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Saturday, 23 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
  • 04/05/2017 - 11:58am
    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt
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    lashayduva
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    neilheaney
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  • 10/01/2017 - 11:50pm
    relativ7

Servers: Red Hat, Kubernetes, OpenShift, WriteFreely and WordPress

Filed under
Server
  • Taking System Monitoring to the Next Level: an Interview with Scalyr CEO Steve Newman [Ed: Linux Journal back to the pre-PIA days of promoting proprietary software?]
  • Time zone data (tzdata): 2018 data format changes and Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) needs time zone information in order for all applications in the operating system to correctly print local time. The GNU C Library (glibc) makes use of the tzdata package in order to make APIs such as strftime() work correctly, while applications such as /usr/bin/date make use of this information to print the local date.

    The tzdata package contains the data files documenting both current and historic transitions for various time zones around the world. This data represents changes required by local government bodies or by time zone boundary changes, as well as changes to UTC offsets and daylight saving time (DST).

  • Upcoming Silicon Valley OpenShift Commons Gathering, March 11 on Operating at Scale with Speakers Google, Facebook, Uber, Red Hat and Rook

    The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss the container technologies, operators, the operator framework, best practices for cloud-native application developers and the open source software projects that underpin the OpenShift ecosystem to help take us all to the next level in cloud-native computing. This next gathering will feature 400+ developers, project leads, cloud architects, DevOps professionals, sysadmins, and cloud-native practitioners coming together to explore the next steps in making container technologies successful and secure at scale.

  • 7 Key Considerations for Kubernetes in Production

    Today Enterprise IT does not question the value of containerized applications anymore. Given the move to adopting DevOps and cloud native architectures, it is critical to leverage container capabilities in order to enable digital transformation. Google’s Kubernetes (K8s), an open source container orchestration system, has become the de facto standard — and the key enabler — for cloud native applications, and the way they are architected, composed, deployed, and managed. Enterprises are using Kubernetes to create modern architectures composed of microservices and serverless functions which scale seamlessly.

    However, two years of working with Kubernetes for enterprise applications, and large-scale production deployments have taught us valuable real-world lessons about the challenges of Kubernetes in the enterprise, and what it REALLY takes in order to make it ready for prime time and enable organizations to safely bet on Kubernetes to power mission-critical enterprise application. Large and complex enterprises that have invested in container-based applications often struggle to realize the value of Kubernetes and container technology, due to operational or Day-two management challenges. In this post, we share seven fundamental capabilities large enterprises need to instrument around their Kubernetes investments in order to be able to effectively implement it and utilize it to drive their business.

  • Kubernetes job interview questions: How to prepare

    As Kubernetes adoption grows, so does the need for IT pros with the skills and experience needed to run it in production.

    “There’s a strong correlation between the popularity of Kubernetes and the demand for engineers who have in-depth knowledge of the system,” says Leo Shemesh, CTO at Jackpocket.

    Signs suggest that demand for Kubernetes skills is pointing skyward. That creates a tricky proposition for IT executives and hiring managers. Don’t worry, we’re not here to moan and groan about another skills shortage. Actually, Shemesh notes that it’s relatively easy for IT pros to begin learning about Kubernetes, thanks to a wealth of articles and other resources available online, a vibrant open source community, and the commercial platforms and services that sit on top of the Kubernetes project. It’s also relatively simple to start running a single-node cluster on a local machine with Minikube, a good option for getting your hands messy.

  • OpenShift platform seen as biggest IBM gain from Red Hat acquisition

    IBM's acquisition of open source company Red Hat means that Big Blue is betting that the future of cloud computing is hybrid and it has made the purchase to cover its flanks in this area, the technology analyst firm Gartner says.

  • Four Startup Engineering Killers

    Startup engineering is different from any other type of software engineering. It demands short- and medium-term productivity, relative to the “right way” of building systems. It values people who are able to iterate quickly and are comfortable with hacky code. It rewards pragmatism in technology choices versus picking the most hyped — or most stable — technology.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.6.1 Released For Open-Source, Cross-Platform Benchmarking

    Phoronix Test Suite 8.6.1 is now available as a minor update over Phoronix Test Suite 8.6-Spydeberg that shipped at the start of February.

  • WriteFreely: Start a blog, build a community

    As more of our lives move online, we become dependent on large services with millions (or billions) of users to communicate with each other. Although we tend to notice problems only when these platforms change a policy, erect a paywall, or suffer a data breach, we can often feel how these mass-broadcast platforms don't always have our best interests in mind and often don't "connect" us in the ways they purport to.

    However, over the past few years, we've also seen a renaissance of small, close-knit online communities. New protocols for building federated social networks, like ActivityPub, are seeing more use, popularized by open source platforms like Mastodon. People still gather on forums to discuss their interests with like-minded people. And even on the large, centralized services, many people use "group" features to have more intimate conversations than they would by sending their latest status update to a wide swath of unrelated people.

    In the blogging world, we've also seen platforms like Medium and Tumblr become more popular, partially because of the networks they offer. With these large platforms, each blog is no longer an "island," but part of a huge community. Yet, like any other closed-source, centralized service, if they make a change that doesn't benefit their users, we're forced to find another platform. That's why I built WriteFreely.

  • WordPress 5.1 Improves Security With Site Health Mechanism

    WordPress 5.1 became generally available on Feb. 21, providing users of the popular open-source blogging and content management system (CMS) with updates to improve site operations and site health.

    WordPress is one of the most widely deployed CMS technologies, powering over 30 percent of all websites on the internet. The new WordPress release follows the open-source project's tradition of naming releases after famous Jazz musicians by code-naming the 5.1 release Betty, after jazz vocalist Betty Carter. Among the key new features in the release is a check to warn users if they are running older, unsupported versions of the PHP programming language that is needed to operate WordPress.

    "Following WordPress 5.0 — a major release which introduced the new block editor — 5.1 focuses on polish, in particular by improving the overall performance of the editor," WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg wrote in a blog post. "In addition, this release paves the way for a better, faster, and more secure WordPress with some essential tools for site administrators and developers."

Linus Torvalds on World Domination (x86 Servers)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Linus Torvalds pulls pin, tosses in grenade: x86 won, forget about Arm in server CPUs, says Linux kernel supremo

    Linux kernel king Linus Torvalds this week dismissed cross-platform efforts to support his contention that Arm-compatible processors will never dominate the server market.

    Responding to interest in Arm's announcement of its data center-oriented Neoverse N1 and E1 CPU cores on Wednesday, and a jibe about his affinity for native x86 development, Torvalds almost abandoned his commitment to civil discourse while doing his best to dampen enthusiasm for a world of heterogeneous hardware harmony.

    "Some people think that 'the cloud' means that the instruction set doesn't matter," Torvalds said in a forum post. "Develop at home, deploy in the cloud. That's bullshit. If you develop on x86, then you're going to want to deploy on x86, because you'll be able to run what you test 'at home' (and by 'at home' I don't mean literally in your home, but in your work environment)."

  • Linus on why x86 won for servers

    Responding to a forum post on upcoming ARM server offerings, Linus Torvalds makes a compelling case for why Linux and x86 completely overwhelmed commercial Unix and RISC...

  • ARM announces Ares

    I can pretty much guarantee that as long as everybody does cross-development, the platform won't be all that stable.

    Or successful.

    Some people think that "the cloud" means that the instruction set doesn't matter. Develop at home, deploy in the cloud.

    That's bullshit. If you develop on x86, then you're going to want to deploy on x86, because you'll be able to run what you test "at home" (and by "at home" I don't mean literally in your home, but in your work environment).

    Which means that you'll happily pay a bit more for x86 cloud hosting, simply because it matches what you can test on your own local setup, and the errors you get will translate better.

    This is true even if what you mostly do is something ostensibly cross-platform like just run perl scripts or whatever. Simply because you'll want to have as similar an environment as possible,

    Which in turn means that cloud providers will end up making more money from their x86 side, which means that they'll prioritize it, and any ARM offerings will be secondary and probably relegated to the mindless dregs (maybe front-end, maybe just static html, that kind of stuff).

    Guys, do you really not understand why x86 took over the server market?

Redis Licence/Licensing Getting Weirder, Swim Openwashing

Filed under
OSS
  • Redis Labs drops Commons Clause for a new license

    Redis Labs is dropping its Commons Clause license in favor of its new "available-source" license: Redis Source Available License (RSAL). This is not an open-source license.

    Redis Labs had used Commons Clause on top of the open-source Apache License to protect its rights to modules added to its 3-Clause-BSD-licensed Redis, the popular open-source in-memory data structure store. But, as Manish Gupta, Redis Labs' CMO, explained, "It didn't work. Confusion reigned over whether or not the modules were open source. They're not open-source."

    So, although it hadn't wanted to create a new license, that's what Redis Labs ended up doing.

    RSAL covers some Redis Modules, which run on top of open-source Redis. The current modules covered by RSAL are: RedisSearch, RedisGraph, RedisJSON, RedisML, and RedisBloom. Redis remains under the BSD license.

  • Redis Labs changes its open-source license — again

    Redis Labs, fresh off its latest funding round, today announced a change to how it licenses its Redis Modules. This may not sound like a big deal, but in the world of open-source projects, licensing is currently a big issue. That’s because organizations like Redis, MongoDB, Confluent and others have recently introduced new licenses that make it harder for their competitors to take their products and sell them as rebranded services without contributing back to the community (and most of these companies point directly at AWS as the main offender here).

    “Some cloud providers have repeatedly taken advantage of successful opensource projects, without significant contributions to their communities,” the Redis Labs team writes today. “They repackage software that was not developed by them into competitive, proprietary service offerings and use their business leverage to reap substantial revenues from these open source projects.”

  • Redis Labs Changing Its Licensing for Redis Modules Again, Raspberry Pi Rolling Out the Linux 4.19 Kernel, Windows Subsystem for Linux Updates Coming, Facebook Removing Its Spyware Onavo VPN from the Google Store and openSUSE Leap 15.1 Beta Pizza Party

    Redis Labs has changed its licensing for Redis Modules again. According to TechCrunch, the new license is called the Redis Source Available license, and as with the previous Commons Clause license, applies only to certain Redis Modules created by Redis Labs. With this license, "Users can still get the code, modify it and integrate it into their applications—but that application can't be a database product, caching engine, stream processing engine, search engine, indexing engine or ML/DL/AI serving engine." The TechCrunch post notes that by definition, an open-source license can't enforce limitations, so this new license technically isn't open source. It is, however, similar to other "permissive open-source licenses", which "shouldn't really affect most developers who use the company's modules".

  • Swim Open Sources Its Machine Learning Platform for Edge Computing [Ed: "Taking the "open core" route" means proprietary software or 'free' bait, so this headline is a tad misleading to say the least]

    Taking the "open core" route, the startup wants the open source community to take its platform in more directions than it's been able to so far.

GNU/Linux Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Major 9.8 vulnerability affects multiple Linux kernels— CVE-2019-8912 (af_alg_release())

    Our assessment is that the cause is this commit, the introduction of a "sockfs_setattr()" function. This function neglects to null-out values in a structure, making their values usable after exiting from the function (a so-called ‘use-after-free’ error).

  • Linux use-after-free vulnerability found in Linux 2.6 through 4.20.11

    Last week, a Huawei engineer reported a vulnerability present in the early Linux 2.6 kernels through version 4.20.11. The Kernel Address Sanitizer (KASAN) that detects dynamic memory errors within the Linux kernel code was used to uncover the use-after-free vulnerability which was present since early Linux versions.

    The use-after-free issue was found in the networking subsystem’s sockfs code and could lead to arbitrary code execution as a result.

  • Taking Care of Your Personal Online Security (For Paranoids)

    So, use Linux, and preferably coreboot or Libreboot (open source BIOS). You can buy hardware based on the recommendations of well-known and respected (still a bit paranoid) cypherpunk Richard Stallman.

  • Why do PAM projects fail? Tales from the trenches

    Privileged accounts hold the keys to highly sensitive company information and once these credentials are targeted, they can easily lead to a breach of a company’s most valuable assets; from databases to social media and unstructured data. Most enterprises have implemented some form of Privileged Access Management (PAM), but many find these initiatives fail to live up to expectations. Below are some common reasons why a PAM project might fail to meet the initial expectations; coupled with practical insights on how to prevent it from becoming a dud.

  • Sailfish OS: Security and Data Privacy

    Mobile World Congress is back again! Like every single year during the Jolla journey, we are excited to take part in this event. We have had great experiences in the past MWC’s, our main drivers for attending are the current and relevant topics discussed during the congress. One of this year’s core themes is Digital Trust; “Digital trust analyses the growing responsibilities required to create the right balance with consumers, governments and regulators.” It makes us happy that these topics are being discussed, especially since several scandals have recently affected trust in digital solutions.
    At Jolla we work constantly towards providing a secure and transparent solution. Our value towards our customer’s privacy is reflected in our values and actions. Back in May of 2018 our CEO Sami Pienimäki wrote a blog post on the GDPR laws passed within the European Union and stated the cornerstones on how Jolla views data privacy. This stand on privacy is not rocket science – the core idea is to respect our customers’ privacy and allow them to be in control of their data.

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Which is More Secure: Windows, Linux, or macOS? [Ed: security is not an OS feature but a separate product, insists company that sells "security" as a proprietar ysoftware product]

Games: BATTLETECH, Tesla vs Lovecraft and More

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Foundation, Linux 5.0 and Linux 5.1

Filed under
Linux
  • Certified danger

    I suspected Linux Foundation went to the dark side when they started strange deals with Microsoft. But I'm pretty sure they went to dark side now.

  • The Most Interesting Highlights To The Linux 5.0 Kernel

    With the Linux 5.0 kernel due out within the next week or two, here's a look back at the biggest end-user facing changes for this kernel release that started out as Linux 4.21.

  • AMDGPU Squeezes In Revised Context Priority Handling For Linux 5.1

    With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle soon to kick-off, an early batch of fixes for the AMDGPU DRM driver and other fixes were sent in on Thursday to queue along with all of the new functionality being staged in DRM-Next.

    There's a lot of DRM improvements and throughout all the kernel subsystems of new material queuing up for Linux 5.1. On the AMDGPU side there is AMDGPU DC seamless boot bits, PCI Express bandwidth utilization is now exported to user-space, Vega power management updates, DCC support for scanout surfaces, better page-flipping in DC, and various Vega 20 fixes.

Videos: Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon, Bash Commands and FLOSS Weekly With ClearlyDefined

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon Run Through

    In this video, we look at Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon.

  • JC’s Favorite BASH Commands

    We chill and look at some cool commands for the BASH terminal and scripts.

  • FLOSS Weekly 518: Clearly Defined

    Carol Smith is the program manager for ClearlyDefined, a project under the Open Source Initiative. ClearlyDefined is an open source project to crowd-source the gathering, curation, and upstreaming of licensing and security (and more) data about free and open source projects.

fff – A Simple Fast File Manager for Linux

Filed under
Software

fff (fast file-manager) is a simple, blazing fast and minimal file manager for Linux, written in bash. It only requires bash and coreutils, and its highly optimized now for efficient performance.

Read more

Also: z.lua - A Faster Way Of Changing Directories (cd Command That Learns As You Use It)

qoob – excellent foobar-like music player for Linux

Filed under
Software

Are you debilitated by the countless music players that use web technologies with a massive RAM footprint? Maybe you want a lean yet slick audio player with a good range of features?

You might be interested in qoob. It’s a music player written in the versatile and hugely popular Python programming language. The software uses Qt 5, a cross-platform application framework and widget toolkit for creating classic and embedded graphical user interfaces.

qoob is similar to foobar2000, a freeware audio player respected for its highly modular design, breadth of features, and extensive user flexibility in configuration. Unlike foobar, qoob is available for Linux and it’s released under an open source license.

Read more

Programming: GStreamer, Rust, Python and More

Filed under
Development
  • GStreamer 1.15.1 unstable development release

    The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first development release in the unstable 1.15 release series.

    The unstable 1.15 release series adds new features on top of the current stable 1.16 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

    The unstable 1.15 release series is for testing and development purposes in the lead-up to the stable 1.16 series which is scheduled for release in a few weeks time. Any newly-added API can still change until that point, although it is rare for that to happen.

    Full release notes will be provided in the near future, highlighting all the new features, bugfixes, performance optimizations and other important changes.

  • GStreamer: GStreamer Rust bindings 0.13.0 release

    A new version of the GStreamer Rust bindings, 0.13.0, was released.

    This new release is the first to include direct support for implementing GStreamer elements and other types in Rust. Previously this was provided via a different crate.
    In addition to this, the new release features many API improvements, cleanups, newly added bindings and bugfixes.

  • Niko Matsakis: Rust lang team working groups

    Now that the Rust 2018 edition has shipped, the language design team has been thinking a lot about what to do in 2019 and over the next few years. I think we’ve got a lot of exciting stuff on the horizon, and I wanted to write about it.

  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.13: Keeping CRAN happy

    Another small RVowpalWabbit package update brings us version 0.0.13. And just like Rblpapi yesterday, we have a new RVowpalWabbit update to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made No new code or features were added.

  • Test automation framework thoughts and examples with Python, pytest and Jenkins

    In this article I'll share some personal thoughts about Test Automation Frameworks; you can take inspiration from them if you are going to evaluate different test automation platforms or assess your current test automation solution (or solutions).

    Despite it is a generic article about test automation, you'll find many examples explaining how to address some common needs using the Python based test framework named pytest and the Jenkins automation server: use the information contained here just as a comparison and feel free to comment sharing alternative methods or ideas coming from different worlds.

    It contains references to some well (or less) known pytest plugins or testing libraries too.

  • Basics of Object-Oriented Programming

    In programming, an object is simply a 'thing'. I know, I know...how can you define something as a 'thing'. Well, let's think about it - What do 'things' have? Attributes, right? Let's take a Song for example. A song has attributes! It has a Title, an Artist, a Genre, etc. How about a Dog - A dog has four legs, a color, a name, an owner, and a breed. Though there are millions Dogs with countless names, owners, etc, the one thing that ties them all together are the very fact that every single one can be described as a Dog.

    Although this may seem like a not-very informative explanation, these types of examples are what ultimately made me understand Object-oriented programing. The set of activities that an object can perform is an Object's behavior. A dog can bark, wag it's tail, sit, and even shake if it's owner trains them. In the same way, a programmer can create an object and teach it tricks in order to achieve certain goals. In Ruby(my first programming language), EVERYTHING is an object. This means that every piece of code you encounter can perform certain tricks at your command, some are built into Ruby while others can be created at your disposal.

    Let's look at a common element in programming, a simple string. As you can see, after the string is defined, I'm able to call different 'methods' or functions on the string I created. Ruby has several built in methods on common objects(ie strings, integers, arrays, and hashes.

  • Hello pytest-play!

    pytest-play is a rec&play (rec not yet available) pytest plugin that let you execute a set of actions and assertions using commands serialized in JSON format. It tries to make test automation more affordable for non programmers or non Python programmers for browser, functional, API, integration or system testing thanks to its pluggable architecture and third party plugins that let you interact with the most common databases and systems.

  • Nikola v8.0.2 is out!

    Nikola is a static site and blog generator, written in Python. It can use Mako and Jinja2 templates, and input in many popular markup formats, such as reStructuredText and Markdown — and can even turn Jupyter Notebooks into blog posts! It also supports image galleries, and is multilingual. Nikola is flexible, and page builds are extremely fast, courtesy of doit (which is rebuilding only what has been changed).

  • Mu!

    In the past several days, I innaugurated a private Fediverse instance, "Mu", running Pleroma for now. Although Mastodon is the dominant implementation, Pleroma is far easier to install, and uses less memory on small, private instances. By doing this, I'm bucking the trend of people hating to run their own infrastructure. Well, I do run my own e-mail service, so, what the heck, might as well join the Fediverse.

    So far, it was pretty fun, but Pleroma has problem spots. For example, Pleroma has a concept of "local accounts" and "remote accounts": local ones are normal, into which users log in at the instance, and remote ones mirror accounts on other instances. This way, if users Alice@Mu and Bob@Mu follow user zaitcev@SLC, Mu creates a "remote" account UnIqUeStRiNg@Mu, which tracks zaitcev@SLC, so Alice and Bob subscribe to it locally. This permits to send zaitcev's updates over the network only once. Makes sense, right? Well... I have a "stuck" remote account now at Mu, let's call it Xprime@Mu and posit that it follows X@SPC. Updates posted by X@SPC are reflected in Xprime@Mu, but if Alice@Mu tries to follow X@SPC, she does not see updates that Xprime@Mu receives (the updates are not reflected in Alice's friends/main timeline) [1]. I asked at #pleroma about it, but all they could suggest was to try and resubscribe. I think I need to unsubscribe and purge Xprime@Mu somehow. Then, when Alice resubscribes, Pleroma will re-create a remote, say Xbis@Mu, and things hopefully ought to work. Well, maybe. I need to examine the source to be sure.

  • Django ORM optimization story on selecting the least possible

    This an optimization story that should not surprise anyone using the Django ORM. But I thought I'd share because I have numbers now! The origin of this came from a real requirement. For a given parent model, I'd like to extract the value of the name column of all its child models, and the turn all these name strings into 1 MD5 checksum string.

  • Reasons Mitogen sucks

    I have a particular dislike for nonspecific negativity, where nothing can be done to address its source because the reasons underlying it are never explicitly described. In the context of Mitogen, there has been a consistent stream of this sort originating from an important camp in public spaces, and despite efforts to bring specifics out into the open, still it continues to persist.

    For that reason I'd like to try a new strategy: justify the negativity and give it a face by providing all the fuel it needs to burn. Therefore in this post, in the interests of encouraging honesty, I will critique my own work.

  • The North Star of PyCascades, core Python developer Mariatta Wijaya, receives the 2018 Q3 Community Service Award

    At Montreal PyCon 2015, Guido Van Rossum delivered the closing keynote during which Guido issued a public ask, “I want at least two female Python core developers in the next year ... and I will try to train them myself if that's what it takes. So come talk to me." Consequently, Mariatta did just that, she reached out to Guido after PyCon 2016 to learn more about starting in Python core development. Mariatta recalls, “I hadn’t contributed to open source [yet] and I wanted to know how to start”. Guido recommended some ways for Mariatta to start including reviewing the dev guide, looking at open issues and joining and introducing herself on the Python dev mailing list .

  • Episode #118: Better Python executable management with pipx

NVIDIA: GTX 1660 and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA have released the 418.43 driver, includes support for the just released GeForce GTX 1660

    Two bits of NVIDIA news for you today, not only have they released a new stable driver, they've also put out their latest GPU with the GTX 1660.

    First up, the new stable driver 418.43 is out which you can find here. It follows on from the 418.30 beta driver, released last month. The big new feature of the driver is initial support for G-SYNC Compatible monitors! So those of you with a FreeSync monitor should be able to use it (if you weren't already using the beta driver).

    This new driver also adds in support for the just released GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, the GeForce RTX 2070 with Max-Q Design and the GeForce RTX 2080 with Max-Q Design. There's also NVIDIA optical flow support, NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0, support for stereo presentation in Vulkan and more.

  • NVIDIA 418.43 Stable Linux Driver Released, Includes GTX 1660 Ti Support

    As expected given today's GeForce GTX 1660 Ti launch, NVIDIA has released a new Linux graphics driver supporting the 1660 Ti as well as the RTX 2070 with Max-Q Design and RTX 2080 with Max-Q Design, among other changes.

    This is actually the first stable release in the NVIDIA 418 series for Linux users and succeeds last month's NVIDIA 418.30 Linux driver beta. Most of the changes in today's NVIDIA 418.43 driver release were previously found in the 418.30 version, just now made official with this stable driver debut plus adding in the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card support.

  • NVIDIA 390.116 Legacy & 410.104 Long-Lived Linux Drivers Released

    In addition to NVIDIA christening the 418 driver series as stable today with the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti release, they also issued updates for their 390 legacy driver series as well as the 410 long-lived driver release series.

    The NVIDIA 390.116 driver is out for those still using NVIDIA Fermi graphics cards on Linux. This update is the first in a while and has a number of fixes to the Linux driver, on the FreeBSD side there is now 12.0 support, support for the Linux 5.0 kernel, X.Org Server 1.20 fixes, and other random fixes collected in the past few months.

    For those using this NVIDIA legacy driver can find out more information via this DevTalk thread.

  • GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Launch Today - Supported By The NVIDIA Linux Driver, No Nouveau Yet

    After weeks of leaks, the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is expected to be formally announced in just a few hours. This is a ~$300 Turing graphics card but without any ray-tracing support as so far has been common to all Turing graphics cards. The GTX 1600 series family is expected to expand as well in the weeks ahead.

Betty – A Friendly Interface For Your Linux Command Line

Filed under
Software

All Linux experts might already know this statement “Command line mode is more powerful than GUI” but newbies are scared about CLI.

Don’t think that working on Linux CLI is difficult as everything is opensource nowadays and you can get it in online whatever you want.

If you have any doubt just google it and you will get many suggestion, select the suitable one and move forward.

If you are looking for some virtual assistant tool instead of google.

Yes, there is a tool is available for this and the tool name is Betty which helps you to get the information right from your terminal.

Do you want to try? if so, go through the entire article for details.

Read more

Linux 5.0 Kernel Performance Is Sliding In The Wrong Direction

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the Linux 5.0 kernel performance approaching the finish line, the past few days I've been ramping up my tests of this new kernel in our benchmarking farm. Unfortunately, when looking at the results at a macro level it's pointing towards Linux 5.0 yielding lower performance than previous kernel releases.

I haven't spotted any workload yet yielding a catastrophic performance regression on Linux 5.0 compared to 4.20 and earlier, but in a lot of workloads the 5.0 kernel is running faintly slower than 4.20. At first I thought it was isolated to just a particular box or two, but as my testing has increased, it's happened on a variety of at least x86_64 Intel/AMD hardware tested so far.

Read more

Renesas unveils 64-bit Arm SoCs with 96Boards dev boards

Filed under
Linux

Renesas unveiled an “RZ-G2” family of up to octa-core Cortex-A53 and -A57 SoCs with an updated RZ/G Linux Platform with the 64-bit Arm CIP SLTS kernel for 10 year+ availability. There are also two 96Boards dev boards.

Since Renesas Electronics Corp. announced its dual-core Cortex -A7 and -A15 based RZ/G family of SoCs back in 2015, it has released variants such as the octa-core RZ/G1H with 4x 1.4GHz Cortex-A15 cores and 4x 780MHz Cortex-A7 cores, as well as a dual -A7 RZ/N1D SoC aimed at industrial multi-protocol communications. Now Renesas has launched an R2-G2 family that moves into Cortex-A53 and -A57 architectures in four models ranging from dual- to octa-core.

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Variscite unveils two i.MX8 QuadMax modules

Filed under
Android
Linux

Variscite announced Linux-powered “VAR-SOM-MX8” and “SPEAR-MX8” modules with an up to an i.MX8 QuadMax SoC plus up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC. It also previewed a VAR-SOM-6UL COM.

At Embedded World next week in Nuremberg, Germany, Variscite will showcase its Linux and Android driven i.MX8-family computer-on-modules, including new VAR-SOM-MX8 and SPEAR-MX8 modules that feature NXP’s highest-end i.MX8 SoC up to a QuadMax model (see farther below). We have already covered most of the other showcased products, including the 14nm fabricated, quad -A53 i.MX8M Mini based DART-MX8M-Mini. When we covered the DART-MX8M-Mini in September, Variscite didn’t have an image or product page, but both are now available here

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Programming: Developer Happiness, Rblpapi 0.3.8 and Python

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Development
  • Developer happiness: What you need to know

    A person needs the right tools for the job. There's nothing as frustrating as getting halfway through a car repair, for instance, only to discover you don't have the specialized tool you need to complete the job. The same concept applies to developers: you need the tools to do what you are best at, without disrupting your workflow with compliance and security needs, so you can produce code faster.

    Over half—51%, to be specific—of developers spend only one to four hours each day programming, according to ActiveState's recent Developer Survey 2018: Open Source Runtime Pains. In other words, the majority of developers spend less than half of their time coding. According to the survey, 50% of developers say security is one of their biggest concerns, but 67% of developers choose not to add a new language when coding because of the difficulties related to corporate policies.

  • Rblpapi 0.3.8: Keeping CRAN happy

    A minimal maintenance release of Rblpapi, now at version 0.3.9, arrived on CRAN earlier today. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).

    This is the ninth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. It accomodates a request by CRAN / R Core to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made (besides updating a now-stale URL at Bloomberg in a few spots and other miniscule maintenance). However, a few other changes have been piling up at the GitHub repo so feel free to try that version too.

  • Episode #200: Escaping Excel Hell with Python and Pandas
  • Testing native ES modules using Mocha and esm.

Games: Steam, Devil Engine, City Game Studio and More

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Security Leftovers

  • Major 9.8 vulnerability affects multiple Linux kernels— CVE-2019-8912 (af_alg_release())
    Our assessment is that the cause is this commit, the introduction of a "sockfs_setattr()" function. This function neglects to null-out values in a structure, making their values usable after exiting from the function (a so-called ‘use-after-free’ error).
  • Linux use-after-free vulnerability found in Linux 2.6 through 4.20.11
    Last week, a Huawei engineer reported a vulnerability present in the early Linux 2.6 kernels through version 4.20.11. The Kernel Address Sanitizer (KASAN) that detects dynamic memory errors within the Linux kernel code was used to uncover the use-after-free vulnerability which was present since early Linux versions. The use-after-free issue was found in the networking subsystem’s sockfs code and could lead to arbitrary code execution as a result.
  • Taking Care of Your Personal Online Security (For Paranoids)
    So, use Linux, and preferably coreboot or Libreboot (open source BIOS). You can buy hardware based on the recommendations of well-known and respected (still a bit paranoid) cypherpunk Richard Stallman.
  • Why do PAM projects fail? Tales from the trenches
    Privileged accounts hold the keys to highly sensitive company information and once these credentials are targeted, they can easily lead to a breach of a company’s most valuable assets; from databases to social media and unstructured data. Most enterprises have implemented some form of Privileged Access Management (PAM), but many find these initiatives fail to live up to expectations. Below are some common reasons why a PAM project might fail to meet the initial expectations; coupled with practical insights on how to prevent it from becoming a dud.
  • Sailfish OS: Security and Data Privacy
    Mobile World Congress is back again! Like every single year during the Jolla journey, we are excited to take part in this event. We have had great experiences in the past MWC’s, our main drivers for attending are the current and relevant topics discussed during the congress. One of this year’s core themes is Digital Trust; “Digital trust analyses the growing responsibilities required to create the right balance with consumers, governments and regulators.” It makes us happy that these topics are being discussed, especially since several scandals have recently affected trust in digital solutions. At Jolla we work constantly towards providing a secure and transparent solution. Our value towards our customer’s privacy is reflected in our values and actions. Back in May of 2018 our CEO Sami Pienimäki wrote a blog post on the GDPR laws passed within the European Union and stated the cornerstones on how Jolla views data privacy. This stand on privacy is not rocket science – the core idea is to respect our customers’ privacy and allow them to be in control of their data.
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Which is More Secure: Windows, Linux, or macOS? [Ed: security is not an OS feature but a separate product, insists company that sells "security" as a proprietar ysoftware product]

Games: BATTLETECH, Tesla vs Lovecraft and More

Linux Foundation, Linux 5.0 and Linux 5.1

  • Certified danger
    I suspected Linux Foundation went to the dark side when they started strange deals with Microsoft. But I'm pretty sure they went to dark side now.
  • The Most Interesting Highlights To The Linux 5.0 Kernel
    With the Linux 5.0 kernel due out within the next week or two, here's a look back at the biggest end-user facing changes for this kernel release that started out as Linux 4.21.
  • AMDGPU Squeezes In Revised Context Priority Handling For Linux 5.1
    With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle soon to kick-off, an early batch of fixes for the AMDGPU DRM driver and other fixes were sent in on Thursday to queue along with all of the new functionality being staged in DRM-Next. There's a lot of DRM improvements and throughout all the kernel subsystems of new material queuing up for Linux 5.1. On the AMDGPU side there is AMDGPU DC seamless boot bits, PCI Express bandwidth utilization is now exported to user-space, Vega power management updates, DCC support for scanout surfaces, better page-flipping in DC, and various Vega 20 fixes.

Videos: Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon, Bash Commands and FLOSS Weekly With ClearlyDefined

  • Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon Run Through
    In this video, we look at Manjaro 18.0.3 Cinnamon.
  • JC’s Favorite BASH Commands
    We chill and look at some cool commands for the BASH terminal and scripts.
  • FLOSS Weekly 518: Clearly Defined
    Carol Smith is the program manager for ClearlyDefined, a project under the Open Source Initiative. ClearlyDefined is an open source project to crowd-source the gathering, curation, and upstreaming of licensing and security (and more) data about free and open source projects.