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Wednesday, 28 Jan 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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7 reasons asynchronous communication is better than synchronous communication in open source

Filed under
OSS

Traditionally, open source software has relied primarily on asynchronous communication. While there are probably quite a few synchronous conversations on irc, most project discussions and decisions will happen on asynchronous channels like mailing lists, bug tracking tools and blogs.

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LibreOffice for Android coming soon

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Android
LibO

The Document Foundation on Tuesday announced it had assigned the work necessary to build the Android apps to two companies. The Document Foundation is hoping the result will be a "compelling, elegant and full-featured experience of LibreOffice on Android", Ital Vignoli, one of its founders, said.

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NVIDIA's Latest Maxwell Line-Up Against AMD With Catalyst On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Last week NVIDIA released the GeForce GTX 960, a great $200 GPU for Linux gamers that is based on their new power-efficient Maxwell architecture. On launch-day I delivered some initial performance figures of the full GeForce GTX 900 series line-up along with other graphics cards and following that I did many new NVIDIA Linux GPU tests going back to the GeForce GTX 400 (Fermi) series. Not part of those tests were any AMD Radeon graphics cards while in this article are such numbers in making a new 18-way graphics card comparison with the latest Linux graphics drivers.

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Linux Desktop Evolution: Minor, Invisible, or Aesthetic

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In the last two years, the Linux desktop has settled into a period of quiet diversity. The user revolts of 2008-2012 are safely in the past, and users are scattered among at least seven major desktops -- Cinnamon, GNOME, KDE,LXDE, MATE, Unity, and Xfce -- and likely to stay that way.

So what comes next? What will the next innovations on the desktop be? Where will they come from? Prediction is as safe as investing in penny mining stocks, but some major trends for the next couple of years seem obvious without the bother of a tarot reading.

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Ubuntu Touch apps can run in windowed mode

Filed under
Ubuntu

The developers of the Ubuntu Linux operating system for desktop, notebook, and server computers are working on a touch-friendly version for smartphones and tablets, with the first Ubuntu phones expected to go on sale this year.

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Square tries to make open source “welcoming and inspiring” to women

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OSS

What is open source? Simply put, it is source code (used to develop software programs) that is freely available and modifiable on the Internet. Open source developers from all over the world contribute to various projects, which are hosted on various websites—GitHub, a popular code hosting site, has over 8 million users and over 19 million code “repositories.”

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Citizens call on Dortmund to use free software

Filed under
OSS

Four citizens of the German city of Dortmund have started a citizens’ initiative, asking the city council to seriously consider the use of free and open source software. “The city needs to recognise free software as a topic in the public interest”, the DO-FOSS initiators write.

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NVIDIA Tegra DRM Driver Supports Atomic Mode-Setting In Linux 3.20

Filed under
Linux

The latest work landing in the DRM-Next code-base for the Linux 3.20 kernel merge window is the Tegra DRM driver updates.

The Tegra DRM driver is primarily designed to support the Tegra 4 and older SoCs while the Tegra K1 and newer is supported by the Nouveau DRM driver due to the graphics core now being common with their mainline desktop architecture. The Tegra K1's GK20A graphics core is derived directly from Kepler while the brand new Tegra X1 is derived from Maxwell. Regardless, the Tegra DRM driver continues to be actively developed by NVIDIA stakeholders.

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LibreOffice 4.4 the beautiful

Filed under
LibO

We are very close to release LibreOffice 4.4 and I thought I’d share my thoughts on the work that has been put into this new branch and what the general idea is about it. LibreOffice 4.4 is unusual; as a major release you may expect some important underlying change in its architecture, or the inclusion of a set of major features. The 4.4 does include several important features and improvements, most notably for Impress and the much forgotten HTML editor (the comprehensive release notes may be found here). But the most important details are not to be found in this area. If you want to understand where the 4.4 branch is headed, I think it is useful to keep two fundamental trends in mind.

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Embedded Linux Conference hijacked by drones

Filed under
Linux

The Embedded Linux Conference + Android Builders Summit on Mar. 23-25 in San Jose is about “Drones, Things, and Automobiles,” but drones get the most love.

Maybe it’s just our imagination, but the Linux Foundation’s Embedded Linux Conference seems to be getting more interesting than ever. The program increasingly reflects new opportunities for Linux in areas such as drones, robots, automotive computers, IoT gizmos, 3D sensing, modular phones, and much more. For those of you worried that ELC North America is skimping on the basics as it explores the more colorful sides of Linux, rest your mind at ease. There are still plenty of sessions on booting, trace analysis, NAND support, PHY frameworks, power management, defragmenting, systemd, device tree, and toolchain. Geeks still rule!

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15 Reasons Android Phones Are Better Than The iPhone

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Android

Apple just reported a record number of iPhone sales in its Q1 earnings.

But while iPhones might be selling like hot-cakes, there are still a bunch of reasons why Android phones are better.

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Linux Kernel 3.18.4 Stable Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux


Linux Kernel 3.18.4 Stable Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Linux Kernel 3.18.4 Stable is released and can be installed or updated in Ubuntu Vivid Vervet, Utopic Unicorn, Trusty Tahr and Linux Mint Rebecca and Qiana.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Mobie Is a Tablet That Dual-Boots Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Windows 8.1

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Mobie is a new kind of 2-in-1 tablet developed in Finland that is capable to dual-boot Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Windows 8.1. It's being launched in a couple of months and it already looks very good, at least on paper.

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Can or Can’t?

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OSS

What I love about open source is that it’s a “can” world by default. You can do anything you think needs doing and nobody will tell you that you can’t. (They may not take your patch but they won’t tell you that you can’t create it!)

It’s often easier to define things by what they are not or what we can’t do. And the danger of that is you create a culture of “can’t”. Any one who has raised kids or animals knows this. “No, don’t jump.” You can’t jump on people. “No, off the sofa.” You can’t be on the furniture. “No, don’t lick!” You can’t slobber on me. And hopefully when you realize it, you can fix it. “You can have this stuffed animal (instead of my favorite shoe). Good dog!”

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IT pros to move to open source software in 2015

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OSS

IT professionals are expected to move away from proprietary to open source software in 2015, according to new research.

A survey by Ponemon Institute and Zimbra shows 67 per cent of EMEA IT professionals agree that commercial open source software offers better business continuity.

74 per cent in the US also agree open source is better for business continuity, compared to propriety software.

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Open-source development of Pirate Bay replacement could make site immune to police takedown

Filed under
OSS

Online torrent repository IsoHunt has launched a $100,000 (£66,000) competition to encourage open-source development of The Old Pirate Bay, the popular torrent site set up in the wake of The Pirate Bay's shutdown.

The unprecedented move to offer prize money will mean that an open-source community will be responsible for developing the site rather than a closed team, therefore making the site more difficult to take down.

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Also: IsoHunt Is Sick of Closed-Development; Offers $100,000 for Open-Source Developers

isoHunt offers $100,000 to ‘most active’ Old Pirate Bay contributors

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