local machine and how to start using it to do data science projects. First, though: what is a “notebook”? A notebook integrates code and its output into a single document that combines visualizations, narrative text, mathematical equations, and other rich media. This intuitive workflow promotes iterative and rapid development, making notebooks an increasingly popular choice at the heart of contemporary data science, analysis, and increasingly science at large. Best of all, as part of the open source Project Jupyter, they are completely free. The Jupyter project is the successor to the earlier IPython Notebook, which was first published as a prototype in 2010. Although it is possible to use many different programming languages within Jupyter Notebooks, this article will focus on Python as it is the most common use case. (Among R users, R Studio tends to be a more popular choice).

  • Python for NLP: Creating Multi-Data-Type Classification Models with Keras

    This is the 18th article in my series of articles on Python for NLP. In my previous article, I explained how to create a deep learning-based movie sentiment analysis model using Python's Keras library. In that article, we saw how we can perform sentiment analysis of user reviews regarding different movies on IMDB. We used the text of the review the review to predict the sentiment. However, in text classification tasks, we can also make use of the non-textual information to classify the text. For instance, gender may have an impact on the sentiment of the review. Furthermore, nationalities may affect the public opinion about a particular movie. Therefore, this associated info, also known as meta data can also be used to improve accuracy of statistical model. In this article, we will build upon the concepts that we studied in the last two articles and will see how to create a text classification system that classifies user reviews regarding different business, into one of the three predefined categories i.e. "good", "bad", and "average". However, in addition to the text of the review, we will use the associated meta data of the review to perform classifcation. Since we have two different types of inputs i.e. textual input and numerical input, we need to create a multiple inputs model. We will be using Keras Functional API since it supports multiple inputs and multiple output models.

  • Django Template Fiddle Launched !!!!

    This is not an article. We just want to inform you that we have launched our new platform where you can experiment, play or fiddle with Django Templates.

  • Python Script 16: Generating word cloud image of a text using python

    Word cloud is an image composed of words used in a particular text or subject, in which the size of each word indicates its frequency or importance.

  • Python 3.7.3 : Using the inotify.
  • Git is eating the world

    The inception of Git (2005) is more or less the halfway point between the inception of Linux (1991) and today (2019). A lot has happened since. One thing is clear however: software is eating the world and Git is the fork with which it is being eaten. (Yes, pun intended).

CoreCtrl: A Radeon Settings Alternative For Linux

It’s a frustrating reality for Linux users that Windows software counterparts tend to be better. They may offer greater functionality, better design, and be easier-to-use. There are some exceptions, such as with the NVIDIA Linux GPU driver, which offers two features the Windows version doesn’t: temperature monitoring, and fan control. For the most part, though, things like driver control panels are a scarcity in Linux. Read more Also: New Intel Lightning Mountain SoC Appears in Linux Code

Total War: THREE KINGDOMS Comes to GNU/Linux

Security: One More Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day, New FOSS Patches, Major Metapackage Makeover in Kali and Securing Crypto Wallets

  • One more Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day

    Not long ago I published an article about Steam vulnerability. I received a lot of feedback. But Valve didn’t say a single word, HackerOne sent a huge letter and, mostly, kept silence. Eventually things escalated with Valve and I got banned by them on HackerOne — I can no longer participate in their vulnerability rejection program (the rest of H1 is still available though).

    You can read the story in more detail in previous article, here is a couple of words about current situation.

    And it’s sad and simple — Valve keeps failing. Last patch, that should have solved the problem, can be easily bypassed (https://twitter.com/general_nfs/status/1162067274443833344) so the vulnerability still exists. Yes, I’ve checked, it works like a charm.

    But this article is not about an old vulnerability, it’s about new one. Since Valve decided to read a public report instead of private report one more time, I won’t take that pleasure away from them.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (nginx), openSUSE (ImageMagick and putty), Red Hat (Ansible, atomic-openshift-web-console, ceph, and qemu-kvm-rhev), SUSE (kvm, libssh2_org, postgresql96, qemu, and wavpack), and Ubuntu (libzstd and openjpeg2).

  • Major Metapackage Makeover

    With our 2019.3 Kali release imminent, we wanted to take a quick moment to discuss one of our more significant upcoming changes: our selection of metapackages. These alterations are designed to optimize Kali, reduce ISO size, and better organize metapackages as we continue to grow. Before we get into what’s new, let’s briefly recap what a metapackage is. A metapackage is a package that does not contain any tools itself, but rather is a dependency list of normal packages (or other metapackages). This allows us to group related tools together. For instance, if you want to be able to access every wireless tool, simply install the kali-tools-wireless metapackage.

  • Securing Your Crypto Wallet

    When it came time to create my CryptocurrencyOS, based on Linux Mint I wanted to solve some practical user and security issues. The end result was for people to have their own crypto wallets in a secure, opensource, environment and encourage more adoption of cryptocurrency. I applied some of my experience with some of the products I developed for compevo and Techrich. The first problem is that a lot of people don’t even know how to find or download a wallet (at least safely, since there are a lot of fake / malware wallets that steal people’s coins). If they don’t know how to avoid the above, then how would they be able to secure their computer?