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Thursday, 03 Sep 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE-5_15.09 – september release for Slackware-current
  • Kontact and GnuPG under Windows

    Kontact has, in contrast to Thunderbird, integrated crypto support (OpenPGP and S/MIME) out-of-the-box.

    That means on Linux you can simply start Kontact and read crypted mails (if you have already created keys).

    After you select your crypto keys, you can immediately start writing encrypted mails. With that great user experince I never needed to dig further in the crypto stack.

  • Randa – KDE sprints 2015
  • KDE 5 Application Dashboard: A fullscreen app launcher that beats the competition

    Fullscreen applications launchers are my favorite kind of application menus, of which there are several to choose from on the K Desktop Environment, or KDE.

    On KDE 4, available options are the Takeoff Launcher, Simple Welcome, and Homerun.

  • Krita 2.9.7 Released!

    Two months of bug fixing, feature implementing, Google-Summer-of-Code-sweating, it’s time for a new release! Krita 2.9.7 is special, because it’s the last 2.9 release that will have new features. We’ll be releasing regular bug fix releases, but from now on, all feature development focuses on Krita 3.0. But 2.9.7 is packed! There are new features, a host of bug fixes, the Windows builds have been updated with OpenEXR 2.2. New icons give Krita a fresh new look, updated brushes improve performance, memory handling is improved… Let’s first look at some highlights:

  • Last Krita 2.9 Release Adds New Features, Fixes 150 Bugs, Krita 3.0 Coming Next

    The development team of the popular, open-source, and cross-platform digital painting software Krita, acclaimed by numerous artists from all over the world, have announced the release of the last maintenance version of the 2.9 branch.

GIMP and GNOME Foundation

Filed under
GNU
GNOME

Red Hat Results, Beta Release

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Flock Rochester

    I’m not going to do a day by day outline of what I did at flock, if I did it would basically be “blah blah blah I talked a lot to a lot of people about a lot of tech topics” and anyone that’s ever met me would have guessed that! It was, as in the past, a great conference. A big shout out to the organisers for an excellent event with two excellent evening events! So I’m going to give a brief summary to my talks and link to slides and video recordings.

  • Day 4 of Flock 2015
  • Write the Docs 2015

    Writing documentation is not only about writing, but actually a lot about layout, accessibility, UX and UI, too. So I actually enjoyed listening to Beth Aitman, for example (here are here slides). Among the most memorable were Elijah Caine with his talk about writing emails, which I really really hope more people could listen to, and Christina Elmore talking about creative problem solving. One of my personal favorites was a lightning talk by Marcin Warpechowski about laptop stickers! TL;DR – stickers are a great way to engage employees and the community! Got me (and actually everybody) excited about stickers even more and willing to create some. GitHub’s octocat also contributed to my feelings about stickers. They actually produce a special version for all conferences they attend! Also I think it was ladies from GitHub taking most the notes (or maybe I just happened to seat behind them Wink ).

  • F23 Cloud Base Test Day September 8th!

    For this test day we are going to concentrate on the base image. We will have vagrant boxes (see this page for how to set up your machine), qcow images, raw images, and AWS EC2 images. In a later test day we will focus on the Atomic images and Docker images.

  • Impostor syndrome talk: FAQs and follow-ups
  • More Fedora 22 scrollbar annoyances (fixed)

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Should I switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice or Microsoft Office?

    [Ed: yes, it's Microsoft Jack promoting Microsoft Office again]

  • Hello, Columbus: Ohio LinuxFest Up Next Oct. 2-3

    Next up on Brother FOSS’s Traveling Salvation Show — pack up the babies and grab the old ladies and everyone go — brings the proverbial tent and revival show to Columbus, Ohio, at the beginning of next month.

  • Gandi Joins Open Source Initiative Corporate Sponsorship Program

    Sponsorship consolidates technical infrastructure and support for OSI’s web hosting and administrative systems.

  • Building efficiency software available as open source code

    A set of automated calibration techniques for tuning residential and commercial building energy efficiency software models to match measured data is now available as an open source code. The Autotune code, developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is available on GitHub.

  • ORNL-Developed Building Efficiency Software Now Available
  • Project Calico: Open Source, High-Scale Network Fabric For The Cloud

    Cloud developers and operators are facing a challenge: Much of the IT toolkit that has worked well for "silo" architectures and well enough for virtual machine environments isn't a good match for apps made using containers or for microservices, where components may be not just on different machines but in many locations, and instances may come, go, or multiply. Yesterday’s "network fabric" does not accommodate this activity efficiently or reliably.

  • The True Internet of Things

    For a clear and encouraging look at where this should be going, read Phil Windley. He not only writes eloquently about the IoT, but he has been working on GPL'd open-source code for things and how they relate. To me, Phil is the Linus of IoT—or will be if people jump in and help out with the code. Whether Phil fills that role or not, nobody has more useful or insightful things to say about IoT. That's why I decided to interview him here.

  • SAP Hana Vora to Bridge Spark and Hadoop

    SAP is out to create closer connections between the worlds of Big Data and Business Intelligence. The company is embracing Spark via SAP HANA Vora, a new in-memory query engine that leverages and extends the Spark framework to produce enriched Hadoop queries and experiences.

  • VMware Integrated OpenStack 2.0 Arrives, Based on Kilo
  • Android developers can now build Chrome custom tabs into their apps

    Google released Chrome 45 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android yesterday, and today we’re learning that the Android update includes support for a new feature called Chrome custom tabs. You can download the new Chrome version now from Google Play, but you won’t see Chrome custom tabs right away — today’s news is primarily aimed at developers. That said, Google has partnered with a few apps already — Feedly, The Guardian, Medium, Player.fm, Skyscanner, Stack Overflow, Tumblr, and Twitter will support custom tabs “in the coming weeks.”

  • FreeBSD on Beagle Bone Black (with networking)

    I set out to run FreeBSD on my Beagle Bone Black (now dubbed “smurf” by the kids on account of it’s small and blue), for network services. My DSL modem is a crappy under-configurable thing, but I don’t dare to start hacking on it directly because it runs the telephony side of things, too. So I decided to use the Beagle Bone Black to take control of my home network.

  • Ireland strengthens its Open Data strategy with a governance body and a new portal

    The Irish Government opened an ‘expression of interest’ for a new open data public body in charge of the Open Data Strategy Governance and presented a new version of the national Open Data portal.

  • Scotland released an open data resource pack

    The Scottish government has published an open data resource pack aimed at helping all local public authorities to implement their own open data plan. This resource pack has been developed to support the Open Data Strategy of Scotland.

  • Bulgarians having a date with data

    This summer, the Bulgarian Council of Ministers organised 'A Date with Data'. The theme for this one-day event was 'Open Data for Transparent Governance'. The programme featured presentations, panel discussions, demonstrations of visualisations, and other applications of open data.

  • ​SanDisk and Nexenta release open-source, flash software-defined storage array

    SanDisk is best known for storage. Led by Nithya Ruff, the company's head of open-source strategy, the company is integrating open-source into storage. In their latest deal with Nexenta, an open source software-defined storage leader, the pairing of NexentaStor with SanDisk's all-flash InfiniFlash IF100 system underlines this shift.

  • Nexenta Extends Its Global Market Leadership in Open Source-Driven Software-Defined Storage (OpenSDS) Platform with Simplified Management, Advanced Automation and Real-Time Analytic Capabilities
  • Free and open source online 3D modeling tool CraftML launches beta version

    Over the past few years we’ve noticed that portions of the 3D printing community have regularly struggled with 3D modeling software. After all, the hobby itself isn’t cheap, so do you splurge on expensive, professional tools, or do you stick to a more limited free one? And does your programming experience limit your choice, or are you willing to learn a new language for the sake of the software you found? If you’ve struggled with these issues yourself or are unhappy with your current setup, then we’ve got some good news for you: a brand new, free and open source online 3D modeling tool has just launched a beta version; called CraftML, it is especially interesting for being accessible through common web technologies including html, css and Javascript.

  • Cross-compiling a PowerPC64 LE kernel and hitting a GCC bug
  • Code ninjas earn "belts" with CoderDojo

    But where, one may ask, will we as a global workforce find the next generation of bright young programmers, hardware engineers, and system administrators? This is the problem being addressed—in part—by CoderDojo, an Ireland-based international organization of more than 700 coding clubs worldwide. By engaging young people ages 7-17 in informal, creative environments, independent clubs of youngsters can learn web and application development along with other opportunities to explore technology and learn what excites them. Volunteer adults lead the local clubs, called Dojos, and teams of mentors and helpers are working together to keep the Dojo active and healthy. The kids are usually referred to as Ninjas and can complete activities and earn belts as their skills grow, although most clubs are using color-coded USB bracelets to signify ranks.

  • Stupid RCU Tricks: Hand-over-hand traversal of linked list using SRCU

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Calligra 2.9.7 Released

Filed under
KDE
Software

The Calligra team is pleased to announce the release of Calligra Suite, and Calligra Active 2.9.7. It is recommended update that brings further improvements to the 2.9 series of the applications and underlying development frameworks.

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Manjaro Linux KDE 15.09 RC1 Ships with KDE Plasma 5.4 Desktop, KDE Apps 15.08

Filed under
KDE
Linux

After announcing the release of the Manjaro Linux Xfce 15.09 RC1 distribution, Philip Müller comes with some more great news, this time for KDE fans, as the first Release Candidate build of the upcoming Manjaro Linux KDE 15.09 operating system has been seeded to testers worldwide earlier today, September 3, 2015.

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Is Office 365 really cheaper than going open source?

Filed under
OSS

The claim certainly generated plenty of headlines about the benefits of moving from OpenOffice to Office 365. However, it seems that, from the report, some of those savings are tied to the specific scenario facing the local authority in question, while others would diminish over time, as the bulk of the cost difference stems from estimates of lost productivity during years immediately after shifting to OpenOffice.

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Special Exclusive: Q&A with Joyent CEO Scott Hammond

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

So far, we have utilized open source as a model to innovate quickly and engage with customers and a broad developer community. SmartOS and Node.js are open source projects we have run for a number of years. In November of last year we went all in when we open sourced two of the systems at Joyent’s core: SmartDataCenter and Manta Object Storage Service. The unifying technology beneath both SmartDataCenter and Manta is OS-based virtualization and we believe open sourcing both systems is a way to broaden the community around the systems and advance the adoption of OS-based virtualization industry-wide.

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EXT4 Updates Are Pretty Boring For Linux 4.3

Filed under
Linux

The EXT4 file-system updates have been sent in for the Linux 4.3 kernel.

There isn't much to the EXT4 updates for Linux 4.3 besides clean-ups and fixes. Ted Ts'o wrote in the pull request, "Pretty much all bug fixes and clean ups for 4.3, after a lot of features and other churn going into 4.2."

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Jonathan Riddell Mocks Canonical with His Own Intellectual Property Policy

Filed under
Ubuntu
Legal

In some more relaxing news, Jonathan Riddell, leader of the Kubuntu Linux distribution, has had the great pleasure of announcing his own IP (Intellectual Property) policy, mocking Canonical's.

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Original: Jonathan Riddell™ IP Policy

Debian-Based Robolinux Xfce 8.1 OS Lets You Run Windows 10 in Stealth VM

Filed under
Debian

The development team behind the Robolinux project announced earlier today, September 3, the immediate availability for download of their brand new Robolinux Xfce 8.1 "Raptor" Linux distribution.

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Leftovers: Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

LibreOffice 5.0 review - Good stuff

Filed under
LibO
Reviews

I woke up this morning babe, and the Internet was storming, inside of me. And when I get that feeling I know I need some LibreOffice testing. Yes. What happened was, I opened the browser, like, and I was, like, there's a new, like, LibreOffice, like, and it's a whole-number version. Yay.

In all seriousness, LibreOffice 5.0 got me really excited. Yes, I know, it was an almost arbitrary increment of a minor version to a major one, much like Mozilla did with Firefox a few years back. Still, I totally liked the previous version, and for the first time in many years, it showed real, actual potential of being a viable alternative to payware solutions. Let's see in which direction this latest edition carries the good news and all that hope.

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Riddell Answers Canonical with Own IP Policy

Filed under
-s

In the latest salvo in the Canonical IP controversy, Jonathan Riddell today posted his own IP Policy. Elsewhere, the GNOME Foundation today posted support of an updated User Data Manifesto and SUSE today revealed some SUSECon 2015 plans. Phoronix reported Monday that ext3 will be removed from the kernel and Red Hat announced the release of 7.2 Beta.

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