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Monday, 06 Jul 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 10:56am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 8:33am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 8:30am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 8:30am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 8:29am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 8:26am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 8:25am
Story Systemd 222 Will Do Away With Its Accelerometer Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 8:00am
Story Linux 4.2-rc1 Rianne Schestowitz 05/07/2015 - 10:50pm
Story Do Your Prefer Modern Or Traditional Linux Desktop Environments? Rianne Schestowitz 05/07/2015 - 10:44pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Systemd 222 Will Do Away With Its Accelerometer

Filed under
Linux

For the past four years in systemd there's been a Udev accelerometer helper for exposing the device orientation as a property. With the upcoming systemd 222 release, that will change and instead users taking advantage of device orientation information should switch to iio-sensor-proxy 1.0+.

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Linux 4.2-rc1

Filed under
Linux

I thought this release would be one of the biggest ones ever, but it
turns out that it will depend on how you count. Just counting pure
commits, it is indeed one of the bigger rc1's in recent history, but
3.10-rc1 was almost as big, and then the final 3.10 grew from that
more than most. I doubt we'll match the 3.10 release, since we have
been getting progressively better at *not* merging tons of stuff after
-rc1.

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Do Your Prefer Modern Or Traditional Linux Desktop Environments?

Filed under
Linux

So what kind of Linux desktop environments do you prefer?

Do you prefer the modern desktop environments with maybe less flexibility but perhaps better desktop integration and slightly more intuitive or do you like things more traditional with menus and panels? Maybe you don't care so long as you can make it the way you want it. Let me know in the comments below.

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illume OS 3 Linux Distro Officially Released, Based on Debian 8.1 "Jessie"

Filed under
OS
Linux
Debian

Clarence Siew was very proud Softpedia earlier today, July 4, about the immediate availability for download of the final version of his illume OS 3 distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux.

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LibreOffice 5, a foundation for the future

Filed under
LibO

The release of the next major version of LibreOffice, the 5.0, is approaching fast. In several ways this is an unique release and I’d like to explain a bit why.

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Samsung Continues to Lessen Android Dependence

Filed under
OS
Linux

Samsung's partnership with members of the Linux Foundation appears to be bearing fruit. The partnership's mobile operating system -- dubbed Tizen -- is Linux-based. Samsung's initial Tizen phone rollout was rocky: The company's highly anticipated Samsung Z launch in Russia was quickly canceled last year, and the company blamed concerns about the ecosystem for the delay. Unfortunately, in many cases, ecosystem development presents a "chicken and egg" problem: Developers won't build apps until you have users, and users won't select your product until you have apps.

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Linux 4.2 Offers Performance Improvements For Non-Transparent Bridging

The Non-Transparent Bridge code is undergoing a big rework that has "already produced some significant performance improvements", according to its code maintainer Jon Mason. For those unfamiliar with NTB, it's described by the in-kernel documentation, "NTB (Non-Transparent Bridge) is a type of PCI-Express bridge chip that connects the separate memory systems of two computers to the same PCI-Express fabric. Existing NTB hardware supports a common feature set, including scratchpad registers, doorbell registers, and memory translation windows." Or explained simply by the Intel Xeon documentation that received the NTB support, "Non-Transparent Bridge (NTB) enables high speed connectivity
between one Intel Xeon Processor-based platform to another (or other IA or non-IA platform via the PCIe interface)."

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Benchmarks Of 54 Different Intel/AMD Linux Systems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This week in celebrating 200,000 benchmark results in our LinuxBenchmarking.com test lab, I ran another large comparison against the latest spectrum of hardware/software in the automated performance test lab.

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Snappy Open House Is Your Chance to Get Familiar with Ubuntu Snappy

Filed under
Ubuntu

Nicholas Skaggs had the great pleasure of announcing a couple of days ago yet another innovation from Canonical, Snappy Open House, a new way for Ubuntu developers, contributors, and members of the community to get familiar with the Snappy technology created by Canonical for its Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Also: First Ubuntu Snappy Open House Announced, UbuCon Germany Planning Continues

Linux 4.2 Bringing Support For ARCv2, HS38 CPU Cores

Filed under
Linux

The ARC architecture updates for the Linux 4.2 kernel have landed.

With the ARC architecture updates in Linux 4.2 comes support for HS38 cores, which in turn are based on the Synopsys next-gen ISA known as ARCv2. The ARCv2 ISA is faster and more feature-rich than their original instruction set architecture. The HS38 cores have a 10-stage pipeline core with MMU support, SMP up to four cores, and other new features. The HS38 processor is still 32-bit and is "optimized for high-performance embedded applications running Linux."

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Also: Radeon & AMDGPU DRM Fixes Queue Up For Linux 4.2

Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Will Bring a New Thumbnailer in Unity 8, Support for Refunds

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Alejandro J. Cura had the great pleasure of reporting a few hours ago that the upcoming OTA-5 update for the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system will get some attractive new features in the Unity 8 user interface.

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The July 2015 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved.

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The Linux Setup - Neil McGovern, Debian Project Leader

Filed under
Interviews
Debian

I’m the current Debian Project Leader—which is a very impressive title that boils down to being a figurehead for the Debian project.

I first started getting involved with Debian in 2003, and have wended my way through various roles in the project, from designing t-shirts to being the Release Manager for the last three releases, Lenny, Squeeze and Wheezy.

In my day job, I’m the engineering manager for Collabora, an open source software consultancy which is fairly similar—basically making sure that all the engineers are happy and helping unblock any problems that come along.

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