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Monday, 22 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure. Read more

Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written. Read more

Open source is not dead

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS
Security

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source.

Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Filed under
OSS

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure.

Read more

Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

Filed under
OSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written.

Read more

From next release onwards, Debian is tied to systemd

Filed under
Debian

Anyone who installs Jessie from scratch will find that they are not offered no choice in the matter. This means that only the technically well-equipped will be able to make a switch in the event that systemd does not work as promised. Existing users of the testing stream will find, on checking, that their systems have been migrated over to systemd. Systems running the stable version of Debian have not been migrated across yet.

Read more

Ubuntu to Get Native HTML5 Streaming Through Google Chrome Soon

Filed under
Ubuntu

Netflix is looking to expand its business, and one of the ways to do that is to look at what other platforms it can support. Ubuntu is the most used Linux distribution, so it stands to reason that they might be interested to have their service working on it.

Read more

Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

Filed under
BSD

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features.

Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types.

Read more

Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game

Filed under
Android

India is now the world’s third largest Internet market and “on a bullet train to become the second”. But even when we become the second with around 300 million Internet users, India would still have over 75 per cent of the population that has no access to this so-called information superhighway. It is this chunk of population that will form the “next billion” which companies like Nokia, and now Google, has been talking about. And it is this next billion that Google thinks will line up to buy and good smartphone that is also affordable.

Read more

Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa.

The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful.

Read more

Small Console Menu Utilities

Filed under
Linux
OSS

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications.

The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects.

Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own.

This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill.

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Samsung ship SM-Z130H budget Tizen Smartphones to India for R&D Purposes

Filed under
Linux

According to a Zauba International shipping manifest, Samsung have shipped 150 of these units from South Korea to India for R&D and Evaluation purposes, which is a fair amount for an R&D unit to continue its work with. We have been tracking two budget Tizen based Smartphones lately, the SM-Z130H & SM-Z130E, with various parts being shipped to India every couple of months or so, but this is one of the largest shipments that we have seen so far.

Read more

Fresh software from the 3.14 menu

Filed under
GNOME

If all goes according to plan, I'll be able to merge the aforementioned automatic rotation support into systemd/udev. The kernel API is pretty bad, which makes the user-space code look bad...

The first parts of ebooks support in gnome-documents have already been written, scheduled for 3.16

Read more

Florida is back on the Map for Linux and Open Source conventions with FOSSETCON 2

Filed under
Linux
OSS

In summary the event was a good investment in time and booth expenses spent. We were able to distribute and promote Fedora in a very positive manner. More importantly getting more information on the various spins offered on our website pointed out to many individuals that there are more available on the Fedora Project website.. As the event ended on the 13th, I had had a conversation with the event coordinator with the plus side and the down side of what was going on.

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Linux 3.17-rc6

Filed under
Linux

It's been quiet - enough so that coupled with my upcoming travel, this
might just be the last -rc, and final 3.17 might be next weekend.

Of course, that still depends on what happens - if we have something
scary coming up next week, I may have to delay things. But as it looks
right now, we're all good to go.

The shortlog is appended, but the view from ten thousand feet is
pretty normal: a bit more than half is drivers (gpu, sound, iio,
media, usb), just under a third is arch updates (arm, mips, x86), and
the rest is mainly filesystem updates (gfs2, cifs, btrfs, nfs).

Nothing particular stands out, and I'm not aware of any big pending
issues either. So please go out and test, because this *should* all be
pretty close to release.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
HowTos

F2FS Tools Gain FSCK Support

Filed under
Linux

The F2FS Tools v1.4.0 release introduces fsck.f2fs for fixing corrupted images/partitions for Samsung's Flash-Friendly File-System. There's also now dump.f2fs for retrieving a specific file. Additionally, the f2fs-tools 1.4 update also has bug-fixes for the stat and fibmap utilities. Last but not least is some code refactoring for the Android build. The release was mentioned today on the kernel mailing list by Samsung's Jaegeuk Kim.

Read more

xorg-server 1.16.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

xorg-server 1.16.1 is now available. A single fix since Monday's
1.16.0.901, to address an issue when building Xwayland from the tarball.

Julien Cristau (2):
xwayland: always include drm.xml in tarballs
Bump to 1.16.1

git tag: xorg-server-1.16.1

Read more

Geary Email Client Receives Major Overhaul and New Features

Filed under
GNOME

Geary, a lightweight email program designed around conversations and built for the GNOME desktop by the Yorba software group, has reached version 0.8 and it comes with a ton of new features.

Read more

Why I love Linux — even if I no longer use it

Filed under
Linux

Thinking about this, I remembered how much I loved (and still love) Linux. And I had to reminisce. I remember being a pimply high school kid circa 2002 and configuring Gentoo Linux by hand — kernel and all — onto my little beige eMachines computer, losing days of actual productivity in the process. And loving it. I remember diving into forums and arguing, however ineptly, over the merits of KDE over Gnome. I remember never quite mastering the command line, but getting pretty damn good at it. It let me do whatever I wanted, and my friends didn't get it. Back then, I was open source. Linux was safer, better, and cooler than the competition. We were gonna win the desktop. One day! I had my quiet, nerdy rebellion moment compiling code for hours when my friends were playing World of Warcraft. And I loved every minute of it.

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FreeBSD 10.1-BETA2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The second BETA build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available
on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64
and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow at the end of this email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/ISO-IMAGES/10.1/

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Linux Kernel 3.16.3 Becomes the Newest and Best Stable Version Available

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel 3.16.x is a relatively new release, but it was already adopted by a number of Linux distributions and it's available in the repositories for many others. The third release in the series is a little bigger than the previous one, but not much. In any case, it's going to be an interesting update nonetheless.

Even if the first update for this branch has been rather smaller, the development seems to have picked up a little and more changes and improvements have been made in the meantime.

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