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Tuesday, 21 Oct 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Automatic Feedback Directed Optimizer Merged Into GCC

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Development

The latest merged feature for next year's GCC 5 compiler release is AutoFDO support!

AutoFDO is the Automatic Feedback Directed Optimizer. AutoFDO relies on the Linux kernel's perf framework for profiling with performance counters. AutoFDO interprets the perf output and attempts to use the FDO infrastructure to produce better optimized code generation. AutoFDO according to its Google engineers is said to be noticeably faster than traditional FDO for GCC.

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Ubuntu at Suzuka, Game-Changing Frictional Games, and Linux for Privacy

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-s

Today in Linux news, Softpedia.com brings us another Ubuntu spotted-in-the-wild sighting. Hamish Wilson looks at Frictional Games' body of work and how it changed computer gaming. My Linux Rig talks to Charles Profitt about his Ubuntu setup and The New American says use Linux if you're "sick of surveillance."

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5 open access journals for open source enthusiasts

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OSS

The ever rising cost of academic journals is a major burden for researchers. Academic libraries cannot always keep up with increases in subscription fees causing libraries to drop journals from their collection. This makes it harder for students and professors to quickly and easily access the information they need. Inter-library loan requests are an option but they do take time. Even if it only takes a few days to fill an inter-library loan request, that is still time wasted for a researcher that has a deadline. While there is no single, quick fix to the problem with the academic journal prices, there is a movement applying the open source way to academic research in an attempt to solve the problem—the open access movement.

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In wake of Anonabox, more crowdsourced Tor router projects make their pitch

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Software

Last week, Ars reported on the story of Anonabox, an effort by a California developer to create an affordable privacy-protecting device based on the open source OpenWRT wireless router software and the Tor Project’s eponymous Internet traffic encryption and anonymization software. Anonabox was pulled from Kickstarter after accusations that the project misrepresented its product and failed to meet some basic security concerns—though its developers still plan to release their project for sale through their own website.
But Anonabox’s brief campaign on Kickstarter has demonstrated demand for a simple, inexpensive way to hide Internet traffic from prying eyes. And there are a number of other projects attempting to do what Anonabox promised. On Kickstarter competitor Indiegogo there’s a project called Invizbox that looks almost identical to Anonabox—except for the approach its team is taking to building and marketing the device.

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Debian Now Defaults To Xfce On Non-x86 Desktops

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Debian

Back in September Debian switched back to the GNOME desktop by default in place of Xfce for the upcoming Debian 8.0 "Jessie" release. However, as of today, the non-x86 versions of Debian have flip-flopped once again back to Xfce.

Debian switched back to GNOME in September over reasons dealing with accessibility, systemd integration, and other factors when seeing what was the best fit to be the default for Debian 8 Jessie. However, now for platforms aside from x86 and x86_64, Xfce has returned to the default over poor experiences in using the GNOME Shell.

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Phoenix Is Trying To Be An Open Version Of Apple's Swift

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Development

Apple unveiled the Swift programming language at this year's WWDC event but sadly it's still not clear whether Apple will "open up" the language to let it appear on non-Apple platforms. Swift is built atop LLVM and designed to be Apple's successor to Objective-C in many regards while suppoorting C/Obj-C/Obj-C++ all within a single program. With non-Apple folks being interested in the language, it didn't take long before an open-source project started up around it.

Ind.ie has today announced their Phoenix project that aims to be a free and open version of Apple's Swift programming language. The work is being led by Greg Casamento who is also the leader of GNUStep, the common open-source implementation of Apple's Cocoa frameworks.

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Google Chromebook quietly takes aim at the enterprise

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Linux
Google

Google's Chromebook is a cheap alternative to a more expensive Windows or Mac PC or laptop, but up until recently it lacked any specific administrative oversight tools for enterprise IT. While IT might have liked the price tag, they may have worried about the lack of an integrated tool suite for managing a fleet of Chromebooks. That's changed with release of Chromebook for Work, a new program designed to give IT that control they crave for Chromebooks.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Linux 3.19 To Have Skylake Graphics, PPGTT Enablement

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Linux

Now that Linux 3.18-rc1 is out, Intel's Open-Source Technology Center developers responsible for their graphics driver work have begun submitting their changes to drm-next for landing with Linux 3.19.

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Why Contribute to an Enterprise Open Source Project?

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OSS

It would be difficult to find a better example of the former scenario than the OpenDaylight project. With a focus on software-defined networking and network functions virtualization, OpenDaylight launched in April 2013 as a collaborative open source project hosted by The Linux Foundation. Since then, it's taken off like a rocket.

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Stick computer runs Android on quad-core Atom

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Android
Gadgets

Shenzhen Apec Electronics has launched a $110, Android stick computer built around a quad-core Intel Atom Z3735 SoC with 1-2GB of RAM and 16-32GB storage.

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Ubuntu Used by FIA Weatherman at Suzuka F1 Grand Prix

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Linux
Ubuntu

One of the favorite pastimes of the Ubuntu community is to find interesting or weird places where this operating system is being used. There have been some strange sightings before and it's usually the last place where you would expect to find a Linux system. The same is true for Suzuka.

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[GNU IceCat] 31.1.1 released

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GNU
Moz/FF

GNU Icecat is now available on Fedora repositories.

We’ve packaged latest release 31.1.1 based on Firefox 31 ESR. The 08th October, it has been announced by IceCat’s new maintainer, Rubén Rodríguez:

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Still running 32 bit Ubuntu?

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Hardware
Ubuntu

I’m considering a proposal to have 16.04 LTS be the last release of Ubuntu with 32 bit images to run on 32 bit only machines (on x86 aka Intel/AMD only – this has no bearing on ARM). You would still be able to run 32 bit applications on 64 bit Ubuntu.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Since last month's Linux review of the GeForce GTX 980 as NVIDIA's newest high-end GPU powered by their Maxwell architecture, many Phoronix readers have been requesting Ubuntu Linux tests of the GTX 970 too. I've now got my hands on an EVGA GeForce GTX 970 and am putting it through its paces today.

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GTK+ Gains Experimental Overlay Scrollbars

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Development
GNOME

The overlay scrollbar work that was committed on Monday is about improving the scrolling experience for those using GTK+ applications from touch screens. This prototype widget allows for showing a scroll position indicator on touch screens while hiding the scrollbar -- it sounds similar to Ubuntu's GTK2/GTK3 overlay scrollbar support for Unity.

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3 Alternatives to the Adobe PDF Reader on Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

Adobe has pulled the plug on supporting its PDF reader app for Linux. This should come as no surprise, as the last time Adobe Reader for Linux was updated came in May 2013. But until recently, you could at least download and install Reader on your Linux desktop machine. Now? You can’t. If you go to the Adobe Reader site, you’ll find the Linux installer is no longer available.

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How OpenStack powers the research at CERN

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OSS
Sci/Tech

OpenStack has been in a production environment at CERN for more than a year. One of the people that has been key to implementing the OpenStack infrastructure is Tim Bell. He is responsible for the CERN IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group which provides a set of services to CERN users from email, web, operating systems, and the Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud based on OpenStack.

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