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Tuesday, 18 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2018 - 6:18am
Story Linux 4.4.168 Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2018 - 6:03am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 10:14pm
Story Five-Way Linux OS Comparison On Amazon's ARM Graviton CPU Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 10:02pm
Story Take a swim at your Linux terminal with asciiquarium Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 9:59pm
Story Photography and Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 9:55pm
Story Linux 3.18.130 Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 9:49pm
Story Rugged, Jetson TX2 based computer targets AI on the edge Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 9:47pm
Story i.MX8M based Pico-ITX SBC has both HDMI and mini-DP Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 9:43pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/12/2018 - 9:38pm

Linux 4.4.168

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.168 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Five-Way Linux OS Comparison On Amazon's ARM Graviton CPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last month Amazon rolled out their "Graviton" ARM processors in the Elastic Compute Cloud. Those first-generation Graviton ARMv8 processors are based on the ARM Cortex-A72 cores and designed to offer better pricing than traditional x86_64 EC2 instances. However, our initial testing of the Amazon Graviton EC2 "A1" instances didn't reveal significant performance-per-dollar benefits for these new instances. In this second round of Graviton CPU benchmarking we are seeing what is the fastest of five of the leading ARM Linux distributions.

An Amazon EC2 a1.4xlarge instance with 16 cores / 32GB RAM was used for this round of benchmarking across the five most common ARM Linux distributions that were available at the time of testing on the Elastic Compute Cloud. The tests included:

Amazon Linux 2 - The reference Amazon Linux machine image with the Linux 4.14 kernel and GCC 7.3.

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Take a swim at your Linux terminal with asciiquarium

Filed under
Linux

We're now nearing the end of our 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. Just one week left after today! If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

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Photography and Linux

Filed under
Linux

So, as you can see, except for the printing step, pretty much the whole workflow is handled very easily by Linux and open-source photography software. Could I have done the whole thing in Linux? Yes and no. Depending on your printing needs, you could forego the printer entirely and use a local professional printing service. Many of those shops use the ROES system for the uploading and management of images to be printed. The ROES client is written in Java and is compatible with Linux. If you invest in a large format printer, you may have to investigate using a solution similar to what I have set up. Open-source software RIPs exist, but they have not been updated for more than a decade. Some commercial Linux solutions are available, but they are prohibitively expensive.

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Linux 3.18.130

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 3.18.130 kernel.

All users of the 3.18 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 3.18.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-3.18.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Rugged, Jetson TX2 based computer targets AI on the edge

Filed under
Ubuntu

Axiomtek’s fanless, IP67-protected “eBOX800-900-FL” computer runs Ubuntu on a Jetson TX2 module and offers -30 to 60°C support, 3Grms vibration resistance, M.2 NVMe expansion, and 2x GbE ports, including one with PoE.

Axiomtek turned to the Arm-based Jetson TX2 module for its eBOX560-900-FL industrial edge AI computer and has now spun a larger (366.83 x 210 x 83mm) more rugged, wall- or VESA-mounted eBOX800-900-FL model designed for smart city, smart manufacturing, and smart transportation applications. It similarly runs Ubuntu 16.04.

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i.MX8M based Pico-ITX SBC has both HDMI and mini-DP

Filed under
Android
Linux

Kontron’s Pico-ITX form-factor “pITX-iMX8M” SBC runs Linux or Android on a dual- or quad-core NXP i.MX8M SoC with Mini-DP and HDMI, 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, and M.2 expansion.

The pITX-iMX8M is the first i.MX8M based product from Kontron and the second i.MX8M based Pico-ITX board we’ve seen after F&S’ armStone MX8M. Other SBCs to use this mid-range i.MX8 SoC — NXP also offers a higher-end, up to hexa-core i.MX8 QuadMax and lower-end, Cortex-A35 based i.MX8X – include Boundary Devices’ 136.7 x 87mm Nitrogen8M and Phytec’s sandwich-style, 100 x 100mm phyBoard-Polaris SBC.

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mv Command in Linux: 7 Essential Examples

Filed under
HowTos

mv command in Linux is used for moving and renaming files and directories. In this tutorial, you’ll learn some of the essential usages of the mv command.
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8 tips to help non-techies move to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

ver the last 10 months, a handful of friends and acquaintances have pulled me back into that realm. How? With their desire to dump That Other Operating System™ and move to Linux.

This has been an interesting experience, in no small part because most of the people aren't at all technical. They know how to use a computer to do what they need to do. Beyond that, they're not interested in delving deeper. That said, they were (and are) attracted to Linux for a number of reasons—probably because I constantly prattle on about it.

While bringing them to the Linux side of the computing world, I learned a few things about helping non-techies move to Linux. If someone asks you to help them make the jump to Linux, these eight tips can help you.

1. Be honest about Linux.

Linux is great. It's not perfect, though. It can be perplexing and sometimes frustrating for new users. It's best to prepare the person you're helping with a short pep talk.

What should you talk about? Briefly explain what Linux is and how it differs from other operating systems. Explain what you can and can't do with it. Let them know some of the pain points they might encounter when using Linux daily.

If you take a bit of time to ease them into Linux and open source, the switch won't be as jarring.

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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for December 2018

Filed under
Red Hat

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

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Linux Networking Improvements To Mitigate Retpoline Overhead Ready For 4.21 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

The recently talked about work to improve/restore Linux networking performance around Retpolines is queued now in net-next for the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel cycle.

This patch series for the Linux kernel's networking subsystem is about mitigating the Retpoline overhead introduced at the start of the year in order to address the Meltdown CPU security issue.

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Linux 4.20--rc76

Filed under
Linux

Well, that's more like it.

This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody
is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we
simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope
the trend continues.

The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of
bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio
completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and
spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem
fixes, core fixes, test updates..)

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Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10.

This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590.

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Sparky SU 0.1.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator.

It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root.

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Leftovers: Linux in the Ham Shack and Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

Filed under
Misc
  • LHS Episode #264: The Weekender XXI

    Welcome to the 21st Weekender episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. This time around, we talk about the few contests and special event stations that are around for December. We also touch on Linux distros to try, things to do in the amateur radio and open source world and then we dive straight into hedonism, discussing good food, good music and good spirits. Thank you for listening and Happy Holidays.

  • The Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

    Apple’s premier gadget faces a less certain future than ever as the market shifts under its feet.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • The fourth industrial revolution is under way, and leaders must adopt open source thinking

    For the first time in history, knowledge is free and abundant, ordinary people are more empowered than ever before, and almost every boundary to communication has been lifted.

    [...]

    Welcome to the 21st Century where everyone and everything is connected 24/7, and where exciting progress opportunities and daunting challenges coexist. In this century, life and business have become “open source”. In order to succeed and thrive, our thoughts and actions must also become open source. It is time for business leaders to shed myths of the past, question conventional wisdom, and adopt “open source thinking” around the following fundamental questions/challenges:

  • Can real-world enterprises digest all this open-source, startup stuff?

    Why does the Cloud Native Computing Foundation now host more than 30 projects? Why are cloud-based startups coming out of the woodwork with narrow point solutions? Mostly just so users can have a better time with an application. But it’s all getting a bit weedy. How can enterprises pick out the right technologies from the aisles of them?

    “It’s really easy to forget that infrastructure is not a thing in its own right — it’s solely there to enable applications and to enable other things,” said Steve Herrod (pictured), managing director at General Catalyst Partners LLC.

  • CableLabs Open Source IoT Project Shoots for Scale

    Opening up another chapter in its open source story, CableLabs this week took another shot at the industrial Internet of Things market with its LPWAN Server project.

    The general concept is to create open source LPWAN Server software that can run on off-the-shelf hardware and support a wide range of low-power, IoT wireless technologies designed to transmit small bits of data over long distances. (See Blog: CableLabs Intros Open Source LPWAN Server.)

    "We don't see one clear winner in the LPWAN space," said Daryl Malas, principal architect at CableLabs' advanced technology group. "We don't see NB-IoT (Narrowband IoT) dominating all use cases. And we don't see LoRA dominating all use cases."

  • The 10 Coolest New Open-Source Technologies And Tools Of 2018
  • The fight to keep ideas open to all

     

    “The only way we can preserve and nurture other and more precious freedoms is by relinquishing the freedom to breed.” This ominous sentence comes not from China’s one-child policy but from one of the 20th century’s most influential—and misunderstood—essays in economics. “The tragedy of the commons”, by Garrett Hardin, marks its 50th anniversary on December 13th.
     

    The article, published in the journal Science, was a neo-Malthusian jeremiad about uncontrolled population growth. But it is remembered for the image that the title conjures up and for the anecdotes that Hardin used. The idea behind it is as simple as it is profound: a resource freely available to all will be used inefficiently. An actual common will inevitably be overgrazed. Who would restrict their cattle if other herders may not follow suit?  

  • Suriname community uses new open-source app to preserve storytelling traditions

    To prevent that from happening, the local community-based organization Stichting voor Dorpsontwikkeling Matawai has spent the last few years documenting their oral storytelling traditions using video recorders and interactive maps. With support from the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), the organization trained younger Matawai to record and interview their elders about the numerous named places and sites in their ancestral lands.

  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a Second Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors to Spur Open Innovation

    Flute is a configurable 5-stage application processor complementing the previously released 3-stage Piccolo microcontroller, both of which are suitable for IoT. The initial release provides synthesizable Verilog for a bare metal RV32IMA core and a supervisor level RV64IMA core. Future releases will add floating point and compressed instructions (RV32GC/RV64GC) and run Linux and FreeRTOS. The Flute download (here) provides working Verilator and Icarus simulations and the Verilog has been tested in Xilinx UltraScale/UltraScale+ boards.

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