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Tuesday, 09 Feb 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 1:09am
Story Kernel Space: Graphics Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 1:00am
Story uGet, the Best Download Manager for Linux, Has Been Updated to Version 2.0.5 Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:59am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:57am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:56am
Story Canonical Makes It a Lot Easier for Newcomers to Discover the Ubuntu Flavours Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:56am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:55am
Story GNOME and KDE Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:55am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:52am
Story HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.2 Supports Debian 8.3 and Linux Mint 17.3 Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2016 - 12:51am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Kernel Space: Graphics

Vulkan

  • Vulkan in Open-Source

    A discussion of the new Vulkan graphics API and its impact on Open-source software

Wayland

  • Wayland Network Transparency Patches Published

    For the longest time, when bringing up Wayland a recurring question was "what about network transparency?!" Well, Samsung's Derek Foreman has today published the set of Wayland patches for providing Wayland network traparency by pushing the Wayland protocol over TCP/IP.

  • WOW, Wayland Over Wire!

    A common complaint about Wayland is that it isn’t network transparent. X allows you to run an application on one computer and display its output on a different computer as long as the application doesn’t depend on certain “modern” features (such as the shared memory extension). Applications are forwarded individually and are indistinguishable from apps on the local desktop (network performance considerations aside). This is different than remote desktop protocols like VNC or RDP which provide control of an entire operating system.

X.Org

  • X.Org Server 1.18 Gets Its First Point Release, Fixes Multiple XWayland Issues

    Today, Adam Jackson of X.Org Foundation has announced the release and immediate availability for download of the first maintenance build in the X.Org Server 1.18 stable series.

    X.Org Server 1.18.1 represents the work done by the X.Org project's developers in the last three months, and it is here to addresses many of the issues reported by users since the release of X.Org Server 1.18.0 on November 9, 2016 (exactly three months ago). Among the highlights, we can mention several XWayland improvements, lots of Glamor patches, as well as some changes in the Present extension and the modesetting driver.

NVIDIA

  • The GTX 750 Series Still Has Lots Of Problems With Nouveau
  • NVIDIA 361.28 Linux Driver Released, Makes GLVND Optional

    The NVIDIA 361.28 release adds a legacy, non-GLVND libGL.so library to the NVIDIA package. This allows distribution packagers to choose between the GLVND and non-GLVND GLX client libraries at install time. The NVIDIA installer itself is defaulting to the legacy library unless --glvnd-glx-client is passed at install time. This is being done due to behavior differences with the NVIDIA GLX client driver that isn't defined by the Linux OpenGL 1.0 ABI.

  • Fedora 23 & Nvidia - Are we gonna have a good time?

    Well, I have to say I'm pleased with today's task. It went as expected, which is always a good thing. No regressions, no weird stuff. Almost. The FAIL error for one of the easyLife packages is somewhat alarming. If I had not looked at the console output, I might not even have noticed. But I have, and it is ever so slightly worrying me.

    However, the end result is, our old laptop is working fine, with the Nvidia drivers in place and all that, and the CPU utilization is a bit lower than with Nouveau, so there's a small bonus to this escapade, too. More importantly, Fedora 23 did not disappoint, and it is a rare beacon of hope in what is otherwise a dreadful distro season for me. To wit, if any one of you is looking for a fresh experience, a little less Ubuntu a little more something else, Fedora 23 could be the right ingredient. We're done. Oh, we shall discuss Fedora and Nvidia again, if you're wondering, so stay tuned.

uGet, the Best Download Manager for Linux, Has Been Updated to Version 2.0.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Whether you want to or not, uGet remains one of the best graphical download manager applications for GNU/Linux operating systems, and it has been updated today to version 2.0.5.

Read more

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Canonical Makes It a Lot Easier for Newcomers to Discover the Ubuntu Flavours

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Michael Hall had the great pleasure of announcing that the ubuntu.com website has been redesigned to make it easier for Ubuntu newcomers to discover the flavours of the world's most popular free operating system.

Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

GNOME and KDE

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

GNOME

  • Updates on GNOME Calculator

    The biggest task I’ve been trying to accomplish is to move all the UI code to GtkBuilder .ui files and rework the codebase to use them as reusable templates.

  • Developer Experience Hackfest 2016

    First of all I would like to thanks the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring once again my trip to Brussels for the GNOME Developer Experience Hackfest.
    Besides hacking on Glade and attending FOSDEM I had a great time meeting with old friends and making new ones, not to mention the amount and variety of beers consumed

KDE

  • Some Neon Artwork

    This is pretty exciting for anyone who wants a stable core system with a setup of KDE Plasma software on to as recent as possible, setted-up and configured as good as possible, with hopefully less issues like “distro X has a slightly outdated version of kibrary Y which is know that makes app Z crash”.

  • HIG about Simple vs. Advanced Settings

    Recently the question was asked in the KDE forums how we handle advanced settings. While there is neither a best practice nor a common approach in KDE software, we actually discussed a similar concept in respect to the Plasma control modules (KCM).

    The updated organization of KCMs was implemented by the developers, the community decided about the basic layout, and a couple of proposals were done [1, 2]. So why don't generalize this idea and write a guideline?

  • 3DPrinterChat -Your 3DPrint Community

    Last week I received and invitation to be a columnist on a blog about 3DPrinting, 3DPrinterChat, and I already made 3 blog posts. It’s amazing. I’m learning more about 3dprinting and sharing the knowledge that I have. It’s a wonderfull website to people that want know more about 3dprinting and how to start use a 3dprinter.

  • Outside the Stellarator

    After having spent a great deal of time improving Plasma, I recently focussed on other ares of our workspace, such as KRunner, and various KDE Applications.

  • Heavy activities setup

    I’ve always had more than a few activities lying around - mainly one for each project I’m working on. Be it KDE, Work, Studies, etc. But I was basing my workflow not only on them, but also on virtual desktops. I had four of them, the first one to keep the web browser and the mail client in, two for actual work (that is related to the current activity), and the last one to keep the music player in.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.2 Supports Debian 8.3 and Linux Mint 17.3

Filed under
Linux
Debian

The developers behind the HP Linux Imaging and Printing project, an open-source initiative to bring the latest HP printer drivers to GNU/Linux distributions, released HPLIP 3.16.2.

Read more

Raspbian and Debian Reproducible Builds

Filed under
Debian
  • New Raspbian release adds experimental OpenGL driver

    A new release of Raspbian is now available for download. The update primarily consists of bug fixes, but there are also new updates to some of the standard applications; including Scratch, Sonic Pi and Node-RED.

  • Raspbian Gets Experimental OpenGL Driver, GPU Now Used for Acceleration

    Raspbian is the official Linux distribution of the Raspberry Pi products, and a new version has been released by its developers.

    As the name indicates, Raspbian is based on Debian, but nothing that major happened to the base of the OS, with one exception. The developers did make a number of upgrades to the packages, as it was to be expected. Raspbian is stable, and the current iteration of the OS will be kept a little bit longer, but the devs need to upgrade packages in the OS.

  • Reproducible builds: week 41 in Stretch cycle

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • What Have We Learned From This Open Source Project?

    Start an open source project if you want to learn all you can about software design, development, planning, testing, documenting, and delivery; enjoy technical challenges, administrative challenges, compromise, and will be satisfied hoping that someone out there is benefitting from your work. Do not start an open source project if you need praise, warmth and love from your fellow human beings.

  • Mon 2016/Feb/08

    After a couple of months of work and thanks to the kind code reviews of the folks at Google, we got the feature landed in Chromium's repository. For a while, though, it remained hidden behind a runtime flag, as the Chromium team needed to make sure that things would work well enough in all fronts before making it available to all users. Fast-forward to last week, when I found out by chance that the runtime flag has been flipped and the Simplify page printing option has been available in Chromium and Chrome for a while now, and it has even reached the stable releases. The reader mode feature in Chromium seems to remain hidden behind a runtime flag, I think, which is interesting considering that this was the original motivation behind the dom distiller.

  • Impetus' Analytics Platform Extends to Work with Multiple Apache Projects

    Impetus Technologies, a big data solutions company, has announced StreamAnalytix 2.0, featuring support for Apache Spark Streaming, in addition to the current support for Apache Storm. Streaming data analytics has become a big deal, especially with the Internet of Things and other emerging technologies helping to produce torrents of streaming data that enterprises need to make sense of.

    Impetus' platform is open source-based, and here are more details on how enterprises can leverage it along with tools like Spark.

  • Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W05
  • deepSQL Database Promises MySQL Compliance with Cloud Scalability

    Can you make the most of MySQL and the cloud at the same time? Not if you do things the traditional way, according to Deep Information Sciences. But the company says the newest version of its database solution, deepSQL, delivers a MySQL-compatible database that is also able to scale efficiently with the cloud.

  • GNU social and #RIPTwitter

    What a weekend! Buzzfeed sent rumours soaring that Twitter was going to stop displaying tweets in order and instead have an “algorithm” optimise it. Scary, right? I have no idea if it’s true but the possibility hit a nerve. #RIPTwitter was trending globally and it encouraged a small fraction of Twitter users to wonder “what could I use instead?” That is, one heck of a lot of people.

    Next minute, thousands of new users are pouring into GNU social—a social network whose existing users only numbered in the thousands to begin with. It’s free software’s decentralised answer to Twitter and to date it has a fairly niche following. Not any more. The admin of the largest server, quitter.se, reported 1200 new signups in two days.

  • License Compatibility and Relicensing

    Only the GNU licenses give authors a choice about whether to permit upgrades to future license versions. When I wrote the first version of the GNU GPL, in 1989, I considered including a license upgrade option as is found now in CC licenses, but I thought it more correct to give that choice to each author. Thus, the author could release a program either under “GPL 1 only” or “GPL 1 or later.”

  • Students, librarians urge professors to use open-source textbooks

    A student advocacy group, along with one of the University of Washington’s top librarians, is urging faculty members to take a good look at using more free online textbooks.

    And two bills in the state Legislature would promote and facilitate the use of such open-source textbooks and course materials.

  • Student Group Releases New Report on Textbook Prices

    Earlier today, U.S. PIRG released a new report investigating the real impact of high textbook prices on today’s students. The report, titled “Covering the Cost,” is based on a survey of nearly 5,000 students from 132 institutions.

    Over the last decade, the price of college textbooks has soared. Since 2006, the cost of a college textbook increased by 73% - over four times the rate of inflation. Today, individual textbooks often cost over $200, sometimes as high as $400.

Rosa Is a Real Powerhouse

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The Rosa Desktop Fresh R series is one of the most impressive and productive Linux releases I have seen in quite some time. Its performance is top notch.

It gets high marks in all the right places: Installation is flawless, the KDE integration is innovative, and the software is reliable.

KDE is one of the most complex desktop environments, so potential users who are less familiar with the Linux OS should approach the default KDE release with the idea that it is a great computing platform but might not be what they need. Rosa developers offer enough options to meet the skill levels and needs of all user classes.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 44.0.1 Has Been Released

    As you may know, Mozilla Firefox is among the most popular internet browsers available, being very appreciated by FOSS users.

  • The Internet is a Global Public Resource

    I committed myself to the idea that the Internet is a global public resource that we all share and rely on, like water. I committed myself to stewarding and protecting this important resource. I committed myself to making the importance of the open Internet widely known.

    When we say, “Protect the Internet,” we are not talking about boosting Wi-fi so people can play “Candy Crush” on the subway. That’s just bottled water, and it will very likely exist with or without us. At Mozilla, we are talking about “the Internet” as a vast and healthy ocean.

  • Martin Thomson Appointed to the Internet Architecture Board

    Martin’s appointment recognizes a long history of major contributions to the Internet standards process: including serving as editor for HTTP/2, the newest and much improved version of HTTP, helping to design, implement, and document WebPush, which we just launched in Firefox, and playing major roles in WebRTC, TLS and Geolocation. In addition to his standards work, Martin has committed code all over Gecko, in areas ranging from the WebRTC stack to NSS. Serving on the IAB will give Martin a platform to do even greater things for the Internet and the Open Web as a whole.

Mentor Embedded Linux adds SMACK security and IoT support

Filed under
Linux

Mentor Graphics has updated Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) with Yocto Project 2.0 code, SMACK security, and support for CANopen, BACNet, and 6LoWPAN.

Mentor Graphics has spun a more secure and industrial IoT-ready version of its commercial Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) distribution and development platform that moves up to a modern Linux codebase built around Yocto Project 2.0 (“Jethro”). Yocto Project 2.0, which advances to GCC 5.2 and adds Toaster support, among other enhancements, was recently adopted by rival embedded distro Wind River Linux 8.

Read more

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • GHC performance is rather stable

    Johannes Bechberger, while working on his Bachelor’s thesis supervised by my colleague Andreas Zwinkau, has developed a performance benchmark runner and results visualizer called “temci”, and used GHC as a guinea pig. You can read his elaborate analysis on his blog.

  • Ready for a nostalgia kick? Usborne has put its old computer books on the web for free

    UK publishing house Usborne is giving out its iconic 1980s programming books as free downloads.

    The books, which are available for free as PDF files, include Usborne's introductions to programming series, adventure games, computer games listings and first computer series. The series was particularly popular in the UK, where they helped school a generation of developers and IT professionals.

  • LLVM Patches Confirm Google Has Its Own In-House Processor

    Patches published by Google developers today for LLVM/Clang confirm that the company has at least one in-house processor of its own.

    Jacques Pienaar, a software engineer at Google since 2014, posted patches today seeking to mainline a "Lanai" back-end inside LLVM. He explained they want to contribute their Lanai processor to the LLVM code-base as they continue developing this back-end with a focus on compiling C99 code. He mentions Lanai is a simple in-order 32-bit processor with 32 x 32-bit registers, two registers with fixed values, four used for program state tracking, and two reserved for explicit usage by user, and no floating point support.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
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