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Sunday, 19 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux 4.15 Is A Huge Update For Both AMD CPU & Radeon GPU Owners

Filed under
Linux

Linux 4.15 is shaping up to be a massive kernel release and we are just half-way through its merge window period. But for AMD Linux users especially, the 4.15 kernel release is going to be rocking.

Whether you are using AMD processors and/or AMD Radeon graphics cards, Linux 4.15 is a terrific way to end of the year. There are a number of improvements to make this release great for AMD customers.

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Announcing Season of KDE 2018

Filed under
KDE

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way.

Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work.

For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program.

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How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux.

Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15

    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.

  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers

    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems.

    Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney

    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.

  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon

    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.

  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9

    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself.

    So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Darling ('Wine' for OS X) and Games Leftovers

Filed under
Mac
Gaming

Linux 4.13.14, 4.9.63, 4.4.99, and 3.18.82

Filed under
Linux

Security: Amazon, Microsoft, and John Draper

Filed under
Security
  • Amazon security camera could be remotely disabled by rogue couriers

    However, researchers from Rhino Security Labs found attacking the camera's Wi-Fi with a distributed denial of service attack, which sends thousands of information requests to the device, allowed them to freeze the camera. It would then continue to show the last frame broadcast, rather than going offline or alerting the user it had stopped working.

  • Pentagon contractor leaves social media spy archive wide open on Amazon

    A Pentagon contractor left a vast archive of social-media posts on a publicly accessible Amazon account in what appears to be a military-sponsored intelligence-gathering operation that targeted people in the US and other parts of the world.

    The three cloud-based storage buckets contained at least 1.8 billion scraped online posts spanning eight years, researchers from security firm UpGuard's Cyber Risk Team said in a blog post published Friday. The cache included many posts that appeared to be benign, and in many cases those involved from people in the US, a finding that raises privacy and civil-liberties questions. Facebook was one of the sites that originally hosted the scraped content. Other venues included soccer discussion groups and video game forums. Topics in the scraped content were extremely wide ranging and included Arabic language posts mocking ISIS and Pashto language comments made on the official Facebook page of Pakistani politician Imran Khan.

  • Pirated Microsoft Software Enabled NSA Hack says Kaspersky

    Earlier reports accused Kaspersky's antivirus software which was running on the NSA worker's home computer to be the reason behind the Russian spies to access the machine and steal important documents which belonged to NSA hacking unit, Equation Group.

  • Iconic hacker booted from conferences after sexual misconduct claims surface

    John Draper, a legendary figure in the world of pre-digital phone hacking known as "phreaking," has been publicly accused of inappropriate sexual behavior going back nearly two decades.

    According to a new Friday report by BuzzFeed News, Draper, who is also known as "Captain Crunch," acted inappropriately with six adult men and minors between 1999 and 2007 during so-called "energy" exercises, which sometimes resulted in private invitations to his hotel room. There, Draper allegedly made unwanted sexual advances.

    As a result of the new revelations, Draper, 74, is now no longer welcome at Defcon. Michael Farnum, the founder of HOU.SEC.CON, told Ars on Friday afternoon that Draper, who had been scheduled to speak in April 2018, was disinvited.

Debian Developers

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Joey Hess: stupid long route

    Yesterday, I surpassed all that, and I did it in a way that hearkens right back to the original story. I had two computers, 20 feet apart, I wanted one to talk to the other, and the route between the two ended up traveling not around the Earth, but almost the distance to the Moon.

    I was rebuilding my home's access point, and ran into a annoying bug that prevented it from listening to wifi. I knew it was still connected over ethernet to the satellite receiver.

    I connected my laptop to the satellite receiver over wifi. But, I didn't know the IP address to reach the access point. Then I remembered I had set it up so incoming ssh to the satellite receiver was directed to the access point.

  • I am now a Debian Developer

    On the 6th of April 2017, I finally took the plunge and applied for Debian Developer status. On 1 August, during DebConf in Montréal, my application was approved. If you’re paying attention to the dates you might notice that that was nearly 4 months ago already. I was trying to write a story about how it came to be, but it ended up long. Really long (current draft is around 20 times longer than this entire post). So I decided I’d rather do a proper bio page one day and just do a super short version for now so that someone might end up actually reading it.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Programming: GNU Nano, Software Engineering Talent Shortage, HHVM (PHP)

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GNU Nano Latest Version 2.9.0

    GNU nano 2.9.0 "Eta" introduces the ability to record and
    replay keystrokes (M-: to start and stop recording, M-;
    to play the macro back), makes ^Q and ^S do something
    useful by default (^Q starts a backward search, and ^S
    saves the current file), changes ^W to start always a
    forward search, shows the number of open buffers (when
    more than one) in the title bar, no longer asks to press
    Enter when there are errors in an rc file, retires the
    options '--quiet' and 'set quiet' and 'set backwards',
    makes indenting and unindenting undoable, will look in
    $XDG_CONFIG_HOME for a nanorc file and in $XDG_DATA_HOME
    for the history files, adds a history stack for executed
    commands (^R^X), does not overwrite the position-history
    file of another nano, and fixes a score of tiny bugs.

  • GNU Nano Text Editor Can Now Record & Replay Keystrokes

    GNU Nano 2.9 is now available as the latest feature release of this popular CLI text editor and it's bringing several new capabilities.

    First up, GNU Nano 2.9 has the ability to record and replay keystrokes within the text editor. M-: is used to start/stop the keystroke recording session while M-; is used to playback the macro / recorded keystrokes.

  • 2018's Software Engineering Talent Shortage— It’s quality, not just quantity

    The software engineering shortage is not a lack of individuals calling themselves “engineers”, the shortage is one of quality — a lack of well-studied, experienced engineers with a formal and deep understanding of software engineering.

  • HHVM 3.23

    HHVM 3.23 is released! This release contains new features, bug fixes, performance improvements, and supporting work for future improvements. Packages have been published in the usual places, however we have rotated the GPG key used to sign packages; see the installation instructions for more information.

  • Facebook Releases HHVM 3.23 With OpenSSL 1.1 Support, Experimental Bytecode Emitter

    HHVM 3.23 has been released as their high performance virtual machine for powering their Hack programming language and current PHP support.

    As mentioned back in September though, Facebook will stop focusing on PHP 7 compatibility in favor of driving their own Hack programming language forward. It's after their next release, HHVM 3.24, in early 2018 they will stop their commitment to supporting PHP5 features and at the same time not focus on PHP7 support. Due to the advancements made by upstream PHP on improving their performance, etc, Facebook is diverting their attention to instead just bolstering Hack and thus overtime the PHP support within HHVM will degrade.

Linux 4.14 File-System Benchmarks: Btrfs, EXT4, F2FS, XFS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Our latest Linux file-system benchmarking is looking at the performance of the mainline Btrfs, EXT4, F2FS, and XFS file-systems on the Linux 4.14 kernel compared to 4.13 and 4.12.

In looking to see how the file-system/disk performance has changed if at all under the newly released Linux 4.14 kernel, I carried out some 4.12/4.13/4.14 benchmarks using Btrfs/EXT4/F2FS/XFS while freshly formatting the drive each time and using the default mount options.

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Also: Freedreno Gallium3D Supports A Fair Amount Of OpenGL 4.x

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.35 with Support for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Solus

Filed under
Ubuntu

Snapcraft 2.35 comes approximately two months after the September release of Snapcraft 2.34, and it's a major update that finally adds support for the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series, which is maintained by Canonical for five years, until April 2019.

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS support in Snapcraft is particularly important for running Snaps based on ROS (Robot Operating System) Indigo, which is based on this LTS Ubuntu release. In addition, Snapcraft also appears to have received support for the Solus Linux-based operating system.

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Snaps Are Coming to Ubuntu 18.04 by Default, Kubuntu Could Also Adopt Them

Filed under
Ubuntu

Snap, the universal Linux binary format from Canonical, allows us to run the most recent versions of apps on day one. The developers of the Ubuntu MATE official Ubuntu flavor pioneered the concept of Snaps by default for their distribution with the release of Ubuntu MATE 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) by shipping a tiny PulseAudio mixer command-line app to get the pulse of the community.

As things went well on their side and no issues were reported by users so far, now the Ubuntu team laid down plans on a mechanism that should allow users to install Snaps on a freshly installed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system from the ISO image.

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BlackArch Linux Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing OS Drops 32-Bit Support

Filed under
Linux

The announcement was published this morning on their website and Twitter account, as it looks like the BlackArch developers plan to remove the 32-bit ISO images and respective repositories soon, urging all those running BlackArch on 32-bit PCs to upgrade to the 64-bit version of the operating system as soon as possible.

"Following 9 months of deprecation period, support for the i686 architecture effectively ends today. By the end of November, i686 packages will be removed from our mirrors and later from the packages archive," said the devs. "We wish to thank all of BlackArch's users, mirrors, and supporters. Thanks for your help."

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Also: BlackArch Linux Distro For Ethical Hacking Drops 32-bit Support

Raspberry Pi Digital Signage OS Updated to Debian Stretch, Chromium 62 Browser

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Raspberry Digital Signage 10.0 is the latest release of the operating system designed for deployment on digital signage infrastructures, backed by the tiny Raspberry Pi computer. It comes six months after the release of version 9.0 with a complete rebase on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series.

Marco Buratto announces the release of Raspberry Digital Signage 10.0 today, saying that it's utilizing the latest and greatest Chromium 62 open-source web browser, which features improved HTML5 video playback capabilities, better Adobe Flash support, as well as overall H264/AVC video playback performance improvements.

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Open Linux – Beyond distributions, regressions and rivalry

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I love Linux. Which is why, whenever there’s a new distro release and it’s less than optimal (read, horrible), a unicorn dies somewhere. And since unicorns are pretty much mythical, it tells you how bad the situation is. On a more serious note, I’ve started my autumn crop of distro testing, and the results are rather discouraging. Worse than just bad results, we get inconsistent results. This is possibly even worse than having a product that works badly. The wild emotional seesaw of love-hate, hope-despair plays havoc with users and their loyalty.

Looking back to similar tests in previous years, it’s as if nothing has changed. We’re spinning. Literally. Distro releases happen in a sort of intellectual vacuum, isolated from one another, with little to no cross-cooperation or cohesion. This got me thinking. Are there any mechanisms that could help strengthen partnership among different distro teams, so that our desktops looks and behave with more quality and consistency?

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers