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Monday, 19 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Shutdown Command: 5 Practical Examples itsfoss 19/11/2018 - 2:22pm
Story Linux Shutdown Command: 5 Practical Examples itsfoss 19/11/2018 - 2:20pm
Story Games: Vendetta Online, Bad North, Fighting Games Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 12:00pm
Story Server: Silicon Sky, IBM and Red Hat Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 11:58am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 11:55am
Story Interview With Mark Shuttleworth Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 11:30am
Story Security: Facebook/Instagram Breach and More FUD From Microsoft's Friends at WhiteSource Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 10:51am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 10:30am
Story Unite Shell: Making GNOME Shell More Like Ubuntu's Unity Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 9:24am
Story New/Updated Fedora 29 ISO and Red Hat's Dan Walsh Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2018 - 9:19am

Linux Shutdown Command: 5 Practical Examples

Filed under
HowTos

The shutdown command in Linux allows you to shut down, reboot or schedule a shutdown of your system. This article explains the most common and useful examples of the Linux shutdown command.
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Linux Shutdown Command: 5 Practical Examples

Filed under
HowTos

The shutdown command in Linux allows you to shut down, reboot or schedule a shutdown of your system. This article explains the most common and useful examples of the Linux shutdown command.
Read more

Games: Vendetta Online, Bad North, Fighting Games

Filed under
Gaming

Server: Silicon Sky, IBM and Red Hat

Filed under
Server

today's howtos

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos
  • Free Ebook Kubernetes Essentials - A Tutorial for Beginners
  • Twitter Alerts: A Trick for the Twitter-averse
  • Tuning your Intel Graphics Card in Ubuntu 18.04

    In the computing world things move at a brisk pace. To appeal to business users and conservative types like me Ubuntu releases the Long Term Support (LTS) versions of Ubuntu the latest of which is Ubuntu 18.04 which came out early this year. Ubuntu 16.04 for which I wrote the guide, is the LTS version prior to 18.04.

    It’s a little bit late to say this now but Ubuntu 18.04 came with a lot of changes including the infamous switchback to GNOME and the subsequent death of Unity. Another not so famous change was the fact that Intel drivers now ship with the kernel. This is not an Ubuntu specific change per se which explains why it was more of a footnote and not a headline in the Ubuntu world.

  • 4 Best open source & free YouTube Downloader for Ubuntu Linux

    Downloading YouTube Videos on Ubuntu Linux is not that much difficult as it appears. Lots of newbies think that Windows is the only platform to download online Youtube videos due to the availability of tons of free YouTube downloader software for it. However, after going through this article their opinion would be changed forever because not only normal videos but 4K videos can be downloaded on the Linux platforms as easy as on Windows.

  • Beginner's Guide: How To Install Ubuntu Linux 18.10

Interview With Mark Shuttleworth

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth delivered an unashamed plug for Ubuntu while cheerfully throwing a little shade on the competition at the OpenStack Berlin 2018 summit last week.

If Nick Barcet of Red Hat had elicited gasps by suggesting the OpenStack Foundation (OSF) might consider releasing updates a bit more frequently, Shuttleworth sent eyebrows skywards by announcing that the latest Long Term Support (LTS) edition of Ubuntu, 18.04, would get 10 years of support.

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Security: Facebook/Instagram Breach and More FUD From Microsoft's Friends at WhiteSource

Filed under
Security

Unite Shell: Making GNOME Shell More Like Ubuntu's Unity

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

If you are/were a fan of Ubuntu's Unity desktop environment, Unite-Shell is one of the most promising efforts to date for making the current GNOME 3 stack more like Unity.

The Unite Shell is an extension to GNOME Shell for configuring it to look just like Ubuntu's Unity 7. While it made waves a bit earlier this month, a Phoronix reader reported in over the weekend just how good it looks and works that it's worthy of an extra shout-out.

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New/Updated Fedora 29 ISO and Red Hat's Dan Walsh

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Testers needed for New Fedora 29 updated isos

    The Fedora Respin Sig has been working on being able to produce Fedora 29 updated isos. This past week we have been able to produce updated isos. We are looking for Testers to help test the isos for release. If you are willing to help please join us in #fedora-respins on the Freenode irc network tomorrow 20181119.

  • Video: Container Security

    Red Hat's Dan (Mr. SELinux) Walsh gave a talk about Container Security at the USENIX LISA 2018 conference.

Is Linux IoT a potential big new market for EUC vendors?

Filed under
Linux

One thing we’re seeing now is how Linux for IoT is clearly a big trend, with several well-known vendors developing Linux IoT operating systems. A 2018 survey from earlier this year found that it dominates IoT, with about 72% using Linux-based OSes.

This could have an effect on players big and small in our space, so let’s take a look at what’s going on.

Read more

Also: What Do You Want To See Out Of The Redesigned, Next-Gen Raspberry Pi?

7 command-line tools for writers

Filed under
OSS

For most people (especially non-techies), the act of writing means tapping out words using LibreOffice Writer or another GUI word processing application. But there are many other options available to help anyone communicate their message in writing, especially for the growing number of writers embracing plaintext.

There's also room in a GUI writer's world for command line tools that can help them write, check their writing, and more—regardless of whether they're banging out an article, blog post, or story; writing a README; or prepping technical documentation.

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Stumbling into Linux and open source from Vietnam to Amsterdam

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Since the beginning of time... no, really, just the beginning of Opensource.com in 2010, our writers have shared personal stories of how they got into open source or Linux (many times both).

Some had friends in school remark "You don't know Linux? What's going on with you, dude?" Some came in through the gateway of gaming, and others were simply looking for alternatives.

When I came on the scene in 2012 as a newcomer to open source and Linux, I saw these stories as pure gold. They get to the heart of why people are so passionate about it and why they love talking about it with other people who "get it." Now I'm one of those people, too.

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Review: NetBSD 8.0

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

NetBSD, like its close cousins (FreeBSD and OpenBSD) does not do a lot of hand holding or automation. It offers a foundation that will run on most CPUs and we can choose to build on that foundation. I mention this because, on its own, NetBSD does not do much. If we want to get something out of it, we need to be willing to build on its foundation - we need a project. This is important to keep in mind as I think going into NetBSD and thinking, "Oh I'll just explore around and expand on this as I go," will likely lead to disappointment. I recommend figuring out what you want to do before installing NetBSD and making sure the required tools are available in the operating system's repositories.

Some of the projects I embarked on this week (using ZFS and setting up file sharing) worked well. Others, like getting multimedia support and a full-featured desktop, did not. Given more time, I'm sure I could find a suitable desktop to install (along with the required documentation to get it and its services running), or customize one based on one of the available window managers. However, any full featured desktop is going to require some manual work. Media support was not great. The right players and codecs were there, but I was not able to get audio to play smoothly.

My main complaint with NetBSD relates to my struggle to get some features working to my satisfaction: the documentation is scattered. There are four different sections of the project's website for documentation (FAQs, The Guide, manual pages and the wiki). Whatever we are looking for is likely to be in one of those, but which one? Or, just as likely, the tutorial we want is not there, but is on a forum or blog somewhere. I found that the documentation provided was often thin, more of a quick reference to remind people how something works rather than a full explanation.

As an example, I found a couple of documents relating to setting up a firewall. One dealt with networking NetBSD on a LAN, another explored IPv6 support, but neither gave an overview on syntax or a basic guide to blocking all but one or two ports. It seemed like that information should already be known, or picked up elsewhere.

Newcomers are likely to be a bit confused by software management guides for the same reason. Some pages refer to using a tool called pkg_add, others use pkgsrc and its make utility, others mention pkgin. Ultimately, these tools each give approximately the same result, but work differently and yet are mentioned almost interchangeably. I have used NetBSD before a few times and could stumble through these guides, but new users are likely to come away confused.

One quirk of NetBSD, which may be a security feature or an inconvenience, depending on one's point of view, is super user programs are not included in regular users' paths. This means we need to change our path if we want to be able to run programs typically used by root. For example, shutdown and mount are not in regular users' paths by default. This made checking some things tricky for me.

Ultimately though, NetBSD is not famous for its convenience or features so much as its flexibility. The operating system will run on virtually any processor and should work almost identically across multiple platforms. That gives NetBSD users a good deal of consistency across a range of hardware and the chance to experiment with a member of the Unix family on hardware that might not be compatible with Linux or the other BSDs.

Read more

Security: Cracking, Fingerprinting and Open Source Security Podcast

Filed under
Security
  • 50 countries vow to fight cybercrime - US, Russia don’t

    Fifty nations and over 150 tech companies pledged Monday to do more to fight criminal activity on the internet, including interference in elections and hate speech. But the United States, Russia and China are not among them.

    The group of governments and companies pledged in a document entitled the “Paris call for trust and security in cyberspace” to work together to prevent malicious activities like online censorship and the theft of trade secrets.

  • Researchers Find Critical Vulnerability In Optical In-Display Fingerprint Sensors, Allowed Attackers To Unlock Devices Instantly

    In-Display Fingerprint sensors seem like an upcoming trend in smartphones. Conventional fingerprint sensors have become quite reliable over the years, but it’s still limited by design. With conventional fingerprint sensors, you need to locate the sensor and then unlock your phone. With the scanner placed under the display, unlocking the device feels much more natural. The technology is still in its infancy and hasn’t really matured yet, but a few companies like OnePlus have already put out phones with In-Display fingerprint sensors.

    Optic sensors used in most of the In-Display fingerprint scanners these days aren’t very accurate and some researchers even discovered a big vulnerability in them, which was patched recently. The vulnerability discovered by Tencent’s Xuanwu Lab gave attackers a free pass, allowing them to bypass the lock screen completely.

    Yang Yu, a researcher from the same team stated that this was a persistent problem present in every In-Display Fingerprint scanner module they tested, also adding that the vulnerability is a design fault of In-display fingerprint sensors.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 123 - Talking about Kubernetes and container security with Liz Rice

    Josh and Kurt talk to Liz Rice about Kubernetes and container security. How did we get where we are today, what's new and exciting today, and where do we think things are going.

OSS: OpenCV 4.0, Google BERT, and Google "Pastel" in Vulkan 1.1.93

Filed under
Google
  • OpenCV 4.0 Released As The Overhauled Computer Vision Library, Adds Experimental Vulkan

    OpenCV 4.0 is now officially out as the widely-used real-time computer vision library.

    This is a big update for OpenCV and also marks converting it into a C++11 library. Besides shifting more to a C++ focus, OpenCV 4.0 also has performance improvements, DNN improvements, a QR code detector, a Kinect Fusion module, and various other additions.

  • Google’s Move To Open Source BERT May Change NLP Forever

    In 1954, with the success of the Georgetown experiment in which the scientists used a machine to translate random sentences from Russian to English, the field of computational linguistics took giant strides towards building an intelligent machine capable of recognising and translating speech. These models were even used in translations during the Nuremberg trials. Nonetheless, the future of machine translation was nowhere close to the forecast due to sluggish computational devices and scarcity of data to train on.

    [...]

    Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers or BERT, which was open sourced earlier this month, offers a new ground to embattle the intricacies involved in understanding the language models.

    Pre-training a binarised prediction model helps understanding common NLP tasks like Question Answering or Natural language Inference.

    Unidirectional models are efficiently trained by predicting each word conditioned on the previous words in the sentence. However, it is not possible to train bidirectional models by simply conditioning each word on its previous and next words, since this would allow the word that’s being predicted to indirectly “see itself” in a multi-layer model.

  • Vulkan 1.1.93 Released With Two New Extensions, Adds ID For Google "Pastel"

    Continuing to make Sunday mornings more entertaining are new Vulkan documentation updates on their weekly-ish update cycle. 

    Vulkan 1.1.93 brings a lot of the usual fixes/clarifications to the growing documentation. There are though some interesting bits: two new extensions and the driver ID being added for "Pastel".

Lars Wirzenius Retiring from Debian, Ubuntu 18.04 Retiring in 2028, and Daniel Stenberg (Curl) Leaving Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Lars Wirzenius: Retiring from Debian

    I've started the process of retiring from Debian. Again. This will be my third time. It'll take a little while I take care of things to do this cleanly: uploading packages to set Maintainer to QA, removing myself from Plant Debian, sending the retirement email to -private, etc.

    I've had a rough year, and Debian has also stopped being fun for me. There's a number of Debian people saying and doing things that I find disagreeable, and the process of developing Debian is not nearly as nice as it could be. There's way too much friction pretty much everywhere.

    For example, when a package maintainer uploads a package, the package goes into an upload queue. The upload queue gets processed every few minutes, and the packages get moved into an incoming queue. The incoming queue gets processed every fifteen minutes, and packages get imported into the master archive. Changes to the master archive get pushed to main mirrors every six hours. Websites like lintian.debian.org, the package tracker, and the Ultimate Debian Database get updated at time. (Or their updates get triggered, but it might take longer for the update to actually happen. Who knows. There's almost no transparency.)

    The developer gets notified, by email, when the upload queue gets processed, and when the incoming queue gets processed. If they want to see current status on the websites (to see if the upload fixed a problem, for example), they may have to wait for many more hours, possibly even a couple of days.

  • Linux: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be supported for a full decade

    Mark Shuttleworth has announced that Ubuntu 18.04 will be supported for ten years. Long Term Support releases of Ubuntu usually enjoy just five years of support, so this doubling is highly significant.

    Shuttleworth -- the founder of Canonical and Ubuntu -- made the announcement at the OpenStack Summit in Berlin, and the change is a tactical maneuver that will help Ubuntu better compete against the likes of Red Hat/IBM. It is also an acknowledgement that many industries are working on projects that will not see the light of day for many years, and they need the reassurance of ongoing support from their Linux distro. Ubuntu can now offer this.

  • Daniel Stenberg: I’m leaving Mozilla

    It's been five great years, but now it is time for me to move on and try something else.

    During these five years I've met and interacted with a large number of awesome people at Mozilla, lots of new friends! I got the chance to work from home and yet work with a global team on a widely used product, all done with open source. I have worked on internet protocols during work-hours (in addition to my regular spare-time working with them) and its been great! Heck, lots of the HTTP/2 development and the publication of that was made while I was employed by Mozilla and I fondly participated in that. I shall forever have this time ingrained in my memory as a very good period of my life.

    [...]

    I had worked on curl for a very long time already before joining Mozilla and I expect to keep doing curl and other open source things even going forward. I don't think my choice of future employer should have to affect that negatively too much, except of course in periods.

    With me leaving Mozilla, we're also losing Mozilla as a primary sponsor of the curl project, since that was made up of them allowing me to spend some of my work days on curl and that's now over.

    Short-term at least, this move might increase my curl activities since I don't have any new job yet and I need to fill my days with something...

Games: Developer Priority Interrupt and Linux Gaming Performance

Filed under
Gaming
  • First-person dungeon crawler 'Delver' now has an open source engine and editor

    Developer Priority Interrupt has officially released the game engine and editor behind their first-person dungeon crawler as open source. This is the same developer who made 'Shockolate', a cross-platform open source System Shock.

    Writing on Twitter a few days ago, the developer said "In fun and scary news, we've just open sourced the tech behind Delver".

  • Linux Gaming Performance Can Be Impaired By STIBP, But Hope May Be On The Horizon

    It's been a busy past few days of benchmarking after discovering earlier this week the Linux 4.20 performance was dropping, bisecting the cause to be the introduction of STIBP for cross-hyperthread Spectre V2 mitigation, and seeing just how significant is the impact. Here are my latest tests and findings.

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