Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 4.19 Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2018 - 2:16pm
Story Games: Depth of Extinction Scandal, BATTLETECH, Das Geisterschiff, Entangled, Red Embrace: Hollywood, Rogue Bit and Lutris Roy Schestowitz 1 22/10/2018 - 2:05pm
Story Linspire 8.0 RC1 Released Roy Schestowitz 1 22/10/2018 - 1:38pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly and For The Record Look at elementary OS 5.0 Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2018 - 8:46am
Story Windows 10 October Update Once Again Plagued By Another File Management Bug Roy Schestowitz 1 22/10/2018 - 8:40am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2018 - 7:34am
Story 5 tips for choosing the right open source database Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2018 - 7:23am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 11:49pm
Story Security: Cracking, Elections and Apache Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 7:50pm
Story Colibri - A Browser Without Tabs Mohd Sohail 21/10/2018 - 7:13pm

Linux 4.19

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.19

    Hi everyone!

    It's been a long strange journey for this kernel release...

    While it was not the largest kernel release every by number of commits,
    it was larger than the last 3 releases, which is a non-trivial thing to
    do. After the original -rc1 bumps, things settled down on the code side
    and it looks like stuff came nicely together to make a solid kernel for
    everyone to use for a while. And given that this is going to be one of
    the "Long Term" kernels I end up maintaining for a few years, that's
    good news for everyone.

    A small trickle of good bugfixes came in this week, showing that waiting
    an extra week was a wise choice. However odds are that linux-next is
    just bursting so the next -rc1 merge window is going to be bigger than
    "normal", if there is such a thing as "normal" for our rate of
    development.

    And speaking of development, there's that other thing that happened this
    release cycle, that ended up making it such that I'm the one writing
    this instead of Linus. Allow me the guilty pleasure of taking a few
    minutes to talk about that....

    I've been giving my "How the kernel is developed" talk all around the
    world for over a decade now. After the first year or so, I was amazed
    that it kept needing to be given as surely everyone knew how we did this
    type of thing, right? But my wife, someone much smarter than I, then
    told me, "Every year there is a new kindergarten class."

    And we all need to remember that, every year new people enter our
    community with the goal, or requirement, to get stuff done for their
    job, their hobby, or just because they want to help contribute to the
    tool that has taken over the world and enabled everyone to have a solid
    operating system base on which to build their dreams.

    And when they come into our community, they don't have the built-in
    knowledge of years of experience that thousands of us already do.
    Without that experience they make mistakes and fumble and have to learn
    how this all works. Part of learning how things work is dealing with
    the interaction between people, and trying to understand the basic
    social norms and goals that we all share. By providing a document in
    the kernel source tree that shows that all people, developers and
    maintainers alike, will be treated with respect and dignity while
    working together, we help to create a more welcome community to those
    newcomers, which our very future depends on if we all wish to see this
    project succeed at its goals.

    And that goal we all share is the key here. We _ALL_ want to create the
    best kernel that we possibly can. We can disagree on lots of different
    things in other parts of our lives, but we do share this one thing. And
    we should focus on that shared goal as it has pulled us all together in
    a way that has enabled us to create something that no other company or
    group of people has ever been able to accomplish.

    We used to joke that our goal was "Total World Domination", but it
    really wasn't a joke. We achieved that goal, Linux really does rule the
    world. All companies use it, contribute to it, and it has ended up
    making the world a much better place because of all of us working on it.

    In these talks I give, I also say that "the only thing that can stop us
    is ourselves, it is up to us to mess this up." And that's truer now
    than when I first started saying that a decade ago. There is no other
    operating system out there that competes against us at this time. It
    would be nice to have something to compete against, as competition is
    good, and that drives us to do better, but we can live with this
    situation for the moment Smile

    These past few months has been a tough one for our community, as it is
    our community that is fighting from within itself, with prodding from
    others outside of it. Don't fall into the cycle of arguing about those
    "others" in the "Judean People's Front" when we are the "We're the
    People's Front of Judea!" That is the trap that countless communities
    have fallen into over the centuries. We all share the same goal, let us
    never loose sight of that.

    So here is my plea to everyone out there. Let's take a day or two off,
    rest, relax with friends by sharing a meal, recharge, and then get back
    to work, to help continue to create a system that the world has never
    seen the likes of, together.

    Personally, I'm going to take my own advice. I'll be enjoying this week
    in Edinburgh with many other kernel developers, drinking some good
    whiskey, and taking some time off of reading email, by spending it with
    the great friends I have made in this community.

    And with that, Linus, I'm handing the kernel tree back to you. You can
    have the joy of dealing with the merge window Smile

    thanks,

    greg k-h

  • The 4.19 kernel is out

    Greg Kroah-Hartman has released the 4.19 kernel. Headline features in this release include the new AIO-based polling interface, L1TF vulnerability mitigations, the block I/O latency controller, time-based packet transmission, the CAKE queuing discipline, and much more.

  • Greg KH Releases Big Linux 4.19 Kernel, Codenamed "People's Front"

    Greg Kroah-Hartman went ahead and released the Linux 4.19 kernel.

    When releasing the Linux 4.19 kernel, he quietly changed the codename to "People's Front" -- a nod to the Code of Conduct happenings and more that have shook the kernel community the past several weeks.

    Greg did note that Linux 4.19 is larger than the past three kernel releases. In terms of why it's so big, see our Linux 4.19 feature overview.

Games: Depth of Extinction Scandal, BATTLETECH, Das Geisterschiff, Entangled, Red Embrace: Hollywood, Rogue Bit and Lutris

Filed under
Gaming

DistroWatch Weekly and For The Record Look at elementary OS 5.0

Filed under
Reviews
  • Review: elementary OS 5.0

    I found a lot to like about Juno. The release announcement is detailed and shows lots of examples and screen shots. The operating system is easy to install, thanks to Ubuntu's Ubiquity installer and there is a nice collection of default software that will likely appeal to inexperienced users.

    The Pantheon desktop and icons are beautiful. I sometimes ran into sluggish moments with the desktop, but usually only when the disk was under load or I had a video playing. I was really impressed by how Pantheon was put together and I like a lot of the little convenience features. The picture-in-picture preview and the shared edge window resizing are great. I also love that tapping the meta key will show a list of desktop short-cuts. It is little details like these which give the distribution a polished, friendly feel.

    I already mentioned the icons look good and it bears repeating. Minimal icon design drives me mildly mad. I don't like functions represented by vague dots or arrows, I want a detailed icon and (preferably) text to let me know what a button does. elementary does a good job of making icons distinct, clear in purpose and typically accompanied by a text label or tooltip.

    There were a few problems. Some of them were fairly minor, like Epiphany using high CPU load, especially in the virtual machine, or X11 gobbling CPU cycles on my workstation. There were other little touches like the release notes link in the installer not working, that are perhaps only worth mentioning because the rest of the experience was generally so polished and showed a lot of attention to detail.

    My few serious complaints were with user accounts. Specifically, there appears to be a guest account enabled, but I could not find any way to sign into it. It is not a big deal to set up another account for guests, but it makes me wonder if the enabled (and hidden) account could be exploited. I also found it disappointing the parental controls did not work to block application access or forbidden websites.

    On the other hand, I think Pantheon includes some great features and I like that it is fairly flexible in its look and behaviour. The flexible notification area and the quick switching between application menu styles were welcome features.

    Generally speaking, I think elementary OS looks and feels professional. I hope it gets picked up by more hardware sellers, like System76, as I think Juno feels polished and looks good. I think it will especially appeal to less experienced users, but many of the features and the Code tool will likely be useful to more advanced users and developers too.

  • elementary os 5 Juno – For The Record

    elementary os 5 Juno first look. What’s working, what’s not and what happens to be brand new with elementary os. This first look at elementary os 5 Juno includes some things to make upgrading a little easier, suggestions for the next release and list of features I think are simply fantastic.

Windows 10 October Update Once Again Plagued By Another File Management Bug

Filed under
Microsoft

Since the announcement of Windows 10 October update 2018, things have been going pretty bad for Windows users. At first, it was the file deletion which caused a lot of inconvenience to Windows users, and later the driver issues.

Now, people have come across another Windows 1809 bug which appears to be another File Explorer issue. Several users on Reddit and Ask Woody have reported an unusual activity while extracting files.

The primary issue revolves around the prompt which should technically appear during the process of un-zipping a file on Windows 10; however, it does not, leading to data loss.

Read more

Linspire 8.0 RC1 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today we are pleased to release RC1 of Linspire 8. As we approach our December release, huge strides in stability and functionality have been made with the release candidate. Even so, it should be used for testing only, not on production systems

Read more

5 tips for choosing the right open source database

Filed under
OSS

So, your company has a directive to adopt more open source database technologies, and they've recruited you to select the right direction. Whether you are an open source technology veteran or a newcomer, this is a daunting and overwhelming task.

Over the past several years, open source technology adoption has steadily increased in the enterprise space. With its popularity comes a crowded marketplace with open source software companies promising that their solution will solve every problem and fit every workload. Be wary of these promises. Choosing the right open source technology—especially a database—is an important and difficult decision you can't make lightly.

Read more

Security: Cracking, Elections and Apache

Filed under
Security
  • Hack [sic] on 8 adult websites exposes oodles of intimate user data

    A recent [crack] of eight poorly secured adult websites has exposed megabytes of personal data that could be damaging to the people who shared pictures and other highly intimate information on the online message boards. Included in the leaked file are (1) IP addresses that connected to the sites, (2) user passwords protected by a four-decade-old cryptographic scheme, (3) names, and (4) 1.2 million unique email addresses, although it’s not clear how many of the addresses legitimately belonged to actual users.

  • Professors discuss election security, voting systems at panel

    Amid questions of election security and potential system hacking in the upcoming midterm elections, Engineering prof. J. Alex Halderman spoke at the University of Michigan Alumni Center Thursday night about vulnerabilities in U.S. voting systems. Last June, Halderman appeared before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence to testify about such.

    [...]

    “If an attack takes place, we won’t necessarily see the physical evidence," Halderman said. "The physical evidence that it took place is a discrepancy between what’s written on a piece of paper and what a computer total of that paper says. Because elections are so complicated, they’re so noisy, because the [crackers] can hide their traces in various ways, we won’t necessarily see when something like this happen for the first time. We've got to be ready.”

  • Apache Access Vulnerability Could Affect Thousands of Applications

    A recently discovered issue with a common file access method could be a major new attack surface for malware authors.
    Vulnerabilities in Apache functions have been at the root of significant breaches, including the one suffered by Equifax. Now new research indicates that another such vulnerability may be putting thousands of applications at risk.

    Lawrence Cashdollar, a vulnerability researcher and member of Akamai's Security Incident Response Team, found an issue with the way that thousands of code projects are using Apache .htaccess, leaving them vulnerable to unauthorized access and a subsequent file upload attack in which auto-executing code is uploaded to an application.

Colibri - A Browser Without Tabs

Filed under
Software

Almost all browsers are competing with each other in terms of functionality, speed, and performance. Though I did recently settle for Firefox as my default browser, I am still looking for better options. And this quest of mine took me to Colibri - A Browser without Tabs. And I was really interested in finding out what this meant. How could a browser be without tabs? It’s like a car without wheels. So here is a review of Colibri.

Read<br />
more

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Screenshot Tour and Statistics

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Screenshot Tour | What’s New

    Here we are going to take a screenshot tour of the latest release Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish). Let’s go through the recent changes since the earlier long term support release Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver).

    Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) introduces major user interface changes and more mature interface since Canonical decided ditching Unity desktop environment. Cosmic release ships with Gnome Shell 3.30.1 desktop environment for its main Desktop release and there are more variants of desktop environments you could choose from, check the release notes for further information.

    The default desktop and login screen “GDM” features the Cuttlefish background with the usual color scheme for Ubuntu desktop releases. It comes with multiple colorful and cheering desktop backgrounds. I will leave a link down below if you are interested to download the default Wallpapers for Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish).

  • Canonical and Ubuntu – user statistics

    Then you arrive at the story of Canonical and Ubuntu and things aren’t quite so clear anymore, lines are blurred. Ubuntu appears everywhere, sometimes accompanied by Canonical, but frequently not. Then sometimes Canonical tries to make an appearance alone and everyone is left asking ‘what is Canonical?’
    Well, no more. No more shall wondering what Canonical is be akin to a quiz question of who was the fourth Destiny’s Child. (Answer at the end)
    We all know Ubuntu, it’s the most popular open source operating system (OS) in the world, loved by developers for a multitude of reasons, it’s where innovation happens, and it’s everywhere.
    Canonical is described by Wikipedia (let’s face it that’s where your Google search takes you) as a UK-based, “privately held computer software company founded and funded by South African entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth to market commercial support and related services for Ubuntu and related projects.”
    Well, that’s pretty accurate, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. You see, Canonical is passionate about Ubuntu. We love it. We all use it and we want everyone else to use the OS because we think it’s the best around and it’ll make your lives a lot easier.
    Canonical is full of people working on improving and adding to Ubuntu, from the OS to things that rely on the OS at the core but are more related to things such as Kubernetes, yes we really do Kubernetes, or OpenStack, AI/ML, and a whole host of technologies related to the internet of things (IoT).

Licensing in Kate and Other KDE News/Changes

Filed under
KDE
  • MIT licensed KSyntaxHighlighting usage

    With the KDE Frameworks 5.50 release, the KSyntaxHighlighting framework was re-licensed to the MIT license.

    This re-licensing only covers the actual code in the library and the bundled themes but not all of the syntax highlighting definition data files.

    One of the main motivation points was to get QtCreator to use this, if possible, instead of their own implementation of the Kate highlighting they needed to create in the past due to the incompatible licensing of KatePart at that time (and the impossibility to do a quick split/re-licensing of the parts in question).

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 41
  • KDE Will Now Set Scale Factor For GTK Apps, Plasma Gets Other Scaling & UI Polishing Too

    KDE developer Nate Graham is out with his weekly recap of interesting development activities impacting Plasma, Frameworks, and the Applications stack.

    When the display scaling factor for KDE is set to an integer, KDE will now export that as well to the GNOME/GTK environment variables of GDK_SCALE/GDK_DPI_SCALE, for helping out GTK applications running on the KDE desktop so they should still scale appropriately. The Wayland behavior was already correct while this should help out GTK X11 applications. The GNOME/GTK scaling though only supports scaling by integer numbers.

Graphics: NVIDIA, Kazan, Sway and Panfrost

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Developers Express Interest In Helping Out libc++/libstdc++ Parallel Algorithms

    NVIDIA developers have expressed interest in helping the open-source GCC libstdc++ and LLVM Clang libc++ standard libraries in bringing up support for the standardized parallel algorithms.

    C++17 brings parallelized versions for some of the algorithms exposed by the C++ standard library, but sadly GCC's libstdc++ and LLVM's libc++ do not yet support these parallel algorithms while the rest of their C++17 support is in great shape. Going back over a year Intel has been interested in contributing parallel support code to these C++ standard libraries that could be shared by both projects. The Intel path builds in abstractions for supporting different underlying thread/parallelism APIs.

  • The Rust-Written Kazan Vulkan Driver Lights Up Its Shader Compiler

    This week the Kazan project (formerly known as "Vulkan-CPU") celebrated a small but important milestone in its trek to having a CPU-based Vulkan software implementation.

    As a refresher, Kazan is the project born as Vulkan-CPU during the 2017 Google Summer of Code. The work was started by student developer Jacob Lifshay and he made good progress last summer on the foundation of the project and continued contributing past the conclusion of that Google-funded program. By the end of the summer he was able to run some simple Vulkan compute tests. He also renamed Vulkan-CPU to Kazan (Japanese for "volcano").

  • Sway 1.0 Beta Released - Offers 100% Compatibility With i3 Window Manager

    The Sway Wayland compositor inspired by X11's i3 window manager is now up to its beta ahead of the big 1.0 release.

    Sway 1.0 Beta offers "100%" compatibility with the i3 window manager. The Sway 1.0 release has also been working on many other changes including improved window handling, multi-GPU support, virtual keyboard protocol, real-time video capture, tablet support, and many other changes.

  • Panfrost Open-Source GPU Driver Continues Advancing For Mali GPUs

    The Panfrost open-source, community-driven, reverse-engineered graphics driver for ARM Mali graphics processors continues panning out pretty well.

    Alyssa Rosenzweig has provided an update this weekend on the state of Panfrost for open-source Mali 3D support. The developers involved have been working out some texture issues, various OpenGL / GLES issues around GLMark2, and support now for running Wayland's Weston reference compositor.

The Performance & Power Efficiency Of The Core i7 990X vs. Core i9 9900K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With my initial Core i9 9900K benchmarks out there following Friday's embargo expiration, for some weekend benchmarking fun I decided to pull out the old Core i7 990X to see how it compares to the new 9900K... The Gulftown and Coffeelake processors were compared not only on raw performance but also overall power consumption and performance-per-Watt.

The Core i7 990X was the Extreme Edition processor back from 2011 codenamed "Gulftown" (Westmere microarchitecture), the 32nm generation before Sandy Bridge. Granted the announced but not yet released Core i9 9900X X-Series CPU will be more akin for comparison to the 990X, and I will at such time that it is available, but just for some extra benchmark runs over the weekend I was curious to see how the 990X and 9900K compare...

Read more

Linux and systemd updates, with Plasma 5.13.5, Applications 18.08.1 and Frameworks 5.50 by KDE now available to all Chakra users

Filed under
KDE

This time we have been a bit late, as many of our contributors were busy over the last couple of months, but we hope we can soon get back to normal delivery times. Blushing

Better late than never though, so we are happy to inform you that on your next system upgrade you will receive newer versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to updates to important packages such as the linux kernel and systemd. The latest Plasma 5.14 2 series should follow soon.

Read more

Can You Build An Open Source Pocket Operator?

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Toys are now musical instruments. Or we’ll just say musical instruments are now toys. You can probably ascribe this recent phenomenon to Frooty Loops or whatever software the kids are using these days, but the truth is that it’s never been easier to lay down a beat. Just press the buttons on a pocket-sized computer.

One of the best examples of the playification of musical instruments is Pocket Operators from Teenage Engineering. They’re remarkable pieces of hardware, and really just a custom segment LCD and a few buttons. They also sound great and you can play real music with them. It’s a game changer when it comes to enabling musicianship.

Of course, with any popular platform, there’s a need for an Open Source copy. That’s where [Chris]’ Teensy Beats Shield comes in. It’s a ‘shield’ of sorts for a Teensy microcontroller that adds buttons, knobs, and a display, turning this into a platform that uses the Teensy’s incredible audio system designer.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Destination Linux EP92 – Elementary My Dear Distro

    On this very special episode of Destination Linux, we are joined by 2 friends of the show. Unfortunately, Zeb was sick this week so we needed a last minute guest host, thankfully Gabriele Musco of TechPills stepped up to help out. If that wasn’t special enough, Daniel Foré from elementary joined us for a segment to discuss the latest release of elementary OS 5.0 (Juno). This episode we discuss a ton of hot topics in the Linux world including Microsoft making 60,000 patents available to the Open Invention Network (OIN), Plex joins the universal package format game with a new Snap, Google+ announces it is shutting down after a security bug debacle, there were some patches proposed to the Linux kernel’s new Code of Conduct. All that and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

  • Tune Into Free Live Stream of Keynotes at Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, October 22-24!
  • ethtool Commands and Examples
  • WHAT TO DO AFTER INSTALLING ELEMENTARY OS 5.0
  • Weblate 3.2.2

    Weblate 3.2.2 has been released today. It's a second bugfix release for 3.2 fixing several minor issues which appeared in the release.

  • Kiwi TCMS 6.1

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.1! This release introduces new database migrations, internal updates and bug fixes. It is a small release designed to minimize the number of database migrations by squashing them together. You can explore everything at https://demo.kiwitcms.org.

    NOTE: there is the 6.0.1 release which resolves an upgrade problem caused by non-applied migrations which have been later squashed and released in the same release! It is best to jump through the intermediate releases to ensure a smooth upgrade!

  • NeuroFedora update: week 42

    There is a lot of software available in NeuroFedora already. You can see the list here. If you use software that is not on our list, please suggest it to us using the suggestion form.

  • FPgM report: 2018-42
  • Asynchronous bodhi-ci
  • Fuchsia Friday: New ‘Sherlock’ prototype offers more questions than answers

    That brings us to today, with the newly developed Sherlock prototype. First introduced earlier this month, Sherlock features 2GB of RAM and an Amlogic T931 processor. There’s no public information about this processor, beyond it having at least 4 cores, but Amlogic’s T series chips have been almost exclusively built into Smart TVs.

    What makes me hesitant to definitively call Sherlock a Smart TV is a feature that the overwhelming majority of Smart TVs no longer have: a camera. A few short years ago, Smart TVs began to include microphones and cameras to offer things like voice control and Skype video calling.

    It didn’t take long for it to be discovered how vulnerable these devices were and that people probably don’t want their TV watching them back. Then again, that isn’t stopping a rumored Facebook set-top TV box with built-in camera.

  • Google’s Fuchsia OS could mean the end of Android

    If you’ve had your ear to the Google grapevine the past couple of years, you might already know about Fuchsia. As early as 2016 there were whispers and rumors about a new OS for Android, and little more has trickled down to public knowledge since then.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Windows 10 October Update Once Again Plagued By Another File Management Bug

Since the announcement of Windows 10 October update 2018, things have been going pretty bad for Windows users. At first, it was the file deletion which caused a lot of inconvenience to Windows users, and later the driver issues. Now, people have come across another Windows 1809 bug which appears to be another File Explorer issue. Several users on Reddit and Ask Woody have reported an unusual activity while extracting files. The primary issue revolves around the prompt which should technically appear during the process of un-zipping a file on Windows 10; however, it does not, leading to data loss. Read more

Linspire 8.0 RC1 Released

Today we are pleased to release RC1 of Linspire 8. As we approach our December release, huge strides in stability and functionality have been made with the release candidate. Even so, it should be used for testing only, not on production systems Read more

Android Leftovers

5 tips for choosing the right open source database

So, your company has a directive to adopt more open source database technologies, and they've recruited you to select the right direction. Whether you are an open source technology veteran or a newcomer, this is a daunting and overwhelming task. Over the past several years, open source technology adoption has steadily increased in the enterprise space. With its popularity comes a crowded marketplace with open source software companies promising that their solution will solve every problem and fit every workload. Be wary of these promises. Choosing the right open source technology—especially a database—is an important and difficult decision you can't make lightly. Read more