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Friday, 03 Jul 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Key Question: Is Bundling Proper?

    In both cases, bundling is either a restraint of trade or simply a wasted motion. You don’t paint a house green only to paint it red if you have any sense. The right way to do IT is to make your choice and buy/acquire what you need to accomplish your goals in the most efficient manner possible. Bundling exclusively That Other OS with all PCs was only good for an illegal monopolist and its “partners” in crime. This is not about denying businesses profits. It’s about competition in the market and freedom for users/buyers to have choice.

  • Dell Gets An Airplane Mode Switch Driver In Linux 4.2
  • Call for hosts for GUADEC 2016

    GUADEC is the biggest gathering of GNOME users and developers, which takes place in Europe every year. It includes conference days, the GNOME Foundation annual general meeting and hacking in a week of coding and discussion.

  • 4MLinux 13.0 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Tumbleweed is rolling again

    Opensuse Tumbleweed has been static since the 20150612 snapshot. But today the 20150630 snapshot was released. We are moving again.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed net-tools vs net-tools-deprecated
  • PostgreSQL 9.5 in Debian

    The package is also waiting in NEW to be accepted for Debian experimental.

  • DUCK challenge at DebConf15
  • Upgrades to Jessie, Ruby 2.2 transition, and chef update

    Last month I started to track all the small Debian-related things that I do. My initial motivation was to be concious about how often I spend short periods of time working on Debian. Sometimes it’s during lunch breaks, weekends, first thing in the morning before regular work, after I am done for the day with regular work, or even during regular work, since I do have the chance of doing Debian work as part of my regular work occasionally.

    Now that I have this information, I need to do something with it. So this is probably the first of monthly updates I will post about my Debian work. Hopefully it won’t be the last.

  • Avalue debuts Braswellian COMs and an SBC

    Avalue unveiled three Linux-friendly embedded boards based on Intel’s 14nm Braswell SoCs: a Qseven COM, a COM Express Type 6 COM, and a 5.25-inch SBC.

  • Tizen In-App Purchases(IAP) for Unity Applications goes Live!
  • 5 Best Enterprise Apps and Extensions for Google Chrome

    We have already covered a lot of enterprise applications on our site before. However, one would never expect apps in this genre to exist on a browser like Google Chrome. But, nothing could be further from the real truth. Google's effort to outsmart even the biggest players in the enterprise market are gradually paying off. Slowly spreading its wings into the business world, Google is venturing into arenas where Microsoft once reigned supreme. While the competition doesn't concern us much, but what has happened, in effect, is that the rivalry is bringing out the best in both companies.

  • Platform9 Aims to Control the Private Cloud from the Cloud [Video]
  • Teaching Email Self-Defense: Campaigns intern leads a workshop at PorcFest

    My workshop on Email Self-Defense took place at the 12th annual Porcupine Freedom Festival in Lancaster, New Hampshire. Around eight people attended, which was a few more than I expected. Christopher Waid and Bob Call of ThinkPenguin joined me in helping everyone who brought a laptop to set up GnuPG properly. Those who didn't bring a laptop participated by observing the process on the system most similar to their own and asking questions about particular steps, so as to enable them to achieve the same configuration when they returned home.

  • Security advisories for Thursday

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat Summit and News

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Open source platform security considerations

Filed under
OSS

These days, more and more organizations are opting to use open-source platforms and software for their business needs. Open-source software is software that allows third parties to view, modify, and even relicense the software. There are a number of benefits to using this type of software, but it is important to recognize the potential network security risks, as well.

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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Ubuntu Is Finally Fixing Its Annoying GRUB Setting

Filed under
Ubuntu

An annoying setting of Ubuntu's GRUB configuration is going to be finally addressed in Ubuntu 15.10 and will be addressed in current Ubuntu releases via a stable release update.

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How Open Source Drives IBM's Systems Unit

Filed under
OSS

"Fifteen years ago, we made the decision to bring Linux into the mainframe. In fact, this was the first $1 billion commitment IBM made to Linux back in the year 2000. And I’d like to think, in some small way, we helped bring Linux to the enterprise with that commitment of over 15 years ago," Balog said.

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OPNsense 15.7 Released As Fork Of Pfsense

Filed under
Security
BSD

The OPNsense 15.7 release added i386 and NanoBSD support, LibreSSL support, re-based to FreeBSD 10.1, added OpenDNS support, intrusion detection support, new local/remote backlist options, some security fixes, and added many other new features.

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Also: Pfmatch, a packet filtering language embedded in Lua

bsdtalk 254 [Ogg]

finding bugs in tarsnap

Cinnamon and MATE Flavors

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Scientific Linux 7.1 review - More fiasco

Filed under
Red Hat

Scientific Linux is supposed to be a serious, stable, useful operating system. So is CentOS. And they both try to be fully compatible with RedHat Enterprise, because after all, that is what they are all about. However, while the latter does manage to do this in a rather smooth, pleasant manner AND still be a great candidate for home use, Scientific Linux fails in its mission statement on oh-so-many levels, definitely not helped by using the Gnome nonsense. Oh man how have the tables turned. Gnome 2 used to be my favorite desktop environment, and Gnome 3 is my most hated one.

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Fedora Pinos to do for Video what PulseAudio did for Audio

Filed under
-s

There were quite a few interesting headlines in the reader tonight. First up, Linux Mint 17.2 was released and openSUSE Tumbleweed is back on a roll. Christian Schaller recently said that Fedora is planning to do for video what PulseAudio did for audio. Several reviews warrant a mention and RedMonk published their bi-annual programming language rankings report. Sourceforge is forming a community panel and Linus Torvalds was interviewed over at Slashdot.

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Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Applications receive security fixes

    KDE recently released the latest slew of security updates for KDE Applications 15.04, bumping the version number to 15.04.3. Other than security fixes there are translation updates, there are no big features so upgrading will go smoothly.

  • KDE Applications 15.04.3 Out Now with over 20 Bugfixes

    KDE announced just a few minutes ago the immediate availability of the third maintenance release for the KDE Applications 15.04 software suite that is being distributed as part of the next-generation KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

  • Roundcube Next: The Next Steps

    The crowdfunding campaign to provide funding and greater community engagement around the refactoring of Roundcube's core to give it a secure future has just wrapped up. We managed to raise $103,531 from 870 people. This obviously surpassed our goal of $80,000, so we're pretty ecstatic. This is not the end, however: now we begin the journey to delivering a first release of Roundcube Next. This blog entry outines some of that path forward

  • Looks as if Wily got Plasma 5.3.2.

    No backports PPA required.

  • GSoC 2015 midterm update
  • GSoC ’15 Post #3: Install-ed!
  • Joining the press – Which topic would you like to read about?

    Therefore, I thought that a closer collaboration with Linux Veda could be mutually beneficial: Getting exclusive insights directly from a core KDE contributor could give their popularity an additional boost, while my articles could get an extended audience including people who are currently interested in Linux and FOSS, but not necessarily too much interested in KDE yet.

  • Pointing devices KCM: update #2

    Originally I planned to work on the KCM UI at this time. But as I am unsure how it should look like, I started a discussion on VDG forum, and decided to switch to other tasks.

  • Fiber UI Experiments – Conclusion?

    It’s been one heckuva road, but I think the dust is starting to settle on the UI design for Fiber, a new web browser which I’m developing for KDE. After some back-and fourth from previous revisions, there are some exciting new ideas in this iteration! Please note that this post is about design experiments – the development status of the browser is still very low-level and won’t reach the UI stage for some time. These experiments are being done now so I can better understand the structure of the browser as I program around a heavily extension-based UI, so when I do solidify the APIs it we have a rock-solid foundation.

  • KDEPIM without Akonadi
  • KDEPIM report (week 26)

Smartphones Are The New PC And */Linux Rules

Filed under
Android
Linux

According to Digitimes and StatCounter the smartphone is the new PC and */Linux is the winner in a competitive market for client operating systems. That Other OS is still ahead in total share of client OS page-views but is in decline while Linux operating systems grow by high single digits.

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Ground zero for an open-source revolution

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

For a relatively small company, Red Hat, inc. has become a major player in open source technology.

“It is definitely more than a Linux company,” said theCUBE cohost Dave Vellante, summarizing day one of Red Hat Summit 2015. “This conference is ground zero for an open-source revolution.”

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Also: Red Hat Summit kicks off with PaaS focus

Q&A: Why Congress is Jumping on the Open Source Bandwagon

Filed under
OSS

Members of the House, committees and staff have officially received the green light to obtain open source software for their offices, and to discuss software code and policy with developers, citizens and other legislators in communities such as GitHub, according to the Congressional Data Coalition advocacy group.

The White House joined open source code repository site GitHub in 2012. But it wasn't until this May a sitting congressman, Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., first joined the site. Connolly used it to make edits to guidance on implementation of the Federal IT Acquisition Reform Act.

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