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Wednesday, 18 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Solus to Move to GNOME 3.22 Stack Soon, Adopt Linux 4.9 and Bulletproof Updates Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 12:11am
Story Mozilla rebrands with clever new logo and open source design principles Rianne Schestowitz 1 18/01/2017 - 10:05pm
Story The Fairphone 2 Running Ubuntu Will Be On Show at MWC17 Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:56pm
Story Linux Devices, Raspberry Pi, and Tizen Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:05pm
Story Debian News (manpages and TeX Live) Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:04pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:03pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:01pm
Story Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:01pm
Story PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 8:59pm
Story Licensing FUD and Licensing Advice Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 8:58pm

Solus to Move to GNOME 3.22 Stack Soon, Adopt Linux 4.9 and Bulletproof Updates

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It's been a little over two weeks since the Solus Project launched the first ISO snapshot of their Linux-based operating system, Solus 2017.01.01.0, but its development team has been engaged in various duties since then.

We've already told you about their plans to concentrate on delivering the Linux Driver Management tool that lets users more easily choose and install the perfect drivers for their hardware, as well as the long-anticipated Budgie 11 desktop environment for Q1 2017.

Read more

The Fairphone 2 Running Ubuntu Will Be On Show at MWC17

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mobile World Congress 2017 kicks off next month, and Canonical is, once again, going to be in attendance.

But although there are unlikely to be any shiny new Ubuntu phones and tablets to show off, Ubuntu Touch won’t be entirely absent.

Read more

Linux Devices, Raspberry Pi, and Tizen

  • Rugged, customizable POS system runs on Braswell

    Advantech’s rugged “UBX-310D” POS computer offers a quad-core, 2.0GHz Celeron J1900, plus SATA, mSATA, and mini-PCIe.

    Advantech’s UBX-310D is a fanless point of sale computer intended for small countertops and limited-space installations. The shock and vibration resistant device has a modest, 245 x 185 x 45mm footprint. The system runs Windows 7 or 8 as a default, with optional Linux 3.13, and supports applications such as retail, self-service, digital signage, and store management.

  • Open spec, $29 COM shrinks Pine A64 to SODIMM dimensions

    Pine64’s open spec, 67.9 x 31mm “SoPine A64” COM has a quad-core -A53 Allwinner A64 and 2GB RAM, plus an optional baseboard that mimics a Pine A64+ SBC.

  • RetroPie, NES Classic and Bluetooth peripherals

    I wanted to write a more in-depth post about RetroPie the Retro Gaming Appliance OS for Raspberry Pis, either technically or more positively, but unfortunately I don't have much positive to write.

    What I hoped for was a nice appliance that I could use to play old games from the comfort of my sofa. Unfortunately, nine times out of ten, I had a malfunctioning Linux machine and the time I'd set aside for jumping on goombas was being spent trying to figure out why bluetooth wasn't working. I have enough opportunities for that already, both at work and at home.

    I feel a little bad complaining about an open source, volunteer project: in its defence I can say that it is iterating fast and the two versions I tried in a relatively short time span were rapidly different. So hopefully a lot of my woes will eventually be fixed. I've also read a lot of other people get on with it just fine.

    Instead, I decided the Nintendo Classic NES Mini was the plug-and-play appliance for me. Alas, it became the "must have" Christmas toy for 2016 and impossible to obtain for the recommended retail price. I did succeed in finding one in stock at Toys R Us online at one point, only to have the checkout process break and my order not go through. Checking Stock Informer afterwards, that particular window of opportunity was only 5 minutes wide. So no NES classic for me!

  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Extends IoT

    Raspberry Pi Foundation updates embedded Compute Module with faster ARM processor to help developers and businesses build new IoT devices.

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced its new Compute Module 3 (CM3) on Jan. 16, providing internet of things (IoT) device makers with a powerful new option for embedded compute capabilities.

    The CM3 should not be confused with the Raspberry Pi's namesake device, which had its last major update in February 2016 with the debut of the Raspberry Pi 3 device. The Raspberry Pi is a small form-factor ARM-powered computer that was originally developed in 2012 as a way to help both kids and adults learn about computer science.

  • Smartphone App: Saavn Music app hits the Tizen Store

    Saavn Music app, which lets you listen to music online, is now available on your Tizen Store via Openmobile World Wide Inc. Previously Indian Z2 smartphone users got JioMusic app for it’s 4G & Jio support feature. Now, the online music Saavn app is available for the Samsung Z1 & Z3, as well as the Samsung Z2.

Debian News (manpages and TeX Live)

Filed under
Debian
  • manpages.debian.org has been modernized (2017-01-18)

    https://manpages.debian.org has been modernized! We have just launched a major update to our manpage repository. What used to be served via a CGI script is now a statically generated website, and therefore blazingly fast.

    While we were at it, we have restructured the paths so that we can serve all manpages, even those whose name conflicts with other binary packages (e.g. crontab(5) from cron, bcron or systemd-cron). Don’t worry: the old URLs are redirected correctly.

  • Debian/TeX Live January 2017

    As the freeze of the next release is closing in, I have updated a bunch of packages around TeX: All of the TeX Live packages (binaries and arch independent ones) and tex-common. I might see whether I get some updates of ConTeXt out, too.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Wednesday's security updates
  • Secure your Elasticsearch cluster and avoid ransomware

    Last week, news came out that unprotected MongoDB databases are being actively compromised: content copied and replaced by a message asking for a ransom to get it back. As The Register reports: Elasticsearch is next.

    Protecting access to Elasticsearch by a firewall is not always possible. But even in environments where it is possible, many admins are not protecting their databases. Even if you cannot use a firewall, you can secure connection to Elasticsearch by using encryption. Elasticsearch by itself does not provide any authentication or encryption possibilities. Still, there are many third-party solutions available, each with its own drawbacks and advantages.

  • Resolve to Follow These 8 Steps for Better Data Security in 2017

    Getting physically fit is a typical New Year's resolution. Given that most of us spend more time online than in a gym, the start of the new year also might be a great time to improve your security “fitness.” As with physical fitness challenges, the biggest issue with digital security is always stagnation. That is, if you don't move and don't change, atrophy sets in. In physical fitness, atrophy is a function of muscles not being exercised. In digital fitness, security risks increase when you fail to change passwords, update network systems and adopt improved security technology. Before long, your IT systems literally become a “sitting duck.” Given the volume of data breaches that occurred in 2016, it is highly likely that everyone reading this has had at least one breach of their accounts compromised in some way, such as their Yahoo data account. Hackers somewhere may have one of the passwords you’ve used at one point to access a particular site or service. If you're still using that same password somewhere, in a way that can connect that account to you, that's a non-trivial risk. Changing passwords is the first of eight security resolutions that can help to improve your online security fitness in 2017. Click through this eWEEK slide show to discover the rest.

  • Pwn2Own 2017 Takes Aim at Linux, Servers and Web Browsers

    10th anniversary edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest offers over $1M in prize money to security researchers across a long list of targets including Virtual Machines, servers, enterprise applications and web browsers.

    Over the last decade, the Zero Day Initiative's (ZDI) annual Pwn2Own competition has emerged to become one of the premiere events on the information security calendar and the 2017 edition does not look to be any different. For the tenth anniversary of the Pwn2Own contest, ZDI, now owned and operated by Trend Micro, is going farther than ever before, with more targets and more prize money available for security researchers to claim by successfully executing zero-day exploits.

  • 'Factorio' is another game that was being hit by key scammers

    In another case of scammers trying to buy keys with often stolen credit cards to sell on websites like G2A, the developers of 'Factorio' have written about their experience with it (and other stuff too).

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC

Filed under
Development

PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • PulseAudio 10 Coming Soon, Using Memfd Shared Memory By Default

    It's been a half year since the debut of PulseAudio 9.0 while the release of PulseAudio 10 is coming soon.

    PulseAudio 9.99.1 development release was tagged earlier this month, then usually after x.99.2 marks the official release, so it won't be much longer now before seeing PulseAudio 10.0 begin to appear in Linux distributions.

  • Experimenting With Virtual GPU Support On Linux 4.10 + Libvirt

    With the Linux 4.10 kernel having initial but limited Intel Graphics Virtualization Tech support, you can begin playing with the experimental virtual GPU support using the upstream kernel and libvirt.

Licensing FUD and Licensing Advice

Filed under
Legal
  • On the Law and Your Open Source License [Ed: Black Duck is just a parasite selling proprietary software by bashing FOSS]

    "Looking back five or ten years, companies managing open source risk were squarely focused on license risk associated with complying with open source licenses," notes a report from Black Duck Software. Fast-forward to today, and the rules and processes surrounding open source licensing are more complex than ever.

  • Explaining the source code requirement in AGPLv3

    This condition was intended to apply mainly to what would now be considered SaaS deployments, although the reach of "interacting remotely through a computer network" should perhaps be read to cover situations going beyond conventional SaaS. The objective was to close a perceived loophole in the ordinary GPL in environments where users make use of functionality provided as a web service, but no distribution of the code providing the functionality occurs. Hence, Section 13 provides an additional source code disclosure requirement beyond the object code distribution triggered requirement contained in GPLv2 Section 3 and GPLv3 and AGPLv3 Section 6.

KDE Support For Flatpak Portals Progressing

Filed under
KDE

While GNOME / Red Hat developers have been leading the Flatpak app sandboxing initiative, KDE developers are making progress too with embracing Flatpak as a more convenient and secure way of securely packaging Linux desktop apps.

The latest on the KDE + Flatpak front is that Jan Grulich has been getting a KDE implementation of Flatpak's "Portals" working. Portals are the APIs offered to the sanboxed apps for essentially escaping the sandbox for certain operations.

Read more

Original: KDE Flatpak portals introduction

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Graphics: Nouveau, NVIDIA and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Red Hat's OpenShift Container Platform openly shifts storage into the hands of devs

Filed under
Red Hat

Enterprise Linux biz Red Hat has revised its OpenShift Container Platform to include support for dynamic storage provisioning in local and remote applications.

The software is an on-premises platform-as-a-service product that allows organizations to run applications using Kubernetes orchestration and Docker containers.

Read more

Mozilla rebrands with clever new logo and open source design principles

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

Mozilla is a very important organization for the open web. While Firefox's share of usage has not been lighting the world on fire lately, Mozilla is much more than just a web browser developer. It often fights for the rights of web users. Since it is a not-for-profit organization, you can be fairly confident that its intentions are pure.

Read more

Open Source Serverless Computing Frameworks, and Why They Matter

Filed under
OSS

Serverless computing is fast becoming one of the hottest trends in the channel since the cloud. What is the open source ecosystem doing to keep pace with the serverless trend, and why does it matter? Here's a look.

Read more

Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 900

Filed under
Linux

Dell charges $1650 for a similar XPS 13 albeit with the next generation of Intel chip. The current model of Yoga is the 910, and that laptop costs $1300. However, I didn’t even consider it because they screwed the pooch on the keyboard. Lots of reviews start with the color and feel of the materials on the outside, but I’m going to start on the keyboard layout.

Read more

5 of the Best Places to Find DEBs Packages for Debian-Based Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Debian-based Linux distributions have one thing going for them: superior software selection for users. When it comes to making software for Linux, all the big companies target this type of Linux distribution first. Often some developers don’t even bother to make packages for other types of Linux distributions and only make DEB packages.

However, just because many developers target these types of Linux distros doesn’t mean that its users never have problems finding software. Most Debian and Ubuntu users will find themselves hunting down DEB packages on the Internet.

Read more

Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Munzali Garba

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I became interested in Linux when I started coding and learned of this entirely free, open source, and powerful system that a lot of computer tech pros used (and which also powered most of the servers on the Internet). Then I looked into it, found Ubuntu was the most popular distro …and so the glorious journey began.

Read more

Who Contributes to the Linux Kernel?

Filed under
Linux

The Linux kernel is an enormous open source project that has been in development for more than 25 years. While many people tend to think of open source projects as being developed by passionate volunteers, the Linux kernel is mostly developed by people who are paid by their employers to contribute. According to The Linux Foundation, since 2005, “some 14,000 individual developers from over 1,300 different companies have contributed to the kernel.”

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Debian News (manpages and TeX Live)

  • manpages.debian.org has been modernized (2017-01-18)
    https://manpages.debian.org has been modernized! We have just launched a major update to our manpage repository. What used to be served via a CGI script is now a statically generated website, and therefore blazingly fast. While we were at it, we have restructured the paths so that we can serve all manpages, even those whose name conflicts with other binary packages (e.g. crontab(5) from cron, bcron or systemd-cron). Don’t worry: the old URLs are redirected correctly.
  • Debian/TeX Live January 2017
    As the freeze of the next release is closing in, I have updated a bunch of packages around TeX: All of the TeX Live packages (binaries and arch independent ones) and tex-common. I might see whether I get some updates of ConTeXt out, too.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • Secure your Elasticsearch cluster and avoid ransomware
    Last week, news came out that unprotected MongoDB databases are being actively compromised: content copied and replaced by a message asking for a ransom to get it back. As The Register reports: Elasticsearch is next. Protecting access to Elasticsearch by a firewall is not always possible. But even in environments where it is possible, many admins are not protecting their databases. Even if you cannot use a firewall, you can secure connection to Elasticsearch by using encryption. Elasticsearch by itself does not provide any authentication or encryption possibilities. Still, there are many third-party solutions available, each with its own drawbacks and advantages.
  • Resolve to Follow These 8 Steps for Better Data Security in 2017
    Getting physically fit is a typical New Year's resolution. Given that most of us spend more time online than in a gym, the start of the new year also might be a great time to improve your security “fitness.” As with physical fitness challenges, the biggest issue with digital security is always stagnation. That is, if you don't move and don't change, atrophy sets in. In physical fitness, atrophy is a function of muscles not being exercised. In digital fitness, security risks increase when you fail to change passwords, update network systems and adopt improved security technology. Before long, your IT systems literally become a “sitting duck.” Given the volume of data breaches that occurred in 2016, it is highly likely that everyone reading this has had at least one breach of their accounts compromised in some way, such as their Yahoo data account. Hackers somewhere may have one of the passwords you’ve used at one point to access a particular site or service. If you're still using that same password somewhere, in a way that can connect that account to you, that's a non-trivial risk. Changing passwords is the first of eight security resolutions that can help to improve your online security fitness in 2017. Click through this eWEEK slide show to discover the rest.
  • Pwn2Own 2017 Takes Aim at Linux, Servers and Web Browsers
    10th anniversary edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest offers over $1M in prize money to security researchers across a long list of targets including Virtual Machines, servers, enterprise applications and web browsers. Over the last decade, the Zero Day Initiative's (ZDI) annual Pwn2Own competition has emerged to become one of the premiere events on the information security calendar and the 2017 edition does not look to be any different. For the tenth anniversary of the Pwn2Own contest, ZDI, now owned and operated by Trend Micro, is going farther than ever before, with more targets and more prize money available for security researchers to claim by successfully executing zero-day exploits.
  • 'Factorio' is another game that was being hit by key scammers
    In another case of scammers trying to buy keys with often stolen credit cards to sell on websites like G2A, the developers of 'Factorio' have written about their experience with it (and other stuff too).

Red Hat News

Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC