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Thursday, 27 Jan 22 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Audiocasts/Shows: Videos Editing and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Chile citizens: Support these constitutional proposals for free software and user privacy by Feb 1

Filed under
GNU

Chile is in the midst of governmental changes, and with these changes comes the opportunity for the people of Chile to make their voices heard for long-term benefits to their digital rights and freedoms. Chilean activists have submitted three constitutional proposals relating to free software and user freedom, but they need signatures in order to have these proposals submitted to the constitutional debate.

We encourage free software community members in Chile to have a look at these proposals, and sign those that uphold digital freedom and autonomy. The deadline for collecting signatures is February 1st.

Some further explanation and other information gathered by one of our community members, Felix Freeman, is included below. The English version of Felix's message is provided below.

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GNU poke 2.0 released

Filed under
GNU

I am happy to announce a new major release of GNU poke, version 2.0.

This release is the result of a full year of development. A lot of things have changed and improved with respect to the 1.x series; we have fixed many bugs and added quite a lot of new exciting and useful features.

See the complete release notes at https://jemarch.net/poke-2.0-relnotes.html for a detailed description of what is new in this release.

We have had lots of fun and learned quite a lot in the process; we really wish you will have at least half of that fun using this tool!

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LWN Articles on Linux Kernel (Liberated Thursday)

Filed under
Linux
  • Resurrecting fbdev [LWN.net]

    The Linux framebuffer device (fbdev) subsystem has long languished in something of a purgatory; it was listed as "orphaned" in the MAINTAINERS file and saw fairly minimal maintenance, mostly driven by developers working elsewhere in the kernel graphics stack. That all changed, in an eye-opening way, on January 17, when Linus Torvalds merged a change to make Helge Deller the new maintainer of the subsystem. But it turns out that the problems in fbdev run deep, at least according to much of the rest of the kernel graphics community. By seeming to take on the maintainer role in order to revert the removal of some buggy features from fbdev, Deller has created something of a controversy.

    Part of the concern within the graphics community is the accelerated timeline that these events played out on. Deller posted his intention to take over maintenance of the framebuffer on Friday, January 14, which received an ack from Geert Uytterhoeven later that day. Two days later, before any other responses had come in, Deller sent a pull request to Torvalds to add Deller as the fbdev maintainer, which was promptly picked up. On January 19, Deller posted reversions of two patch sets that removed scrolling acceleration from fbdev. In the meantime, those reversions had already been made in Deller's brand new fbdev Git tree.

  • The first half of the 5.17 merge window [LWN.net]

    As of this writing, just short of 7,000 non-merge commits have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 5.17 release. The changes pulled thus far bring new features across the kernel; read on for a summary of what has been merged during the first half of the 5.17 merge window.

  • Struct slab comes to 5.17 [LWN.net]

    The page structure is at the core of the memory-management subsystem. One of these structures exists for every page of physical memory in the system; they are used to track the status of memory as it is used (and reused) during the lifetime of the system. Physical pages can adopt a number of different identities over time; they can hold user-space data, kernel data structures, DMA buffers, and so on. Regardless of how a page is used, struct page is the data structure that tracks its state. These structures are stored in a discontiguous array known as the system memory map.

    There are a few problems that have arisen with this arrangement. The page structure was significantly reorganized for 4.18, but the definition of struct page is still a complicated mess of #ifdefs and unions with no mechanisms to ensure that the right fields are used at any given time. The unlucky developer who needs to find more space in this structure will be hard put to understand which bits might be safe to use. Subsystems are normally designed to hide their internal data structures, but struct page is heavily used throughout the kernel, making any memory-management changes more complicated. One possible change — reducing the amount of memory consumed by page structures by getting rid of the need for a structure for every page — is just a distant dream under the current organization.

    So there are a lot of good reasons to remove information from struct page and hide what remains within the memory-management subsystem. One of the outcomes from the folio discussions has been a renewed desire to get a handle on struct page, but that is not a job for the faint of heart — or for the impatient. Many steps will be required to reach that goal. The merging of the initial folio patches for 5.16 was one such step; the advent of struct slab in 5.17 is another.

PETget now PKGget

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The traditional package manager in Puppy Linux is the "Puppy Package Manager", often just known as the "PPM".

EasyOS has a derivative of the PPM, named "PETget". However, I have never been entirely happy with that name, as the package manager can install virtually any type of package -- .deb, .rpm. .tgz, .tar.zst, .tar.xz, etc., as well as .pet packages.

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Canonical/Ubuntu: Corporate Stuff and Accessibility

Filed under
Ubuntu

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • IBM Sales Surge. The Company’s Turnaround May Be Taking Hold. [Ed: This is a lie. IBM is collapsing and it offloaded some units to fake growth while laying off staff. This writer (Eric J. Savitz) has lied for Microsoft too for over a decade [1, 2]. IBM gets fake news published, then links to it.]

    IBM posted strong results Monday for its fourth quarter, with its best sales growth in more than a decade. The results suggest that CEO Arvind Krishna’s strategy for returning the legacy tech giant to growth is beginning to pay off.

  • When to Use API Management and Service Mesh Together - DevOps.com

    I recently chatted with Mark Cheshire, director of product, Red Hat, to discuss the nuances between API management and service mesh. According to Cheshire, API management and service mesh can work quite well side-by-side for particular use cases. For example, a large organization using service mesh could benefit from applying API management that wraps microservices in a usable contract for internal departments. Or, API management could help a company expose specific APIs from the mesh to outside partners.

  • Adopting open-source platforms to modernize citizen services - StateScoop

    States like Tennessee are modernizing their legacy, siloed and on-premises systems to a more integrated and agile infrastructure to keep pace with the digital demands of customers.

    In an exclusive StateScoop interview, KPMG managing director, advisory Mark Calem, Red Hat chief technologist, North America public sector David Egts and Tennessee Department of Human Services chief information officer Wayne Glaus discuss how states can use open-source platforms to engage with constituents more fully and to improve the digital services they deliver.

  • BU and Red Hat Announce First Research Incubation Awards | BU Today | Boston University

    For almost five years, Boston University and Red Hat, a leading provider of open-source computer software solutions, have collaborated to drive innovative research and education in open-source technology. Now that partnership has announced the first recipients of the Red Hat Collaboratory Research Incubation Awards. (Open source means that the original source code is made available for use or modification by users and developers.)

    The awards are administered through BU’s Red Hat Collaboratory, housed within the Rafik B. Hariri Institute for Computing and Computational Science & Engineering, and Red Hat Research. “This collaborative model gives us the opportunity to increase the diversity and richness of open engineering and operations projects we undertake together, and also allows us to pursue fundamental research under one umbrella,” says Heidi Picher Dempsey, Red Hat research director, Northeast United States.

  • What a C++, C, Go or Rust developer should know about RHEL 9

    The purpose of this blog is to explain to system developers some of the new C++, C, Go or Rust features in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 9.

  • How open managers can talk to neurodivergent teammates about performance

    I’ve had many conversations recently that have me looking at a crucial question that impacts neurodivergent corporate employees and their managers: how do we understand, encourage, measure, nurture, and assess the career development of neurodivergent people? Development opportunities, and how managers assess performance, are critical aspects of career growth, financial compensation, morale, feelings of self worth, happiness, employee retention, and the ability of individuals and companies to achieve their goals. And yet, I believe it is something that can be subjective, underappreciated, and under-invested in. As a late-diagnosed autistic person who has had significant anxiety, social phobia, and other mental health conditions for my entire career, and as someone who has been in senior leadership roles, leading hundreds of employees, I’ve thought about this quite a bit.

Script SNAFU means Linux notification didn't reach everyone

Filed under
Linux

A small SNAFU in Linux kernel land meant that a notification regarding the stable review cycle for the 5.16.3 release didn't reach everyone it should have.

For the first time in the 31-year history of the Linux kernel, there were over 999 commits to a stable version, which caused a very minor problem.

Greg Kroah-Hartman, lead maintainer of the -stable branch, has a set of scripts which CC various interested parties when there's been a new release.

"Usually I split big ones out in two releases over the week," he told The Reg. "This time, I did it all at once to see what it would stress. The 'bug' of not copying some people on an email is the only thing that broke that I noticed, so we did pretty well."

He told the kernel development mailing list: "Found the problem, this was the first set of -rc releases that we have over 999 commits and the script was adding the cc: to msg.000 not msg.0000. I'll fix this up."

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Here's Why Ksnip is My New Favorite Linux Screenshot Tool in 2022

Filed under
Software

So, I recently upgraded to a dual-monitor setup (1080p + 1440p).

While I was excited about the productivity boost by getting things done faster without the need to manage/minimize active windows constantly, there were a few nuances that I came across.

To my surprise, Flameshot refused to work. And, for the tutorials or articles I write, a screenshot tool that offers minor editing or annotation capabilities comes in handy.

If you have a similar requirement and are confused, the GNOME Screenshot tool is an option that works with multiple screens flawlessly.

However, it does not offer annotations. So, I will have to separately open the image using another image editor or Ksnip to make things work.

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Back End/Databases: AgensGraph, Apache AGE, and Apache Kafka

Filed under
Server
  • PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of AgensGraph 2.5

    The AgensGraph Development Team are pleased to announce the release of AgensGraph v2.5.

    AgensGraph is a new generation multi-model graph database for the modern complex data environment. AgensGraph is a multi-model database, which supports the relational and graph data model at the same time that enables developers to integrate the legacy relational data model and the flexible graph data model in one database. AgensGraph supports ANSI-SQL and openCypher (http://www.opencypher.org). SQL queries and Cypher queries can be integrated into a single query in AgensGraph.

    AgensGraph is based on the powerful PostgreSQL RDBMS, and is very robust, fully-featured and ready for enterprise use. AgensGraph is optimized for handling complex connected graph data and provides plenty of powerful database features essential to the enterprise database environment including ACID transactions, multi-version concurrency control, stored procedure, triggers, constraints, sophisticated monitoring and a flexible data model (JSON). Moreover, AgensGraph leverages the rich eco-systems of PostgreSQL and can be extended with many outstanding external modules, like PostGIS.

    For more details please see the release notes.

  • PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of Apache AGE(incubating) 0.6.0

    Apache AGE(incubating) is a PostgreSQL extension that provides graph database functionality.

    AGE is an acronym for A Graph Extension, and is inspired by Bitnine's fork of PostgreSQL 10, AgensGraph, which is a multi-model database. The goal of the project is to create single storage that can handle both relational and graph model data so that users can use standard ANSI SQL along with openCypher, the Graph query language.

  • Apache Kafka 3.1 opens up data streaming for analytics

    Apache Kafka is continuing to build out its event data streaming technology platform as the open source project moves forward.

    Apache Kafka 3.1 became generally available on Jan. 24, providing users of the open source event streaming technology with a series of new features.

    Organizations use Kafka to enable real-time data streams that can be used for operations, business intelligence and data analytics.

    Kafka is a developed by an open source community of developers that includes Confluent, an event streaming vendor that provides a commercial platform for Kafka, as well as Red Hat, which has a managed Kafka service.

    Gartner analyst Merv Adrian said he looks at Kafka as a data source that feeds a database.

    "More uses and users are moving upstream to engage with data in motion, before it comes to rest, and Kafka and its adjacent technologies are moving to capture share of that business," Adrian said.

OPNsense 22.1 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

For more than 7 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through
modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple
and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, fast adoption
of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD
licensing.

22.1, nicknamed "Observant Owl", features the upgrade to FreeBSD 13,
switch to logging supporting RFC 5424 with severity filtering, improved
tunable sysctl value integration, faster boot sequence and interface
initiation and dynamic IPv6 host alias support amongst others.

On the flip side major operating system changes bear risk for regression
and feature removal, e.g. no longer supporting insecure cryptography in
the kernel for IPsec and switching the Realtek vendor driver back to its
FreeBSD counterpart which does not yet support the newer 2.5G models.
Circular logging support has also been removed.  Make sure to read the
known issues and limitations below before attempting to upgrade.

Download links, an installation guide[1] and the checksums for the images
can be found below as well.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to configure Pure-FTPD on Ubuntu/Debian with Self Signed Certificate

    In this post, you will learn how to configure Pure-FTPD.

    Pure-FTPD is a free FTP server which mainly focuses on security. It can be setup really easily within five minutes and it does not take much time or effort to setup. Pure-FTPD offers many features like limiting simultaneous users, Limiting bandwidth on each user to avoid saturation of the network speed, hiding files through permissions and moderating new uploads and content. In this tutorial we will see how to easily configure Pure-FTPD server with Self Signed Certificate

    File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a way to receive or transfer data from one server to another. It is a standard communication protocol that enables the transfer or receiving of data over network. For in our case, We can use SFTP protocol for linux servers to transfer files, but if we have to create a FTP server we can use Pure-FTPD

  • How to create and use a Red Hat Satellite manifest

    In this multi-part tutorial, we cover how to provision RHEL VMs to a vSphere environment from Red Hat Satellite. Learn how to prepare the Satellite environment in this post.

  • How to install Redmine on Ubuntu 20.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to install Redmine on Ubuntu 20.04.

    Redmine is a free and open-source, web-based project management and issue tracking tool. It allows users to manage multiple projects and associated subprojects. It has project wikis and forums, time tracking, and role-based project controls.

  • How to Install Grafana on Rocky Linux

    Grafana is free and open-source analytics and visualization tool. It's a multi-platform web-based application that provides customizable charts, graphs, and alerts for supported data sources.

    By default, Grafana supports multiple data sources like Prometheus, Graphite, InfluxDB, Elasticsearc, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Zabbix, etc. It allows you to create an interactive and beautiful dashboard for your application monitoring system.

    This tutorial will show you how to install Grafana with Nginx as a Reverse Proxy on the Rocky Linux system.

  • How to Install Lighttpd Web server on CentOS 8

    In this post, you will learn how to Install Lighttpd on CentOS 8

    Lighttpd is an open-source, secure, fast, flexible, and more optimized web server designed for speed-critical environments with less memory utilization as compared to other web servers. It can handle up to 10,000 parallel connections in one server with effective CPU-load management. Also, It comes with an advanced feature set such as FastCGI, SCGI, Auth, Output-Compression, URL-Rewriting and many more. Lighttpd is an excellent solution for every Linux server, due to its high-speed io-infrastructure that allows us to scale several times better performance with the same hardware than with other alternative web-servers.

    In this article we will learn how to Install Lighttpd Web server on CentOS 8.

  • How to install flameshot on RHEL/CentOS using Snapcraft

    In this post, you will learn how to install Flameshot on RHEL / CentOS

    Flameshot is a powerful open source screenshot and annotation tool for Linux, Flameshot has a varied set of markup tools available, which include Freehand drawing, Lines, Arrows, Boxes, Circles, Highlighting, Blur. Additionally, you can customize the color, size and/or thickness of many of these image annotation tools.

    Snap is a software packaging and deployment system developed by Canonical for operating systems that use the Linux kernel. The packages, called snaps, and the tool for using them, snapd, work across a range of Linux distributions and allow upstream software developers to distribute their applications directly to users. Snaps are self-contained applications running in a sandbox with mediated access to the host system.

  • How to Convert Ubuntu 20.04 In Zentyal Firewall

    Greeting for the day! We are going to convert Ubuntu 20.04 in Zentyal today. The Server is a very popular OS among Linux admins across the planet. Though Zentyal community edition comes as dedicated os too, I was just testing what if we convert running Ubuntu Machine to the server? The verdict was clear that Servers get ready much quicker in comparison to installing dedicated OS instead. Thought to create a write-up for the same. We have categorized the article into three parts. First, a brief introduction of the server and its features. Second, how to convert Ubuntu into the Server. The third part will be having a conclusion and other views regarding the scenario.

  • 5 ways to make your Ansible modules work faster | Enable Sysadmin

    Ansible is a powerful open source tool that helps you automate many of your IT infrastructure operations, from the smallest of tasks to the largest. Ansible has hundreds of modules to help you accomplish your configuration needs, both official and community-developed. When it comes to complex and lengthy workflows, though, you need to consider how to optimize the way you use these modules so you can speed up your playbooks.

    Previously, I wrote about making your Ansible playbooks run faster. Here are five ways I make my Ansible modules work faster for me.

  • 1 DNS server container Podman dirty easy

    Linux distributions. So, what is a DNS? A DNS server is a service that helps resolve a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) into an IP address and performs a reverse translation of an IP address to a user-friendly domain name.

    Why is name resolution important? Computers locate services on servers using IP. However, IPs are not as user-friendly as domain names. It would be a big headache to remember each IP address associated with every domain name. So instead, a DNS server steps in and helps resolve these domain names to computer IP addresses.

    The DNS system is a hierarchy of replicated database servers worldwide that begin with the “root servers” for the top-level domains (.com, .net, .org, etc.). The root servers point to the “authoritative” servers located in ISPs and large companies that turn the names into IP addresses. The process is known as “name resolution.” Using our www.business.com example, COM is the domain name, and WWW is the hostname. The domain name is the organization’s identity on the Web, and the hostname is the name of the Web server within that domain. Debian DNS server setup can be found the link.

  • Deploy a Kubernetes Cluster based on Calico and openSUSE Kubic – Hollow Man’s Blog

    openSUSE Kubic is a certified Kubernetes Distribution based on openSUSE MicroOS. Calico is an open-source project that can be used by Kubernetes to deploy a pod network to the cluster. In this blog, I will show you how to deploy a Kubernetes Cluster based on Calico and openSUSE Kubic by a Virtual Machine. We are going to deploy a cluster that has a master and a worker.

    I was intended to use Oracle VM VirtualBox. However, it turned out that on my machine, when I tried to run kubeadm at openSUSE Kubic in VirtualBox, it always stuck at watchdog: BUG: soft lockup - CPU#? stuck for xxs! with CPU usage around 100%. As a result, I switched to VMware Workstation Pro and the issue got solved. Guess it’s caused by some bugs of VirtualBox.

  • Qemu backup on Debian Bullseye – Michael Ablassmeier – ..

    In my last article i showed how to use the new features included in Debian Bullseye to easily create backups of your libvirt managed domains.

    A few years ago as this topic came to my interest, i also implemented a rather small utility (POC) to create full and incremental backups from standalone qemu processes: qmpbackup

    The workflow for this is a little bit different from the approach i have taken with virtnbdbackup.

    While with libvirt managed virtual machines, the libvirt API provides all necessary API calls to create backups, a running qemu process only provides the QMP protocol socket to get things going.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Apple Releases Security Updates for Multiple Products

    An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

  • Why Security in Kubernetes Isn't the Same as in Linux: Part 1 | MarketScreener

    The risks of a Kubernetes (K8s) deployment are actually the same as in traditional Linux servers.

  • Do you need pkexec and polkit on a WM? NO! CVE-2021-4034

    Thanks to Somewhat Reticent for being always on alert and contributing:

    Do you need pkexec and polkit on a WM? NO! CVE-2021-4034

    Not unless you want some automated menu and icons to click on and use various user/root rights to execute a gui! Otherwise you are “safe“.

    Don’t think because RH is reporting this the only affected parties are RHEL users, anyone who uses their systemd elogind and polkit derivatives are equally affected.

    But gksu/gksudo was insecure and had to be erased from nearly every distro that is an IBM “client”.

  • Bug bounties: finding and fixing security holes with European Commission funds - The Document Foundation Blog

    Free and open source software (FOSS) is about much more than driving costs down, in some cases even down to zero – it’s about giving control back to users, developers and even nations. With FOSS, everyone gains the freedom to study, improve and share the software – and to use it whenever and wherever they want, without being restricted by vendor lock-in strategies.

    FOSS has been widely used amongst government bodies and public services, so thanks to the coordination of their recently formed Open Source Programme Office (OSPO), the European Commission has started a series of hackathon and “bug bounty” programmes to help selected projects find (and potentially fix) security issues.

Games: Steam, ChromeOS, Open 3D Game Engine, and N-Gage

Filed under
Gaming
  • Steam's latest crazy indie hit Vampire Survivors is coming to Linux | GamingOnLinux

    The developer of Vampire Survivors, an absolute smash-hit on Steam has confirmed that a Linux version is in the works. Their latest update post mentioned it might be available by the end of the month, if all goes well.

    Developed by poncle, it arrived on Steam in Early Access for Windows on December 17 - 2021 and suddenly on January 6 - 2022 it starting gathering thousands of players. More arrived each day, and this game of complete chaos suddenly managed to be a total hit with an all-time peak player count of 37,075 and that was only hit yesterday so it's continuing to grow all the time. On Steam, it's managed to hit an Overwhelmingly Positive rating too.

  • Prison Architect: Perfect Storm DLC and The Tower update get a surprise release | GamingOnLinux

    Today Paradox Interactive and Double Eleven have done a surprise launch of the Prison Architect: Perfect Storm expansion. Plus, as always for Paradox, there's a free update out now too called The Tower. So not only do you have to worry about what the inmates have smuggled around but you now also need to look to the skies. No one wants to sit in a freezing cold cell, or have wild rats running across their feet.

  • Steam Lunar New Year Sale 2022 is now live | GamingOnLinux

    Do you feel the need for some new games? Perhaps to continue building up a collection for the upcoming Steam Deck? Now is yet another chance for you with the Steam Lunar New Year Sale 2022. Not only is there a big sale but if you head over to the Points Shop, you'll also get a new sticker each day too.

  • Gaming Chromebooks Running Steam Are Reportedly On the Way

    Don't worry, gamers, there will be plenty of RGB lighting.

  • Open 3D Game Engine 2111.2 Released - Phoronix

    In addition to closing in on the Godot 4.0 release, another equally exciting effort in the open-source game engine space is the Open 3D Engine originally from the Amazon Lumberyard code and backed by the Linux Foundation and other organizations. Open 3D Engine 2111.2 is out today as the newest stable point release for this less than one year old open-source game engine effort.

    Back in December saw the release of O3DE 21.11 as the first major release of this open-source game engine under the Apache 2.0 license. O3DE 2111.2 is the latest in that stable lineage for this game engine. a

  • Release Notes for Open 3D Engine 2111.2 - Open 3D Engine

    Open 3D Engine release 2111.2 is a maintenance and quality of life improvement release based on 2111.1. This release is bugfix-only and contains no new features.

  • An Up-To-Date Development Environment For The Nokia N-Gage | Hackaday

    One of the brave but unsuccessful plays from Nokia during their glory years was the N-Gage, an attempt to merge a Symbian smartphone and a handheld game console. It may not have managed to dethrone the Game Boy Advance but it still has a band of enthusiasts, and among them is [Michael Fitzmayer] who has produced a CMake-based toolchain for the original Symbian SDK. This is intended to ease development on the devices by making them more accessible to the tools of the 2020s, and may serve to bring a new generation of applications to those old Nokias still lying forgotten in dusty drawers.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • A deeper look into the Genesis GV60 digital cockpit

    We announced in 2021 that Hyundai Motor Company has selected Qt as their key HMI technology partner for all Hyundai, Kia, and Genesis brands. Since then, they have released their new electric luxury SUV Genesis GV60, and we love it!

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: td 0.0.6 on CRAN: Minor Bugfix

    The td package for accessing the twelvedata API for financial data has been updated once more on CRAN and is now at version 0.0.6.

    The release comes in response to an email from CRAN who noticed (via r-devel) that I was sloppy (in one spot, it turns out) with a logical expression resulting in an expression of length greather than one. Fixed by wrapping an all() around it—and the package was back at CRAN minutes later thanks to automated processing over their end.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.10.8.1.0 on CRAN: Upstream Updates

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 950 other packages on CRAN, downloaded over 22.9 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint/vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 451 times according to Google Scholar.

    This release brings another upstream update 10.8.0, and first bug fix release 10.8.1. As updates by Conrad can come a little quicker than the desired monthly cadence CRAN aims for, we skipped the 10.8.0 release for CRAN only but of course generally provide them via the Rcpp drat repo as well as via general updates to the repo, and full reverse dependency testing (for which results are always logged here).

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 427

Vu Premium TV 32-inch with Bezel-Less Design, Linux OS Launched in India: Price, Specifications

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Vu, India’s popular online smart TV brand has announced a new TV under the Premium series. The company has unveiled the Vu Premium TV 32-inch in India today. Previously, the company had announced Vu QLED Premium TV in India with Android 11, Dolby Vision, and 40W speakers. The newly launched Premium TV 32-inch comes with features like a premium bezel-less design, Linux OS, and more for under Rs 15,000.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, TLLTS, and BSDNow

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

Mozilla Leftovers: Thunderbird, Firefox, Tor Browser, and More

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
  • Thunderbird – Hotkeys Shortcuts Cheatsheet
  • Another Step in Automating the Pageload Recordings

    In a previous article, Kimberly Sereduck told us about Updates to Warm Page Load Tests and how we are continuously working to make our tests more representative of real user behavior. Besides that, we are working on automating the process of recording the website’s page load.

  • Practicing lean data is a journey that can start anywhere - Open Policy & Advocacy

    “It’s not about the destination, but about the journey.” I’m sure data and privacy are the furthest from your mind when you hear this popular saying. However, after a year of virtually sharing Mozilla’s Lean Data Practices (LDP), I’ve realized this quote perfectly describes privacy, LDP, and the process that stakeholders work through as they apply the principles to their projects, products, and policies.

    [...]

    There is an appetite to understand how we as consumers can hold companies accountable. One of the biggest surprises for me came when I would field questions at the end of a presentation, and people would ask about their rights as consumers and how they can hold companies accountable. For example, people wanted to understand their rights and recourse options if companies contacted them without permission, didn’t honor their unsubscribe requests, or did something else frustrating. I teach LDP for individuals to apply it in a business context, but we are all also consumers and customers. LDP can help us better understand how our own data should be handled and improve our understanding of what organizations are doing. We can then remember how we feel about certain situations and then ensure we are doing things in a more consumer-friendly way within our organizations.

    Lean Data Practices is a journey. For many there won’t be an ultimate destination because it is an iterative process. If you try to apply all the principles across your entire organization at once, you will find yourself overwhelmed and likely unsuccessful. To maximize your chance of success, my advice — which is the same advice we give when we present — is to just start somewhere. Choose one aspect of your business and focus on that, one pillar at a time. Once you’ve successfully applied the principles, go to a different business unit and do the same. Remember to review and adapt as products and business needs (or data!) change as well. You may likely never reach your destination, but you will see your company improve in its practices along the way.

  • Tor vs. VPN: Is One Better than the Other?

    Tor and VPN have unique ways to ensure user privacy on the Internet. They’re fundamentally very different yet have many similar aims. Due to the overlap in features, you may be weighing the pros and cons of using one over the other. Or maybe they can be treated equally but with separate purposes. This guide digs into everything you need to know about which software should be used for more Internet anonymity.

  • New Alpha Release: Tor Browser 11.5a2 (Windows, macOS, Linux)

    Tor Browser 11.5a2 is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory.

    This version includes important security updates to Firefox.

Intel Core i9 12900K P-State Governor Performance On Linux Review

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since Intel's Alder Lake launch one of the test requests to come in a few times has been about the Intel P-State CPU frequency scaling driver and how its performance differs with the various governor choices available for altering the CPU frequency scaling behavior. Now that Linux 5.16 stable is out and running in good shape on Alder Lake, here are some Core i9 12900K benchmarks looking at various CPU frequency scaling choices and their impact on raw performance as well as CPU thermals and power consumption.

With Alder Lake having seen fixes in Linux 5.16 as well as ADL-S graphics being enabled by default on this new kernel, it's a good target for carrying out the P-State testing. The main reader inquiry has obviously been about how how well these new Intel hybrid processors perform if moving from P-State "powersave" as is often the default governor on most distributions to instead using the "performance" governor that tends to keep the CPU in its higher performance states more aggressively than powersave.

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Stable Kernels: 5.16.3, 5.15.17, 5.10.94, 5.4.174, 4.19.226, 4.14.263, 4.9.298, and 4.4.300

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.16.3 kernel.

All users of the 5.16 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.16.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.16.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

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Also: Linux 5.15.17

Linux 5.10.94

Linux 5.4.174

Linux 4.19.226

Linux 4.14.263

Linux 4.9.298

Linux 4.4.300

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