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Monday, 22 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt Mohd Sohail 22/05/2017 - 9:36am
Story Debian-Based Untangle 13.0 Linux Firewall Tackles Bufferbloat, Adds New Features Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 6:09am
Story Kernel Space: HMM, Cloud Native, Linux 4.12, TFS, Linux 4.11.2, and 4.10 EoL Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 6:02am
Story ROSA Fresh R9 Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 5:47am
Story More of today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 5:38am
Story Software: Linfo, EasyTag, Simple Scan, Albert, VLC, Remote Desktop, Frogr, Brisk Menu, and OpenShot Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 5:14am
Story CloudReady - Chromebook re-experienced Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 5:00am
Story Security Leftovers: All Versions of Windows Compromised, WannaCry Keeps Going Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 4:46am
Story Ubuntu MATE 17.04 - Fast Forward to the Past Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 4:07am
Story Imagine an Android Phone Without Linux Inside Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2017 - 3:49am

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

Filed under
Linux

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers.

Read<br />
more

Debian-Based Untangle 13.0 Linux Firewall Tackles Bufferbloat, Adds New Features

Filed under
Debian

Untangle NG Firewall, the open-source and powerful Debian-based network security platform featuring pluggable modules for network apps, has been updated to version 13.0, a major release adding new features and numerous improvements.

The biggest improvement brought by the Untangle NG Firewall 13.0 release is to the poor latency generated by excess buffering in networking equipment, called bufferbloat, by supporting a queueing algorithm designed to optimize QoS and bandwidth to enforce a controlled delay.

Read more

Kernel Space: HMM, Cloud Native, Linux 4.12, TFS, Linux 4.11.2, and 4.10 EoL

Filed under
Linux
  • Faster machine learning is coming to the Linux kernel

    Heterogenous memory management (HMM) allows a device’s driver to mirror the address space for a process under its own memory management. As Red Hat developer Jérôme Glisse explains, this makes it easier for hardware devices like GPUs to directly access the memory of a process without the extra overhead of copying anything. It also doesn't violate the memory protection features afforded by modern OSes.

  • Product Development in the Age of Cloud Native

    Ever since the mass adoption of Agile development techniques and devops philosophies that attempt to eradication organizational silos, there’s been a welcome discussion on how to optimize development for continuous delivery on a massive scale. Some of the better known adages that have taken root as a result of this shift include “deploy in production after checking in code” (feasible due to the rigorous upfront testing required in this model), “infrastructure as code”, and a host of others that, taken out of context, would lead one down the path of chaos and mayhem. Indeed, the shift towards devops and agile methodologies and away from “waterfall” has led to a much needed evaluation of all processes around product and service delivery that were taken as a given in the very recent past.

  • Running Intel Kabylake Graphics On Linux 4.12
  • TFS File-System Still Aiming To Compete With ZFS, Written In Rust

    The developers behind the Rust-based Redox operating system continue working on the "TFS" file-system that they hope will compete with the long-standing ZFS file-system, but TFS isn't being tied to just Redox OS.

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.11 Series

    Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the Linux community about the release and immediate availability of the seventeenth maintenance update to the Linux 4.10 kernel series, which also marked the end of life.

  • Linux Kernel 4.11.2 Has Many F2FS and CIFS Improvements, Lots of Updated Drivers

ROSA Fresh R9

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

ROSA is a desktop distribution that was originally forked from Mandriva Linux, but now is independently developed. While the company which produces ROSA is based in Russia, the distribution includes complete translations for multiple languages. The ROSA desktop distribution is designed to be easy to use and includes a range of popular applications and multimedia support. ROSA R9 is available in two editions, one featuring the KDE 4 desktop and the second featuring the KDE Plasma 5 desktop. These editions are scheduled to receive four years of support and security updates.

I decided to download the Plasma edition of ROSA R9 and found the installation media to be approximately 2GB in size. Booting from the ROSA disc brings up a menu asking if we would like to load the distribution's live desktop environment or begin the installation process. Taking the live option brings up a graphical wizard that asks us a few questions. We are asked to select our preferred language from a list and accept the project's warranty and license. We are then asked to select our time zone and keyboard layout from lists. With these steps completed, the wizard disappears and the Plasma 5.9 desktop loads.

Read more

Software: Linfo, EasyTag, Simple Scan, Albert, VLC, Remote Desktop, Frogr, Brisk Menu, and OpenShot

Filed under
Software
  • Linfo – Shows Linux Server Health Status in Real-Time

    Linfo is a free and open source, cross-platform server statistics UI/library which displays a great deal of system information. It is extensible, easy-to-use (via composer) PHP5 library to get extensive system statistics programmatically from your PHP application. It’s a Ncurses CLI view of Web UI, which works in Linux, Windows, *BSD, Darwin/Mac OSX, Solaris, and Minix.

  • 2 tag management tools for organizing your music library

    These days, EasyTag seems to be my go-to tag editor. While I can't claim to have tried them all, I have mostly stopped looking now that I have this one. Generally speaking, I like its three-panel layout: file system directory on the left; selected tracks in the middle, showing file name and tags; and specific tags and cover image on the right.

  • New Simple Scan Designs Emerge; Seeking Devs to Implement Them

    Simple Scan is one of my personal favourite and perhaps even one of the "essential" apps on the Linux desktop for me. It does what it says on the tin: it's simple and it scans, with a nice preview system and enough options to be decently functional. Some new designs for the app have emerged and they are looking quite nice indeed.

    GNOME UX designer and Red Hat Desktop Team Member, Allan Day, showed the new mockup designs off in his blog post. Simple Scan has a pretty sparse and simplistic interface already, and I mean that in a positive way, but Allan believes that "just because it's great, doesn't mean it can't be improved" and that most of the improvements are simply "refinements", rather than major overhauls, in order to make some of the app's functions a bit easier to discover and navigate.

  • Albert – A Fast, Lightweight and Flexible Application Launcher for Linux

    A while ago, we have written about Ulauncher which is used to launch application quickly. Today we came up with similar kind of utility called Albert which is doing the same job and have some additional unique features which is not there in ulauncher.

  • 5 Tricks To Get More Out Of VLC Player In Linux

    In fact, for the desktop, VLC is much more than just a tool to play videos stored on your hard drive! So, stay with me for a tour of the lesser known features of that great software.

  • 5 of the Best Linux Remote Desktop Apps to Remotely Access a Computer

    Remote desktop apps are a very useful group of apps because they allow access to a computer anywhere in the world. While the simplest way to do this is via a terminal, if you don’t want to have to type commands but rather want a more advanced way to access a remote computer, here are five of the best remote desktop apps for Linux.

  • Frogr 1.3 released
  • Brisk Menu 0.4.0 Is Out with Super Key Support, Adapts to Vertical Panel Layouts

    Solus Project founder and lead developer Ikey Doherty is today announcing the release and immediate availability of the Brisk Menu 0.4.0 application menu for Solus and other supported GNU/Linux distributions.

  • OpenShot 2.3.3 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Stability Improvements

    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas is announcing the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform non-linear video editor.

CloudReady - Chromebook re-experienced

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

I haven't done any extensive testing, but then, how much testing is really needed to run a bunch of Web apps. The whole idea is to have this cloud-based operating system, with easy, flexible access to your data anywhere you go. So if you judge this from the perspective of a typical desktop, you miss the point.

But that is the point. When I install something on a desktop-like form factor, I expect its behavior to match. CloudReady takes you away from that experience, and the transition is not comfortable. You feel very limited. This makes a lot of sense for schools, for instance, where you do want to lock down the devices, and make them simple for reuse. In a home setup, why would you go for just cloud, when you can have that plus any which desktop application on a typical system? After all, nothing prevents you from launching a browser and using Google applications, side by side with your desktop stuff. It's the same thing.

The notion of reviving old hardware is a bit of a wishful thinking. My eeePC test shows that it gets completely crippled when you run HD content in either Firefox or Chrome. An operating system based on Chromium OS will not drastically change that. It cannot do that. Maybe you will have better performance than having Windows there, the same way I opted for a Linux setup on the Asus netbook, but there are physical limits to what old hardware can accomplish.

And then, there's the whole question of cloud ... Most people might be comfy with this, after having used smartphones for a while, but I don't think this is anything novel or mindblowing. CloudReady works as advertised, it's a very cool concept, but ultimately, it gives you a browser on steroids. Google and Neverware have their own agenda for doing this, but for home users, there really isn't any added value in transforming their keyboard-and-mouse box into a browsing portal. So if you ask me, am I ready for the cloud, the answer is, only when it becomes sophisticated enough to match my productivity and freedom of creativity. And for you, do you want a simple, locked down, secure and entirely Google machine that isn't a mobile phone or a dedicated piece of hardware? The answer is 42.

Read more

Security Leftovers: All Versions of Windows Compromised, WannaCry Keeps Going

Filed under
Security
  • WikiLeaks Reveals 'Athena' CIA Spying Program Targeting All Versions of Windows [iophk: "thus the active smear campaign againse Assange within tech circles"]

    WikiLeaks has published a new batch of the ongoing Vault 7 leak, detailing a spyware framework – which "provides remote beacon and loader capabilities on target computers" – allegedly being used by the CIA that works against every version of Microsoft's Windows operating systems, from Windows XP to Windows 10.

  • How To Avoid Future WannaCry Style Ransomware Attacks

    Critical tasks are often trusted to Linux or similar operating systems (Unix, BSD, etc.) because of reliability and security. When efficiency is required, Linux is often tapped because it can be deployed in a very efficient manner. Linux acts internally like the prison, not the food court. The system itself is constantly monitored open source code, and most of what runs on it is openly monitored as well. Software is usually distributed via secure repositories. The system is free and easily updated, there is no such thing as a pirated copy of Linux. There is a regular schedule of updates, they come out every Sunday.

  • WannaCry is a Cry for VEP Reform

    This weekend, a vulnerability in some versions of the Windows operating system resulted in the biggest cybersecurity attack in years. The so-called “WannaCry” malware relied on at least one exploit included in the latest Shadow Brokers release. As we have repeated, attacks like this are a clarion call for reform to the government’s Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP).

  • Will Linux protect you from ransomware attacks?

    Ransomware attacks are all the rage these days among hackers, and many people are worried about becoming victims. Are Linux users secure against such attacks?

    This topic came up recently in a thread on the Linux subreddit, and the folks there had some interesting thoughts to share about Linux and ransomware attacks.

  • Linux Ransomware

    A few people have asked me over the past week whether or not Linux is susceptible to ransomware attacks. While the answer is fairly straight forward, let's go over a couple things here first.

  • Improving Internet Security through Vulnerability Disclosure

    We support the PATCH Act because it aims to codify and make the existing Vulnerabilities Equities Process more transparent. The Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP) is the U.S. government’s process for reviewing and coordinating the disclosure of new vulnerabilities learns about.

  • ​Gmail Docs phishing attack: Google targets devs with tighter web app ID checks

    Google is slowing down the process for publishing web applications to prevent a repeat of the phishing attack that abused users' trust in its sign-in system with a fake Google Docs app.

    Google has warned web app developers that new rules and an additional risk assessment may add "some friction" to the process of publishing apps.

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 - Fast Forward to the Past

Filed under
Reviews

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 32-bit Live left an ambiguous impression on me.

It was fast and responsive on a high-spec laptop. Felt relatively solid. Set of default applications was good. Multimedia playback caused no issues.

However, small bugs here and there were quite annoying: frozen screen after the Keyboard icon click, no search in the menu, issues with the search in the default software management tool, issues with keyboard layout setup. And the memory usage is simply frightening.

All these are not something you would expect from a newly-released distribution in 2017.

Read more

Imagine an Android Phone Without Linux Inside

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Google Fuchsia first saw the light of day in the summer of 2016 as an unannounced bit of code posted on GitHub. Now, in May 2017, the word is being spread by so many tech news outlets that we don’t have room to list them all.

The Fuchsia demo app is called Armadillo, and you’re free to build it for yourself. We even found an article for you titled How to build Fuchsia Armadillo for Android in case you want to see how Fuchsia looks on your own Android phone or tablet.

Read more

Development and Programming: Hugo, Jekyll, D, and Kotlin

Filed under
Development
  • Hugo vs. Jekyll: Comparing the leading static website generators

    Unless your spirit animal is Emily Dickinson, when you make a thing, you want to share it with the world. Sharing your work means that you need a website. Of course, you could simply partake in digital sharecropping and use any of the various social media sites to get your work in front of an audience. There sure are plenty to choose from... and not just "conventional" social media sites. With places like Artstation, Flickr, Soundcloud, and Wattpad, there's an outlet for you, whatever your medium.

  • 5 reasons the D programming language is a great choice for development

    It's not uncommon to find yourself in a situation where you have an idea and you want to implement it in code exactly the way you are thinking about it in your mind. However, sometimes you have to compromise the idea to fit the code, instead of modeling the code to fit the idea. D supports several programming paradigms, including functional style, imperative, object oriented, metaprogramming, and concurrent (actor model), all harmoniously integrated. You have the option to choose whichever paradigm is convenient for modeling code to fit your idea.

  • Sick of Java and C++? Google pours a cup o' Kotlin for Android devs
  • How Socrates taught me to talk to developers

    The University of Chicago Law School, where Barack Obama taught constitutional law until making a slight career change, describes the Socratic method as an inquiry practice based on "asking continual questions until a contradiction was exposed, thus proving the fallacy of the initial assumption." A catchier description, offered by this quick how-to for using the method with children, is "clarify, synthesize, restate."

TinkerOS Android 13.11.0.4 Released

Filed under
Android
Hardware
Debian

Asus has released a new version of their TinkerOS Android distribution for the Asus Tinker Board. It’s still powered by Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow running on a 3.10.0 kernel. But unlike the previous release, Android 13.11.0.4 is not classed as a beta release. The release seems pretty stable.

The TinkerOS Android release offers a few notable improvements including some handy bug fixes. The previous Android image produced fuzzy text on some HDMI monitors. The only way to obtain sharp text was to reset the HDMI resolution after each boot. This issue is fixed in the new release. The release also fixes a volume consistent issue in the setting and notification bar.

Read more

Intel’s “Euclid” robotics compute module on sale for $399

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Intel has launched its “Euclid” robotics compute module, which runs Ubuntu on an Atom x7-Z8700, and offers a RealSense 3D cam, WiFi, and sensors.

When Intel demonstrated its Intel Euclid robotics controller at last August’s Intel Developer Conference, the company gave no indication of its release date or even if it would be more than a proof of concept. The candy-bar sized module is now available for order as part of a $399 Intel Euclid Development Kit, with shipments due by the end of the month. A Euclid community site has gone live with tutorials and documentation.

Read more

Lubuntu Vs. Xubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

​Over the years, Lubuntu and Xubuntu have been two popular flavors that have provided an alternative to a lot of folks who have preferred something other than vanilla Ubuntu with the Unity desktop. Lubuntu and Xubuntu have been the choice of Linux enthusiasts and users who would rather have a lean or lightweight Linux distro or one that will provide the best performance on an old desktop or laptop. But how do these two distros compare, which one would I recommend and why? Let’s read along as I weigh the strengths and weaknesses of these two awesome Ubuntu flavors.

Read more

Also:

  • Canonical Releases New Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 16.10, 16.04 and 14.04

    After patching six vulnerabilities in the kernel packages of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, Canonical also updated the kernels of the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr).

    Only the kernel packages of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.04.1 LTS releases received the most attention in this new update, addressing a stack-based buffer overflow (CVE-2017-7187) issue discovered by Dmitry Vyukov in Linux kernel's generic SCSI (sg) subsystem, which lets local attackers that had access to an sg device to crash the affected system or execute random code.

  • NHS mulling Ubuntu switch after Windows XP fail?

    The NHS could be considering switching its software infrastructure from Windows to Ubuntu, after Windows XP vulnerabilities were exploited in the recent cyber attack that crippled the National Health Service. Or is it just an elaborate gag?

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

White House Tech Policy Brought by Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
  • The White House will meet with tech execs for advice on giving the government a digital upgrade

    Announced in April, the American Technology Council is comprised of federal officials who oversee technology-focused agencies, and it's officially led by Chris Liddell, a White House aide who previously served as the chief financial officer at Microsoft. The initiative itself lives under the umbrella of Kushner's Office of American Innovation, which aspires to cure longtime, unresolved government ills, such as the poor, aging technology in use at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • Sharing America's code

    Since Salehi joined the CIO team in 2015, the government has made great strides toward open sourcing its code. The Federal Source Code Policy, released in August 2016, was the first U.S. government policy to support open source across the government.

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Getting Free Software into our users’ hands

    In KDE we cover a mix of platforms and form factors that make our technology very powerful. But how to reach so many different systems while maintaining high quality on all of them?

  • Plasma 5.11 Wallpaper Production – Part 1

    Today I streamed the first half of the Plasma 5.11 wallpaper production, and it was an interesting experience. The video above is the abridged version sped up ~20x, heavily edited to the actual creation, and should be a fun watch for the interested.

  • Randa Meetings 2017 – Registration goes live
  • https://blogs.kde.org/2017/05/20/simon-0490-beta-released

    The second version (0.4.90) towards Simon 0.5.0 is out in the wilds. Please download the source code, test it and send us feedback.

  • Correcting mistakes from the past

    Not only, but to a large extent I worked in the last few months on foundational improvements to KWin’s DRM backend, which is a central building block of KWin’s Wayland session. The idea in the beginninng was to directly expand upon my past Atomic Mode Setting (AMS) work from last year. We’re talking about direct scanout of graphic buffers for fullscreen applications and later layered compositing. Indeed this was my Season of KDE project with Martin Flöser as my mentor, but in the end relative to the initial goal it was unsuccessful.

Top 10 Linux distros for developers in 2017

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

More popular versions of Linux such as Ubuntu focus on enhancing the user experience by automatically updating packages and providing flashy, resource-heavy GUIs.

While user-friendly distributions (distros) certainly have their place, in this guide, we've tried to get back to the glory days when developers would customise their Linux build. These Linux distros allow you to fine-tune your development environment so whether you're a veteran programmer or relative newcomer, you can get on with your coding.

In short, whatever your programming preferences, you’ll find a distro to suit your needs in this top 10 roundup.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

ROSA Fresh R9

ROSA is a desktop distribution that was originally forked from Mandriva Linux, but now is independently developed. While the company which produces ROSA is based in Russia, the distribution includes complete translations for multiple languages. The ROSA desktop distribution is designed to be easy to use and includes a range of popular applications and multimedia support. ROSA R9 is available in two editions, one featuring the KDE 4 desktop and the second featuring the KDE Plasma 5 desktop. These editions are scheduled to receive four years of support and security updates. I decided to download the Plasma edition of ROSA R9 and found the installation media to be approximately 2GB in size. Booting from the ROSA disc brings up a menu asking if we would like to load the distribution's live desktop environment or begin the installation process. Taking the live option brings up a graphical wizard that asks us a few questions. We are asked to select our preferred language from a list and accept the project's warranty and license. We are then asked to select our time zone and keyboard layout from lists. With these steps completed, the wizard disappears and the Plasma 5.9 desktop loads. Read more

More of today's howtos

Software: Linfo, EasyTag, Simple Scan, Albert, VLC, Remote Desktop, Frogr, Brisk Menu, and OpenShot

  • Linfo – Shows Linux Server Health Status in Real-Time
    Linfo is a free and open source, cross-platform server statistics UI/library which displays a great deal of system information. It is extensible, easy-to-use (via composer) PHP5 library to get extensive system statistics programmatically from your PHP application. It’s a Ncurses CLI view of Web UI, which works in Linux, Windows, *BSD, Darwin/Mac OSX, Solaris, and Minix.
  • 2 tag management tools for organizing your music library
    These days, EasyTag seems to be my go-to tag editor. While I can't claim to have tried them all, I have mostly stopped looking now that I have this one. Generally speaking, I like its three-panel layout: file system directory on the left; selected tracks in the middle, showing file name and tags; and specific tags and cover image on the right.
  • New Simple Scan Designs Emerge; Seeking Devs to Implement Them
    Simple Scan is one of my personal favourite and perhaps even one of the "essential" apps on the Linux desktop for me. It does what it says on the tin: it's simple and it scans, with a nice preview system and enough options to be decently functional. Some new designs for the app have emerged and they are looking quite nice indeed. GNOME UX designer and Red Hat Desktop Team Member, Allan Day, showed the new mockup designs off in his blog post. Simple Scan has a pretty sparse and simplistic interface already, and I mean that in a positive way, but Allan believes that "just because it's great, doesn't mean it can't be improved" and that most of the improvements are simply "refinements", rather than major overhauls, in order to make some of the app's functions a bit easier to discover and navigate.
  • Albert – A Fast, Lightweight and Flexible Application Launcher for Linux
    A while ago, we have written about Ulauncher which is used to launch application quickly. Today we came up with similar kind of utility called Albert which is doing the same job and have some additional unique features which is not there in ulauncher.
  • 5 Tricks To Get More Out Of VLC Player In Linux
    In fact, for the desktop, VLC is much more than just a tool to play videos stored on your hard drive! So, stay with me for a tour of the lesser known features of that great software.
  • 5 of the Best Linux Remote Desktop Apps to Remotely Access a Computer
    Remote desktop apps are a very useful group of apps because they allow access to a computer anywhere in the world. While the simplest way to do this is via a terminal, if you don’t want to have to type commands but rather want a more advanced way to access a remote computer, here are five of the best remote desktop apps for Linux.
  • Frogr 1.3 released
  • Brisk Menu 0.4.0 Is Out with Super Key Support, Adapts to Vertical Panel Layouts
    Solus Project founder and lead developer Ikey Doherty is today announcing the release and immediate availability of the Brisk Menu 0.4.0 application menu for Solus and other supported GNU/Linux distributions.
  • OpenShot 2.3.3 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Stability Improvements
    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas is announcing the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform non-linear video editor.

CloudReady - Chromebook re-experienced

I haven't done any extensive testing, but then, how much testing is really needed to run a bunch of Web apps. The whole idea is to have this cloud-based operating system, with easy, flexible access to your data anywhere you go. So if you judge this from the perspective of a typical desktop, you miss the point. But that is the point. When I install something on a desktop-like form factor, I expect its behavior to match. CloudReady takes you away from that experience, and the transition is not comfortable. You feel very limited. This makes a lot of sense for schools, for instance, where you do want to lock down the devices, and make them simple for reuse. In a home setup, why would you go for just cloud, when you can have that plus any which desktop application on a typical system? After all, nothing prevents you from launching a browser and using Google applications, side by side with your desktop stuff. It's the same thing. The notion of reviving old hardware is a bit of a wishful thinking. My eeePC test shows that it gets completely crippled when you run HD content in either Firefox or Chrome. An operating system based on Chromium OS will not drastically change that. It cannot do that. Maybe you will have better performance than having Windows there, the same way I opted for a Linux setup on the Asus netbook, but there are physical limits to what old hardware can accomplish. And then, there's the whole question of cloud ... Most people might be comfy with this, after having used smartphones for a while, but I don't think this is anything novel or mindblowing. CloudReady works as advertised, it's a very cool concept, but ultimately, it gives you a browser on steroids. Google and Neverware have their own agenda for doing this, but for home users, there really isn't any added value in transforming their keyboard-and-mouse box into a browsing portal. So if you ask me, am I ready for the cloud, the answer is, only when it becomes sophisticated enough to match my productivity and freedom of creativity. And for you, do you want a simple, locked down, secure and entirely Google machine that isn't a mobile phone or a dedicated piece of hardware? The answer is 42. Read more