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Tuesday, 16 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games: InnerSpace, BATTLETECH, Civilization VI, SteamOS, Unreal Engine Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 4:01am
Story Servers: Containers, MapR, 'Serverless', Bonitasoft Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 4:00am
Story Mozilla: VR, Ford Money, WebRender, Firefox Extensions Discovery, Firefox 58 Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:58am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:56am
Story Linux Microsoft Office Alternatives Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:51am
Story Security: Updates, WordPress, Hardware Patches, and Open Source Security Podcast Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:25am
Story GNOME Devs to Users: Desktop Icons Are Moving to GNOME Shell with GNOME 3.28 Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:24am
Story Red Hat News and Posts Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:17am
Story Yocto-on-i.MX6UL gateway serves up I2C and SPI on a DB9 port Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:15am
Story Fedora Elections Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2018 - 3:00am

Games: InnerSpace, BATTLETECH, Civilization VI, SteamOS, Unreal Engine

Filed under
Gaming
  • InnerSpace from PolyKnight Games & Aspyr Media launches with day-1 Linux support, some thoughts

    InnerSpace [Steam], an exploration flying game set in the Inverse, a world of inside-out planets without horizons is now available for Linux.

    Disclosure: Key provided by Aspyr Media.

    In InnerSpace, you are an autonomous drone named Cartographer, which was created by the Archaeologist from information left over by the Ancients. The Archaeologist requires your help to reach areas of the Inverse where they cannot go and so your journey begins.

    I will start off by recommending a gamepad for InnerSpace. While it does work with Keyboard, it doesn’t feel good at all, you will have a much better experience with a gamepad in your hands.

  • BATTLETECH will only be coming to Linux post-launch, along with other features

    The turn-based mech strategy game developed by Harebrained Schemes won’t be on Linux at launch later this year. Other features have also been cut or altered and will be making into the game post-release.

  • Civilization VI: Rise and Fall shows off overview of new features

    The upcoming expansion for Civilization VI [Official Site] will be introducing quite a few interesting changes to the game. You can see how exactly you’ll be spending just one more turn in this overview video.

  • SteamOS Beta Switches To Linux 4.14.13 For KPTI To Mitigate Meltdown

    Valve has pushed out a new SteamOS Beta build for the Debian Jessie-based "Brewmaster" series.

    SteamOS Beta 2.145 is out with its main focus on transitioning to the Linux 4.14 (v4.14.13) stable kernel.

  • Unreal Engine 4.19 Preview Rolls Out With Renderer Enhancements

    Epic Games has rolled out their public preview build of the upcoming Unreal Engine 4.19 game engine update.

    Unreal Engine 4.19 features renderer improvements, new animation and physics capabilities, VR improvements, initial support for the HTC Vive Pro, Steam Audio Beta 10 integration, Live Link plug-in improvements, and a plethora of other work.

  • Unreal Engine 4.19 Preview 1 Now Available

    Unreal Engine 4.19 will be available soon and it'll include many new exciting features and fixes. The first Preview build is now available on the Epic Games launcher for you to download. You can explore a number of new animation and physics updates, including improvements to the Live Link plugin and Sequencer performance, and signficant changes to VR resolution settings. There are also a number of quality-of-life improvements.

Servers: Containers, MapR, 'Serverless', Bonitasoft

Filed under
Server
  • Containers versus Operating Systems

    The most popular docker base container image is either busybox, or scratch. This is driven by a movement that is equal parts puritanical and pragmatic. The puritan asks “Why do I need to run init(1) just to run my process?” The pragmatist asks “Why do I need a 700 meg base image to deploy my application?” And both, seeking immutable deployment units ask “Is it a good idea that I can ssh into my container?” But let’s step back for a second and look at the history of how we got to the point where questions like this are even a thing.

    In the very beginnings, there were no operating systems. Programs ran one at a time with the whole machine at their disposal. While efficient, this created a problem for the keepers of these large and expensive machines. To maximise their investment, the time between one program finishing and another starting must be kept to an absolute minimum; hence monitor programs and batch processing was born.

  • MapR: How Next-Gen Applications Will Change the Way We Look at Data

    MapR is a Silicon Valley-based big data company. Its founders realized that data was going to become ever increasingly important, and existing technologies, including open source Apache Hadoop, fell short of being able to support things like real-time transactional operational applications. So they spent years building out core technologies that resulted in the MapR products, including the flagship Converged Data Platform, platform-agnostic software that’s designed for the multicloud environment. It can even run on embedded Edge devices.

  • 7 Open-Source Serverless Frameworks Providing Functions as a Service

    With virtualization, organizations began to realize greater utilization of physical hardware. That trend continued with the cloud, as organizations began to get their machines into a pay-as-you-go service. Cloud computing further evolved when Amazon Web Services (AWS) launched its Lambda service in 2014, introducing a new paradigm in cloud computing that has become commonly referred to as serverless computing. In the serverless model, organizations pay for functions as a service without the need to pay for an always-on stateful, virtual machine.

  • Bonitasoft Offers Open Source, Low-Code Platform on AWS Cloud

    Bonitasoft, a specialist in open source business process management and digital transformation software, is partnering with the Amazon Web Services Inc. (AWS) cloud to broaden the reach of its low-code development platform.

    That platform, just released in a new version called Bonita 7.6, comes in an open source version and a subscription version with professional support and advanced features.

Mozilla: VR, Ford Money, WebRender, Firefox Extensions Discovery, Firefox 58

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla and Sundance Film Festival Present: VR the People

    On Monday January 22, Mozilla is bringing together a panel of the top VR industry insiders in the world to the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, to explain how VR storytelling is revolutionizing the film and entertainment industry.

    “We want the storyteller’s vision to exceed the capacity of existing technology, to push boundaries, because then the technologist is inspired to engineer new mechanisms that enable things initially thought impossible” says Kamal Sinclair, Director of New Frontier Lab Programs at Sundance Institute. “However, this is not about creating something that appeals to people simply because of its novel technical achievements; rather it is something that has real meaning, and where that meaning can be realized by engineering the technologies to deliver the best experience possible.”

  • Host an Open Internet Activist [Ed: Mozilla now in the pockets of the Ford Foundation, just like the ‘Guardian’]

    Today, we’re launching the Ford-Mozilla Open Web Fellowship call for host organizations. If your organization is devoted to a healthy internet for all users, we encourage you to apply.

  • WebRender newsletter #12
  • The User Journey for Firefox Extensions Discovery

    The ability to customize and extend Firefox are an essential part of Firefox’s value to users. Extensions are small tools that allow developers and users who install the extensions to modify, customize, and extend the functionality of Firefox. For example, during our workflows research in 2016, we interviewed a participant who was a graduate student in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. While she used Safari as her primary browser for common browsing, she used Firefox specifically for her academic work because of the extension Zotero was the best choice for keeping track of her academic work and citations.

    Popular categories of extensions include ad blockers, password managers, and video downloaders. Given the variety of extensions and the benefits to customization they offer, why is it that only 40% of Firefox users have installed at least one extension? Certainly, some portion of Firefox users may be aware of extensions but have no need or desire to install one. However, some users could find value in some extensions but simply may not be aware of the existence of extensions in the first place.

    Why not? How can Mozilla facilitate the extension discovery process?

    A fundamental assumption about the extension discovery process is that users will learn about extensions through the browser, through word of mouth, or through searching to solve a specific problem. We were interested in setting aside this assumption and to observe the steps participants take and the decisions they make in their journey toward possibly discovering extensions. To this end, the Firefox user research team ran two small qualitative studies to understand better how participants solved a particular problem in the browser that could be solved by installing an extension. Our study helped us understand how participants do — or do not — discover a specific category of extension.

  • Firefox Release, Xen, KDE's Plasma and More

    Set your calendars for January 23, 2018, to download the latest Firefox 58 release packed with performance/bottleneck and bug fixes, an even better site source code debugger and more.

Linux Microsoft Office Alternatives

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Despite what you may have been led to believe, there are in fact a number of solid Linux alternatives for Microsoft Office available. In fact, there are even options available with varied levels of docx support, if that is something relevant to your business.

This article will explore my recommended Microsoft Office alternatives for Linux. Some of them you've likely heard of, others may be cloud/server based options that you might not have thought much about until now.

Read more

Also: The best open source video editors 2018: free to download, edit, use and share

Security: Updates, WordPress, Hardware Patches, and Open Source Security Podcast

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • WordPress 4.9.2 Security and Maintenance Release

    WordPress 4.9.2 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

    An XSS vulnerability was discovered in the Flash fallback files in MediaElement, a library that is included with WordPress. Because the Flash files are no longer needed for most use cases, they have been removed from WordPress.

  • Debian-Based SolydXK Linux OS Receives Patch for Meltdown Security Vulnerability

    The Debian-based SolydXK Linux operating system has been updated today with patches for the Meltdown security vulnerability, as well as various other new features and improvements.

    To mitigate the Meltdown security exploit that allows a locally installed program to access the memory, including the kernel memory, and steal sensitive information like passwords and encryption keys, the SolydXK 201801 ISO images are now powered by the latest kernel release with patches against this vulnerability.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Now Patched Against Meltdown & Spectre Security Vulnerabilities

    It's time for users of the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system to patch their systems against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities as new kernel updates landed today in the repos.

    Publicly disclosed earlier this month, the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities are affecting us all, but OS vendors and OEMs are trying their best to mitigate them so that no user can be the victim of attacks where their sensitive data is at risk of getting in the hands of the wrong person.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 78 - Risk lessons from Hawaii

GNOME Devs to Users: Desktop Icons Are Moving to GNOME Shell with GNOME 3.28

Filed under
GNOME

There appears to be a lot of fuss lately about the removal of an option from the GNOME desktop environment that allows users to display icons on their desktops.

Long story short, last month, near the Christmas holidays, GNOME developer Carlos Soriano shared his plans on removing a so-called "the desktop" feature from the Nautilus file manager starting with the upcoming GNOME 3.28 release of the desktop environment, proposing its integration into the GNOME Shell component.

The feature is there to handle application icons on the user's workspace, but it shouldn't have been implemented in Nautilus in the first place, according to the developer. So for the GNOME devs to be able to add new features to the Nautilus file manager, they need to remove its ability to handle desktop icons and place the code somewhere else.

Read more

Red Hat News and Posts

Filed under
Red Hat

Yocto-on-i.MX6UL gateway serves up I2C and SPI on a DB9 port

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Axiomtek’s compact “IFB125” DIN-rail IoT gateway runs Yocto Linux on an i.MX6 UL SoC with dual LANs, mini-PCIe expansion, extended temperature and vibration resistance, COM and USB ports, and a DB9 port that supports both SPI and I2C.

Axiomtek has released a minor variation on its IFB122 IoT gateway. Like the IDB122, the new IFB125 runs Yocto Project code with Linux 3.14.52 on NXP’s 528MHz Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 UltraLight (UL) SoC. The headless gateway is designed for remote control and remote monitoring management applications such as unmanned control room, industrial automation, automatic parking lot, and traffic cabinets.

Read more

Also: Display-oriented eNUC SBC runs on Apollo Lake

Linux Foundation and Verizon

Filed under
Linux
  • Verizon joins the Linux Foundation's ONAP project

    Verizon has joined the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project as a Platinum member, a move that reflects the service provider's desire to drive industry harmony around network virtualization and automation.

    ONAP brings together several global carriers and vendors to build an automation and orchestration platform to transform the service delivery lifecycle for network, cable and cloud providers.

  • Verizon Joins Linux Foundation's Open Network Automation Platform Project as Platinum Member

    Verizon and The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced today that Verizon has joined the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project as a Platinum member. ONAP brings together the majority of global carriers and vendors to build an automation and orchestration platform to transform the service delivery lifecycle for network, cable and cloud providers. ONAP enables nearly 60 percent of the world's mobile subscribers.

KDE Plasma's Discover Package Manager Gets Better Snap and Flatpak Support

Filed under
KDE

After sharing last week more info on the maturity of Flatpak support in KDE Plasma's Discover package manager, now Nathaniel Graham published details on some new user-facing highlights of what's done in Plasma Discover in the last week or so, and there's quite a bunch of improvements for both Snap and Flatpak universal binary formats.

For Snaps, Plasma Discover now no longer lets users click the "Install" button during the installation of Snaps, displays information on the license for Snaps, as well as the size of Snaps that aren’t installed on user's computer. For Flatpak apps, it now shows the version number if that info is defined in the AppStream file.

Read more

KWin/X11 is feature frozen

Filed under
KDE

Yesterday the KDE Community released the Beta for Plasma 5.12 LTS. With that release the feature freeze for 5.12 is in place and also an eternal feature freeze for KWin/X11. To quote the release announcement: “5.12 is the last release which sees feature development in KWin on X11. With 5.13 onwards only new features relevant to Wayland are going to be added.” This raised quite some questions, concerns and misunderstandings in the social networks. With this blog post I try to address those question and explain why this change in policy is done.

Read more

Also: KDE's KWin Now Considers Its X11 Code To Be Under An "Eternal Feature Freeze"

Plasma 5.12 LTS beta available in PPA for testing on Artful & Bionic

Filed under
KDE

Adventurous users, testers and developers running Artful 17.10 or our development release Bionic 18.04 can now test the beta version of Plasma 5.12 LTS.

Read more

Also: Kubuntu 17.10 and 18.04 Users Can Now Try the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Desktop

Leftovers: Proprietary Software, HowTos, and GXml

Filed under
Software
OSS
HowTos

Debian Developers: Google Summer of Code, Quick Recap of 2017

Filed under
Debian
  • RHL'18 in Saint-Cergue, Switzerland

    In between eating fondue and skiing, I found time to resurrect some of my previous project ideas for Google Summer of Code. Most of them are not specific to Debian, several of them need co-mentors, please contact me if you are interested.

  • Quick recap of 2017

        

    After the Stretch release, it was time to attend DebConf’17 in Montreal, Canada. I’ve presented the latest news on the Debian Installer front there as well. This included a quick demo of my little framework which lets me run automatic installation tests. Many attendees mentioned openQA as the current state of the art technology for OS installation testing, and Philip Hands started looking into it. Right now, my little thing is still useful as it is, helping me reproduce regressions quickly, and testing bug fixes… so I haven’t been trying to port that to another tool yet.

    I also gave another presentation in two different contexts: once at a local FLOSS meeting in Nantes, France and once during the mini-DebConf in Toulouse, France. Nothing related to Debian Installer this time, as the topic was how I helped a company upgrade thousands of machines from Debian 6 to Debian 8 (and to Debian 9 since then). It was nice to have Evolix people around, since we shared our respective experience around automation tools like Ansible and Puppet.

Devices: Raspberry Pi and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Command Line Heroes Launched

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat launches new podcast series, Command Line Heroes

    Technology has become so integrated into our daily lives that it can be easy to take it for granted. But we’ve only gotten to where we are today because of the command line heroes that shaped the industry - and continue to do so.

    Command line hero. What does that really mean? To us it’s the developers, programmers, hackers, geeks and open source rebels - the people who are on the front line, transforming technology from the command line up. The biggest technology advancements and innovations didn’t happen by accident. They were made possible through the passion, creativity and persistence of technologists around the world.

  • Command Line Heroes

    I’ve been looking forward to this for quite a while, ever since it was announced: today, the first two episodes of Command Line Heroes were published. Command Line Heroes, or CLH for short, is a series of podcasts that tells the stories of open source. It’s hosted by Saron Yitbarek, of CodeNewbie fame, and sponsored by Red Hat.

NethServer, Red Hat, and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Why building a community is worth the extra effort

    Building the NethServer community was risky. But we've learned so much about the power of working with passionate people.

  • Risk Malaise Alert in Option Market: Red Hat Inc Implied Price Swing Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Red Hat (NYSE:RHT) Receives “Neutral” Rating from Credit Suisse Group
  • Sit Investment Associates Inc. Takes $1.22 Million Position in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Fixing flatpak startup times

    A lot of people have noticed that flatpak apps sometimes start very slowly. Upon closer inspection you notice this only happens the first time you run the application. Still, it gives a very poor first time impression.

    So, what is causing this, and can we fix it?

    The short answer to this is font-cache generation, and yes, I landed a fix today. For the longer version we have to take a detour into how flatpak and fontconfig works.

  • Fedora 28 wallpaper contest now open -- submit your image to the Linux distro!

    One of the first things I do after installing a new Linux distribution is set a different wallpaper. Why? Desktop pictures really inspire me -- my mood can be positively altered by a beautiful image. The default wallpaper is often boring. For the most part, I prefer images of nature with bright colors. After all, if I am stuck indoors working on my computer, a wallpaper of the beach, mountains, or a colorful bird, for instance, can transport me to the outdoors -- in my mind.

    Sadly, not every distro has beautiful high-quality images. Fedora, however, often does -- thanks to its "supplemental" wallpapers. What is particularly cool  about that operating system, is that it regularly accepts wallpaper submissions from the community as part of a contest. In other words, anybody can potentially contribute to a new version of the distro by simply uploading a photo, drawing, or other picture. Fedora 28 is the upcoming version of the OS, and the developers are now calling for wallpaper submissions for it. Will you submit an entry to the contest?

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