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Friday, 28 Jan 22 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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What’s New in KDE Plasma 5.24: 5 Major Improvements to Expect

Filed under
KDE

KDE is set to release Plasma 5.24, the first major release of 2022. The beta version is already out and gives a glimpse of what new features to expect in KDE Plasma 5.24. This new version brings forward various updates spread across the entire KDE ecosystem and improves things like Wayland support and system navigation.

Read below to find out all the exciting new features you can expect in KDE Plasma 5.24, which will be released in February 2022.

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Anbernic RG552 review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Reviews
Gaming

From the RG350 to the RG280V and many more inbetween, it’s built a solid reputation for putting out superb, affordable Linux-based handhelds purpose built for retro gaming, with build quality far beyond expectations.

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Wine 7.1

Filed under
Software
  • WineHQ - Wine Announcement - The Wine development release 7.1 is now available.
    The Wine development release 7.1 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Vulkan 1.3 support.
      - A number of theming fixes.
      - WebSocket improvements.
      - Improved cursor clipping on macOS.
      - IDL compiler fixes for C++.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/7.x/wine-7.1.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/7.x/wine-7.1.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 7.1 is out with Vulkan 1.3 support | GamingOnLinux

    Now that the dust has settled on the bottle of Wine 7.0, the biweekly development releases have begun and Wine 7.1 is out with new features and bug fixes. This is the compatibility layer that allows you to run games and applications developed for Windows - on Linux. Part of what makes up Steam Play Proton. Once a year or so, a new stable release is made.

  • Wine 7.1 Released With Vulkan 1.3 Support, Theming Fixes - Phoronix

    With Wine 7.0 having been released, the code freeze is over and we are now onto the Wine 7.x bi-weekly development releases that will then culminate with the Wine 8.0 stable release one year from now. In kicking off the new development series, Wine 7.1 is out today. Wine 7.1 brings support for Vulkan 1.3 that released earlier this week. The headers and other bits for Wine's Vulkan integration have been updated against the v1.3 specification.

How the Free Software and the IP Wars of the 1990s and 2000s Presaged Today’s Toxic, Concentrated Internet

Filed under
GNU
Web
Legal

The history of free software and the IP Wars of the 1990s and 2000s provides a good illustration of these path-dependencies around the meaning of liberty, law, and power throughout the period. In response to the rise in prominence of Unix, a proprietary system developed by Bell Labs, in the 1980s, free software advocate Richard Stallman and others began a crusade to liberate software from its proprietary ties. They created the GPL (“GNU Public License”) a free open license that requires anyone reusing, buying or redistributing the software to comply with the freedoms granted by the original license.. The free software movement later inspired a parallel movement to liberate content and creativity from copyright strictures.

In an article titled “Anarchism Triumphant,” Columbia Law Professor Eben Moglen argued that free software represented the beginning of a shift towards a free-er anarchic digital political economy which would do away with most forms of private ownership. In a 1994 essay, Electronic Frontier Foundation co-founder John Perry Barlow argued that copyright law, which protects the material expression of ideas, had become obsolete on the internet, the “Home of the Mind.” Many of these ideas grew in opposition to the powerful interests of the time: against firms like Bell Labs producing proprietary software, against firms like AT&T controlling telecommunications and broadband, against Hollywood studios and music labels who sought to enclose and profit from creative digital assets. Yet many of these views also unconsciously built the intellectual, legal, and economic case for new forms of enclosure, those that were already being adopted by open platforms such as Google which would soon thrive on the distributed sharing of content by opaquely acquiring control over and monetizing attention and data. In disputes on who should win between Hollywood and YouTube, users were the ones ultimately left behind.

As Tel Aviv University Law Professor Niva Elkin-Koren put it, “[w]hat began as a controversy over the appropriateness of copyright law to accommodate … technological changes, became a political battle over the distribution of the potential gains that cyberspace offers.”

These so-called “IP Wars” embodied institutional controversies on the stakes of the internet’s ecology and saliently illustrate confusions that are still with us today. For example, as Duke University Law Professor James Boyle put it, it was as if early cyberlibertarians “couldn’t agree on whether [their] motto was to be ‘Taxation is theft’ or ‘Property is theft.’” Their aversion for IP often hid faith in new forms of digital capitalism. Further, the rhetoric of freedom and anarchy underlying the IP Wars helped strengthen commercial interests and monopoly rents on the Internet. Visions of the internet as an apolitical laboratory of innovation, a frictionless space governed by individual choices took the center stage, ultimately facilitating the accumulation of digital control in the hands of a few internet gatekeepers. The move towards private and code-based governance opened the door to widespread and poorly regulated surveillance practices that remained disguised under the facial neutrality of code and cyber-economists’ efficiency-based arguments.

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Flatpak App of the Week: Extension Manager – Browse and Install GNOME Shell Extensions

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Reviews

Extension Manager is a very simple app that does one thing (and does it good), to mirror the content of the GNOME Extensions website at extensions.gnome.org.

The application lets you easily manage your installed GNOME Shell extensions, similar to what the official GNOME Extensions app does, but it also lets you browse the extensions.gnome.org website straight from within the app if you want to install more extensions on your GNOME desktop.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Custom Piano Tickles the Ivories

    This electronic keyboard is completely designed and built from scratch, including the structure of the instrument and the keys themselves. [Balthasar] made each one by hand out of wood and then built an action mechanism for them to register presses. While they don’t detect velocity or pressure, the instrument is capable of defining the waveform and envelope for any note, is able to play multiple notes per key, and is able to change individual octaves. This is thanks to a custom 6×12 matrix connected to a STM32 microcontroller. Part of the reason [Balthasar] chose this microcontroller is that it can do some of the calculations needed to produce music in a single clock cycle, which is an impressive and under-reported feature for the platform.

  • Hacking A Proper Dash Into The Tesla Model 3 | Hackaday

    The build relies on a CANserver, an ESP32-based device specifically built for hooking up to the CAN bus on Tesla vehicles and sharing the data externally. The data can then be piped wirelessly to an Android phone running CANdash to display all the desired information. With the help of an aftermarket dash clip or a 3D printed custom mount, the phone can then be placed behind the steering wheel to display data in the usual location.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 108
  • Celebrating Data Privacy Day

    Happy International Data Privacy Day! While January 28 marks a day to raise awareness and promote best practices for privacy and data protection around the world, we at Mozilla do this work year-round so our users can celebrate today — and every day — the endless joy the internet has to offer.

    We know that data privacy can feel daunting, and the truth is, no one is perfect when it comes to protecting their data 24/7. At Mozilla though, we want to make data protection feel a bit easier and not like something else on the never-ending life to-do list. We build products that protect people online so they can experience the best of the web without compromising on privacy, performance or convenience. The internet is too good to miss out on — we’ll take care of securing it so you can focus on exploring and enjoying it.

    To accomplish this, we started with square one: our Firefox browser — enhancing its privacy and tracking protections over the past year, while improving its user experience to make surfing the web less dangerous and more carefree.

    [...]

    Despite how it sounds, you don’t need to be a hacker to make use of an encrypted connection. Whether you’re online shopping or want to make sure your login credentials are safe from attackers, we’re working on ensuring your browsing experience is secure from start to finish. That’s why, when you open up a Private Browsing tab on Firefox, you can be confident that your information is safe thanks to our HTTPS by Default offering, which ensures the data you share with and receive from a website is encrypted and won’t be able to be intercepted, viewed or tampered with by a hacker. To take this one step further, we’re also working with Internet Service Providers like Comcast and other partners through our Trusted Recursive Resolver program, to begin making DNS encryption the default for Firefox users in the US and Canada.

  • Abuse & Sex Crimes at FOSDEM and Open Source tech events

    All these people have conflicts of interest. For example, Molly herself was secretly sleeping with Chris Lamb when he was leader of Debian. Imagine a woman comes to Molly's team to make an abuse complaint about Lamb or one of his close friends.

    [...]

    Women trusting women simply because they are women is not a good choice.

    There are numerous examples of women like Molly who have been sympathetic to or even in cahoots with male abusers.

  • What is MongoDB, and how does it work? | FOSS Linux

    MongoDB is the most common and widely used NoSQL database. It is an open-source document-oriented DB. NoSQL is used to refer to ‘non-relational’. This means that the MongoDB database is not based on tabular relations like RDBMS as it provides a distinct storage and data retrieval mechanism.

    The storage format employed by MongoDB is referred to as BSON. The database is maintained by MongoDB Inc. and is licensed under the Server-Side Public License (SSPL).

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • #28 PrintScrn · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from January 21 to January 28.

  • Implementing a MIME database in XXXX

    Recently, I have been working on implementing a parser for media types (commonly called MIME types) and a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice-versa. I thought this would be an interesting module to blog about, given that it’s only about 250 lines of code, does something useful and interesting, and demonstrates a few interesting xxxx concepts.

    The format for media types is more-or-less defined by RFC 2045, specifically section 5.1. The specification is not great. The grammar shown here is copied and pasted from parts of larger grammars in older RFCs, RFCs which are equally poorly defined. For example, the quoted-string nonterminal is never defined here, but instead comes from RFC 822, which defines it but also states that it can be “folded”, which technically makes the following a valid Media Type:

    text/plain;charset="hello
     world"
    

    Or so I would presume, but the qtext terminal “cannot include CR”, which is the mechanism by which folding is performed in the first place, and… bleh. Let’s just implement a “reasonable subset” of the spec instead and side-step the whole folding issue.1 This post will first cover parsing media types, then address our second goal: providing a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice versa.

  • gst-editing-services compiled in OE

    I discovered that 'gst-editing-services' is another dependency of Pitivi, added to these:
    https://bkhome.org/news/202201/more-dependencies-for-pitivi-video-editor.html
    There is no recipe in OE, so I attempted to compile it on the host system. Stuffed around for about 3 hours, unable to compile, ninja is doing something stupid.

  • More dependencies for Pitivi video editor

    This morning I posted about a complete recompile in OpenEmbedded, "revision 7":

    https://bkhome.org/news/202201/what-to-expect-in-the-next-release-of-easyos.html

    This included bumped gstreamer version, suitable to run Pitivi.

  • Wasmer 2.2 Bringing Its WebAssembly "Singlepass" Compiler To AArch64 - Phoronix

    Wasmer 2.2-rc1 is out today as the WebAssembly run-tme to "run any code on any client" with its broad platform coverage and allowing numerous programming languages from Rust to PHP to C# being able to be compiled into WebAssembly and then running on any OS or embedded into other languages for execution.

    Wasmer continues as one of the leading open-source WebAssembly runtimes with a diverse feature-set. Its project site at Wasmer.io talks up Wasmer for use from "supercharged blockchain infrastructure" to "portable ML/AI applications". Buzzwords aside, Wasmer has been a very interesting WebAssembly open-source project.

  • Alternatives to Visual Basic

    This is a list of free/libre open source software (FLOSS) alternatives to Visual Basic (part of Microsoft Visual Studio) computer programming platform. If your school is still teaching VB 6, or if you now use Ubuntu for programming classroom, we strongly suggest you to switch to either one of these alternatives. With these, one can create computer programs visually by drag and drop as well as coding just like what one can do with VB.

Graphics: DXVK-NVAPI, Wayland, Resizable BAR

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • DXVK-NVAPI 0.5.2 Released With Entry Points For NVIDIA PhysX - Phoronix

    DXVK-NVAPI as the open-source project implementing support for NVIDIA's NVAPI within the realm of DXVK is out with a new release, which is exciting for NVIDIA Linux gamers.

    DXVK-NVAPI is an important project for NVIDIA Linux gamers enjoying Valve's Steam Play (Proton) or outside of it as well if using DXVK otherwise. DXVK-NVAPI provides an NVAPI library implementation that can be used by the Windows games that make use of this NVIDIA API. DXVK-NVAPI is already used for Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS), NVAPI D3D11 extensions, and other features.

  • Wayland Testing New Protocol Extension To Handle Session Locking - Phoronix

    Wayland Protocols 1.25 was released today as the collection of testing and stable Wayland protocols. New to Wayland Protocols 1.25 is the session-lock-v1 protocol being experimental and responsible to handle session locking.

    The session-lock-v1 protocol is the main addition of Wayland Protocols 1.25 and allows for privileged Wayland clients to lock the session and display arbitrary graphics while in the locked mode. That authenticated client is responsible for handling user authentication and interfacing with the compositor for disabling the session lock when appropriate.

  • Intel Preparing Resizable BAR Support For Their Arc Graphics On Linux - Phoronix

    Ahead of the Intel Arc "Alchemist" graphics cards shipping this year, Intel's open-source developers have continued ironing out the Linux driver support. The most recent kernel patches are for getting their Resizable BAR "ReBAR" support in order.

    Sent out this week were a set of patches for small BAR recovery support for the Intel kernel graphics driver on Linux.

Kubernetes Leftovers

Filed under
Server
  • How to Tackle the Cloud Native Trends of 2022 | SUSE Communities

    At SUSE, we partner with several top-notch managed service providers to deliver the whole enterprise package — our open, interoperable offerings backed by their proven ops teams. We help MSPs more easily and securely deliver objectives despite the increasing complexity of the cloud and Kubernetes, while they help our enterprises get up and stay up, running faster, while cutting costs. We provide that much needed abstraction layer so they can focus on your enterprise modernizing securely.

  • Securing Kubernetes at the Infrastructure Level

    Infrastructure security is important to get right so that attacks can be prevented—or, in the case of a successful attack, damage can be minimized. It is especially important in a Kubernetes environment because, by default, a large number of Kubernetes configurations are not secure.

    Securing Kubernetes at the infrastructure level requires a combination of host hardening, cluster hardening and network security.

    [...]

    I have listed 10 best practices for securing Kubernetes at the infrastructure level. While this is certainly not an exhaustive list by any means, it should give you the foundation to make a good start. I recommend reading chapter two of Kubernetes security and observability: A holistic approach to securing containers and cloud-native applications, an O’Reilly book I co-authored, to learn about these best practices in further detail and to discover additional best practices for infrastructure security.

  • Should You Learn Kubernetes? – CloudSavvy IT

    Kubernetes has seen a surge of adoption over the past few years as companies have pivoted towards containers and cloud-native deployment methods. The platform’s become the leading orchestration solution for running containers in production. This means people who are skilled in using and managing Kubernetes clusters are now in-demand across the industry.

    In this article, we’ll look at whether you should learn Kubernetes based on your current role and future objectives. If you’re not being tasked with managing a cluster, the decision ultimately comes down to the skill set you want to acquire and the areas you might move into down the line.

  • Declarative vs Imperative Kubernetes Object Management – CloudSavvy IT

    Kubernetes is usually described as a declarative system. Most of the time you work with YAML that defines what the end state of the system should look like. Kubernetes supports imperative APIs too though, where you issue a command and get an immediate output.

    In this article, we’ll explore the differences between these two forms of object management. The chances are you’ve already used both even if you don’t recognize the terms.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Debian (graphicsmagick), Fedora (grafana), Mageia (aom and roundcubemail), openSUSE (log4j and qemu), Oracle (parfait:0.5), Red Hat (java-1.7.1-ibm and java-1.8.0-openjdk), Slackware (expat), SUSE (containerd, docker, log4j, and strongswan), and Ubuntu (cpio, shadow, and webkit2gtk).

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 202 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 202. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Don't fail if comparing a nonexistent file with a .pyc file (and add test).
      (Closes: #1004312)
    * Drop a reference in the manual page which claims the ability to compare
      non-existent files on the command-line. This has not been possible since
      version 32 which was released in September 2015. (Closes: #1004182)
    * Add experimental support for incremental output support with a timeout.
      Passing, for example, --timeout=60 will mean that diffoscope will not
      recurse into any sub-archives after 60 seconds total execution time has
      elapsed and mark the diff as being incomplete. (Note that this is not a
      fixed/strict timeout due to implementation issues.)
      (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#301)
    * Don't return with an exit code of 0 if we encounter device file such as
      /dev/stdin with human-readable metadata that matches literal, non-device,
      file contents. (Closes: #1004198)
    * Correct a "recompile" typo.
    
    [ Sergei Trofimovich ]
    * Fix/update whitespace for Black 21.12.

  • CISA Adds Eight Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog | CISA

    CISA has added eight new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence that threat actors are actively exploiting the vulnerabilities listed in the table below. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors of all types and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Single-command Docker environments on any machine with Multipass | Ubuntu

    Multipass has a new workflow tailored to run Docker containers on macOS, Windows or Linux. One single command, no dependencies, full flexibility.

    Multipass exists to bring Ubuntu-based development to the operating system of your choice. Whether you prefer the GUI of macOS (even on M1), Windows or any other Linux, the unmatched experience of developing software on Ubuntu is there at your fingertips, just one “multipass launch” away. Today, the Multipass team is delighted to enhance this experience for developers working with containerised applications!

  • How to create fillable forms in ONLYOFFICE Docs 7.0

    ONLYOFFICE Docs is an open-source office suite distributed under GNU AGPL v3.0. It comprises web-based viewers and collaborative editors for text documents, spreadsheets, and presentations highly compatible with OOXML formats.

    ONLYOFFICE Docs can be integrated with various cloud services such as Nextcloud, Seafile, Redmine, Alfresco, etc., as well as embedded into your own solution. The editors can also be used as a part of the complete productivity solution ONLYOFFICE Workspace.
    With the latest major update, the ONLYOFFICE developers added online form functionality allowing users to create, collaborate on and fill in forms to create documents from templates. Forms can be exported in fillable PDF and DOCX.

    In this tutorial, we’ll learn how to create a fillable form with ONLYOFFICE Docs.

  • 10 Funny Commands in Linux

    On Linux, the Terminal is used quite often to maintain the system. But besides doing serious work, there are also some funny commands, which I will show you below.

    Here, we are using Ubuntu 20.04, but you can basically use any other Linux operating system.

  • GNU Linux Debian – very fast and easy semi-automatic online install Debian 11 (non-free)

    given the fact – that once installed – GNU Linux Debian can boot (almost) anywhere, the fastest and easiest way to “install” it is to simply 1:1 copy it on whatever the user wants to boot from (harddisk or usb stick (some sticks can not be made bootable, try at least 3 different vendors)).

    So… this install script 1:1 copy installs Debian 11 (non-free) on any laptop/desktop/server (depending on internet speed) very fast & easy.

    The process can be automated (on similar hardware or on hardware where /dev/sda is always the device the user wants to 1:1 overwrite).

  • What to do when App Window is larger than Screen Height in Ubuntu | UbuntuHandbook

    For Ubuntu PC or laptop with a low resolution monitor, some app windows may be bigger than screen height, thus it’s NOT fully accessible especially for the bottom part.

    This usually happens in some Qt apps and Gnome Extension settings dialog in my Ubuntu laptop with 1366×768 screen resolution. A workaround is moving the app window above the top of the screen. Here’s how to do the trick in Ubuntu!

Audiocasts/Shows: Self-Hosted, Linuxfx, and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Pulling the Rug Out | Self-Hosted 63

    Alex has a new high-quality self-hosted music setup, and Chris solves complicated Internet problems.

  • YouTube Shorts | Blathering – CubicleNate's Techpad

    YouTube Shorts are the response of the Video Giant to the Tik Tok. They are 1 minute in length or less and have to be in portrait format to be a “short.” I don’t have nor do I want a Tik Tok so this sort of intrigues me, but I do wonder if it will actually go anywhere. For fun, I thought I would do some YouTube Shorts in preparation for the next Linux Saloon live stream where we will be talking about Solus, an independent Linux distribution that has been known for its speed and efficiency. I haven’t given it a spin since late 2018 so it is well over due for me. It will be quite fun to try it out and see how things have changed. I have historically liked its flagship desktop environment, Budgie but it has been a while.

  • Hackaday Podcast 153: A 555 Teardown To Die For, Tetrabyte Is Not A Typo, DIY Injection Molding, And Using All The Parts Of The Trash Printer | Hackaday

    Join Hackaday Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Managing Editor Tom Nardi on another whirlwind tour of the week’s top stories, hacks, and projects. We start off with some breaking Linux security news, and then marvel over impeccably designed pieces of hardware ranging from a thrifty Z table for the K40 laser cutter to a powerful homebrew injection molding rig. The finer technical points of a USB device that only stores 4 bytes at a time will be discussed, and after taking an interactive tour through the internals of the 555 timer, we come away even more impressed by the iconic 50 year old chip. We’ll wrap things up by speculating wildly about all the bad things that can happen to floating solar panels, and then recite some poetry that you can compile into a functional computer program should you feel so inclined.

  • Live - The Return to Arch Linux - Invidious
  • Linuxfx 11.1.1103 overview | Fast, stable and very safe - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linuxfx 11.1.1103 and some of the applications pre-installed.

GStreamer 1.19.90 pre-release (1.20 rc1)

Filed under
GNOME

The GStreamer team is excited to announce the first release candidate for the upcoming stable 1.20 release series.

This 1.19.90 pre-release is for testing and development purposes in the lead-up to the stable 1.20 series which is now feature frozen and scheduled for release very soon. Any newly-added API can still change until that point, although it is extremely unlikely for that to happen at this point.

Depending on how things go there might be more release candidates in the next couple of days, but in any case we're aiming to get 1.20.0 out as soon as possible.

Read more

A Long Overdue Update - Fractal-next

Filed under
Software
GNOME

It’s been a while since I last blogged about the state of Fractal-next. Even though I’m not great at writing updates we’ve been making steady and significant progress on the code front. Before we dive into our progress I want to say thank you to all contributors, and especially Kévin Commaille.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Top tech conferences for sysadmins in 2022 | Enable Sysadmin

    In the pre-pandemic past, time and budget often limited which industry events people could attend. While time will always be a factor, the shift towards virtual gatherings has made that commitment much easier for many people. Pair a more flexible schedule with reduced costs for travel and tickets, and you have the most accessible industry landscape in history.

    Sysadmins are known as "jack-of-all-trades" technologists who need broad and deep knowledge to do their jobs well. But this makes it hard for them to choose which conferences—many aimed at specific tech audiences—to attend.

    Like everything in life, it comes down to your priorities. Want to focus on your automation skills this year? AnsibleFest it is. Want to bridge the gap between sysadmins and developers? Try DevConf or All Things Open (which, in my experience, leans towards developers). What about container technology? Well, there's Kubecon for that...

    You see my point. There are a lot of events to choose from. So it raises the question, what is your number one must-attend tech event for 2022?

  • Simple Partitioning with Ansible Storage Role – Storage APIs

    There are probably not too many people that need to do disk partitioning and storage space management on a daily basis. For most of us it is something low level that needs to be set up just once and then promptly forgotten.

    Strangely enough the Ansible Storage Role can be very useful for both of these groups of people. Here, I would like to try and explain why and how to use it.

    Please remember that Storage Role operations are often destructive – the user can easily lose data if he is not being careful. Backup, if possible, think twice if not.

  • Safeguarding consumer data for banks: some guidelines for privacy engineering

    Open banking requirements add complexity to protecting customer data. Banks need to juggle the complexity of keeping customer data safe and adhering to privacy requirements and expectations -- while also sharing data with authorized institutions. These regulations also inform the software development process, which must implement ever increasing functional capability and efficiencies while adhering to the prescribed directives. The question is, how?

    Software development efforts are not conducted independently of regulatory requirements. While ultimately banks must ensure that customer data is not stolen or altered in the process of sharing and that customer privacy is not compromised - violations can risk a bank’s reputation and incur financial penalties from regulators - there is a clear need for developers to contribute significantly to better privacy engineering standards.

  • IBM Emeritus Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Is It Possible to Establish Norms for Responsible State Behavior in Cyberspace?

    In mid-December, the Council one Foreign Relations sponsored a virtual roundtable with Joseph Nye, - former dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, - to discuss his recent Foreign Affairs article The End of Anarchy?: How to Build a New Digital Order. Professor Nye has long been regarded as one of America’s preeminent strategic thinkers and political scientists. In the 1970s he chaired the National Security Council Group on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons, and over the past decade he’s brought his expertise to the study of conflict and deterrence in cyberspace.

    Cybersecurity is an increasingly important aspect of the of US national security strategy, including global trade and the protection of our critical infrastructures. In June of 2021, FBI Director Christopher Wray compared the danger of ransomware attacks on US firms by Russian criminal groups to the September 11 terrorist attacks. And, in a July editorial, the NY times said that ransomware attacks have emerged as “a formidable potential threat to national security,” given “their ability to seriously disrupt economies and to breach strategically critical enterprises or agencies,” urging governments that “It is a war that needs to be fought, and won.”

    At an MIT conference in February of 2019, former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was asked if we need cybersecurity control agreements with Russia, China and other nations similar to the nuclear arms control agreements that he spent so much time negotiating during the Cold War. Dr. Kissinger replied that for arms control to be effective, the two sides needed to share information and agree to inspections. But such mechanisms are harder to apply in the digital world, because the transparency that was essential for arms control would be very hard to establish for cyber threats. In addition, while controls of physical arms are relatively explicable and negotiable, the variety and speed of cyber attacks make it much harder to develop adequate control agreements.

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Tumbleweed Development and Rancher Desktop 1.0

Filed under
SUSE
  • Bash, systemd, libvirt Update in Tumbleweed - openSUSE News

    Some other noteworthy news within Tumbleweed is that Wicked is being phased out. New installations of Tumbleweed are all using NetworkManager by default. This is not only for desktops, but also for server installs. However, upgraders are not planned as of yet to be migrated away from Wicked.

    The latest Tumbleweed snapshot is 20220126. Samba updated twice this week; this snapshot brought in the 4.15.4 version, which provided a bit of cleanup and configuration changes. The 5.16.2 Linux Kernel quickly went from staging to snapshot. The updated kernel had multiple Advanced Linux Sound Architecture fixes for newer Lenovo laptops and KVM fixes for s390 and x86 architectures. The text editor vim had several fixes along with some additional changes for the experimental vim9 fork in its 8.2.4186 version. xlockmore, which is a screen saver and X Window System package, updated an xscreensaver port and fixed some modules in its 5.68 version. The 3.74 version for mozilla-nss replaced four Google Trust Services LLC root certificates, added a few iTrusChina root certificates and added support for SHA-2 hashes in CertIDs in Online Certificate Status Protocol responses.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2022/04 – Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*)

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    The week has passed without any major hiccups, which also shows in the number of Tumbleweed snapshots released during this week. Not the highest count ever achieved, but we are at a solid 6 snapshots (0121.0126), with the next one already in QA.

  • SUSE unveils Rancher Desktop 1.0 for Kubernetes on your PC | ZDNet

    As Kubernetes users know, Rancher is a popular complete software stack for running and managing multiple Kubernetes clusters across any infrastructure. Now, since Linux and cloud-power SUSE acquired Rancher, it's launched its first new program: Rancher Desktop 1.0

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Let's Try to Install Raspberry Pi 5.10 on VirtualBox!

    Today we will see how to install Raspberry Pi with VirtualBox. The famous Linux OS comes as an embedded system which usually utilized in projects. For testing and simulation environments having Pi in VirtualBox will be a good idea. As per official documentation, this Debian derivative can be a buildup for Microsoft, Apple OS, and Linux-based environments. For Linux Ubuntu can be customized as a Pi- environment. But, here we are discussing to buildup a dedicated os with the help of Virtual Box. Let’s take a brief on Pi’s features.

  • How to build, run, and manage container images with Podman | FOSS Linux

    Linux Containers have been around for some time but were introduced in the Linux kernel in 2008. Linux containers are lightweight, executable application components that combine app source code with OS libraries and dependencies required to run the code in different environments.

    Developers use containers as an application packaging and delivery technology. One key attribute of containers is combining lightweight application isolation with the flexibility of image-based deployment methods.

    RHEL based systems like CentOS and Fedora Linux implements containers using technologies such as control groups for resource management, namespaces for system process isolation, SELinux for security management. These technologies provide an environment to produce, run, manage and orchestrate containers. In addition to these tools, Red Hat offers command-line tools like podman and buildah for managing container images and pods.

  • How To Install ELK Stack on AlmaLinux 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install ELK Stack on AlmaLinux 8. For those of you who didn’t know, The ELK Stack is an acronym for a combination of three widely used open-source projects: E=Elasticsearch, L=Logstash, and K=Kibana. With the addition of Beats, the ELK Stack is now known as the Elastic Stack. the ELK platform allows you to consolidate, process, monitor, and perform analytics on data generated from multiple sources in a way that is fast, scalable, and reliable.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the ELK Stack on an AlmaLinux 8. You can follow the same instructions for Rocky Linux.

  • Install Minikube On Ubuntu 22.04 / 20.04 LTS | Tips On UNIX

    minikube is an open-source tool, also a local Kubernetes focusing on making it easy to learn and develop for Kubernetes.

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to install minikube on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Ubuntu 22.04.

  • How to know which Linux Kernel Version is installed in my System - TREND OCEANS

    There are a couple of reasons why you should know your Linux kernel version, It could be a handful when you want to install the Linux header, and even it’s a pretty common error for the VMware Workstation to fail in case of a missing Linux header.

    In this article, you will see how to check the kernel version, alongside you will see the steps to install Linux header on your system.

  • How to create and run a shell script in Linux and Ubuntu - Coffee Talk: Java, News, Stories and Opinions

    It’s pretty easy to run a batch file on windows.

    Just just create a file, change the extension to .bat, and either call the script in PowerShell or double click to execute it. Windows users are spoiled.

    If you want to create a script and run it in Ubuntu, a few extra steps are involved.

  • Install Puppet Server & Agent on Rocky Linux or AlmaLinux 8 - Linux Shout

    In this tutorial, we will learn the steps to install Puppet Server on AlmaLinux or Rocky Linux 8 distros using the command terminal.

    Puppet is an open-source project with enterprise support, it allows admins to automate the configuration of a single server or computer to a large network of systems; Ansible and Foreman are a few of its alternatives.

    When developers and administrators have to configure multiple servers at a time with similar configurations then instead of repeating the same tasks on each system one by one they use special configuration managers such as Puppet. Ideally, many tasks can be automated with it using Puppet’s Domain-Specific Language (DSL) — Puppet code — which you can use with a wide array of devices and operating systems. It was developed in 2005 by Puppet Labs, Portland, Oregon; written in Ruby and designed to be cross-platform. Any login term enterprise operating system can be used to host Puppet servers such as OracleLinux, RedHat, SuSE, Ubuntu, Debian AlmaLinux, and Rocky Linux. Systems running Windows can also be configured and managed with Puppet, with some limitations.

  • How to Use GitLab’s Built-In Sentry Error Tracking Service – CloudSavvy IT

    Sentry is a popular error-tracking platform that gives you real-time visibility into issues in your production environments. GitLab’s Error Reporting feature lets you bring Sentry reports into your source control platform, offering a centralized view that unifies Sentry errors and GitLab issues.

    The feature originally relied on an integration with an existing Sentry service, either the official Sentry.io or your own self-hosted server. This changed with GitLab 14.4 which added a lightweight Sentry-compatible backend to GitLab itself. You no longer need an actual Sentry installation to get error reports into GitLab.

    Here’s how to get started with the integrated Sentry backend. Before we proceed, it’s worth mentioning that this capability might not be right for you if you’re already acquainted with the Sentry dashboard. GitLab’s backend is a barebones solution which surfaces errors as a simple list. It’s best for smaller applications where you don’t want the overhead of managing a separate Sentry project.

  • Learn to Install Android Studio Step by Step on Ubuntu

    Android Studio is Android’s official development environment. The tool is designed specifically for Android devices to help you build the highest quality apps. Android applications are built on a setup developed by Google, which is known to all Android users. The IDE replaced the Eclipse tool, which was primarily used for Android development. AS IDE has been used to develop some of the most well-known Android applications.

Latest Raspberry Pi OS Release Adds New Options to Its Configuration Tool, Many Bug Fixes

Filed under
Linux
News

The new Raspberry Pi OS release (dated 2022-01-28) is here about three months after the previous update, which rebased the distribution on the Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” operating system series to add various improvements to the raspi-config application that lets you configure Raspberry Pi system settings.

Both the raspi-config command-line tool and its rc_gui GTK graphical user interface received enhancements. For example, rc_gui no longer ships with the camera interface switch and features a combo box to allow users to set the resolution for VNC (Virtual Network Computing) connections. In addition, Mutter is now automatically disabled when the VNC server is running and the system falls back to Openbox.

Read more

Games: Chromebooks, Valve, New Titles, and Predictions

Filed under
Gaming
  • Google Said to Be Working on Gaming Chromebooks

    Chromebooks are great, inexpensive machines that work via a connection to Google services and seem like the perfect platform for game streaming. That’s why it’s not too much of a surprise that the rumor mill is suggesting that Google is working on gaming Chromebooks.

  • GitHub IS NOT for you. But here's how you can still use software from it. - Invidious [Ed: "The Linux Gamer" needs to shun GitHub (Microsoft Proprietary Software Prison), not legitimise the misuse of it]
  • Wine manager Bottles has a big new release with major overhauls | GamingOnLinux

    Managing various games and applications installed on Linux using Wine can be a hassle, and while there's stuff like Lutris available perhaps Bottles might be a better dedicated option just for Wine directly.

    Version 2022.1.28 has rolled out, with an aim to make the experience more stable thanks to a whole new Wine backend. The new system is split across three components (WineCommand, WineProgram, Executor), that should allow for easy extensions to what Bottles can offer. One useful change with this is that you can run commands without other things interfering (like Gamescope and GameMode).

    There's also now the ability to show / hide programs inside each Bottle, their new build of Wine (Caffe) is based on Wine 7.0 with support for the newer Futex2 code, an improved view with a search bar for installers like Epic Games and GOG Galaxy and some other minor features.

  • Unavowed from Wadjet Eye Games arrives on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Wadjet Eye Games seem to be on a roll lately for Linux support. First we saw upgrades and new ports of The Blackwell Bundle, then Gemini Rue and now we have Unavowed. A good time to be a point and click adventure game fan.

    "A demon possessed you one year ago. Since that day, you unwillingly tore a trail of bloodshed through New York City. Your salvation comes in the form of the Unavowed – an ancient society dedicated to stopping evil.

  • Gemini Rue gets a fresh and up to date Linux port | GamingOnLinux

    Wadjet Eye Games continue getting their older published titles upgraded for Linux, after doing the same for The Blackwell Bundle we now have a modern port of Gemini Rue for Linux.

    "Azriel Odin, ex-assassin, arrives on the rain-drenched planet of Barracus. When things go horribly wrong, he can only seek help from the very criminals he used to work for.

    Meanwhile, across the galaxy, a man called Delta-Six wakes up in a hospital with no memory. Without knowing where to turn or who to trust, he vows to escape before he loses his identity completely.

  • 'Vampire Survivors' patch confirms Mac and Linux ports, mocks NFTs

    Version 0.2.9 launched earlier in the week, and it includes the addition of an in-game item called the Nduja Fritta Tanto – or, NFT for short.

    “From game patch 0.2.9, the Nduja Fritta Tanto can randomly drop from candles/braziers to add 10 spicy seconds to your runs. Terrible pun, great item. We’re against NFT practices if that wasn’t clear,” reads the patch notes.

    Aside from Poncle’s choice “to jump on the hottest trends in gaming,” there are several other changes made to Vampire Survivors with the patch.

    This includes a Garlic evolution, one additional new evolution, and two more achievements.

  • Bold Predictions for Linux Gaming in 2022 - Boiling Steam

    It’s time for the Linux Gaming predictions for 2022! Last year in early 2021 we collected predictions from numerous actors of the Linux Gaming Sphere, and it was a lot of fun. And very useful too: our combined predictions ended up being more right than not (as documented) and we hope to be able to repeat this feat again this year.

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More in Tux Machines

How the Free Software and the IP Wars of the 1990s and 2000s Presaged Today’s Toxic, Concentrated Internet

The history of free software and the IP Wars of the 1990s and 2000s provides a good illustration of these path-dependencies around the meaning of liberty, law, and power throughout the period. In response to the rise in prominence of Unix, a proprietary system developed by Bell Labs, in the 1980s, free software advocate Richard Stallman and others began a crusade to liberate software from its proprietary ties. They created the GPL (“GNU Public License”) a free open license that requires anyone reusing, buying or redistributing the software to comply with the freedoms granted by the original license.. The free software movement later inspired a parallel movement to liberate content and creativity from copyright strictures. In an article titled “Anarchism Triumphant,” Columbia Law Professor Eben Moglen argued that free software represented the beginning of a shift towards a free-er anarchic digital political economy which would do away with most forms of private ownership. In a 1994 essay, Electronic Frontier Foundation co-founder John Perry Barlow argued that copyright law, which protects the material expression of ideas, had become obsolete on the internet, the “Home of the Mind.” Many of these ideas grew in opposition to the powerful interests of the time: against firms like Bell Labs producing proprietary software, against firms like AT&T controlling telecommunications and broadband, against Hollywood studios and music labels who sought to enclose and profit from creative digital assets. Yet many of these views also unconsciously built the intellectual, legal, and economic case for new forms of enclosure, those that were already being adopted by open platforms such as Google which would soon thrive on the distributed sharing of content by opaquely acquiring control over and monetizing attention and data. In disputes on who should win between Hollywood and YouTube, users were the ones ultimately left behind. As Tel Aviv University Law Professor Niva Elkin-Koren put it, “[w]hat began as a controversy over the appropriateness of copyright law to accommodate … technological changes, became a political battle over the distribution of the potential gains that cyberspace offers.” These so-called “IP Wars” embodied institutional controversies on the stakes of the internet’s ecology and saliently illustrate confusions that are still with us today. For example, as Duke University Law Professor James Boyle put it, it was as if early cyberlibertarians “couldn’t agree on whether [their] motto was to be ‘Taxation is theft’ or ‘Property is theft.’” Their aversion for IP often hid faith in new forms of digital capitalism. Further, the rhetoric of freedom and anarchy underlying the IP Wars helped strengthen commercial interests and monopoly rents on the Internet. Visions of the internet as an apolitical laboratory of innovation, a frictionless space governed by individual choices took the center stage, ultimately facilitating the accumulation of digital control in the hands of a few internet gatekeepers. The move towards private and code-based governance opened the door to widespread and poorly regulated surveillance practices that remained disguised under the facial neutrality of code and cyber-economists’ efficiency-based arguments. Read more

Flatpak App of the Week: Extension Manager – Browse and Install GNOME Shell Extensions

Extension Manager is a very simple app that does one thing (and does it good), to mirror the content of the GNOME Extensions website at extensions.gnome.org. The application lets you easily manage your installed GNOME Shell extensions, similar to what the official GNOME Extensions app does, but it also lets you browse the extensions.gnome.org website straight from within the app if you want to install more extensions on your GNOME desktop. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Custom Piano Tickles the Ivories

    This electronic keyboard is completely designed and built from scratch, including the structure of the instrument and the keys themselves. [Balthasar] made each one by hand out of wood and then built an action mechanism for them to register presses. While they don’t detect velocity or pressure, the instrument is capable of defining the waveform and envelope for any note, is able to play multiple notes per key, and is able to change individual octaves. This is thanks to a custom 6×12 matrix connected to a STM32 microcontroller. Part of the reason [Balthasar] chose this microcontroller is that it can do some of the calculations needed to produce music in a single clock cycle, which is an impressive and under-reported feature for the platform.

  • Hacking A Proper Dash Into The Tesla Model 3 | Hackaday

    The build relies on a CANserver, an ESP32-based device specifically built for hooking up to the CAN bus on Tesla vehicles and sharing the data externally. The data can then be piped wirelessly to an Android phone running CANdash to display all the desired information. With the help of an aftermarket dash clip or a 3D printed custom mount, the phone can then be placed behind the steering wheel to display data in the usual location.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 108
  • Celebrating Data Privacy Day

    Happy International Data Privacy Day! While January 28 marks a day to raise awareness and promote best practices for privacy and data protection around the world, we at Mozilla do this work year-round so our users can celebrate today — and every day — the endless joy the internet has to offer. We know that data privacy can feel daunting, and the truth is, no one is perfect when it comes to protecting their data 24/7. At Mozilla though, we want to make data protection feel a bit easier and not like something else on the never-ending life to-do list. We build products that protect people online so they can experience the best of the web without compromising on privacy, performance or convenience. The internet is too good to miss out on — we’ll take care of securing it so you can focus on exploring and enjoying it. To accomplish this, we started with square one: our Firefox browser — enhancing its privacy and tracking protections over the past year, while improving its user experience to make surfing the web less dangerous and more carefree. [...] Despite how it sounds, you don’t need to be a hacker to make use of an encrypted connection. Whether you’re online shopping or want to make sure your login credentials are safe from attackers, we’re working on ensuring your browsing experience is secure from start to finish. That’s why, when you open up a Private Browsing tab on Firefox, you can be confident that your information is safe thanks to our HTTPS by Default offering, which ensures the data you share with and receive from a website is encrypted and won’t be able to be intercepted, viewed or tampered with by a hacker. To take this one step further, we’re also working with Internet Service Providers like Comcast and other partners through our Trusted Recursive Resolver program, to begin making DNS encryption the default for Firefox users in the US and Canada.

  • Abuse & Sex Crimes at FOSDEM and Open Source tech events

    All these people have conflicts of interest. For example, Molly herself was secretly sleeping with Chris Lamb when he was leader of Debian. Imagine a woman comes to Molly's team to make an abuse complaint about Lamb or one of his close friends. [...] Women trusting women simply because they are women is not a good choice. There are numerous examples of women like Molly who have been sympathetic to or even in cahoots with male abusers.

  • What is MongoDB, and how does it work? | FOSS Linux

    MongoDB is the most common and widely used NoSQL database. It is an open-source document-oriented DB. NoSQL is used to refer to ‘non-relational’. This means that the MongoDB database is not based on tabular relations like RDBMS as it provides a distinct storage and data retrieval mechanism. The storage format employed by MongoDB is referred to as BSON. The database is maintained by MongoDB Inc. and is licensed under the Server-Side Public License (SSPL).

Programming Leftovers

  • #28 PrintScrn · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from January 21 to January 28.

  • Implementing a MIME database in XXXX

    Recently, I have been working on implementing a parser for media types (commonly called MIME types) and a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice-versa. I thought this would be an interesting module to blog about, given that it’s only about 250 lines of code, does something useful and interesting, and demonstrates a few interesting xxxx concepts. The format for media types is more-or-less defined by RFC 2045, specifically section 5.1. The specification is not great. The grammar shown here is copied and pasted from parts of larger grammars in older RFCs, RFCs which are equally poorly defined. For example, the quoted-string nonterminal is never defined here, but instead comes from RFC 822, which defines it but also states that it can be “folded”, which technically makes the following a valid Media Type:

    text/plain;charset="hello
     world"
    
    Or so I would presume, but the qtext terminal “cannot include CR”, which is the mechanism by which folding is performed in the first place, and… bleh. Let’s just implement a “reasonable subset” of the spec instead and side-step the whole folding issue.1 This post will first cover parsing media types, then address our second goal: providing a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice versa.

  • gst-editing-services compiled in OE

    I discovered that 'gst-editing-services' is another dependency of Pitivi, added to these: https://bkhome.org/news/202201/more-dependencies-for-pitivi-video-editor.html There is no recipe in OE, so I attempted to compile it on the host system. Stuffed around for about 3 hours, unable to compile, ninja is doing something stupid.

  • More dependencies for Pitivi video editor

    This morning I posted about a complete recompile in OpenEmbedded, "revision 7": https://bkhome.org/news/202201/what-to-expect-in-the-next-release-of-easyos.html This included bumped gstreamer version, suitable to run Pitivi.

  • Wasmer 2.2 Bringing Its WebAssembly "Singlepass" Compiler To AArch64 - Phoronix

    Wasmer 2.2-rc1 is out today as the WebAssembly run-tme to "run any code on any client" with its broad platform coverage and allowing numerous programming languages from Rust to PHP to C# being able to be compiled into WebAssembly and then running on any OS or embedded into other languages for execution. Wasmer continues as one of the leading open-source WebAssembly runtimes with a diverse feature-set. Its project site at Wasmer.io talks up Wasmer for use from "supercharged blockchain infrastructure" to "portable ML/AI applications". Buzzwords aside, Wasmer has been a very interesting WebAssembly open-source project.

  • Alternatives to Visual Basic

    This is a list of free/libre open source software (FLOSS) alternatives to Visual Basic (part of Microsoft Visual Studio) computer programming platform. If your school is still teaching VB 6, or if you now use Ubuntu for programming classroom, we strongly suggest you to switch to either one of these alternatives. With these, one can create computer programs visually by drag and drop as well as coding just like what one can do with VB.