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Tuesday, 20 Apr 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Initial Radeon vs. GeForce Vulkan Ray-Tracing Performance On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With today's Radeon Software for Linux 21.10 packaged driver release is the first time Vulkan ray-tracing is being exposed on Linux for AMD Radeon graphics cards with any of the multiple driver options. Here are some initial benchmarks looking at how the Radeon RX 6000 series Vulkan ray-tracing performance is on Linux compared to NVIDIA's Vulkan ray-tracing support with the existing RTX 20/30 series hardware.

As outlined in the earlier article, Radeon Software for Linux 21.10 delivers initial Vulkan ray-tracing support via this packaged driver on enterprise Linux distributions. This initial Vulkan ray-tracing support is just in their binary driver stack and hasn't yet appeared in AMDVLK as their open-source AMD Radeon Vulkan driver build. Hopefully that AMDVLK code drop will come soon for those not wanting to use the packaged driver or running on an unsupported distribution, etc. Meanwhile as mentioned the Mesa RADV Vulkan driver is also working towards Vulkan ray-tracing but will likely be still some more time before that is ready to go and merged into Mesa.

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Webchats (so-called 'Events'): Red Hat/IBM, FreeBSD, KubeCon, and Other LF Fluff

Filed under
Red Hat
BSD
  • Hybrid and edge strategies in an open-source world will be key focus during Red Hat Summit on Apr. 27, 28

    When IBM announced its intention to acquire Red Hat Inc. for $34 billion in 2018, it was widely viewed as a sign that the open-source train had finally arrived in the station. Less than three years later, open source has grown to encompass not only the station, but the train tracks and surrounding enterprise territory as far as the eye can see.

    In March, Red Hat released its “State of Enterprise Open Source” report, which, not surprisingly, validated the technology’s widespread enterprise influence. The report found that 90% of IT leaders were using open-source products, primarily in infrastructure modernization, networking and application development.

  • FreeBSD meetings on the Desktop

    FreeBSD on the desktop is a whole stack - X11, Qt, KDE Frameworks, KDE Plasma and KDE Gear, and Wayland, and Poppler and GTK - o my!

  • Ubuntu Blog: Canonical & Ubuntu at KubeCon Europe 2021

    It’s that time of the year again! KubeCon and CloudNativeCon Europe 2021 are just around the corner and, as always, Canonical and Ubuntu have a lot cooking in the Kubernetes oven especially for the event. This year, we’ll be showcasing solutions and best practices around Charmed Operators, as well as streamlined Kubernetes at the edge with micro clouds.

    We’ll be at KubeCon on May 4-7th, as well as hosting a co-located event of our own on May 3 so make sure to book a meeting and come by to chat about your K8s use case anytime during the week.

  • SD Times news digest: Android GPU Compute changes, Xilinx’s Kria Portfolio, and ELISA Project expands its global ecosystem

    The ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project announced that Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat joined its ecosystem.

    The project aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems

    “The primary challenge is selecting Linux components and features that can be evaluated for safety and identifying gaps where more work is needed to evaluate safety sufficiently,” said Shuah Khan, Chair of the ELISA Project Technical Steering Committee and Linux Fellow at the Linux Foundation. “We’ve taken on this challenge to make it easier for companies to build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications by exploring potential methods to enable engineers to answer that question for their specific system.”

  • Linux, Lyft establish mobile developers collective to build enterprise-grade apps

    To stimulate better collaboration amongst mobile developers, the Linux Foundation has founded one of its first open-source platforms centered around mobile app development. The new group is known as the Mobile Native Foundation, and it will be a collaborative IT infrastructure intended at enhancing the building of Android and iOS smartphone applications.

Dev kit and module run Linux on Zynq Ultrascale+

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Topic Embedded has launched a “Florida Plus” dev kit that runs Linux on its Zynq Ultrascale+ based Miami MPSoC Plus module. Meanwhile, Aries announced it has begun distributing Topic’s Zynq-based Miami modules.

Netherlands-based Topic Embedded Systems has been around for 20 years doing FPGA work, with the last decade focused primarily on manufacturing Linux-driven Xilinx Zynq based modules. Last week, Topic announced an open-spec Florida Plus Development Kit that showcases its top-of-the-line Miami MPSoC Plus compute module, which features the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC.
system-on-chip.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install Mosh Shell as SSH Alternative on Linux Desktop

    Using an SSH client tool is always helpful and handy for the system administrator and the remote users. In the conventional SSH clients, you may find some network and auto session logout issues. As a system admin, you already realize the importance of the CLI-based remote SSH client. To solve frequent logout, lagging, and packet loss issues, you can install the Mosh SSH as an SSH alternative on Linux. The Mosh stands for the Mobile shell, which is a command-line-based secure shell client for Linux. It doesn’t require a stale and static IP address to establish the connection; moreover, the Mosh SSH shell client is also compatible with mobile devices.

  • New Linux Publication Released: How Linux Works, 3rd Edition: What Every Superuser Should Know by Brian Ward

    I am very excited about this publication not only because it is a great book covering such a large set of Linux-related topics but also because I helped with the technical review.

  • How to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04

    The objective is to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo Linux and switch from a opensource Nouveau driver to the proprietary Nvidia driver.

    To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

  • How to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2.

  • How to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

    If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

GNU Project: GCC 11.1 Release Candidate and Cryptographic Algorithms GnuTLS

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GCC 11.1 Release Candidate available from gcc.gnu.org
    The first release candidate for GCC 11.1 is available from
    
     https://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420/
     ftp://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420
    
    and shortly its mirrors.  It has been generated from git revision
    r11-8265-g246abba01f302eb453475b650ba839ec905be76d.
    
    I have so far bootstrapped and tested the release candidate on
    x86_64-linux and i686-linux.  Please test it and report any issues to
    bugzilla.
    
    If all goes well, I'd like to release 11.1 on Tuesday, April 27th.
    
  • GCC 11.1 RC Released, GCC 12 In Development On Trunk

    The release candidate to GCC 11.1 as the first stable release of GCC 11 is now available for testing. If all goes well GCC 11.1.0 will officially debut next week while GCC 12 is now in development with their latest Git code.

    Red Hat's Jakub Jelinek announced the GCC 11.1 release candidate today, which has been bootstrapped and tested so far for i686 and x86_64 Linux. He is hoping to release GCC 11.1 officially next week if all goes well.

  • Daiki Ueno: AF_ALG support in GnuTLS

    The Linux kernel implements a set of cryptographic algorithms to be used by other parts of the kernel. These algorithms can be accessed through the internal API; notable consumers of this API are encrypted network protocols such as IPSec and WireGuard, as well as data encryption as in fscrypt. The kernel also provides an interface for user-space programs to access the kernel crypto API.

    GnuTLS has recently gained a new crypto backend that uses the kernel interface in addition to the user-space implementation. There are a few benefits of having it. The most obvious one is performance improvement: while the existing user-space assembly implementation has comparable performance to the in-kernel software emulation, the kernel crypto implementation also enables workload offloading to hardware accelerators, such as Intel QAT cards. Secondly, it brings support for a wider variety of CPU architectures: not only IA32 and AArch64, but also PowerPC and s390. The last but not least is that it could be used as a potential safety net for the crypto algorithms implementation: deferring the crypto operations to the kernel means that we could have an option to workaround any bugs or compliance (such as FIPS140) issues in the library.

More JingPad A1 Linux tablet detailed revealed ahead of crowdfunding

Filed under
Hardware

The JingPad A1 is a tablet with an 11 inch AMOLED touchscreen display, support for digital pen input, and a detachable keyboard that lets you use the tablet like a laptop. It also has an operating system that’s designed for both tablet and laptop mode.

That’s because the JingPad A1 will be the first tablet to ship with JingOS, an operating system developed by Chinese company Jingling that’s a custom Linux distribution designed for tablets but capable of running desktop applications (as well as some Android applications).

First unveiled in March, the tablet will go up for pre-order soon through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. Jingling hasn’t announced a price yet, but an Indiegogo preview page is now live, and folks who sign up with an email address may be able to save 40-percent when orders open up in May.

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Firefly ROC-RK3566-PC: Another credit card-sized Linux PC with a Rockchip RK3566 processor

Filed under
Hardware

Rockchip’s RK3566 processor is a new 1.8 GHz ARM Cortex-A55 chip with Mali-G52 graphics and support for features including playback of 4K/60Hz video in H.264, H.265, and VP9 codecs.

The first single-board computers (SBCs) powered by the chip are expected to ship in the coming months. Last week Pine64 revealed that a Raspberry Pi-sized SBC called the Quartz64 Model B was on the way. Now Firefly has introduced a similarly-sized RK3566 SBC called the ROC-RK3566-PC.

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Let's Try Debian Unstable

Filed under
Reviews
Debian

You may have been familiar with the name Debian Unstable also known as Sid and may want to try it. As an Ubuntu user, this curiosity is nothing weird, as every release of Ubuntu itself is created from it, and many persons around you may talk about it pretty often. The secret is, there is no image file to download for it, so you cannot install it as an operating system. This is why I make this simple guide to invite you to try Debian Unstable on your computer. Let's go!

[...]

You must have a computer with Debian Stable installed. For example, you may install Debian in a virtual machine as it counts as one computer. At the time I write this, Stable is Debian 10. Next time, Stable will be Debian 11. If you do not have one yet, download Debian 10, and install it to your computer. Please be aware that doing this will require you large data transfer and also time. As an example,in an expe riment it requires ~2GB download, ~4GB storage, and no less than 4 hours to finish.

[...]

Finally, post-upgrade may introduce you to multiple packages need to be removed. This can be known by running simply $ sudo apt-get install without argument. It may say "some packages need to be removed by command line apt-get autoremove.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • HOWTO Make Mozilla Firefox Blazing Fast On Linux

    The Firefox web browser is, by default, much, much slower than it can be on Linux. There is, luckily, several ways to make it a whole lot faster by changing one or more configuration options that are not so easy to find or understand. Newly released Firefox 88 made it easier, though you can make older Firefox versions and Firefox LTS versions faster with some trickery. Here's the options you have and the performance they provide.

  • How to Install Guider Linux Performance Analyzer on Ubuntu 20.04

    Monitoring the real-time state and behavior of the system and each of its components is crucial for any system administrator. Guider is an open-source performance analyzing tool for Linux operating systems. It is designed to measure the use of system resources, analyze it and improve the performance of the operating system.

    In this tutorial, I will show you how to install and use Guider on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to Uninstall Chromium and Get Rid of It From Your Computer

    Chromium is the open-source web browser project used by Google to create Google Chrome. It has an interface and functionality similar to Chrome, allowing you to navigate the Internet and take advantage of privacy features. You can set it up on any operating system, including Windows and Mac. It’s also possible to install Chromium on Linux.

  • How to Write a Shell Script in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    A shell script is a Linux-based script in which commands are written, and when a user executes the script, all those commands that are in the script are executed one after another. Think of it this way: You have a task you need to do that requires a certain number of commands to be written by the user, so it’s difficult to write and then execute those commands one at a time, that’s where the shell script comes in.

    To accomplish this task, simply write all of these commands into a single script and save that script file somewhere. Then, when the user needs to do a particular task, all they have to do is run the saved script and the task is done without having to write all the commands again one by one. The shell is an interpreter of the commands that the user writes.

  • How to display GUI dialogs in bash script using Zenity

    We all know that Linux bash scripts are a real strength of Linux. Often we want to display a graphical user interface (GUI) in our scripts to make interaction with users easier. GUI makes any script more user-friendly and beautiful.
    For GTK in shell scripts, there are many options and tools available in Linux.

    In this article, we will show you how to use Zenity to display GUI dialogs in Bash scripts.

    Zenity is an open-source application for displaying simple GUI in shell scripts. It makes scripts more user-friendly by displaying GTK+ dialogs. Zenity is a handy command-line tool for modern shell scripting. Zenity is easy to use and a cross-platform application.

  • Steven Pritchard: Dealing with old ssh implementations

    Over the last several releases, Fedora has removed support for old, broken crypto algorithms. Unfortunately, this makes it harder to deal with old devices or servers that can't easily be upgraded. For example, I have a switch that I can't connect to with the ssh on Fedora.

The 5 Best Linux PDF Editors You Should Try

Filed under
Software

Finding a good and reliable PDF editor is a nerve-racking job with all these unwanted opinions flying around on the internet. Everyone has different preferences and use cases for their PDF editor, and choosing the one that suits you the best is important.

The number of applications available for Linux-based operating systems is immeasurable. But when it comes to PDF editors, only a handful of the apps top the chart. In this guide we have curated a list of the best Linux PDF editors that you can download for free on your computer.

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How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.04 from Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy to Hirsute)

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

Here are the steps on how to upgrade your Ubuntu 21.04 from Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla to Hirsute Hippo).
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VirtualBox 6.1.20 Released with Linux Kernel 5.11 Support, CentOS Stream Improvements

Filed under
Software

Three months in the works, VirtualBox 6.1.20 is here to introduce support for the latest and greatest Linux 5.11 kernel series for both hosts and guests. This means that you’ll now be able to install VirtualBox on GNU/Linux distributions powered by Linux kernel 5.11, as well as to run Linux 5.11-based distros in virtual machines.

On top of that, this release improves support for the CentOS Stream operating system, as well as for the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.4 operating system release by making sure the kernel module is correctly built, and fixes the compilation of the vboxvideo module for the Linux 5.10 LTS kernel series.

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Firefox 89 Enters Beta Testing with Stunning New Look, Improved Privacy

Filed under
Moz/FF

You might have heard of Firefox’s forthcoming new design, and it’s finally happening with the Firefox 89 release, due out early this summer. Mozilla was working hard during the past few months on a fresh new look for its open source and free web browser, and let me tell you that it looks stunning.

The biggest change in this release being a fresh new designed to make your browsing experience more enjoyable, faster, cleaner, and easier to use. Firefox 89’s stunning new look consists of a modern and great looking toolbar with floating tabs, a simplified and cleaner new tab design that easy to customize, streamlined menus, updated infobars and modals, more consistent styling, as well as a brand-new first-run welcome page.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ARM in the Datacenter

    ARM processors have seen unprecedented growth in the last three years and are now being used in everything from smart watches to Apple's new M1 desktop and laptop systems, but there is one sector where they have yet to take hold: the enterprise market. For years, many of the largest cloud providers have designed computers around ARM chips, and in December 2020, Microsoft said it was joining the fray by designing its own ARM-based chips for Azure and Surface PCs. Now we are seeing technology based on ARM chips float down from the cloud providers and rise up from the consumer market and start to take hold in the datacenter. In this article, I will highlight some different ARM devices and discuss ways that they have made their way into the datacenter.

  • Hacked Codecov uploading script leaked creds for two months

    Scores of projects potentially affected by supply chain attack.
    A malicious alteration to a shell script lay undetected since January this year at software testing coverage report provider Codecov, sparking fears of another significant supply chain attack.

    Forensic analysis shows that an unknown threat actor exploited an error in Codecov's Docker container image creation process, and gained access to the credential that allowed the modification to the company's Bash Uploader script.

    Codecov said a Google Cloud Storage key was accessed starting January 31 this year, and not secured until April 1 US time.

    The script is normally used to upload coverage reports to Codecov, but it was altered to transmit the UNIX shell environment, which can be used to store variables.

    [...]

    The company said it has rotated all credentials, including the key that was captured by the attackers, and set up monitoring and auditing to ensure that the Bash Uploader cannot be compromised like this again.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (xorg-server), Fedora (CImg, gmic, leptonica, mingw-binutils, mingw-glib2, mingw-leptonica, mingw-python3, nodejs, and seamonkey), openSUSE (irssi, kernel, nextcloud-desktop, python-django-registration, and thunderbird), Red Hat (389-ds:1.4, kernel, kernel-rt, perl, and pki-core:10.6), SUSE (kernel, sudo, and xen), and Ubuntu (clamav and openslp-dfsg).

  • Google plans to tidy up search on Chromebooks

    While the exact categories are still up in the air, we could see the company going for something similar to the Linux distro Ubuntu, which organizes system search results into different categories for applications, files, folders, websites, and more.

  • Linux Desktops in the Cloud with Shells.com [Ed: A lot of YouTube has become paid-for spam and pseudo 'reviews']
  • These guys made me a CUSTOM gaming laptop, running LINUX!

    I received this laptop, which has been custom-made for me by a company called Eurorra. It's a bit of a weird story, and this won't be a traditional laptop review, because... well, you'll see.

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Software

  • GStreamer WebKit debugging tricks using GDB (2/2)

    This post is a continuation of a series of blog posts about the most interesting debugging tricks I’ve found while working on GStreamer WebKit on embedded devices.

  • 13 Reasonable Alternatives to Adobe's Expensive Apps [Ed: Glimpse is to GIMP what IceWeasel was to Firefox except there are No trademark issues at all! It's claiming to solve an issue which simply does not exist!]

    I’m not a fan of the GIMP name, but I the GNU Image Manipulation Program has been an open-source alternative to Photoshop for as long as I can remember—decades, really. While I never found it to be as feature-filled as PhotoShop, but before Photopea, it was the software I’d turn to whenever I needed to make some edits on a system that didn’t have a graphic-editing app installed. GIMP is fairly easy to use, but even if you have to spend a little time getting a feel for the app, relish in the fact that you’re paying absolutely nothing to use it.

    Then there’s Glimpse, a fork of GIMP that’s reasonably up-to-date (though it isn’t based off of the latest version of the GIMP app as of this writing). However, if you really detest that name, it’s a perfectly fine alternative.

  • 20 Years FSFE: Interview with Fernanda Weiden

    In our third birthday publication we interview Fernanda Weiden - co-founder of the FSF Latin America and former Vice President of the FSFE - about the early starts of Free Software in Latin America, nowadays use of Free Software in Big Tech and about support of diversity in different communities.

    Fernanda "nanda" Weiden has a long history of personal engagement for Free Software and the FSFE. Actually a way too long to fit into this introduction but we try at least to shed light on some of her contributions: Raised in Porto Alegre, Brasil, Fernanda organised FISL, the largest Free Software conference in Latin America. Later she became founding and council member of the Free Software Foundation Latin America, before moving to Europe, where she joined the FSFE as a volunteer. Just a little bit later she was elected Vice President of the Free Software Foundation Europe from 2009-2011.

    [...]

    When I became a Free Software activist, one had to argue about the platform to be used to build software. Today, Free Software isn't a question anymore. It is the norm in many places. Big companies play an important role because they hire and pay engineers to continue to produce state of art software that is then available through Free Software licenses. Of course not all engineer hours go into that, but it is definitely something that both big tech companies I worked for appreciated and contributed to in different ways.

    The most important thing, in my view, is to make it a priority to build an inclusive environment. [...] It is a virtuous cycle: once you start making positive moves, more diverse talent will keep coming because they will feel safe.

  • Penguicon 2021

    I'll participate to talks and give a Krita workshop about character design (a penguin wizard; a small creature possible to start on a 1h session). If you don't know what is Penguicon and are curious to attend their virtual event this week-end, you can find all information here...

  • Peruse 2.0 Beta 1 "The Long Awaited Beta"

    A fair while ago, in the before times of late 2016, a release was made of a piece of software known as Peruse. Since then, it spent some time getting work done on it on and off, until sometime last year when we decided that it really was time to stop the thing just floundering in some free software equivalence of development hell, and actually get it ready for its next release.

    First things first. For those of you who are new, Peruse is KDE's comic book reader project, which consists of the reader application, Peruse Reader, and the comic book creation tool called Peruse Creator.

    [...]

    The original release of Peruse was built on top of Kirigami 1, during the early days of the development towards what would eventually become Plasma Mobile. One of the first things to happen after the release of version 1.2 was to port Peruse to Kirigami 2, and the result for the user is partly just more modern and stable code, but also much more easily navigable using a keyboard. Since then, the Peruse team has been working to bring more of the features of Kirigami' which didn't exist in the first version into Peruse, such as the way the search field works, the way scrolling pages are handled, page row layers, action handling, and a whole bunch more.

    [...]

    Before we get to the downloads: This is a beta version, and you should expect it to behave like one of those: Things may well be a bit broken or unpolished, and we will be very happy to see reports any bugs you run into over on the Peruse product category on bugs.kde.org. With that out of the way, head over to peruse.kde.org to grab yourself a shiny new copy of Peruse Smile

  • Introducing OpenSearch
  • AWS Introduces OpenSearch [Ed: Isn't it hilarious that Amazon is outsourcing code to proprietary software trap and monopoly of Microsoft? As if Amazon doesn't know how to set up its own Git server...]

    Earlier this year, when Elastic changed the licensing model of Elasticsearch and Kibana from open source Apache v2 license to the Server Side Public License (SSPL), AWS stepped up to ensure the packages remained available and well supported.

  • Continuous 3D Hand Pose Tracking using Machine Learning & Monado OpenXR

    Our hands are our primary operating tools, so their location, orientation, and articulation in space is vital for many human-computer interfaces. Automated hand post estimation can be very useful for diverse applications such as virtual/augmented reality (XR), sign language recognition, gesture recognition and robotics. Collabora is particularly interested in using hand pose estimation in XR as this application meshes nicely with our work on Monado, the world’s first open-source OpenXR runtime.

    Recent interest in hand pose estimation is driven by the marked advantage it can give to many fields, such as virtual sports coaching and factory worker safety. Pose estimation has the potential to create a new generation of automated tools designed to precisely measure human movement. In addition, pose estimation enhances existing applications in a broad range of areas, including: Augmented Reality, Animation, Gaming and Robotics. This is not by any means an exhaustive list, but it includes some of the primary ways in which pose estimation is shaping our future.

    Although the two fields of hand post and body pose estimation have significant overlap regarding their objectives and difficulties, hand pose estimation has a unique set of problems such as lack of characteristic local features, pose ambiguity, and substantial self-occlusion, making it a challenging problem to solve.

  • AI at the Edge with K3s and NVIDIA Jetson Nano: Object Detection and Real-Time Video Analytics

    With the advent of new and powerful GPU-capable devices, the possible use cases that we can execute at the edge are expanding. The edge is growing in size and getting more efficient as technology advances. NVIDIA, with its industry-leading GPUs, and Arm, the leading technology provider of processor IP, are making significant innovations and investments in the edge ecosystem landscape. For instance, the NVIDIA Jetson Nano is the most cost-effective device that can run GPU-enabled workloads and can handle AI/ML data processing jobs. Additionally, cloud native technologies like Kubernetes have enabled developers to build lightweight applications using containers for the edge. To enable a seamless cloud native software experience across a compute-diverse edge ecosystem, Arm has launched Project Cassini – an open, collaborative standards-based initiative. It leverages the power of these heterogenous Arm-based platforms to create a secure foundation for edge applications.

    K3s, developed by Rancher Labs and now a CNCF Sandbox project, has been a key orchestration platform for these compact footprint edge devices. As a Kubernetes distro built for the edge, it is lightweight enough to not put a strain on device RAM and CPU. Taking advantage of the Kubernetes device plugin framework, the workloads running on top of these devices can access the GPU capabilities with efficiency.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

     

  • 4 Excellent Free Books to Learn J

    The J programming language, developed in the early 1990s by Kenneth E. Iverson and Roger Hui, is an array programming language based primarily on APL (also by Iverson). It’s available on a wide variety of computers and operating systems. J is distinguished by its simple and consistent rules, a large set of built-in capabilities, powerful facilities for defining new operations, and a general and systematic treatment of arrays.

    The J system provides: an engine for executing J; various front ends that provide user interfaces to the J engine; a library, written in J, that provides an IDE (interactive development environment), numerous tools, utilities, demos, tutorials; and online documentation.

    J is a very terse array programming language, and is most suited to mathematical and statistical programming, especially when performing operations on matrices. It has also been used in extreme programming and network performance analysis.

  • First steps of sending alerts to Discord and others from syslog-ng: http() and Apprise

    A returning question I get is: “I see, that you can send alerts from syslog-ng to Slack and Telegram, but do you happen to support XYZ?” Replace XYZ with Discord and countless others. Up until recently, my regular answer has been: “Take a look at the Slack destination of syslog-ng, and based on that, you can add support for your favorite service”. Then I learned about Apprise, a notification library for Python, supporting dozens of different services.

    This blog is the first part of a series. It covers how to send log messages to Discord using the http() destination of syslog-ng and an initial try at using Apprise for alerting.

    The next part will show you a lot more flexible version of the Apprise integration: making fields configurable using templates and using a block to hide implementation details from the user.

    The Python code in these two blogs is sample code, provided to you for inspiration. They are not for production use, as among others, they lack error handling and reporting. If time and my Python knowledge permits, I might have a more production-ready code later on, that I plan to cover in a third blog.

  •    

  • The First-Person Sequel and Roda Insights from the Lead Dev: an Exclusive Interview with Jeremy Evan

    Jeremy Evans is the lead developer of the Sequel database library, the Roda web toolkit, the Rodauth authentication framework, and many other Ruby libraries. He is the maintainer of Ruby ports for the OpenBSD operating system, and has contributed to CRuby and JRuby, as well as many popular Ruby libraries. We are happy to present a brand-new interview with Jeremy to our readers. Hope you enjoy it!

    [...]

    I have been contributing patches and bug reports occasionally to Ruby since 2009. However, I started to get more involved with Ruby in early 2019 when hearing about the direction for keyword arguments in Ruby 3. The original proposal for keyword arguments in Ruby 3 was for full separation, so that passing a hash to a method that accepts keywords would raise an error, but also that passing keywords (a hash without braces) to a method that accept an optional hash argument would also raise an error. I thought this proposal went too far, by breaking compatibility with Ruby code that did not use keyword arguments at all. I built a patch on top of the original proposal that was more backwards compatible. I ended up presenting this proposal with Yusuke Endoh at the developer meeting at RubyKaigi 2019. While waiting on a decision from Matz about keyword arguments, I started sending in patches to fix other Ruby bugs, and after quite a few patches, Endoh-san recommended I become a committer, and Matz approved.

  •      

  • Using Subresource Integrity (SRI) in Vite with @small-tech/vite-plugin-sri

             

OOMKiller and httpd

How to set up httpd to survive when OOMKiller kills one of its children.

In Copr, we have had a leaking process in our frontend. It is one route, which was leaking few megabytes. The route has a separate child process in httpd, so only one process has been leaking. We still did not identify the culprit, and in the meantime we had to fight with OOMKiller.

Few megabytes here and there and the process was too big. And we run out of memory. OOMKiller came and killed the process (as it was the biggest one). Usually, you will not care. Httpd is killing its children periodically, and when one is killed, the master process starts new child immediately. But…

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Also: In the trenches with Thomas Gleixner, real-time Linux kernel patch set

Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Focusrite is hostile to Linux, avoid if possible

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Last year, I acquired a Focusrite Scarlett 4i4. The main purpose was to improve the quality of my live coding sessions, and also to allow me experiment with recording my own songs.

It was a pain from the moment I plugged this card into my laptop, until now.

As of today, I’m happy that I’m finally getting rid of it.

Allow me to explain how much of a disaster their approach is. Most USB digital audio interfaces are compatible with industry standards – they’re class compliant. That means they advertise features, inputs, outputs, etc, using a standard USB protocol.

Not Focusrite.

Focusrite decided they didn’t like hardware buttons. So they removed them, and switched to software-controlled features.

For some reason that I’m yet to understand, Focusrite decided they wouldn’t use any standard protocol to advertise these features. So they invented a proprietary protocol only to control these features. This protocol is only usable through their Focusrite Control software – which, as you might have guessed, is proprietary, and only runs on Windows and Mac.

Focusrite decided they didn’t want their hardware to work on Linux, so not even a minimal documentation about routing was published. That makes it even harder for the heroes trying to reverse-engineer their cards.

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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How to install Ubuntu Budgie 21.04

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu Budgie 21.04.

  • Using the /proc Filesystem to Examine Your Linux Inner Workings

    One of the greatest things about Linux is how much control you have over your system. You can edit whatever you want, and there’s so much that’s flexible and available to you. Additionally, Linux is very transparent – error messages are very clear, and it’s not hard to see the inner workings of your system. One of the best ways to see those inner workings is the “/proc” directory. Here we show you how to use the “/proc” directory to examine the inner workings of your Linux system.

  • Using systemd timers instead of /etc/cron entries

    Cron does the job it was written for. But this was years ago, and these days Kernels offer neat things like CPU quotas and memory limits. Cron has no means to use those – but other tools have.

    Additionally, newer tools provide dependencies, a proper configuration language (instead of hard-to-maintain bash lines), multiple triggers, randomized delays and real logging.

    Especially the last bit, real logging, is essential: Cron can forward log messages it thinks needs to be forwarded. But without real kernel backed process management (cgroups) there is no real way for Cron to see if a job is running or has finished, and what log lines belong to it.

    Systemd has all this – and thus it makes sense to create new recurrent jobs in Systemd and even migrate old ones sometimes.

  • How to deploy an NFS server in your data center for easy file sync - TechRepublic

    Data must be shared. This is especially so in a busy company, where employees are constantly working with data and files. When this is the case, you have to make sure the data and files are available to anyone who needs them. For that, you might don several hats to try and get everything to everyone.

    Or you could turn to those Linux servers in your data center. With the help of NFS, you could sync those directories from server to server or server to desktop, with ease. In just a few quick minutes you can get this done.

  • Install Firefox Browser 88 In Ubuntu / LinuxMint / CentOS | Tips On UNIX

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to download and install Mozilla Firefox 88 in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Linux Mint 20.1, and CentOS 8.1 / 7.x.

    Mozilla Firefox is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla foundation and generally utilized by thousands and thousands of individuals in their daily actions.

  • How To Install Samba on Debian 10 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Samba on Debian 10. For those of you who didn’t know, Samba allows you to share files and printers with other computers remotely, regardless of their operating system. It lets you access your desktop files from a laptop and share files with Windows and macOS users.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the Samba on a Debian 10 (Buster).

  • 5 Tips To Use The Linux SS Command Like A Pro

    The ss command is a tool that is used for displaying network socket related information on a Linux system. The tool displays more detailed information that the netstat command which is used for displaying active socket connections.

    In this article we are going to explore some of the best ways to use the command for best results.

  • 3 Ways to Check Your Wi-Fi Password in Ubuntu

    Forgot your wireless access point password? Well, there are a few ways to find it out in Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

Dev kit and module run Linux on Zynq Ultrascale+

Topic Embedded has launched a “Florida Plus” dev kit that runs Linux on its Zynq Ultrascale+ based Miami MPSoC Plus module. Meanwhile, Aries announced it has begun distributing Topic’s Zynq-based Miami modules. Netherlands-based Topic Embedded Systems has been around for 20 years doing FPGA work, with the last decade focused primarily on manufacturing Linux-driven Xilinx Zynq based modules. Last week, Topic announced an open-spec Florida Plus Development Kit that showcases its top-of-the-line Miami MPSoC Plus compute module, which features the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. system-on-chip. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Install Mosh Shell as SSH Alternative on Linux Desktop

    Using an SSH client tool is always helpful and handy for the system administrator and the remote users. In the conventional SSH clients, you may find some network and auto session logout issues. As a system admin, you already realize the importance of the CLI-based remote SSH client. To solve frequent logout, lagging, and packet loss issues, you can install the Mosh SSH as an SSH alternative on Linux. The Mosh stands for the Mobile shell, which is a command-line-based secure shell client for Linux. It doesn’t require a stale and static IP address to establish the connection; moreover, the Mosh SSH shell client is also compatible with mobile devices.

  • New Linux Publication Released: How Linux Works, 3rd Edition: What Every Superuser Should Know by Brian Ward

    I am very excited about this publication not only because it is a great book covering such a large set of Linux-related topics but also because I helped with the technical review.

  • How to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04

    The objective is to install the NVIDIA drivers on Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo Linux and switch from a opensource Nouveau driver to the proprietary Nvidia driver. To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

  • How to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Blender 2.92 on Deepin 20.2.

  • How to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Funkin' High Effort Ugh mod on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

GNU Project: GCC 11.1 Release Candidate and Cryptographic Algorithms GnuTLS

  • GCC 11.1 Release Candidate available from gcc.gnu.org
    The first release candidate for GCC 11.1 is available from
    
     https://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420/
     ftp://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/11.1.0-RC-20210420
    
    and shortly its mirrors.  It has been generated from git revision
    r11-8265-g246abba01f302eb453475b650ba839ec905be76d.
    
    I have so far bootstrapped and tested the release candidate on
    x86_64-linux and i686-linux.  Please test it and report any issues to
    bugzilla.
    
    If all goes well, I'd like to release 11.1 on Tuesday, April 27th.
    
  • GCC 11.1 RC Released, GCC 12 In Development On Trunk

    The release candidate to GCC 11.1 as the first stable release of GCC 11 is now available for testing. If all goes well GCC 11.1.0 will officially debut next week while GCC 12 is now in development with their latest Git code. Red Hat's Jakub Jelinek announced the GCC 11.1 release candidate today, which has been bootstrapped and tested so far for i686 and x86_64 Linux. He is hoping to release GCC 11.1 officially next week if all goes well.

  • Daiki Ueno: AF_ALG support in GnuTLS

    The Linux kernel implements a set of cryptographic algorithms to be used by other parts of the kernel. These algorithms can be accessed through the internal API; notable consumers of this API are encrypted network protocols such as IPSec and WireGuard, as well as data encryption as in fscrypt. The kernel also provides an interface for user-space programs to access the kernel crypto API. GnuTLS has recently gained a new crypto backend that uses the kernel interface in addition to the user-space implementation. There are a few benefits of having it. The most obvious one is performance improvement: while the existing user-space assembly implementation has comparable performance to the in-kernel software emulation, the kernel crypto implementation also enables workload offloading to hardware accelerators, such as Intel QAT cards. Secondly, it brings support for a wider variety of CPU architectures: not only IA32 and AArch64, but also PowerPC and s390. The last but not least is that it could be used as a potential safety net for the crypto algorithms implementation: deferring the crypto operations to the kernel means that we could have an option to workaround any bugs or compliance (such as FIPS140) issues in the library.

More JingPad A1 Linux tablet detailed revealed ahead of crowdfunding

The JingPad A1 is a tablet with an 11 inch AMOLED touchscreen display, support for digital pen input, and a detachable keyboard that lets you use the tablet like a laptop. It also has an operating system that’s designed for both tablet and laptop mode. That’s because the JingPad A1 will be the first tablet to ship with JingOS, an operating system developed by Chinese company Jingling that’s a custom Linux distribution designed for tablets but capable of running desktop applications (as well as some Android applications). First unveiled in March, the tablet will go up for pre-order soon through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. Jingling hasn’t announced a price yet, but an Indiegogo preview page is now live, and folks who sign up with an email address may be able to save 40-percent when orders open up in May. Read more