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Saturday, 06 Feb 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • An intro to git gui

    I have been using git for years now, I think I can say I know the tool quite well, yet I do all my commits with git gui. This often surprises my coworkers because a) it looks a bit ugly and Cool it's a graphical application! The horror!

  • 15 years of VLC and VideoLAN

    Technically, today is the 15th anniversary of the relicensing of all the VideoLAN software to the GPL license, as agreed by the École Centrale Paris, on February 1st, 2001.

  • LiVES Video Editor 2.6.0 Version Released For Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA

    As you know there are plenty of video editors available for other operating systems (Mac, Windows) but there isn't lack of best video editors for Unix/Linux and support wide variety of architecture (x86, amd64, x86_64, i64, sparc, hppa, ppc and xbox/x86.) but using the PPA you can only install for x86/x86_64/amd64 architectures. If you are into video editing and looking for open-source and free alternative for yourself then here is great video editing program "LiVES" for you.
    LiVES is an awesome, very simple, powerful video editor and VJ tool exist for Linux operating system. Using LiVES video editor you can combine realtime and rendered effects, streams and multiple video/audio files, and then encode to over 50 formats. It is small in size, yet it has many advanced features. LiVES is part editor, part VJ tool. It is fully extendable through open standard RFX plugin scripts.

  • Firejail 0.9.38 Release Announcement

    We are happy to announce the release of Firejail version 0.9.38 (download). Firejail is a generic Linux namespaces security sandbox, capable of running graphic interface programs as well as server programs. The project went through an external security audit, and several SUID-releated problems have been found. Please update your software.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Don't Starve: Shipwrecked DLC is now available on SteamOS & Linux

    Heads up survivalists! Don't Starve: Shipwrecked the good looking new DLC for the single player version of Don't Starve is now on SteamOS & Linux.

  • SuperTuxKart - A simple recipe for simple fun

    It's been a while since I've done a proper Linux game review. The reasons being, we now have Steam, so there's less of a distinction between Windows and Linux. That division is now blurred, and we're past the free-only, indie-only games of yore. Good. That, however, does not mean you can't be having fun for free.

    SuperTuxKart is one such title. It's nothing more than a point-and-shoot racer, arcade all the way, with you taking helm in one of the many funnily shaped vehicles and racing down some crazy tracks. Then, it's about taking on some opponents, in-game traps and perks, and gradually unlocking new levels as you make progress in the existing set. But let us explore in more depth.

  • GPUOpen, Mad Max on Linux speculation, and more open gaming news

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Interview with Jóhann Örn Geirdal

    What sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?

    It’s the fast development and that the developers are definitely listening to the artists who use it. That is not always the case with other software.

  • KDevelop 5.0 Beta 2 Release

    Three months after the first KDevelop 5.0 Beta release, I have the pleasure to announce our second beta release! We have worked hard on improving the stability and performance of our new KDevelop 5.0 based on Qt 5 and KDE Frameworks 5. We also continued to port many features from our old C++ language support to the new Clang-based C/C++ plugin, which is still an ongoing effort.

  • Get software packages quickly with KDE Project Neon

    Neon is a platform designed to give KDE users a way to get software updates quickly. It will be providing packages of the latest KDE software so users can stay up to date on a stable OS base.

  • Looking for FreeBSD wallpaper for Plasma 5 Desktop

    Most distro’s that ship Plasma Desktop as .. well, as a desktop to work in, have their own default wallpaper choice that isn’t exactly the upstream default. OpenSUSE has things with geekos (which I personally really like, for their understatedness). KDE neon goes for the upstream default, but that is the nature of that particular distro.

  • Former Kubuntu Head Unveils New KDE Project

    The name Jonathan Riddell should ring a bell if you read Linux and open source news. He was the creator and longtime lead developer of the Kubuntu distribution. He was forced out of his position by Ubuntu boss Mark Shuttleworth last year because he dared to ask what happened to the funds Canonical had raised for Kubuntu. (To the best of my knowledge, Canonical never really answered to his questions about finances.)

  • Calligra 2.9.11 Released
  • So, why we are different?

    On this week, I’m working very hard on my proposal to Google Summer of Code, and to say some things there, I needed to know better the others printers hosts open sources.

  • Hidden b.k.o-phab links

    Well, consider them unhidden now: if you missed a structured place to link bugs.kde.org big/wish reports with KDE Phabricator tasks, look no further.

  • Calligra Suite: The Other Free Office Suite

    Calligra Suite is a mature office suite, with a solid set of basic applications, as well as an integrated, often innovative set of utilities, and at least two truly outstanding tools that have developed their own popularity outside of Calligra Suite.

    Abiword and Gnumeric have their users, but when free office applications come to mind, most people think of LibreOffice, or maybe even Apache OpenOffice. Fewer have heard of Calligra Suite, and those who have sometimes dismiss it as unnecessary.

  • Krita 2.9.11 and the second 3.0 alpha build!

    Today, we’re releasing the eleventh bugfix release for Krita 2.9 and the second development preview release of Krita 3.0! We are not planning more bug fix releases for 2.9, though it is possible that we’ll collect enough fixes to warrant one release more, because there are some problems with Windows 10 that we might be able to work around.

  • The Emperor’s New Clothes or for breeze with inkscape

    Inkscape get full breeze icon support.

  • Logo for “Automobilismo Italiano”

    Thanks inkscape, without you I would be lost !!

  • libotp - email rendering in kube

    The important part of a mailreader is rendering an email. Nobody likes to read the raw mime message.

GNOME Development

Filed under
GNOME

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Falls 7.84% for February 05

    One of the S&P 500’s big losers for Friday February 05 was Red Hat Inc. (RHT). The company’s stock fell 7.84% to $63.24 on volume of 2.18 million shares.

  • Red Hat Enters Oversold Territory (RHT)

    In trading on Friday, shares of Red Hat Inc (NYSE: RHT) entered into oversold territory, hitting an RSI reading of 26.8, after changing hands as low as $64.35 per share.

  • PHPUnit 5.2
  • testing flannel

    I noticed today (maybe I’ve noticed before, but forgotten) that the version of flannel in Fedora 23 is older than what’s available in CentOS. It looks like this is because no one tested the more-recent version of flannel in Fedora’s Bodhi, a pretty awesome application for testing packages.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux Devices

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • The Scooter Computer

    Power consumption, as measured by my Kill-a-Watt, ranged from 7 watts at the Ubuntu Server 14.04 text login screen, to 8-10 watts at an idle Ubuntu 15.10 GUI login screen (the default OS it arrived with), to 14-18 watts in memory testing, to 26 watts in mprime.

  • H3-OLinuXino-NANO is only 50×50 mm but has everything one computer must have
  • Hands on with the Pine64… well sorta

    While I refuse to call this board a ‘supercomputer’ as they do on their Kickstarter page, I do think it will be a great little development board for a lot of people. While I personally prefer the Odroid product line, I think this is a great way for people who have only worked on the Raspberry Pi and other various ‘Fruit Board Clones’, to spread the wings and work with a lot more powerful hardware. While I think I will personally put my money into the forthcoming Odroid C2 for size reasons, I still think the Pine64 is a great board for many people.

  • Can open source chip cores ever threaten ARM in the IoT?

    The open source movement now dominates software, but could it also become the norm in chips? Operating systems like Unix, which could be licensed for many computers, squeezed out single-vendor platforms, but then gave way in turn to fully open source OSs like Linux.

  • How MaruOS Turns Your Android Phone Into A Linux Desktop Computer

    As soon as you connect an external HDMI monitor to your phone, MaruOS fires a Debian-based OS on the bigger screen. “Your phone runs independently of your desktop so you can take a call and work on your big screen at the same time,” MaruOS writes on its website.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Because You Don’t Need Eyes To Have A Vision

    Continuing the MyStory series on It’s FOSS, today I am sharing with you the story of a blind computer programmer from Iraq who goes on the internet by the name of Ali Miracle. By the time you finish reading this article about Ali and his works, I am sure you would agree with his nickname ‘miracle’.

    I came to know about Ali when he contacted me to contribute to It’s FOSS. This was also the time when I come to know about his inability to see. I was amazed to know that despite being blind, Ali contributed to a number of open source projects.

  • What success really looks like in open source

    Linux, and the related open source projects making up the LAMP stack, were the underdogs. Essays like Raymond’s helped legitimize Linux and galvanize support for open source in a world where closed source was still the norm.

  • The Surprising Truth about Big Data

    Big Data gets a lot of headlines. If any technology can be called heavily hyped, Big Data earns the prize for most breathless predictions of enterprise influence.

    Typical of the rosy predictions is this from IDC: spending on Big Data-related infrastructure, software and services will grow at a torrid compound annual rate of 23.1 percent between 2014 and 2019, reaching a hefty $48.6 billion in 2019.

  • 80 percent of UK IT professionals plan to move to OpenStack cloud

    The report also suggested that the biggest concerns facing those advocates centre around security and the challenge of installing the cloud in their business.

    "There is no question that private clouds are seen as the future for many enterprise workloads, including many that are considered to be business-critical," said Mark Smith, senior product marketing manager of cloud solutions at Suse, in a not at all brazen plug for his business.

  • Hadoop vs. Spark: The New Age of Big Data

    A direct comparison of Hadoop and Spark is difficult because they do many of the same things, but are also non-overlapping in some areas.

    For example, Spark has no file management and therefor must rely on Hadoop’s Distributed File System (HDFS) or some other solution. It is wiser to compare Hadoop MapReduce to Spark, because they’re more comparable as data processing engines.

  • OpsClarity Promises Easier Big Data Management for DevOps

    What will it take to make open source big data tools truly useful for the enterprise? OpsClarity thinks the answer is a one-stop solution for monitoring everything from Spark to Elasticsearch to MongoDB. That's what it rolled out this week in a new platform targeted at DevOps teams.

  • Bug squashing in Gammu

    I've not really spent much time on Gammu in past months and it was about time to do some basic housekeeping.

    It's not that there would be too much of new development, I rather wanted to go through the issue tracker, properly tag issues, close questions without response and resolve the ones which are simple to fix. This lead to few code and documentation improvements.

  • Deep Introduces deepSQL and Combines SQL with Cloud

    Called deepSQL, the solution aims to help companies meet real-time customer demands while providing the automated scalability to capitalize on unforeseen business surges.

    “We took control of our destiny by making this our own distribution. It is fully 100% MySQL compliant, there are now application changes but it’s the best of Maria, Percona, MySQL, our own stuff and the machine learning open source worlds together,” said Chad Jones, chief strategy officer at Deep.

  • OpsClarity Provides Monitoring for Open-Source Data-First Apps

    OpsClarity Intelligent Monitoring provides automated discovery, configuration and rapid troubleshooting for Apache Kafka, Apache Spark and Apache Storm.

    OpsClarity, which provides Web-scale application monitoring solutions, has announced that its Intelligent Monitoring offering now provides monitoring for a growing suite of open-source data processing frameworks.

  • Walmart has made its application development cloud platform to open source

    Customers that think of Walmart as the place to get toiletries, groceries and more can now add cloud to the list.

    Perhaps taking a page out of Amazon’s success with AWS, the retail giant has announced it is releasing its internally-developed cloud and application lifecycle management platform, called OneOps, open source to the public.

  • LLVM Clang Compiler Optimization Benchmarks From -O0 To -O3 -march=native
  • EC accepts XBRL as standard for procurement

    The freely-available standard, developed by the not-for-profit XBRL Consortium, was accepted by the Commission after consulting the European multi-stakeholder platform (MSP) on ICT standardisation and other experts.

  • Reclaiming the Computing Commons

    Software freedom — the core commitment of the free software movement — does represent at least the rudiments of a better system. Resisting and reversing enclosure will not come about through “sustainable growth” or the “sharing economy,” which preserve the logics and structures of the status quo. “Openness,” or the conviction that norms of transparency and publicity will clarify (and thereby equalize) power relations, is also no solution at all.

  • New web office suite, UNICEF's innovation fund, and more news
  • City of Riga to renew its ICT strategy

    The city of Riga (Latvia) will soon begin an overhaul of its approach to IT, focussing on making its data open by default, and giving companies and software developers access to some of the city’s eGovernment services through APIs. The city’s current IT architecture was designed about a decade ago, when “no one foresaw the growth of data”, says city council member Agris Ameriks.

  • Adding Position Control To An Open Source Brushless Motor Driver

    Brushless motors are everywhere now. From RC planes to CNC machines, if you need a lot of power to spin something really fast, you’re probably going to use a brushless motor. A brushless motor requires a motor controller, and for most of us, this means cheap Electronic Speed Controllers (ESC) from a warehouse in China. [Ben] had a better idea: build his own ESC. He’s been working on this project for a while, and he’s polishing the design to implement a very cool feature – position control.

  • Why $2 billion startup GitHub is apparently in crisis, again

    A struggle between factions is taking place, according to a report by The Information, which matches what several sources have told Business Insider.

Linux and FOSS Events (FOSDEM and Beyond)

  • FOSDEM video recordings
  • FOSDEM 2016 and ownCloud, Kolab, KDE and more

    After rocking SCALE, FOSDEM was next and a great event. Killing, too - two days with about 8000 people, it was insane. Lots of positive people again, loads of stuff we handed out so we ran out on Sunday morning - and cool devices at the ownCloud booth.

  • Look over the fence – StartUp Weekend Phnom Penh

    Linux and Free Software plays in South East Asia not that role as in Europe or North America. To change that at least a bit, I came here. The asian culture plays definitely a role and this was often discussed. But it plays lesser the vital role as we think and as the linked article shows, we will not find an easy an solution for the cultural differences. From my perspective it is lesser necessary that we adopt, the most asians I met are willing to accept the differences and can live with them.

  • foss-gbg goes foss-north

    As some of you might know, I run a group that meet and learn new stuff about foss month – foss-gbg. Today it’s official that this summer foss-gbg goes foss-north and it is going to be awesome. So I welcome you all to the wonderful city of Gothenburg to a day filled with talks on a wide variety of topics around free and open source technology. It is going to be awesome!

Mozilla Firefox News

Filed under
Moz/FF

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Rootkit Security: The Next Big Challenge

    Combining this with the Juniper issue, where VPN communication could have been hacked, got me thinking about how firmware can be verified and how to ensure that it’s doing what we think it should be doing and not what someone else wants it to do.

  • What Are Your Container Security Options?

    When virtual machine technology emerged, many organizations' initial approach to security was to apply the same security measures to virtual machines as they did to physical machines. Only later did more specialized software emerge that was specifically designed to meet the security requirements of virtual machines.

    That process is now beginning to repeat itself, with software specifically designed to meet the security requirements of containers now starting to emerge. Some examples of specialized container security software include Clair and Twistlock.

  • In the shadows of the cyber colossus

    It might come as a surprise that South Africa is not always rated near the bottom in international surveys. According to various reports, the country comes out either third or sixth in the world of top cyber crime hotspots.

  • Mysterious spike in WordPress hacks silently delivers ransomware to visitors

    It's still not clear how, but a disproportionately large number of websites that run on the WordPress content management system are being hacked to deliver crypto ransomware and other malicious software to unwitting end users.

MakuluLinux Xfce is now Live !

Filed under
GNU
Linux

MakuluLinux Xfce is now live, please see the Xfce Edition section for more information...

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Scientific Linux 7.2 Distro Brings Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 to Science Labs

Filed under
Red Hat

On February 5, 2016, Pat Riehecky of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory was extremely proud to announce the release and immediate availability for download of the final Scientific Linux 7.2 installation images.

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Ubuntu Convergence

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Race to Convergence: Or is it a Marathon?

    This article, although it was smart to feature Ubuntu as a forerunner, it foolishly tried to give credit to Microsoft for ‘truly being the first’ to do convergence. First, did they? I had no idea. Nor do I care. Nor does anyone else I roll with. If the name has ‘Microsoft’ in it, we flee for the hills. Why? Because it’s compromised out of the box. It is dangerous.

  • Have We Converged Yet?

    Convergence is not about a unified computing experience across all your devices. Although that's an important goal, convergence is more about that point in time where your philosophy that technology should respect people converges with that of a group or company that believes the same.

  • Ubuntu.com Gets a New Look for the Tablet Section, Rest of Website to Follow

    With the new Ubuntu tablet out the door, Canonical also had to upgrade the website to reflect the changes accordingly, so now ubuntu.com has a really nice section dedicated to the BQ Aquaris M10.

    If we don't take Android into account, we can't really say that there are successful Linux-based tablet out there. It's not clear why that came to pass, but until this Ubuntu-powered tablet landed, there wasn't much competition. To be fair, there is not much competition right now, since Apple and Google pretty much dominate the market, but BQ Aquaris M10 is the only one that can double down as a regular PC.

  • BQ Ubuntu Tablet Has 64-bit CPU and Will Be Able to Run 32-bit ARM Apps

    The BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu tablet is powered by a 64-bit ARM processor, so the users have already started to ask around if they will be able to run the 32-bit apps from the phone on the tablet. The short answer is yes. The long answer is that it will take a little bit of work.

  • What the Ubuntu Convergence Means for Businesses, Consumers, OEMs, and Devs

    As you may well be aware, Canonical and BQ unveiled the world's first Ubuntu Tablet, the BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition, which also happens to be the first Ubuntu converged device, which users can transform into a full-fledged PC.

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