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Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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European Unified Patent Court goes Open Source

Using Private Cloud and Drupal as a starting point together with small expert partners and agile management the new platform for the European UPC has been shaped to the exact requirements and quickly adapted while more needs surfaced. The only ready to use Open Source tool used has been Zarafa Collaboration Platform which integrated with the Case Management System will provide secure email, instant messaging, file sharing and video conferencing to the platform's users. The result is that, thanks to Open Source based platform and by working with SMEs, the UK IPO team has been able to deliver to the Unified Patent Court team the project earlier than planned and under budget. Read more

Linux Foundation: Open Source Programming and DevOps Jobs Plentiful

Open source can help you make money, especially if you have skills in programming or DevOps, which is emerging as one of the hottest areas of interest for hiring managers seeking open source admins and developers. That's according to the latest Open Source Jobs Report from the Linux Foundation, which is out this week. Read more Also: The 2016 Open Source Jobs Report: Companies Hungry for Professional Open Source Talent

Basho Open Sources Some Bits

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • The Simply Ubuntu Desktop
    Over on Flickr, fosco_ submitted this simple Ubuntu desktop, with just a few things tweaked for a cleaner experience. Like we’ve said, sometimes less is more, and this desktop makes good use of a few widgets to make a great UI even better.
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.5 Supports Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Debian 8.4
    The team of developers behind the HPLIP (short for HP Linux Imaging and Printing) project, announced a few moments ago the availability of the fifth maintenance build in the 3.16 stable series of the software. For those of you who are not in the loop, HP Linux Imaging and Printing is an open-source initiative to bring the latest HP (Hewlett-Packard) printer drivers to GNU/Linux operating systems. The software has a pretty active development team working behind it, releasing maintenance builds at least once a month.
  • Convergence delayed: Unity 8 won’t be the default desktop in Ubuntu 16.10
    Canonical’s vision of convergence—a single, highly adaptive environment that spans mobile and desktop uses—has been delayed yet again. The Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server, which are key to that vision, won’t be used by default in Ubuntu 16.10, according to discussion in the Ubuntu Online Summit.
  • Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet
    After Jack Wallen's recent review of the bq Aquaris M10 tablet, he was hit with a number of questions about the tablet. Jack addresses some of those questions to help you decide if the Ubuntu tablet is a worthy investment.

“LEDE” OpenWrt fork promises greater openness

Filed under
Linux

A “Linux Embedded Development Environment” (LEDE) fork of the lightweight, router-oriented OpenWrt Linux distribution vows greater transparency and inclusiveness.

Some core developers of the OpenWrt community has forked off into a Linux Embedded Development Environment (LEDE) group. LEDE is billed as both a “reboot” and “spinoff” of the lightweight, router-focused distribution that aims to build an open source embedded Linux distro that “makes it easy for developers, system administrators or other Linux enthusiasts to build and customize software for embedded devices, especially wireless routers.”

Read more

Neptune 4.5.1 ISOs are available now

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Neptune 4.5.1 ISOs are available for download now and update the system since the Neptune 4.5 release to the state of 3. May 2016.

The biggest issue fixed in this release is the usb booting from USB 3 ports. Besides that this new maintainance release features KDE SC 4.14.16 as desktop.

Read more

Movidius Fathom — This USB Stick Converts Any Linux Computer Into An A.I. Supercomputer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Chip maker Movidius has unveiled “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator”. Known as the Fathom Neural Compute Stick, this device could be plugged into a Linux device to allow it to perform functions like image recognition, language comprehension, and pattern detection.

Read more

Also: Concurrent Introduces RedHawk Linux for 64-Bit ARM® Processors

European Unified Patent Court goes Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Using Private Cloud and Drupal as a starting point together with small expert partners and agile management the new platform for the European UPC has been shaped to the exact requirements and quickly adapted while more needs surfaced. The only ready to use Open Source tool used has been Zarafa Collaboration Platform which integrated with the Case Management System will provide secure email, instant messaging, file sharing and video conferencing to the platform's users.

The result is that, thanks to Open Source based platform and by working with SMEs, the UK IPO team has been able to deliver to the Unified Patent Court team the project earlier than planned and under budget.

Read more

Linux Foundation: Open Source Programming and DevOps Jobs Plentiful

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Open source can help you make money, especially if you have skills in programming or DevOps, which is emerging as one of the hottest areas of interest for hiring managers seeking open source admins and developers. That's according to the latest Open Source Jobs Report from the Linux Foundation, which is out this week.

Read more

Also: The 2016 Open Source Jobs Report: Companies Hungry for Professional Open Source Talent

Basho Open Sources Some Bits

Filed under
OSS

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Simply Ubuntu Desktop

    Over on Flickr, fosco_ submitted this simple Ubuntu desktop, with just a few things tweaked for a cleaner experience. Like we’ve said, sometimes less is more, and this desktop makes good use of a few widgets to make a great UI even better.

  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.5 Supports Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Debian 8.4

    The team of developers behind the HPLIP (short for HP Linux Imaging and Printing) project, announced a few moments ago the availability of the fifth maintenance build in the 3.16 stable series of the software.

    For those of you who are not in the loop, HP Linux Imaging and Printing is an open-source initiative to bring the latest HP (Hewlett-Packard) printer drivers to GNU/Linux operating systems. The software has a pretty active development team working behind it, releasing maintenance builds at least once a month.

  • Convergence delayed: Unity 8 won’t be the default desktop in Ubuntu 16.10

    Canonical’s vision of convergence—a single, highly adaptive environment that spans mobile and desktop uses—has been delayed yet again. The Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server, which are key to that vision, won’t be used by default in Ubuntu 16.10, according to discussion in the Ubuntu Online Summit.

  • Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet

    After Jack Wallen's recent review of the bq Aquaris M10 tablet, he was hit with a number of questions about the tablet. Jack addresses some of those questions to help you decide if the Ubuntu tablet is a worthy investment.

Bufferbloat Is Still Being Fought In Linux Kernel, Another Big Improvement Queued

Filed under
Linux

Bufferbloat is the excess buffering of packets resulting in high latency, jitter, and lower network throughput. There's been efforts to battle bufferbloat within the Linux kernel going back a long time while this week another new patch has surfaced.

A Phoronix reader pointed out to us a patch that's now been queued up in net-next for Linux 4.7 and could end up being back-ported to Linux stable releases.

Read more

Also: Watch why Linus Torvalds says Linux is the best option for career building

Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet

Filed under
Ubuntu

I will say this. So far I've used the Ubuntu tablet for over a week and prefer using it over any other tablet...even with its quirks. In fact, it's the first mobile device that has me comfortable being away from my trusty desktop environment. Having mobile versions of The GIMP and LibreOffice alone is worth the price of admission. It's not perfect (far from it), but it's a sleek, mobile version of Linux that works incredibly well, especially considering how young it is.

Read more

LibreOffice 5.0.6 Open-Source Office Suite Is Now Available for Download

Filed under
LibO

We were informed just a few minutes ago by The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli about the immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.0.6 "Still" open-source office suite.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • M$ Kicks Second Most Loyal Users In The Teeth [Ed: context below]
  • Windows 10 updates are now ruining pro-gaming streams

    Forcing a gaming PC to update mid-game during a livestream to up to 130,000 followers isn’t best advert for the software

  • Containers Used on over Half of New Apps in Production

    Shippable, the Seattle-based producer of a continuous delivery platform for software developers, recently quizzed 300 coders in the U.S. and found that more than half of them (52 percent) are using Docker or other container technologies to deploy their new applications in production. Fourteen percent are using containers for development and testing purposes.

    Indicating that 2016 is the year that containers cement their hold on the enterprise, a whopping 89 percent of respondents told the startup that they were very or somewhat likely to increase their use of the DevOps-enabling technology within the next 12 months.

    Developers are turning to containers when speed is of the essence. Containers have helped a majority of developers (74 percent) ship new software at least 10 percent faster. Eight percent are enjoying a 50-percent boost.

  • Divide et Impera

    But for those committed long term to an on premise model, new tactics are required. In a market that is struggling with fragmentation, solutions must become less fragmented. In some cases this will mean traditional formal partnerships, but these can be difficult to sustain as they require time and capital resource investments from companies that are certain to be short on one if not both. History suggests, however, that informal aggregations can be equally successful: the Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP combination, as one example, achieved massive success – success that continues to this day.

  • gNewSense 4.0 released

    I hereby announce the release of gNewSense 4, codenamed Ucclia. It's based on a solid Debian, modified to respect the Free Software Foundation's and is available for 3 architectures: i386, amd64 and mipsel (Lemote Yeeloong).

  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux Firewall OS Lands More OpenSSL Security Fixes

    Yesterday we reported news on the release of the IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution, which brought many security patches and improvements, along with updated components.

    Today, May 5, 2016, we're informing our readers about the immediate availability of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102, a small maintenance build to the stable IPFire 2.19 distribution that updates the OpenSSL package to version 1.0.2h, fixing a total of six vulnerabilities discovered upstream.

  • Samsung’s Artik 10, starts shipping in the US for $150

    Samsung’s Artik development boards are finally reaching hands of consumers in the US. The Artik development boards which were unveiled back in May 2015 at the IoT World 2015 have taken quite a lot of time to become consumer ready and take over the likes of the new Raspberry Pi 3, Pine 64,etc which have revolutionized the DIY Maker community with the “PC ona board” concept. And now, the Artik 10- the most powerful board from the Artik series is all set to intensify the ongoing competition. Priced at $150, which is more than what one would pay for 4 $35 priced Raspberry Pis, Samsung will sure have to do a lot to of work to impress the buyers and build a community around it.

  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • ​Why I Hate Security, Computers, and the Entire Modern Banking System

    I woke up yesterday to find that a string of mysterious credit card payments had wiped out my checking account.

    I spent the next few hours as a prisoner of the phone tree, being interrogated on the transactions that I wanted answers about. No, I did not have a Banana Republic credit card. I didn’t have a Capital One credit card either. And I had no idea who Michael was, or what he was doing with all my money.

    The woman on the other end of the phone flagged transaction after transaction. For each one, she read me a long, pre-written paragraph of instructions and disclaimers—verbatim, even if she had repeated the same words just before. “Okay, so,” I said, when she was finally done. “It looks like this person is paying off credit cards through the web. What… am I supposed to do about that? What information do they have that lets them do it?”

    “It looks like they have your routing number and account number,” she told me. “You should close this account and get a new one.”

    I thanked her and hung up. Then my head exploded.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Cockpit 0.105

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. There’s a new release every week. Here are the highlights from this weeks 0.105 release.

  • Mercurial 3.7 and 3.8

    The Mercurial project continues its fast pace of innovation in version control. Both major releases this year (3.7 and 3.8) have very important new features that promise to improve user experience to a large degree.

  • KDE neon User Edition Testing Survey Results

    We made a tech preview release of KDE neon User Edition 10 days ago and I made up a survey to get results for how people’s experiences were. We got 59 responses, here’s a summary:

  • Blog backlog, Post 1, Emoji
  • Nautilus & Gtk+ status – 1 year of progress

    Today I was having a rough time thinking on how to implement the new GtkPathBar, which is taking more time and frustration than expected given some technological limitations on animations in gtk+ and that responsive design is technologically hard to do.

Red Hat pilots new leadgen program in Canada targeting the mid-to-high market

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues

    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.

  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA

    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.

  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA

    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!

Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • The Pyra - handheld computer with Debian preinstalled

    The machine is a complete ARM-based PC with micro HDMI, SATA, USB plugs and many others connectors, and include a full keyboard and a 5" LCD touch screen. The 6000mAh battery is claimed to provide a whole day of battery life time, but I have not seen any independent tests confirming this. The vendor is still collecting preorders, and the last I heard last night was that 22 more orders were needed before production started.

  • New sources for contributors.debian.org

    Many people might not be aware of it, but since a couple of years ago, we have an excellent tool for tracking and recognising contributors to the Debian Project: Debian Contributors

    Debian is a big project, and there are many people working that do not have great visibility, specially if they are not DDs or DMs. We are all volunteers, so it is very important that everybody gets credited for their work. No matter how small or unimportant they might think their work is, we need to recognise it!

  • What's new since Jessie?

    Jessie was released one year ago now and the Java Team has been busy preparing the next release.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • The New Kingmakers and the Next Step for Open Source
  • Puppet Rebrands, Launches Numerous New Projects

    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008.

    Fast-forward to today, and Puppet Labs is changing its name to mark a new era, and is out with several new product initiatives. The organization, now known as just Puppet, has also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who comes to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president.

  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

    After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.

  • Jeremy Sands: Southern Fried College Football and Down-Home Linux

    This is a “Meet the Man Behind the Curtain” interview. It’s more about Sands than about either csnbbs.com or the LinuxFest he spends so much of his time organizing. But at the end of the interview, he talks about how the LinuxFest can always use more volunteers, even if all you can do is woman or man the registration desk for an hour. And sponsors? It’s a pretty healthy operation financially, but more sponsors are always welcome — especially ones from the Southeast, because this conference is proudly regional, not something identical to what you might find in, say, Los Angeles or Washington State.

  • A daughter of Silicon Valley shares her 'nerd' story

    In the end, I had to leave my job at ISC. Luckily, my work and my values brought me to Mozilla, where I've been both perseverant and lucky enough to have several meaningful roles. Today, I'm the senior program manager of diversity and inclusion. I work full-time on building a more diverse and inclusive Mozilla, standing on the shoulders of giants who did the same before me and in partnership with many of the smartest and kindest people I know. I've followed my passion for empowering people to find meaningful ways to contribute to the Internet I believe the world needs: an expansion of the one that excited me so long ago. And I get to see a lot of the world while I do it!

  • Waiting for Plugins: The Nylas N1 Email Client

    I wish the Nylas N1 team the best. I love that they took the time to build a Linux client. I love the idea of a hackable email client. But Nylas N1, as it stands now, is very limited. If you happen to like the defaults, you’re in for a treat. But if you’re looking for an email client that bends to your will and that you can easily customize as a non-developer, you’re probably better off with Thunderbird (especially now that people are thinking about its future). Thunderbird isn’t pretty—certainly not as pretty as Nylas N1—but it lets you build it into whatever email client you want it to be.

  • RightScale, Focused on the Cloud, Delivers Docker Container Management
  • Drupal developer on how to make your website more accessible

    For open source developer Mike Gifford, founder and president of OpenConcept Consulting Inc., any mention of Drupal accessibility after his name is redundant. He has spent the better part of 10 years improving and cementing accessibility in Drupal, enough to earn the role of official core accessibility maintainer for the project.

    Accessibility awareness has grown considerably in the Drupal community, but the Internet changes rapidly and the software needs to keep up to remain relevant. Recent press on the trend of decoupling Drupal—including the milestone post by project founder Dries Buytaert himself—tends to skirt the issue that so-called headless configurations can blot out accessibility functions designed for the theme layer.

  • DuckDuckGo Gives $225,000 to Open Source Projects

    It appears as if people have been using DuckDuckGo’s privacy centered search enough to make the company successful. Certainly not we-control-the-world successful like Google, but successful enough to give it some cash-on-hand breathing room. Also successful enough for the company to give back to the community by handing out $225,000 to some free and open source projects.

  • DuckDuckGo's 2016 open source donations
  • H2020 submission is rather 'anti-open'

    So what's the EC's current stand with forcing citizens to use Adobe's proprietary, closed technology and only Windows or Mac for submission of H2020 projects?

    With Adobe retiring Linux versions of Acrobat a couple of years ago (yes you can still download an obsolete version for Linux from Adobe's FTP but it won't work with ECAS "A forms"), this is a very "anti-open" situation.

  • It's Time to Open Source Moving Vehicles

    Open source software has made its mark on desktop computing, mobile phones, and the internet of things. But one area yet to be cracked wide open with freely distributed software is mobility: from autonomous cars, software-assisted driving, to connecting vehicles to other devices.

    On Wednesday, Arthur Taylor, chief technology officer at Advanced Telematic Systems, presented an open-source platform that he hopes will be the start of more innovation in software development for mobility technologies. But he also argued for the merits of open source software in a space pretty much dominated by the closed-off products of large corporates, such as Google and Uber.

  • Next Phase of Development Begins for The Hovalin, An Open Source 3D Printed Violin

    The Hovalin, developed by Matt and Kaitlyn Hova, is a open source 3D printed violin that has received much attention since the first version was released. Now the next phase of development has begun for the Hovalin 3.0, and Matt Hova has posted a blog entry and started a Reddit thread about the project that always keeps improving in a collaborative effort by many Hovalin fans.

    In the Hovalin website blog post, Hova explains what the most recent plans are for the latest version. First, version 3.0 will “move away from the current carbon fiber rectangle to an 8 mm rod.” Also, a lock will be created that will be used to keep the top and bottom pieces together. Custom brims to prevent warping will be added, as well as possible chin and shoulder rests. Finally, Hova wants to “work out a new system for distributing multiple options for the .stls including files with brim, files without brim, pre-sliced files with supports for the middle piece.” There are many changes in the works here, as you can see from just this list alone.

KDE Neon Plasma Wayland Daily Build ISOs Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Are Now Live

Filed under
KDE

Ex-Kubuntu leader Jonathan Riddell announced the availability of daily build ISO images for the rolling KDE Neon Linux operating system, which early adopters can get and test drive as we speak.

Read more

Fedora 25 Release Schedule Published, the Linux OS Could Arrive on November 8

Filed under
OS
Red Hat

Fedora 24 is currently in heavy development with the Beta release knocking at the door, and it looks like the Fedora Project developers are already planning on the next major release of the GNU/Linux operating system.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

European Unified Patent Court goes Open Source

Using Private Cloud and Drupal as a starting point together with small expert partners and agile management the new platform for the European UPC has been shaped to the exact requirements and quickly adapted while more needs surfaced. The only ready to use Open Source tool used has been Zarafa Collaboration Platform which integrated with the Case Management System will provide secure email, instant messaging, file sharing and video conferencing to the platform's users. The result is that, thanks to Open Source based platform and by working with SMEs, the UK IPO team has been able to deliver to the Unified Patent Court team the project earlier than planned and under budget. Read more

Linux Foundation: Open Source Programming and DevOps Jobs Plentiful

Open source can help you make money, especially if you have skills in programming or DevOps, which is emerging as one of the hottest areas of interest for hiring managers seeking open source admins and developers. That's according to the latest Open Source Jobs Report from the Linux Foundation, which is out this week. Read more Also: The 2016 Open Source Jobs Report: Companies Hungry for Professional Open Source Talent

Basho Open Sources Some Bits

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • The Simply Ubuntu Desktop
    Over on Flickr, fosco_ submitted this simple Ubuntu desktop, with just a few things tweaked for a cleaner experience. Like we’ve said, sometimes less is more, and this desktop makes good use of a few widgets to make a great UI even better.
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.5 Supports Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Debian 8.4
    The team of developers behind the HPLIP (short for HP Linux Imaging and Printing) project, announced a few moments ago the availability of the fifth maintenance build in the 3.16 stable series of the software. For those of you who are not in the loop, HP Linux Imaging and Printing is an open-source initiative to bring the latest HP (Hewlett-Packard) printer drivers to GNU/Linux operating systems. The software has a pretty active development team working behind it, releasing maintenance builds at least once a month.
  • Convergence delayed: Unity 8 won’t be the default desktop in Ubuntu 16.10
    Canonical’s vision of convergence—a single, highly adaptive environment that spans mobile and desktop uses—has been delayed yet again. The Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server, which are key to that vision, won’t be used by default in Ubuntu 16.10, according to discussion in the Ubuntu Online Summit.
  • Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet
    After Jack Wallen's recent review of the bq Aquaris M10 tablet, he was hit with a number of questions about the tablet. Jack addresses some of those questions to help you decide if the Ubuntu tablet is a worthy investment.