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Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla Firefox 52.0.2 Released to Fix Linux Crash on Startup, Other Issues Rianne Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 10:01pm
Story Orange Pi SBCs offer a choice of 32- or 64-bit SoCs for under $20 Rianne Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 7:33pm
Story Being a Linux user isn't weird anymore Rianne Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 7:02pm
Story Open source software is for everyone – so where are the women? Rianne Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 6:47pm
Story Google launches new site to showcase its open source projects and processes Rianne Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 6:45pm
Story Tizen and Android Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 4:32pm
Story Day of Infamy, CRYENGINE, and Performance Tools Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 4:27pm
Story Red Hat: We're giving VMware a 'run for its money' in virtualization Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 4:24pm
Story Raspberry Pi based computer offers Real-Time Ethernet Rianne Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 4:24pm
Story GNOME Migration and Slideshow Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 4:09pm

Mozilla Firefox 52.0.2 Released to Fix Linux Crash on Startup, Other Issues

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla released today, March 28, 2017, the second maintenance update to the Firefox 52.0 web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

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Orange Pi SBCs offer a choice of 32- or 64-bit SoCs for under $20

Filed under
Android
Linux

The open spec “Orange Pi Zero Plus 2” SBC provides WiFi, BT, HDMI, MIPI-CSI, and a choice of quad-core Allwinner H3 (Cortex-A7) or H5 (-A53) SoCs.

Shortly after launching an Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 with a 32-bit, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3, Shenzhen Xunlong’s open source Orange Pi project shipped an Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 H5 model. The Linux- and Android-ready hacker board is identical except for the change to a similarly quad-core, but 64-bit, Cortex-A53 Allwinner H5 SoC. The open spec boards are shipping now on AliExpress, for $18.90 and $19.90, respectively, but have yet to appear on the Orange Pi website.

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Being a Linux user isn't weird anymore

Filed under
Linux

A few days ago, I was down at the Starbucks in my local bookstore—sipping on a hot chocolate, using the free (but rather pokey) Wi-Fi, and getting some work done.

This is pretty typical for me. Since I work from home, it’s nice to get out of the house and shake things up a little bit. Working for a few hours at a coffee shop tends to be just about right. I’m not the only person in the world who uses coffee shops as short term offices—it’s become so normal, it’s almost a cliché.

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Open source software is for everyone – so where are the women?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

We all know that there is a diversity problem in tech. The depressing stats from numerous reports and studies all point to stereotypes and bias hitting young girls’ perceptions of STEM negatively, with this sitting alongside poor retention figures and a lack of women at the board level.

However, one particular branch of tech may be struggling in more when it comes to diversity and inclusion – the one branch, in fact, which has inclusiveness at the very core of its ethos.

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Google launches new site to showcase its open source projects and processes

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google is launching a new site today that brings all of the company’s open source projects under a single umbrella.

The code of these projects will still live on GitHub and Google’s self-hosted git service, of course, with the new site functioning as a central directory for them. While this new project is obviously meant to showcase Google’s projects, the company says it also wants to use it to provide “a look under the hood” of how it “does” open source.

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Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Day of Infamy, CRYENGINE, and Performance Tools

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Red Hat: We're giving VMware a 'run for its money' in virtualization

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat's enterprise virtualization product is proving stiff competition for VMware, Paul Cormier, EVP and president of products and technologies, claimed at Red Hat's North American Partner Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada yesterday.

According to the executive, Red Hat Virtualization (RHV), the open source software vendor's mission-critical, end-to-end open source virtualization infrastructure, has made a name for itself in such a way that VMware customers are increasingly showing interest in the technology.

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Also: Red Hat CEO says businesses remain confident under Trump

Amazon, Red Hat, Tesaro Price Targets Raised; Snap Started At Hold

Tech Today: Snap’d By Facebook, Apple’s Innovation, Red Hat Jumps

Raspberry Pi based computer offers Real-Time Ethernet

Filed under
Linux

Hilscher is prepping a rugged “netPI” computer that combines a Raspberry Pi 3 with its “netHAT 52-RTE” RPi add-on featuring dual Real-Time Ethernet ports.

German Real-Time Ethernet experts Hilscher will soon launch a Raspberry Pi 3-based industrial computer with Real-Time Ethernet support. Hilscher has yet to formally announce the ruggedized netPI computer, but the board was demonstrated at the recent Embedded World show, and was revealed in a Mar. 27 Element14 Community blog by Shabaz. The system can be used as a Real-Time Ethernet gateway or controller, and it supports add-ons such as sensors or actuators to enable additional applications, writes Shabaz.

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GNOME Migration and Slideshow

Filed under
GNOME
  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2

    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).

  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

Filed under
Linux
  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts

    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration.

    One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture.

    In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member.

    This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location

    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized.

    “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.

  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking

    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier.

    Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.

  • Modules vs. microservices

    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.

  • What Is Kubernetes?

    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation.

    Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.

OSS Leftovers: Harvard University Survey, ASF at 18 Years, Heiko Tietze at LibreOffice

Filed under
OSS
  • Survey seeks to discover the motivations behind open source contributions

    Peer production is one of three fundamental ways to organize human economic activity, along with markets and firms. Yet, although it underlies billions of dollars in open source software production, it is the least understood. Participants in open source are not organized in firms, where they would work under the supervision of managers and earn a salary, nor are they individuals in a market, responding to price signals.

    The economics of peer production is an interesting area of study that raises many important questions regarding the incentives behind voluntary participation, the efficiency of production, the tools and models that can quantify and explain how the process works, and so forth.

    My doctoral research at Harvard University considered incentives issues that arise in a software economy. In particular, my work used principles from market design and mechanism design to address problems, such as how to incentivize high-quality submissions to address bugs or features, and how to elicit truthful prediction of task completion time.

  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces 18 Years of Open Source Leadership

    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today its 18th Anniversary and accomplishments, and rallied support to ensure future innovation.

  • [Video] LibreOffice interview: Heiko Tietze, UX mentor

    An interview with Heiko Tietze, who is working as a UX (user experience) mentor for The Document Foundation.

Linux Foundation Events

Filed under
Linux

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Benchmarks & Trying Out DragonFlyBSD 4.8

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

With DragonFlyBSD 4.8 making its debut yesterday, I was excited to give this updated BSD operating system a try now that it has UEFI support and some performance improvements. Here are some early benchmark results of DragonFlyBSD 4.8 compared to 4.6 and Intel's Clear Linux for some additional reference points.

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Plesk teams with Kolab for open source groupware

Filed under
OSS
Web

Plesk, one of the major providers of website management solutions, has chosen Kolab Systems’ groupware solution for its millions of users.

"You can now deploy Kolab in your Plesk installation with the Premium Email powered by Kolab extension. this extension is a step forward in the field of turn key groupware and online collaboration software. This package is easy and convenient to deploy — it can literally be installed in a few clicks, and it provides full Kolab functionality without the inconveniences and potential pitfalls of having to install Kolab from the ground up," said Kolab Systems in a press release.

This deal shows us why smart companies put their eggs in the open source basket instead of relying on proprietary solutions.

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