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Friday, 25 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

  • 22/05/2020 - 6:08am
    Marius Nestor
  • 20/01/2020 - 5:37am
    johnwalsh
  • 07/07/2019 - 5:40pm
    JamieCull
  • 04/07/2019 - 7:09pm
    ksanaj
  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
  • 11/07/2017 - 9:36am
    itsfoss
  • 04/05/2017 - 11:58am
    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt

10 Open Source Static Site Generators to Create Fast and Resource-Friendly Websites

Filed under
OSS
Web

Technically, a static website means the webpages are not generated on the server dynamically. The HTML, CSS, JavaScript lie on the server in the version the end user receives it. The raw source code files are already prebuilt, the source code doesn’t change with the next server request.

It’s FOSS is a dynamic website which depends on several databases and the web pages are generated and served when there’s a request from your browser. Majority of the web is powered by dynamic sites where you interact with the websites and there are plenty of content that often change.

Read more

Richard Stallman: You can get arrested without a reason

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

The last few months have put data protection back in the spotlight. During a crisis of this kind, do we have to choose between safety and privacy? We talked about this with Richard Stallman, digital privacy activist and the founder of the Free Software Movement.

Read more

7 Amazing Linux Distributions For Kids

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is a very powerful operating system and that is one of the reasons why it powers a lot of servers on the Internet. Though there have been concerns about its user-friendliness which has brought about the debate of how it will overtake Mac OSX and Windows on desktop computers, I think users need to accept Linux as it is to realize its real power.

Today, Linux powers a lot of machines out there, from mobile phones to tablets, laptops, workstations, servers, supercomputers, cars, air traffic control systems, refrigerators, and many more. With all this and more yet to come in the near future, as I had already stated at the beginning, Linux is the operating system for future computing.

Because the future belongs to the kids of today, then introducing them to technologies that will change the future is the way to go. Therefore they have to be introduced at an early stage to start learning computer technologies and Linux as a special case.

One thing common to children is curiosity and early learning can help instill a character of exploration in them when the learning environment is designed to suit them.

Having looked at some quick reasons why kids should learn Linux, let us now go through a list of exciting Linux distributions that you can introduce your kids to so that they can start using and learning Linux.

Read more

Fedora 33 Beta To Be Released Next Week

Filed under
Red Hat

After missing the preferred target date of 15 September and the secondary beta target date of this week, Fedora 33 Beta is now on track to ship next week.

Fedora 33 is ready to make its beta debut next week for increasing the testing of this half-year update to the Red Hat sponsored distribution.

Ben Cotton announced on Thursday that it's a "GO" for releasing Fedora 33 Beta next week with the current images in good shape and no blocker bugs pending.

Read more

Direct: [Test-Announce] Fedora 33 Beta is GO

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Linux Magazine Celebrates 20 Years

    With Issue 240, Linux Magazine is celebrating its 20th year of print publication. Given the transformations that have taken place in Linux, open source, and in publishing during the past 20 years, this is a remarkable achievement.

    Reflecting on these changes, Linux Magazine editor-in-chief Joe Casad said, “I’m struck by how much Linux has changed since I started this job—and how much the publishing industry has itself remained in a perpetual state of reinvention. It is one thing when the subject of the magazine is continually transforming—and quite another when the very context in which you operate is a moving target.”

    [...]

    Linux Magazine has weathered the various industry shifts with consistency of vision and a small, dedicated workforce. Casad credits the internationally distributed team of professionals, “who stay calm under pressure and show up every day with ideas and good energy,” with much of the magazine’s long-running success.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (firefox, libproxy, mbedtls, samba, and zeromq), openSUSE (chromium and virtualbox), Red Hat (firefox and kernel), SUSE (cifs-utils, conmon, fuse-overlayfs, libcontainers-common, podman, libcdio, python-pip, samba, and wavpack), and Ubuntu (rdflib). 

  • LibreOffice Documentation Team Status

    While this progress in shortened documentation development time is fairly good, it can be substantially improved by having more contributors on the team.

    It would be terrific if all contributors were a skilled technical writers, but in reality anyone with a reasonable command of the English language and an eye for detail can make a valuable contribution. No contributor is expected to rewrite entire guide books, although some of our most experienced, long term contributors do exactly that. In fact nothing is expected or demanded of any contributor, other than to let other members of the team know what they what they have chosen to work on. In some cases that might be to update a chapter of an existing guide, or reviewing the work of another team member. Reviewing can take the form of proof reading, or researching the accuracy of the guide information in relation to the software’s actual operation. By identifying yourself as a Docs Team contributor does not mean you are making any permanent or long term commitment, many contributors come and go over long periods according to the demands of their “real” life.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Firefox Reality 12

    The latest version of Firefox Reality for standalone VR headsets brings a host of long-awaited features we're excited to reveal, as well as improved stability and performance.

    [...]

    Look for Firefox Reality 12 available now in the HTC, Pico and Oculus stores. This feature-packed release of Firefox Reality will be the last major feature release for a while as we gear up for a deeper investment in Hubs. But not to worry! Firefox Reality will still be well supported and maintained on your favorite standalone VR platform.

  • Daniel Stenberg: everything curl five years

    At the time of that blog post, the book was already at 13,000 words and 115 written subsections. I still had that naive hope that I would have it nearly “complete” by the summer of 2016. Always the optimist.

    Today, the book is at over 72,000 words with content in 600 subsections – with just 21 subtitles noted “TBD” to signal that there’s still content to add there. The PDF version of it now clocks in at over 400 pages.

    I’ve come to realize and accept that it will never be “complete” and that we will just keep on working on it indefinitely since curl itself keeps changing and we keep improving and expanding texts in the book.

  • Amazon announces 'Luna', their own take on cloud game streaming

    Amazon Luna will give you access to certain Channels of games which you subscribe to. The first two announced are Amazon's own Luna+ to get access to a "growing" library and Ubisoft are also confirmed to have their own subscription channel coming to it too. The Luna+ subscription will have 100s of games from big names too like Resident Evil 7, Control, The Surge 2, A Plague Tale: Innocence and a great many more. By the time it launches, it's going to have quite a full library already.

  • How to Install Discord on Ubuntu & Linux Mint (GUI & CLI)
  • Granulate Applies AI to Linux Server Optimization

    Granulate today announced that a platform that leverages machine learning algorithms to optimize Linux server environments running on-premises or in the cloud is now generally available.

    [...]

    According to the company, more than 40,000 instances of gAgent have already been deployed by IT teams at PicsArt, Perion, AppsFlyer and Coralogix.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • In a world where up is down, it's heartwarming to know Internet Explorer still tops list of web dev pain points

    Web developers resent having to deal with Microsoft Internet Explorer and Apple Safari, which they cite among their top three pain points, alongside layout and styling inconsistencies among browsers.

    This finding comes from the Mozilla Developer Network's 2020 Browser Compatibility Report [PDF], a survey of web development concerns culled from 1,429 responses out of 3,236 – the remainder having been tossed for invalid or missing data.

    The purpose of the report is to alert the browser vendors to problems so they can be addressed.

  • chemfp's chemistry toolkit I/O API

    This is part of a series of essays about working with SD files at the record and simple text level. In the last two essays I showed examples of using chemfp to process SDF records and to read two record data items. In this essay I'll introduce chemfp's chemistry toolkit I/O API, which I developed to have a consistent way to handle structure input and output when working with the OEChem, RDKit, and Open Babel toolkits.

  • 10 Things We Picked Up From Code Reviewing

    Ever wondered what you could learn from a code review?

  • Mike Driscoll: CodingNomads Tech Talk Series!

    Recently CodingNomads invited me on their Tech Talk series. CodingNomads does online code camps for Python and Java.

    The Tech Talks are a series of videos that teach or talk about tech. In my case, I got to talk about my favorite programming language, Python!

  • Arm Begins Bringing Up Neoverse N2, Neoverse V1 Support In The GNU Toolchain

    It was just a few days ago that Arm outlined the Neoverse N2 "Perseus" design as a follow-on to the Neoverse N1 and coming concurrently to the next-generation Cortex-A. Now the company has already jumped on beginning their open-source/Linux enablement work around the Neoverse N2.

    There haven't been any Neoverse N2 additions yet to LLVM/Clang or GCC as the most interesting aspects where it would reveal any new instruction set extensions / capabilities not yet formally announced by Arm (there also isn't any patches out under review on that front either), but a patch out this morning adds Neoverse N2 support to the GNU Assembler (Gas).

  • autoconf-2.69c released [beta]
    We are pleased to announce beta release 2.69c of GNU Autoconf.
    
    This release includes two months of bug fixes since the previous beta,
    2.68b, and eight years of development work since the previous full
    release, 2.69.  See below for the list of significant changes since
    the previous beta.  See the NEWS file for a complete list of
    significant changes since 2.69.
    
    We tentatively plan to make the final release of Autoconf 2.70 at the
    end of October 2020.  Please test this beta with your autoconf
    scripts, and report any problems you find to the Savannah bug tracker:
    
       https://savannah.gnu.org/support/?func=additem&group=autoconf
    
    Please also send general comments and feedback to <autoconf@gnu.org>.
    
    Please also spread this announcement widely, so that as many Autoconf
    users as possible hear about it.
    
    Here are the compressed sources:
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.gz   (2.0MB)
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.xz   (1.3MB)
    
    Here are the GPG detached signatures[*]:
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.gz.sig
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.xz.sig
    
    Use a mirror for higher download bandwidth:
      https://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html
    
    [*] Use a .sig file to verify that the corresponding file (without the
    .sig suffix) is intact.  First, be sure to download both the .sig file
    and the corresponding tarball.  Then, run a command like this:
    
      gpg --verify autoconf-2.69c.tar.gz.sig
    
    If that command fails because you don't have the required public key,
    then run this command to import it:
    
      gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys 384F8E68AC65B0D5
    
    and rerun the 'gpg --verify' command.
    
    This release was bootstrapped with the following tools:
      Automake 1.16.2
    
    Noteworthy changes and bug fixes since the previous beta (2.69b):
    
    * A performance regression in AC_PROG_CXX has been corrected.
      See https://savannah.gnu.org/support/index.php?110285 for details.
    
    * AC_PROG_YACC has been reverted to using ‘bison -y’.  After 2.70,
      we will instead add an AC_PROG_BISON macro for programs that
      require Bison extensions.
      See https://savannah.gnu.org/support/index.php?110266 for details.
    
    * AC_PROG_LEX no longer looks for a library providing the function
      ‘yywrap’.  LEXLIB will only be set to ‘-lfl’ or ‘-ll’ if a
      scanner that defines both ‘main’ and ‘yywrap’ itself still needs
      something else from that library.
    
      Packages should define yywrap themselves, or use %noyywrap.
    
    * When ‘$CC -E’ doesn’t run the C preprocessor, AC_PROG_CPP now looks
      in $PATH for ‘cpp’ before falling back to ‘/lib/cpp’.
    
    * AC_TYPE_PID_T now gives pid_t the correct definition on 64-bit
      native Microsoft Windows.
    
    * AC_INIT now trims extra white space from its arguments.  For instance,
    
        AC_INIT([  GNU  Hello  ], [1.0])
    
      will set PACKAGE_NAME to “GNU Hello”.
    
    * autoreconf will now run gtkdocize and intltoolize when appropriate.
    
    * autoreconf now avoids complaints from subsidiary tools about
      unknown warning categories.  For example, ‘autoreconf -Wcross’
      will no longer cause complaints from (current released versions of)
      aclocal and automake.
    
    * Generated configure scripts no longer fail catastrophically when
      stdin, stdout, or stderr is closed on startup.
    
    * Many bugs related to building Autoconf itself have been corrected.
      These mostly affected non-GNU operating systems and situations where
      optional tools are not available.
    
    * The obsolete macros AC_DIAGNOSE, AC_FATAL, AC_WARNING, and
      _AC_COMPUTE_INT are now replaced with modern equivalents by
      autoupdate.
    
    * The macro AC_OBSOLETE is obsolete.  Autoupdate will replace it with
      m4_warn([obsolete], [explanation]).  If possible, macros using
      AC_OBSOLETE should be converted to use AU_DEFUN or AU_ALIAS instead,
      which enables autoupdate to replace them, but this has to be done by
      hand and is not always possible.
    
    * AC_FC_LINE_LENGTH now documents the maximum portable length of
      "unlimited" Fortran source code lines to be 250 columns, not 254.
    
    * Warnings about obsolete constructs are now on by default.
      They can be turned off with '-Wno-obsolete'.
    
    * autoconf will now issue warnings (in the ‘syntax’ category) if the
      input file is missing a call to AC_INIT and/or AC_OUTPUT.
    
    * AC_INIT will now issue warnings (in the “syntax” category) for a
      non-literal URL argument, and for a TARNAME argument which is either
      non-literal or contains characters that should not be used in file
      names (e.g. ‘*’).
    

JDK 16: What’s coming in Java 16

Filed under
Development

Although not due to arrive until March 2021, Java Development Kit (JDK) 16 has begun to take shape, with proposed features including concurrent thread-stack processing for garbage collection, support for C++ 14 language features, and an “elastic metaspace” capability to more quickly return unused class metadata memory to the OS.

JDK 16 will be the reference implementation of the version of standard Java set to follow JDK 15, which arrived September 15. The six-month release cadence for standard Java would have JDK 16 arriving next March.

Read more

Linux Kernel Latest Developments and New Linux Foundation Report

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT CPUFreq Governor Comparison With Linux 5.9

    One of the most frequent questions received at Phoronix in recent times is whether the "schedutil" governor is ready for widespread use and if it can compare in performance to, well, the "performance" governor on AMD Linux systems. Here are some benchmarks of an AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT using the latest Linux 5.9 development kernel in looking at the performance differences between the CPUFreq governor options of Ondemand, Powersave, Performance, and Schedutil.

  • Intel Engineers Begin Landing Open-Source Support For TDX, Intel Key Locker

    Last month Intel published a whitepaper on TDX as Trust Domain Extensions as a means of better securing virtual machines. TDX allows for isolating VMs from the hypervisor and other non-VMM system software. Intel TDX builds off other recent work around MKTME memory encryption and other features. We are now beginning to see that software side support roll-out along with the also-new Key Locker instructions.

  • HPE Preparing SGI UV5 Support For The Linux Kernel

    Recent hardware enablement work on the Linux kernel is HPE bringing up UV5 support.

    Succeeding the SGI UV4 support is now UV5 under the ownership of HPE. UV5 is the latest iteration of their x86_64 based supercomputer architecture.

  • Linux 5.10 To Support Nitro Enclaves For Security-Critical Applications

    The kernel support for Nitro Enclaves landed this week in char-misc-next ahead of the Linux 5.10 cycle kicking off next month.

    Nitro Enclaves is a capability of Amazon AWS' EC2 cloud for protecting highly sensitive data. Nitro Enclaves provide additional isolation and security by punting the sensitive work/data off to an isolated virtual machine without persistent storage access and other reductions to possible attack surfaces while also providing cryptographic attestation for ensuring only trusted/authorized code is running.

  • Linux Foundation Adds Entry-Level Certification

    The Linux Foundation has announced the development of a new entry-level certification exam to complement their existing Linux Foundation Certified Sysadmin (LFCS) and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) exams. This new certification, the Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate (LFCA), targets people just moving into systems administration.

  • How open-source software transformed the business world [Ed: Today ZDNet deletes GNU and Free software from history, citing this 'report' from LF (made using proprietary software)]

    The Linux Foundation goes into many examples, but I'm going to focus on telecommunications and networking since it's a field I know well. 

  • Software-defined vertical industries: transformation through open source

    What do some of the world’s largest, most regulated, complex, centuries-old industries such as banking, telecommunications, and energy have in common with rapid development, bleeding-edge innovative, creative industries such as the motion pictures industry?
    They’re all dependent on open source software. 
    That would be a great answer and correct, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. A complete answer is these industries not only depend on open source, but they’re building open source into the fabric of their R&D and development models. They are all dependent on the speed of innovation that collaborating in open source enables. 

More IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat OpenShift named as most widely deployed multicloud container platform

    US-based enterprise open source software solution provider Red Hat Inc’s Red Hat OpenShift has been named as the most widely deployed multicloud container platform, boosting powerful development and unified operations experiences across many public and on-premises platforms.

    In a statement today, Red Hat said OpenShift was evaluated by Forrester Research in The Forrester Wave: Multicloud Container Development Platforms, Q3 2020.

  • Ceph scales to 10 billion objects

    Ceph, the open source integrated file, block and object storage software, can support one billion objects. But can it scale to 10 billion objects and deliver good and predictable performance?

    Yes, according to Russ Fellows and Mohammad Rabin of the Evaluator Group who set up a Ceph cluster lab and, by using a huge metadata cache, scaled from zero to 10 billion 64KB objects.

    In their soon-to-be published white paper commissioned by Red Hat, “Massively Scalable Cloud Storage for Cloud Native Applications”, they report that setting up Ceph was complex – without actually using that word. “We found that, because of the many Ceph configuration and deployment options, it is important to consult with an experienced Ceph architect prior to deployment.”

  • What I learned as an engineering intern at Red Hat

    Interning at Red Hat has been one of the most challenging summers of my life, but it's been well worth it. Being an engineering intern working on Red Hat OpenShift's GitOps workflow has forced me to grow and learn more than ever before.

    My internship position on March 4th. A very short time later, COVID-19 caused companies to cancel their internships all over the United States. Thankfully, Red Hat announced that internships would go on in a virtual format.The Early Talent team made the necessary arrangements to make sure that our experience was impacted as little as possible by this change.

  • Start contributing to open source Call for Code projects

    Jumping into the open source world can be intimidating for the uninitiated. Don’t let fear of the unknown stop you from getting involved in open source. In this blog post, we cover some of the basics you need to know before contributing your first line of code.

    [...]

    Now that you understand that basic gist of open source, let’s go a little deeper.

    While some open source projects are small developer tools that help you accomplish a single task, other open source projects are large, complicated pieces of software that have interconnected parts. In these larger projects, different teams or working groups focus on developing specific parts of the technology, collaborating on the technology, peer reviewing and testing the code, and contributing their changes to the core tech.

  • Build Smart on Kubernetes World Tour: Developers’ path to platform freedom

    Without a doubt, Kubernetes is one of hottest open tech projects today and has been so for many years now. The reason for its durable, not-so-secret success? It’s the ability to containerize code, which frees developers from the constraint of writing code for one platform only and instead gives you the freedom of write-once, deploy-anywhere development. And why is this important? Enterprises know that the fastest route to app modernization depends on the ability to develop solutions that protect current tech investments, which likely run across multiple cloud platforms on and off premises. In other words, success depends on your ability to build solutions once and deploy them across multiple hybrid cloud platforms. Yep, containers tech delivers all of that and more.

    With that baseline, I’m writing to let you know that when it comes to learning Kubernetes, the IBM Developer advocates team has you completely covered with the Build Smart on Kubernetes World Tour. Since we launched the World Tour back in the fall of 2019, the team has delivered literally hundreds of free hands-on workshops globally to teach developers about the power of Kubernetes. It’s all part of the IBM Developer Way, delivering on our sole mission to teach the world’s developers about open tech through hands-on workshops and supporting content such as blog posts, tutorials, and videos. With the recent launch of new content on the Build Smart on Kubernetes World Tour site, it feels like a good time to provide a quick virtual tour of all that the site offers. Visit the updated site to find more than just upcoming tour events, but also self-paced learning options. You can now choose whether you learn at your own pace by viewing recorded content, register for upcoming live events, or, even better, both. I’m going to review each section to show you the details.

  • Mainframe Modernization Continues at Phoenix Software

    Tomorrow, Friday September 25, 2020, Phoenix Software International, Inc., will release (E)JES V6R0, an update to its z/OS system management product. This release includes enhancements to further modernization initiatives introduced in previous releases as well as brand new features that bring the accessibility of z/OS resources and tasks to other platforms. Concurrent with this release, Phoenix Software is also launching a new online documentation library within its secure customer support portal.

  • Poste Italiane Speeds Up Cloud-Native Application Development by 80% Using Red Hat’s Open Hybrid Cloud Technologies

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Poste Italiane Group ("Poste Italiane" or the "Group") is building an innovation platform based on Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud portfolio, including Red Hat OpenShift. The platform is intended to support more and deeper connections with ecosystem partners, provide a more seamless customer experience to the Group’s 35 million customers along with access to an extensive, timely product and services portfolio, and support Italy’s growing digital economy.

  • Red Hat Advances Cloud-Native Analytics with New Kubernetes-Based Data Services

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the release of Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.5, delivering Kubernetes-based data services for modern, cloud-native applications across the open hybrid cloud. Tightly integrated with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.5 is designed to help organizations enable a more seamless data services architecture for applications.

Screencasts and Audiocasts: KaOS 2020.09, Bandwhich, BSD Now, Ubuntu Podcast

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • KaOS 2020.09 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at KaOS 2020.09. Enjoy!

  • Bandwhich: Bandwidth Tracking So Simple Anyone Can Use It

    Sometimes you might need to check out what conenctions are being made to and from your computer and while you could always try and work out how an application like Wireshark works sometimes that's a bit over kill and you just want a rough idea of what's happening and that's where a tool like Bandwhich, a very simple bandwidth tracking tool becomes useful.

  • BSD Now #369: Where rc.d belongs

    High Availability Router/Firewall Using OpenBSD, CARP, pfsync, and ifstated, Building the Development Version of Emacs on NetBSD, rc.d belongs in libexec, not etc, FreeBSD 11.3 EOL, OPNsense 20.7.1 Released, MidnightBSD 1.2.7 out, and more.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E27 – Find a penny, pick it up

    This week we’ve been spying on our children and playing games on Twitch. We discuss the Ubuntu Community Council revival, GNOMEs new versioning scheme, Geary adding encryption support, Plasma 5.20, Xfce 4.16, Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 and Microsoft Edge coming Linux. We also round up our picks from the wider tech news.

GNU/Linux-ready Devices and Arduino/Open Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Pico-ITX board spins triple 4K displays with Elkhart Lake

    Congatec announced a Linux-ready “Conga-PA7” Pico-ITX SBC with Intel’s new Atom x6000E SoCs with up to 16GB LPDDR4-4267 and 512GB UFS 2.0 flash, triple 4K display support, 2x GbE with TSN and OOB, and 2x USB 3.1.

    Congatec has announced an SBC and four SMARC, Qseven, COM Express compute modules based on Intel’s new Elkhart Lake Atom x6000E, Pentium, and Celeron system-on-chips. The German embedded vendor also unveiled a dozen Tiger Lake boards, joining its previously announced Conga-TC570 and Conga-HPC/cTLU Tiger Lake modules. We will cover these in separate reports and will focus here on the Pico-ITX form-factor Conga-PA7 SBC.

  • Congatec Unveils Atom x6000E Elkhart Lake Powered Pico-ITX SBC, Qseven, SMARC, COM Express Modules
  • Intel Tiger Lake UP3 COM Express Module Offers High AI Performance, PCIe Gen4 Interface

    Earlier today, Intel announces the Elkhart Lake IoT edge processor family, and quite discreetly more 15W Tiger Lake Core i3/i5/i7 UP3 processors designed for IoT & embedded applications, and with a configurable TDP from 12W to 28W.

  • Automate 35mm film scanning with Arduino and Python

    While taking photos today is normally a digital affair, there is a wealth of visual information stored on film negatives. Digitization is possible, but it tends to be rather time-intensive, so photographer/hacker Seckin Sinan Isik decided to automate the process.

    His setup uses a film carrier augmented with a stepper motor and belt drive to advance the 35mm film under a tripod-mounted digital camera. This is controlled by an Arduino Nano, with the camera’s view shown via a video capture device on a nearby computer.

  • Learning Greek with an arcade-style vocabulary reviewer

    Learning a new language is always a challenge, but can also be extremely rewarding. To help with this task — specifically learning Greek — Angeliki Beyko created an arcade-style review machine. Her device cleverly uses a sheet of pegboard to hold the electronics, including seven LCD screens to indicate category, level, and the actual Greek word being reviewed.

    Possible answers are shown as pictures on four TFT displays, driven by four separate Arduino Uno boards that pull up pictures stored on SD cards. An Arduino Mega provides overall control for the interactive panel.

Geppetto carrier design service licensed by Toradex for Arm Linux modules

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Toradex has licensed Altium’s online Geppetto embedded board prototyping and design tool for customers using its Arm-based, Linux supported Verdin and Colibri modules.

Gumstix, which was acquired by Altium, has long been known for its Geppetto Design-to-Order (D2O) custom board design service for customizing carrier boards based its own Linux-driven modules and those of partners such as Toradex. Now Altium has announced that Toradex has licensed Geppetto for in-house use.

Read more

Graphics: AMD, OpenGL, and X.Org Developers Conference 2020

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Is Hiring To Work On New Radeon Driver Tooling Written In Rust

    It turns out AMD is at least exploring the possibilities around using the Rust programming language in their graphics driver tooling.

    AMD is hiring another 3D Driver Development Engineer but what makes this job posting of interest is they are specifically looking for a Rust developer. Yes, the increasingly popular programming language focused on memory safety and concurrency.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Accelerate

    For a long time now, I’ve been writing about various work I’ve done in the course of getting to GL 4.6. This has generally been feature implementation work with an occasional side of bug hunting and fixing and so I haven’t been too concerned about performance.

    I’m not done with feature work. There’s still tons of things missing that I’m planning to work on.

    I’m not done with bug hunting or fixing. There’s still tons of bugs (like how currently spec@!opengl 1.1@streaming-texture-leak ooms my system and crashes all the other tests trying to run in parallel) that I’m going to fix.

    But I wanted a break, and I wanted to learn some new parts of the graphics pipeline instead of just slapping more extensions in.

  • Samuel Iglesias: X.Org Developers Conference 2020

    Last week, X.Org Developers Conference 2020 was held online for the first time. This year, with all the COVID-19 situation that is affecting almost every country worldwide, the X.Org Foundation Board of Directors decided to make it virtual.

    I love open-source conferences Smile They are great for networking, have fun with the rest of community members, have really good technical discussions in the hallway track… and visit a new place every year! Unfortunately, we couldn’t do any of that this time and we needed to look for an alternative… being going virtual the obvious one.

    The organization team at Intel, lead by Radoslaw Szwichtenberg and Martin Peres, analyzed the different open-source alternatives to organize XDC 2020 in a virtual manner. Finally, due to the setup requirements and the possibility of having more than 200 attendees connected to the video stream at the same time (Big Blue Button doesn’t recommend more than 100 simultaneous users), they selected Jitsi for speakers + Youtube for streaming/recording + IRC for questions. Arkadiusz Hiler summarized very well what they did from the A/V technical point of view and how was the experience hosting a virtual XDC.

Top Email Encryption Tools

Filed under
Software
Security

Email continues to be one of the most popular and useful functions of a Linux system. Being able to keep in touch with your friends, family, and colleagues is essential for any platform. As the scope of email threats keeps increasing, systems for email security and encryption have become more complex and more of a necessity. Protecting email from unauthorized access and inspection is important particularly because the protocols that govern email do not include encryption. Email was not designed with any privacy or security in mind. The consequence of the lack of security is that email can be compromised on the sender’s device, on a network, on a server, and on the recipient’s device.

Sending encrypted messages is one method of ensuring electronic privacy. By encrypting messages, this will help to keep your precious information safe by making messages look like garbled text to uninvited onlookers. Encrypting email may sound a little daunting, but it’s actually simple with the right software.

OpenPGP is the most widely used email encryption standard. Whether you are using an email client or a web-based email solution, you can encrypt your email with OpenPGP.

There are very few email applications that have PGP encryption enabled by default. Fortunately, there are some good open source encryption applications available for Linux that are simple to use.

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PostgreSQL 13 Released!

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Server
OSS

  • PostgreSQL 13 Released!

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group today announced the release of PostgreSQL 13, the latest version of the world’s most advanced open source database.

    PostgreSQL 13 includes significant improvements to its indexing and lookup system that benefit large databases, including space savings and performance gains for indexes, faster response times for queries that use aggregates or partitions, better query planning when using enhanced statistics, and more.

    Along with highly requested features like parallelized vacuuming and incremental sorting, PostgreSQL 13 provides a better data management experience for workloads big and small, with optimizations for daily administration, more conveniences for application developers, and security enhancements.

  • PostgreSQL 13 released

    Version 13 of the PostgreSQL database management system is out. "PostgreSQL 13 includes significant improvements to its indexing and lookup system that benefit large databases, including space savings and performance gains for indexes, faster response times for queries that use aggregates or partitions, better query planning when using enhanced statistics, and more. Along with highly requested features like parallelized vacuuming and incremental sorting, PostgreSQL 13 provides a better data management experience for workloads big and small, with optimizations for daily administration, more conveniences for application developers, and security enhancements."

  • PostgreSQL 13 Released With Performance Improvements

    PostgreSQL 13.0 is out this morning as the latest major update to this widely-used relational database server.

    There are many improvements to find with PostgreSQL 13.0 from better performance to helpful additions for database administrators. Among the PostgreSQL 13 highlights are:

    - Larger databases will find improvements to its indexing and lookup performance for indexes, faster response times for some queries, space savings, better query planning, and more.

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