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Thursday, 23 Oct 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Feeling Scammed After Anonabox? Android-Based Project Sierra Claims To Be The Real Deal Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 1:54pm
Story These 12 agencies embraced open source. Why? Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 10:27am
Story ARM vs. Intel: Why chipmakers want your Chromebook’s brains Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 10:00am
Story European Greens RFC: ‘Transparency implies use of open source’ Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 9:57am
Story Top 3 open source alternatives to Google Analytics Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 9:42am
Story AN EARLY VIEW OF GTK+ 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 8:21am
Story Linux Container Security Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 8:14am
Story openSUSE, ROSA, and Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 7:50am
Story Avoiding systemd isn't hard Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 6:39am
Story 12 Must Have Android Apps Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 6:34am

Feeling Scammed After Anonabox? Android-Based Project Sierra Claims To Be The Real Deal

Filed under
Android
Linux
Security

In the wake of former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's big reveal on government spying, there's been a concerted effort by companies big and small to try and make our lives truly private. One seemingly promising solution was Anonabox, a little plug-and-play device that routes traffic through Tor to keep our online activities anonymous. Unfortunately, we were all misled on a number of levels, prompting Kickstarter to remove the project forever. Hot on its heels is Project Sierra, a network encryption device that's supposedly the real deal.

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These 12 agencies embraced open source. Why?

Why do government agencies turn to open source software? FutureGov has interviewed 12 senior officials to find out.

Australia’s Chief Technology Officer, John Sheridan, has moved his country’s citizen-facing portal onto open source software, and is offering to help agencies migrate too. “Open source licence arrangements enable the development of some sort of public good, where people contribute or benefit from it,” he says.

Other agencies clearly agree. Hong Kong’s Office of the GCIO is notably enthusiastic, with Victor Lam telling FutureGov that “We recognise the fact that it is the kind of technology [where] we need to be ahead of the curve”.

What was their experience of migrating to open source, and how does it match with others?

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ARM vs. Intel: Why chipmakers want your Chromebook’s brains

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Case in point: Samsung's new Chromebook 2, announced Friday, which has Intel's Bay Trail M Celeron N2840—not one of Samsung’s own Exynos dual-core ARM chips. Earlier Chromebook 2 versions shipped with ARM processors and will continue to do so, but in a briefing with PCWorld, Samsung product manager David Ng said Chromebooks are quickly trending toward Intel components. "More than 50% of Chromebooks sold these days have Intel processors," Ng said.

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Also: Chromebook Sales Jump 67 Percent In Last Three Months

European Greens RFC: ‘Transparency implies use of open source’

Filed under
OSS

The Greens/European Free Alliance in the European Parliament want to find out for once and for all if the use of free and open source software is essential for the democratic institution. The political group is asking for comments on a study linking the use of free software to the European Parliament’s principles of openness and right to information.

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Top 3 open source alternatives to Google Analytics

Filed under
OSS
Web

Let’s start off by taking a look at the open source application that rivals Google Analytics for functions: Piwik. Piwik does most of what Google Analytics does, and chances are it packs the features that you need.

Those features include metrics on the number of visitors hitting your site, data on where they come from (both on the web and geographically), from what pages they leave your site, and the ability to track search engine referrals. Piwik also has a number of reports and you can customize the dashboard to view the metrics that you want to see.

To make your life easier, Piwik integrates with over 65 content management, ecommerce, and online forum systems like WordPress, Magneto, Joomla!, and vBulletin using plugins. With anything else, you just need to add a tracking code to a page on your site.

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AN EARLY VIEW OF GTK+ 3.16

Filed under
Development
GNOME

We’ve had long-standing feature requests to turn scrollbars into overlayed indicators, for touch systems. An implementation of this idea has been merged now. We show traditional scrollbars when a mouse is detected, otherwise we fade in narrow, translucent indicators. The indicators are rendered on top of the content and don’t take up extra space. When you move the pointer over the indicator, it turns into a full-width scrollbar that can be used as such.

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Linux Container Security

Filed under
Linux
Security

Hypervisors present a smaller attack surface than containers. This is somewhat mitigated in containers by using seccomp, selinux and restricting capabilities in order to reduce the number of kernel entry points that untrusted code can touch, but even so there is simply a greater quantity of privileged code available to untrusted apps in a container environment when compared to a hypervisor environment[1].

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openSUSE, ROSA, and Red Hat

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news, Jamie Watson is back with a look at the "coming attractions" of Makulu, openSUSE, and Fedora. Lifehacker has the winner of their "best desktop" survey and there are public builds of upcoming Unreal Tournament available. IT-Director.com published an article on "The rise of Red Hat" and Red Hat's Jackie Yeaney talks marketing with Advertising Age. Blogged reviews include Scientific Linux and ROSA R4 and Make Tech Easier discovers "the power of Konqueror."

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Avoiding systemd isn't hard

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Don't listen to trolls. They lie.

Debian was and continues to be about choice. Previously, you could configure Debian to use other init systems, and you can continue to do so in the future.

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12 Must Have Android Apps

Filed under
Android

While some Android apps are important, some truly are must have Android apps. I’ve learned to tell the difference. Over the past couple of years, I've been a very happy Android fan. Being a refugee from the iOS platform, I cannot express just how much more full-featured Android is when compared to my old iPhone.

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Ubuntu 14.10 XMir System Compositor Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn" due for release today, here's some benchmarks showing how the standard Unity 7 desktop on Ubuntu 14.10 is comparing to the still-experimental Unity System Compositor and using XMir for running traditional Linux OpenGL games.

From a standard Intel Core i7 Haswell system with HD Graphics I ran benchmarks with the development snapshot of Ubuntu Utopic as of yesterday to see how well the stock Unity 7.3.1 environment is comparing to when it's run with unity-system-compositor installed and using Mir support with XMir for running a variety of standard OpenGL benchmarks as well as some 2D X11 benchmarks.

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Up the revolution! The rise of Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat

One of the IT industry's quiet successes of the last 20 years has been Red Hat (some stories say it was named for the red caps favoured by 18th and 19th century revolutionaries). In 2012 the vendor reported revenues of $1B+ for the first time and this has increased to $1.5B+ in its most recent full financial year (ending Feb 2014). 26% of Red Hat’s revenue is generated in Europe and more than 20% its 7,000 employees are based in the EU, including those at its Bruno-based development in the Czech Republic.

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Most Popular Linux Desktop Environment: GNOME Shell

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Even after settling on a Linux distribution to use, you still have to decide on a desktop environment. There are tons to choose from, and last week we asked you for your favorites. Then we looked at the five best Linux desktop environments. Now we're back to highlight your favorite, 11,000 votes later.

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Mutual business crowdfunding for LibreOffice results in new features investment

Filed under
LibO

Last Friday Wilhelm Tux, a Swiss community group, reached their €8,000 (CHF 10.000) crowdfunding target for LibreOffice. The money will be used to add support for digital signatures in PDF documents in a secure and compliant way. From announcement to completion took four days.Once implemented,

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ROSA Desktop Fresh R4 Review: Refreshing Mandriva based KDE spin

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

ROSA is a Russian company developing a variety of Linux-based solutions. Its flagship product, ROSA Desktop, is a Linux distribution featuring a highly customized KDE desktop and a number of modifications designed to enhance the user-friendliness of the working environment. The company also develops an "Enterprise Server" edition of ROSA which is based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. On 9th October 2014, Ekaterina Lopukhova has announced the release of ROSA R4 "Desktop Fresh" edition, a desktop Linux distribution featuring a customized and user-friendly KDE 4.13.3 desktop: "The ROSA company is happy to present the long-awaited ROSA Desktop Fresh R4, the number 4 in the "R" lineup of the free ROSA distros with the KDE desktop as the main graphical environment. The distro presents a vast collection of games and emulators, as well as the Steam platform package along with standard suite of audio and video communications software, including the newest version of Skype. All modern video formats are supported. The distribution includes the fresh LibreOffice 4.3.1, the full TeX suite for true nerds, along with the best Linux desktop publishing, text editing and polygraphy WYSISYG software. The LAMP/C++/ development environments are waiting to be installed by true hackers." The present version is supported for 2 years. ROSA was previously based on Mandriva but now independent like many of the formerly Mandriva based distros, e.g. PCLinuxOS, Mageia, OpenMandriva Lx (based on ROSA), to name a few. Mandriva in turn was based on Red Hat Linux and a lot of programs which work for Fedora or OpenSUSE, worked on ROSA as well.

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Development of Nautilus – Popovers, port to GAction and more

Filed under
GNOME

In an application that already use GAction and a normal GMenu for everything is quite easy.

But Nautilus is not using GAction neither GMenu for its menus. Not only that, Nautilus use GtkUIManager for managing the menus and GtkActions. And not only that, Nautilus merge parts of menus along all the code.

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Ten years of Ubuntu: How Linux’s beloved newcomer became its criticized king

Filed under
Ubuntu

In October of 2004, a new Linux distro appeared on the scene with a curious name—Ubuntu. Even then there were hundreds, today if not thousands, of different Linux distros available. A new one wasn't particularly unusual, and for some time after its quiet preview announcement, Ubuntu went largely unnoticed. It was yet another Debian derivative.

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Linux-based smart glasses keep it stylish

Filed under
Linux

Laforge is prepping a $399 beta version of its Linux-based Icis eyewear, as well as a $549 Bold model due in 2015 that adds a camera and higher resolution.

Relatively few of the smart eyewear products now coming to market compete directly with Google Glass as a general-purpose consumer device. Most are vertical-market helmets for industrial or field service use (Vuzix M100), or are designed for specific activities such as skiing (Recon’s Snow 2) or motorcycle riding (Skully AR-1.) Laforge Optical’s Icis stands out from the pack with its consumer focus and its foundation in embedded Linux rather than the stripped-down Android stacks used by most smart eyewear.

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5 Deadly Linux Commands You Should Never Run

Filed under
Linux

As a Linux user, you probably have searched online for articles and tutorials that show you how to use the terminal to run some commands. While most of these commands are harmless and could help you become more productive, there are some commands that are deadly and could wipe out your whole machine.

In this article, let’s check out some of the deadly Linux commands that you should never run.

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Cairo-Dock / GLX-Dock 3.4 is now available

Filed under
Development

Cairo-Dock 3.4 is finally released! One year after the 3.3 version.

Cairo-Dock is a pretty, fast and customizable desktop interface. You can see it as a good alternative/addition to Unity, Gnome-Shell, Xfce-panel, KDE-panel, etc.
(For more details about the Cairo-Dock sessions and more screenshots, please have a look at a previous article: here)

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