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Sunday, 25 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Review: OviOS 2.31

Filed under
Reviews

OviOS is a Linux-based distribution which is designed to act as a storage appliance. OviOS can be thought of along similar lines as a network attached storage (NAS) device, a box dedicated to holding and sharing files over a network. Where OviOS differs from most NAS solutions is OviOS does not feature a graphical or web-based interface. Everything on OviOS is managed from a command line shell, typically over a secure shell (OpenSSH) connection. The OviOS distribution ships with its own, custom shell which should streamline administration. The central idea behind the project appears to be making file storage and sharing as minimal as possible, without any unnecessary features such as web-based control panels.

OviOS ships with ZFS support, giving us the ability to create multi-disk storage volumes, compress files at the file system level and create snapshots of our data. The distribution currently does not support booting on UEFI-enabled computers and runs on 64-bit x86 machines which support booting in legacy BIOS mode only.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chromebooks and Crostini: Containers For Chrome OS By Google I/O?

    noun: small pieces of toasted or fried bread served with a topping as an appetizer or canapé.

    In layman’s terms, a crostini is a fancy crouton. More often than not, you will find crostini served in a similar manner to Bruschetta; brushed with Olive Oil and topped with cheese and other various deliciousness.

  • Chrome OS will soon let you run Linux VMs

    It could soon be possible to run Linux apps on a Chromebook without jumping through hoops. Recent commits to the Chrome OS source code suggests that Google is preparing to introduce support for virtual machines, specifically Linux containers.

  • Allwinner A83T Will Support HDMI With Linux 4.17

    The Sun4i DRM driver work has been progressing a lot since its mainline introduction two years ago with Linux 4.7. With the Linux 4.17 cycle, the A83T SoC will have initial HDMI output support.

    If you happen to have a tablet or other device powered by the Allwinner A83T, it should finally have working HDMI out support when using the Sun4i DRM driver with the kernel update coming later this year.

  • Moving to 64 bit

    When i bought my new desktop at home, i already had a plan to reinstall my old desktop with Slackware64, but i didn't specify the timeframe or even the version i'm going to install with. The old one was 32 bit since i got it installed since 2009 and it has been working well so far, but it's getting slower for my needs where i got to use virtual machines to build packages for MATE and Cinnamon. It is a dual-core E5300 Intel CPU with 4 GB of RAM, 320 GB + 1 TB hard drive, and NVidia GeForce 7050.

  • gvSIG 2.4: New version of gvSIG open source GIS is now available

    gvSIG Desktop 2.4, the new version of the open source Geographic Information System, is now available. You can access both the gvSIG Desktop 2.4 installable and portable versions from the download section of the project website [1], with distributions available for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X.

  • iOS Gopher Client 17+

    This is is a modern Gopher browser for iOS. Built from the ground up, it lets you access the wealth of data available via Gopher from your favorite devices.

  • What will OpenStack "S" Be Named?

    The open-source OpenStack cloud community is now figuring out what to call its first release for 2019. No that's not a typo.

  • LLVM / Clang 6.0 Should Be Released Soon With Its Many New Features

    LLVM 6 is running a few days behind scheduled for its release along with Clang 6 for the C/C++ compiler, but this latest big update to this open-source compiler stack should still be on the ways in the days ahead.

  • What happened after the US moved to chip-embedded payment cards?

     

    The US began its transition to chip-based credit cards in earnest in October 2015, after high-profile credit card hacks in the previous years at Target, Home Depot, Michaels, and other big-box retailers. Today, although only 59 percent of US storefronts have terminals that accept chip cards, fraud has dropped 70 percent from September 2015 to December 2017 for those retailers that have completed the chip upgrade, according to Visa.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 84 - Have I been pwned?

KDE and GNOME: KDE Plasma 5.13 and Arrongin GTK

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KDE
GNOME
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Should Be Starting Up Even Faster

    One of the nice elements of KDE Plasma 5.12 is that it starts up faster, particularly when running on Wayland, but with Plasma 5.13 it's looking like it will be an even faster experience getting to the Plasma desktop.

    KDE Plasma 5.13 isn't scheduled to be released until the middle of June, but this next Plasma installment is already in heavy feature development following this month's successful Plasma 5.12 debut.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 7

    Another busy week in Usability & Productivity. As has been observed, we’re fixing issues at Warp 9 speed! KDE contributors racked up some pretty significant wins this week, and we’ve already got some great stuff in the pipeline that I hope to be able to announce next week! But for now, take a look at this week’s haul!

  • Arrongin GTK Theme Stands Out (But for the Right Reasons)

    Sure, the new Ubuntu theme is pretty great, but it’s still largely a mix of Ambiance, Adwaita and the proposed Unity 8 style. I.e. all known quantities.

    We’ve previously listed what we think are the best GTK themes for Ubuntu (and Linux in general). If you’ve read that list you may have noticed that a number of themes featured look similar, share design trends, or use a similar theme as a foundation.

    With former theme makers like ~half-left no longer making truly original GTK themes, Linux design has fallen into a bit of a creative lull. Every other theme that appears is (seemingly) based on either Adwaita, Arc or Adapta, uses material design cues (like Pop GTK), echoes macOS (Greybird, elementary) or is flatter than the response to most of my jokes (Arc, Plano, Ant, Vimix, et al).

Linux-Ready Hardware and Android Leftovers

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Android
Linux

Red Hat, Oracle's RHEL Clone, and Fedora

Debian and Derivatives: SnowCamp, Debian Gitlab, Debian/TeX Live, Snap Apps

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Report from Debian SnowCamp: day 3

    Thanks to Valhalla and other members of LIFO, a bunch of fine Debian folks have convened in Laveno, on the shores of Lake Maggiore, for a nice weekend of relaxing and sprinting on various topics, a SnowCamp.

  • Report from SnowCamp #1

    As Nicolas already reported, a bunch of Debian folk gathered in the North of Italy for a long weekend of work and socialisation.

  • Debian Gitlab (salsa.debian.org) tricks
  • Debian/TeX Live 2017.20180225-1

    To my big surprise, the big rework didn’t create any havoc at all, not one bug report regarding the change. That is good. OTOH, I took some time off due to various surprising (and sometimes disturbing) things that have happened in the last month, so the next release took a bit longer than expected.

  • Ubuntu Software Will Soon Let You Install Beta, Bleeding Edge Snap Apps

    No, not TV channels, or the sort the that ferries goods between countries, but development channels, e.g, beta, bleeding edge, stable, etc.

    Snap developers are able to distribute different versions of their app over “channels”, and have for almost as long as Snappy has been around in fact.

Games: Deep Sixed, Streets of Rogue, Shroud of the Avatar: Forsaken Virtues and More

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Gaming

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Tactical RPG Ash of Gods set to release in March

    Following a successful crowdfunding campaign last year, this beautiful RPG with hand-drawn animation is nearing release. We should be getting our hands on it sometime in March.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Improvements Coming For Wolfenstein 2 On Wine

    Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus makes use of the Vulkan graphics API on the id Tech 6 engine but sadly remains Windows-only aside from the consoles. While it runs with Wine, there are some bugs when using the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver but fortunately one of Valve's Linux developers is working on some improvements.

  • Nintendo finally catches up to other console makers, allows user game reviews

    To those who may wonder why this is news in an era where user reviews are commonplace, this is a significant detour from Nintendo's long-held attitude about user-created content. The company has traditionally restricted its fans' ability to post and share content in or about its games to other users—at least, without exchanging friend codes. The company's last major exception was Miiverse, a platform that debuted with the Wii U and allowed players to share stylus-authored drawings to the entire world should they receive moderators' approval. Some dubious users still came up with creative ways to get suggestive and inappropriate drawings past Nintendo moderators' eyes (and Miiverse has since been discontinued).

Graphics: Radeon and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Wattman's "Automan" Being Enabled For Vega On Linux

    With the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle there is initial support for Radeon Wattman with the AMDGPU kernel driver and modern Radeon graphics processors. "Automan" is now the latest being worked on for Vega GPUs.

    Automan as implied by the name is automatic Wattman handling for Linux. There was already automatic Wattman support via earlier AMDGPU patches for Polaris GPUs and can be enabled via the pp_power_profile_mode sysfs node to auto, but now there are patches for supporting newer Vega graphics processors.

  • UVD-Based HEVC Video Encoding Main Now Supported In Mesa 18.1

    Earlier this month AMD developers landed VCN-powered video encode support for the HEVC main format while now this has come to the UVD engine so it will work with pre-Raven GPUs.

    VCN "Video Core Next" is the new unified video encode/decode block found so far just on Raven Ridge APUs. That VCN support has been getting into Mesa while AMD's James Zhu this week enabled UVD-based encode for the HEVC main profile.

Chrome OS may soon be able to run Linux applications in a container

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Even though Chrome OS is based on Linux (Gentoo Linux, to be exact), you can't run traditional desktop Linux applications. One solution to this problem is Crouton, a script that sets up a chroot of Ubuntu or Debian Linux on top of Chrome OS. While this does allow many people to use Chrome OS who otherwise couldn't, it's a hacky solution and requires enabling Developer Mode (which turns off most of Chrome OS' security features).

A new commit on the Chromium Gerrit has come to light, with the name "New device policy to allow Linux VMs on Chrome OS." The specific code adds a 'Better Together' menu in the Chrome OS settings, and allows IT administrators to turn the feature on or off.

Of course, the big news is that Chrome OS will almost certainly support running Linux applications at some point. That opens up a huge range of software, from open-source favorites like GIMP and LibreOffice, to Linux-compatible Steam games like Civilization V and Rocket League. Potentially, users could even install Wine to run some Windows programs.

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GNOME Shell vs. KDE Plasma Graphics Tests On Wayland vs. X.Org Server

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Graphics/Benchmarks

A premium member this week had requested some benchmarks of openSUSE Tumbleweed when looking at the performance of KDE Plasma vs. GNOME Shell in some open-source graphics/gaming tests while also looking at the Wayland vs. X.Org Server performance.

With KDE Plasma 5.12 that openSUSE Tumbleweed has picked up, there is much better Wayland session support compared to previous releases. While KDE developers aren't yet ready to declare their Wayland session the default, in my experience so far it's been working out very well but still routinely will find application crashes in Kate and the like when testing under the KWin's Wayland compositor.

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Stable kernels 4.15.6, 4.14.22, 4.9.84, 4.4.118 and 3.18.96

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Linux

Three essential tools for the GNU/Linux Photographer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As a Journalist by day, and awesome cave dwelling Linux nerd by night, I take a lot of photographs with my Nikon D3300.

That said, there are the obvious tools by Adobe that one can use, such as Photoshop, but there are some pretty awesome tools available for free to GNU/Linux users I thought I might share.

With the three together, I’ve got basically everything I have needed.

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Remembering Tom Wallis, The System Administrator That Made The World Better

Filed under
Debian
Obits

So it was a shock to get an email this week that Tom had married for the first time at age 54, and passed away four days later due to a boating accident while on his honeymoon.

Tom was a man with a big laugh and an even bigger heart. When I started a Linux Users Group (LUG) on campus, there was Tom – helping to arrange a place to meet, Internet access when we needed it, and gave his evenings to simply be present and a supporter.

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Introducing the potential new Ubuntu Studio Council

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Ubuntu

Back in 2016, Set Hallström was elected as the new Team Lead for Ubuntu Studio, just in time for the 16.04 Xenial Long Term Support (LTS) release. It was intended that Ubuntu Studio would be able to utilise Set’s leadership skills at least up until the next LTS release in April 2018. Unfortunately, as happens occasionally in the world of volunteer work, Set’s personal circumstances changed and he is no longer able to devote as much time to Ubuntu Studio as he would like. Therefore, an IRC meeting was held between interested Ubuntu Studio contributors on 21st May 2017 to agree on how to fill the void. We decided to follow the lead of Xubuntu and create a Council to take care of Ubuntu Studio, rather than continuing to place the burden of leadership on the shoulder of one particular person. Unfortunately, although the result was an agreement to form the first Ubuntu Studio Council from the meeting participants, we all got busy and the council was never set up.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • My Experience with MailSpring on Linux

    On the Linux Desktop, there are quite a few choices for email applications. Each of these has their own pros and cons which should be weighed depending on one’s needs. Some clients will have MS Exchange support. Others do not. In general, because email is reasonably close to free (and yes, we can thank Hotmail for that) it has been a difficult place to make money. Without a cash flow to encourage developers, development has trickled at best.

  • Useful FFMPEG Commands for Managing Audio and Video Files
  • Set Up A Python Django Development Environment on Debian 9 Stretch Linux
  • How To Run A Command For A Specific Time In Linux
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 7
  •  

  • Why Oppo and Vivo are losing steam in Chinese smartphone market

    China’s smartphone market has seen intense competition over the past few years with four local brands capturing more than 60 percent of sales in 2017.

    Huawei Technologies, Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi Technology recorded strong shipment growth on a year-on-year basis. But some market experts warned that Oppo and Vivo may see the growth of their shipments slow this year as users become more discriminating.

  • iPhones Blamed for More than 1,600 Accidental 911 Calls Since October

    The new Emergency SOS feature released by Apple for the iPhone is the one to blame for no less than 1,600 false calls to 911 since October, according to dispatchers.

    And surprisingly, emergency teams in Elk Grove and Sacramento County in California say they receive at least 20 such 911 calls every day from what appears to be an Apple service center.

    While it’s not exactly clear why the iPhones that are probably brought in for repairs end up dialing 911, dispatchers told CBS that the false calls were first noticed in the fall of the last year. Apple launched new iPhones in September 2017 and they went on sale later the same month and in November, but it’s not clear if these new devices are in any way related to the increasing number of accidental calls to 911.

  • Game Studio Found To Install Malware DRM On Customers' Machines, Defends Itself, Then Apologizes

    The thin line that exists between entertainment industry DRM software and plain malware has been pointed out both recently and in the past. There are many layers to this onion, ranging from Sony's rootkit fiasco, to performance hits on machines thanks to DRM installed by video games, up to and including the insane idea that copyright holders ought to be able to use malware payloads to "hack back" against accused infringers.

    What is different in more recent times is the public awareness regarding DRM, computer security, and an overall fear of malware. This is a natural kind of progression, as the public becomes more connected and reliant on computer systems and the internet, they likewise become more concerned about those systems. That may likely explain the swift public backlash to a small game-modding studio seemingly installing something akin to malware in every installation of its software, whether from a legitimate purchase or piracy.

Server: Benchmarks, IBM and Red Hat

Filed under
Server
  • 36-Way Comparison Of Amazon EC2 / Google Compute Engine / Microsoft Azure Cloud Instances vs. Intel/AMD CPUs

    Earlier this week I delivered a number of benchmarks comparing Amazon EC2 instances to bare metal Intel/AMD systems. Due to interest from that, here is a larger selection of cloud instance types from the leading public clouds of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.

  • IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History

    Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.

  • Red Hat CSA Mike Bursell on 'managed degradation' and open data

    As part of Red Hat's CTO office chief security architect Mike Bursell has to be informed of security threats past, present and yet to come – as many as 10 years into the future.

    The open source company has access to a wealth of customers in verticals including health, finance, defence, the public sector and more. So how do these insights inform the company's understanding of the future threat landscape?

  • Red Hat Offers New Decision Management Tech Platform

    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has released a platform that will work to support information technology applications and streamline the deployment of rules-based tools in efforts to automate processes for business decision management, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux-Ready Hardware and Android Leftovers

Red Hat, Oracle's RHEL Clone, and Fedora

Debian and Derivatives: SnowCamp, Debian Gitlab, Debian/TeX Live, Snap Apps

  • Report from Debian SnowCamp: day 3
    Thanks to Valhalla and other members of LIFO, a bunch of fine Debian folks have convened in Laveno, on the shores of Lake Maggiore, for a nice weekend of relaxing and sprinting on various topics, a SnowCamp.
  • Report from SnowCamp #1
    As Nicolas already reported, a bunch of Debian folk gathered in the North of Italy for a long weekend of work and socialisation.
  • Debian Gitlab (salsa.debian.org) tricks
  • Debian/TeX Live 2017.20180225-1
    To my big surprise, the big rework didn’t create any havoc at all, not one bug report regarding the change. That is good. OTOH, I took some time off due to various surprising (and sometimes disturbing) things that have happened in the last month, so the next release took a bit longer than expected.
  • Ubuntu Software Will Soon Let You Install Beta, Bleeding Edge Snap Apps
    No, not TV channels, or the sort the that ferries goods between countries, but development channels, e.g, beta, bleeding edge, stable, etc. Snap developers are able to distribute different versions of their app over “channels”, and have for almost as long as Snappy has been around in fact.