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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux 4.9.11

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.11 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Also: Linux 4.4.50

Top 5 Linux distros of 2017

Filed under
Linux

Ever since it was introduced, Linux has been gaining rapid popularity among users. Linux is used for networking, software development and web hosting. However, choosing the right distro is very important given that there are dozens of them which can fulfil your needs.

A distro, or distribution, is tech-talk for a Linux operating system (OS). Each distro is differentiated by its default interface, i.e. the way it looks, the library of apps officially supported by the specific “brand” of Linux, catalog of stock applications and even repositories. In the Linux world, there are hundreds of different flavors of distro. Examples include Debian, Ubuntu and Red Hat (among many others).

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Review on Solus 2017.01.01: Solid, Stable and Fast

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Reviews

Solus is an independent Linux distribution which targets desktop PC users. The project started in 2011 carrying the name “SolusOS” but later was changed to a plain “Solus”. What mainly makes Solus different is its desktop interface called “Budgie” beside a lot of other software like “eopkg” which is the distribution’s package manager.

Solus uses a rolling release model. Providing an updated ISO file of the distribution every few months containing the latest software and updates. This, however, doesn’t mean that the system is “unstable” like some other rolling Linux distributions.

There are a lot of exciting things when it comes to Solus. Its desktop interface “Budgie” is completely developed from scratch but is compatible with some GNOME technologies. It also has its own package manager called “eopkg” which uses .eopkg format for package files (it doesn’t depend on .deb or .rpm files nor can install them). “eopkg” was forked from Pardus Linux. But developers of Solus have plans to replace it with “sol“.

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Xfce Resurgence

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Releases, releases, releases!

    So it’s not that I’ve been quiet and lazy – I was actually busy preparing some releases and hacking on stuff. So here’s an update on what’s been going on and what’s to come.

  • Alternative Global Menu For MATE And Xfce: Vala Panel AppMenu [PPA]

    A while back I wrote about TopMenu, a panel plugin that provides global menu (AppMenu) support for MATE, then also included support for Xfce and LXDE.

    The problem with TopMenu is that it only partially supports GTK3, it doesn't support LibreOffice, and with Ubuntu 16.04, it doesn't support Qt (4 or 5) applications.

    Here's where Vala Panel AppMenu comes in.

  • Parole Media Player 0.9.0 Released

    Development for the Xfce media player is back on! Well over a year since the last release, Parole 0.9.0 brings a fresh set of features and fixes.

Reviews: OpenELEC and Clear Linux

Filed under
Reviews

I next turned my attention to a distribution which has only recently been added to the DistroWatch database: Clear Linux. The Clear Linux distribution is unusual in a few ways. For one, the project is not designed to be a full featured or general purpose operating system; Clear Linux focuses on performance more than features. The distribution is fairly minimal and is designed with cloud computing in mind, though it may also be used in other areas, particularly on servers.

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Slackware News

Filed under
Slack

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Ekos Polar Alignment Assistant Tool

    When setting up a German Equatorial Mount (GEM) for imaging, a critical aspect of capturing long-exposure images is to ensure a proper polar alignment. A GEM mount has two axis: Right Ascension (RA) axis and Declination (DE) axis. Ideally, the RA axis should be aligned with the celestial sphere polar axis. A mount's job is to track the stars motion around the sky, from the moment they rise at the eastern horizon, all the way up across the median, and westward until they set.

  • KStars 2.7.4 for Windows is released!

    Glad to announce the release of KStars v2.7.4 for Windows 64bit. This version is built a more recent Qt (5.8) and the latest KF5 frameworks for Windows bringing more features and stability.

  • Atom 1.14 Has Been Released

    As you may know, Atom is an open-source, multi-platform text editor developed by GitHub, having a simple and intuitive graphical user interface and a bunch of interesting features for writing: CSS, HTML, JavaScript and other web programming languages. Among others, it has support for macros, auto-completion a split screen feature and it integrates with the file manager.

  • Computer Eye Strain Prevention App `SafeEyes` Sees New Release

    SafeEyes is a Linux application which tries to protect your eyes from eye strain by reminding you to take breaks, while also providing some simple exercises.

  • WeatherDesk Changes Your Wallpaper Based On Current Weather Conditions

    WeatherDesk is a Python3 tool that allows using a wallpaper that changes based on the weather and optionally, time of day. It supports most Linux desktop environments as well as Windows and Mac.

  • Penguin Subtitle Player 1.0 Released With SSA/ASS Subtitles Support [Quick Update]

    Penguin Subtitle Player is especially useful for online video streaming websites that don't support subtitles or don't allow custom subtitles. You can also use Penguin Subtitle Player to display subtitles in a custom position, like on the black top/bottom bands, or to display multiple subtitles in the same time.

    The Qt5 application should be able to display subtitles on top of any window, including HTML5 or Flash videos.

    Until now, Penguin Subtitle Player (which we've covered before) only supported SRT subtitles, however, with the latest 1.0.0 version, released yesterday, the application received support for SSA/ASS subtitles.

  • Jam: Listen To Google Play Music From The Console

    Jam is a new Google Play Music console player for Linux and Windows. The application, which is written in Go, had its first alpha release about two weeks ago, and it's currently at version 0.4.0.

    Jam features a console interface very similar to that of Cmus, with easy keyboard navigation. While the interface is easy to use, it currently lacks a help screen, so for a list of keyboard shortcuts, see the Jam GitHub page.

  • “Wiki, what’s going on?” is back again and has a lot to say!
  • Plasma Sprint: Legacy Media Support in KDE Applications

    Boudhayan Gupta dropped by for the final day of the Plasma Sprint because he had 3D printed that save icon and wanted to test it. Coincidently I found a treasure in the glove compartment of my dad’s car, a Eurythmics Greatest Hits audio CD.

  • Kubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Update Available

    The second point release update to our LTS release 16.04 is out now. This contains all the bugfixes added to 16.04 since its first release in April. Users of 16.04 can run the normal update procedure to get these bugfixes. In addition, we suggest adding the Backports PPA to update to Plasma 5.8.5. Read more about it: http://kubuntu.org/news/plasma-5-8-5-bugfix-release-in-xenial-and-yakkety-backports-now/

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed.

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Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Filed under
GNOME

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding.

Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable.

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When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Filed under
Debian

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely.

Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers.

You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember.

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Android and Tizen Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Video: The Future of Samsung Tizen TV, a new user interface for your changing moods

    It’s our vision that helps us shape what tomorrow’s technology will look like. Samsung Design America are no strangers to the idea of vision and want to conceptualise the future of television or in our case Tizen television.

    Samsung wanted to realise how their products could adapt to this new world in which you are able to play any of the world’s media content, which is available anytime, anywhere on any given device.

  • Smartphone App: Indian Rail IRCTC PNR Status available in Tizen Store
  • NuAns is back with Neo Reloaded, but it's Android-powered

    Back in 2015, Japanese company NuAns showed off its Windows 10-powered Neo smartphone for the first time. It's selling point was the TWOTONE interchangeable covers for its back. The phone debuted at CES 2016, post which the company announced its plans for the device's global launch through a Kickstarter campaign.

  • New LG G6 photos surface
  • OnePlus 3 and 3T get Nougat-based Hydrogen OS 3.0 update
  • What devices are Android Authority readers using?
  • The Facts-Based Survey of Mobile Money Globally Focusing on the Reality and Numbers - Ignores totally the utterly trivial noise of Apple Pay, Bitcoins and Paypal

    World has 2.5 Billion active users of mobile payments already in 2016. That is more than the total active user base of Facebook. The value of mobile payment transactions last year was worth $600 Billion dollars. Easily ten times bigger than the total combined value of all app stores, iOS, Google Play and others, put together. Just in tickets sold onto mobile alone, the world saw 11.5 Billion mobile tickets delivered last year. The bulk of those were on busses, trains and airplanes, not movies, rock concerts and lottery tickets. Mobile coupons are worth $30 Billion dollars all by that category alone. All this is discussed in today's blog article. This article sets in proper relationship the various technologies that you probably have heard of about mobile payments such as mobile internet based services like Paypal, NFC based payments like Apple Pay, Starbucks style mobile wallets, M-Pesa style SMS payments, Bitcoins, but also QR codes, USSD, MMS and WAP Billing. This article offers the most thorough treatment of mobile payments in the public domain currently, and it focuses on where the money is. 54% of all mobile payments processed last year went through..... SMS. There are tons of case examples and statistics from all around the world: Australia, China, Finland, India, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Norway, Philippines, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK and USA. There are major corporations and brands discussed who do remarkable things with mobile payments today like Air Asia, Castrol, Coca Cola, Finnair, Lifebuoy, Nordstrom, Rihanna and Tally Weijl.

5 Best Linux Password Managers

Filed under
Linux

How do you keep track of ton of user accounts and passwords in this online age. I hope you do not use one password for all your online accounts as that is not safe. You need to come up with the unique and secure passwords for all your online services and accounts. So how do you manage or keep track of these passwords. In your memory? Come on! I recommend you use a password manager.

Read<br />
more

NGINX moves towards web server dominance with European expansion

Filed under
OSS

Web server NGINX powers more than 317 million sites around the globes, and has rapidly replaced Apache as the engine of choice for the world's 100,000 busiest, counting Netflix, Airbnb and Dropbox among its high-profile clients.

NGINX Inc - the company set up to commercialise the open source technology - has now set its sights on developing its business in Europe and recently opened a new EMEA headquarters in Cork, Ireland as a launching point to the region.

NGINX began life as a web server written by a Russian engineer called Igor Syosev in 2002 while he was working as a system administrator for the portal site Rambler.

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Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Security News

Filed under
Security

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Call to adopt free and open source software in Oman

Filed under
OSS

Adoption of free software applications in the public and private sectors in the Sultanate was one of the recommendations of the just concluded Free and Open Source Software Conference.

It also called for strengthening the role of small and medium enterprises in deploying free software developed in accordance with the requirements of the market and its needs.

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More in Tux Machines

Xfce Resurgence

  • Releases, releases, releases!
    So it’s not that I’ve been quiet and lazy – I was actually busy preparing some releases and hacking on stuff. So here’s an update on what’s been going on and what’s to come.
  • Alternative Global Menu For MATE And Xfce: Vala Panel AppMenu [PPA]
    A while back I wrote about TopMenu, a panel plugin that provides global menu (AppMenu) support for MATE, then also included support for Xfce and LXDE. The problem with TopMenu is that it only partially supports GTK3, it doesn't support LibreOffice, and with Ubuntu 16.04, it doesn't support Qt (4 or 5) applications. Here's where Vala Panel AppMenu comes in.
  • Parole Media Player 0.9.0 Released
    Development for the Xfce media player is back on! Well over a year since the last release, Parole 0.9.0 brings a fresh set of features and fixes.

Reviews: OpenELEC and Clear Linux

I next turned my attention to a distribution which has only recently been added to the DistroWatch database: Clear Linux. The Clear Linux distribution is unusual in a few ways. For one, the project is not designed to be a full featured or general purpose operating system; Clear Linux focuses on performance more than features. The distribution is fairly minimal and is designed with cloud computing in mind, though it may also be used in other areas, particularly on servers. Read more

Slackware News