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Tuesday, 29 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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  • 22/05/2020 - 6:08am
    Marius Nestor
  • 20/01/2020 - 5:37am
    johnwalsh
  • 07/07/2019 - 5:40pm
    JamieCull
  • 04/07/2019 - 7:09pm
    ksanaj
  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
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    itsfoss
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    Variscite
  • 09/04/2017 - 4:47pm
    mwilmoth
  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt

Customize an Intel NUC with Linux

Filed under
Linux

After nearly six months of frequent video conferencing, I was tired of looking at my colleagues as tiny thumbnails on 13" and 15" laptop displays. However, I didn't want the clutter of a desktop or tower case and all the associated cabling.

I briefly considered a Mac Mini but didn't want to surrender to a proprietary interface. I really wanted a Linux desktop with power, portability, and a small footprint. I considered System76's Meerkat but instead opted to build my own computer using an Intel Next Unit of Computing (NUC).

Intel created the NUC as a very small, barebones computer system with a number of options. It's more powerful and more modular than something like a Raspberry Pi, but it's smaller than even a microATX sized PC tower.

Read more

13 Best Photo Image Editors for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS

In this article, I have reviewed of some the best photo editing software available on different Linux distributions. These are not the only photo editors available but are among the best and commonly used by Linux users.

Thanks for reading and hope you find this article useful, if you know of other good photo editors available in Linux, let us know by leaving a comment. Stay connected to Tecmint for more quality articles.

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5 qualities of outstanding open source community managers

Filed under
OSS

A community manager is the quarterback of an open source community. This is the person who ensures that everything runs smoothly, the one who helps the community and all its members grow. Every thriving community needs one.

While the specific skills and expertise a community manager needs depend on the community itself—after all, every community is unique—there are a handful of core qualities you'll see in any outstanding community manager.

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Arduino and GNU/Linux Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • This Arduino-controlled soft robot gets around like an earthworm

    After studying the way a worm wiggles, Nicholas Lauer decided to create his own soft robotic version. What he came up with uses an Arduino Uno for control, inflating six 3D-printed segments sequentially to order to generate peristaltic motion for forward movement.

    The robotic worm uses a 12V mini diaphragm pump to provide inflation air, while a series of transistors and solenoid valves directly regulate the airflow into the chambers.

  • PicoRio dev board PC with a RISC-V chip will be a low-cost, open source Raspberry Pi alternative

    The Raspberry Pi line of tiny computers have made a big splash in recent years. For as little as $35 you can get a fully functional computer capable of running a variety of (mostly Linux-based) operating systems. Some models are even cheaper.

    A bunch of competitors have entered the space, but like the Raspberry Pi, most similarly-priced models have processors based on ARM architecture.

    Now Imagination Technologies and a startup named RIOS Laboratory are working on a new single-board computer with a RISC-V processor. It’s called PicoRio, and the first version is expected to launch in the fourth quarter of 2020.
    PicoRio Pygmy
    @pdp7

    While Raspberry Pi computers run open source, GNU/Linux distributions, every Raspberry Pi system to date has shipped with an ARM-based Broadcom processor featuring some proprietary components.

  • Elkhart Lake SBC features 2.5GbE port, 32GB RAM

    Avalue’s rugged, 3.5-inch “ECM-EHL” runs Linux or Win 10 on an Atom x6000E and offers up to 32GB DDR4-3200, 2.5GbE and GbE, 2x USB 3.1 Gen2, triple 4K displays, and 2x M.2 slots with SIM.

    Avalue has posted specs for a 3.5-inch ECM-EHL SBC that runs on Intel’s new dual- or quad-core Elkhart Lake Atom x6000E, Pentium, and Celeron SoCs. Elkhart Lake runs on 10nm SuperFin Tremont CPU cores and up to 32EU Intel Gen11 graphics with triple 4K and improved AI performance. Intel claims up to 1.7x better single-thread, 1.5x better multi-thread, and 2x better graphics performance compared to Gemini Lake.

  • SMARC module delivers Elkhart Lake with up to 256GB UFS

    Advantech’s Linux-ready “SOM-2532” SMARC 2.1 module is built around Intel’s Atom-class, 10nm Elkhart Lake platform and supplies up to 16GB LPDDR4-3200, 256GB UFS 2.1, dual GbE with TSN, dual USB 3.1 Gen 2, dual CAN, and triple 4K support.

Stellarium 0.20.3 Released with Tons of Changes [Ubuntu PPA]

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech
SciFi

Free-software planetarium Stellarium 0.20.3 was released a day ago with numerous changes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04 via PPA.

Stellarium 0.20.3 fixed nutation and, with it, season beginning times, included many changes in AstroCalc tool, Oculars and Satellites plugins, and updated DSO catalog.

Read more

Screencasts of Debian 10.6 Cinnamon and Enso OS 0.4

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Audiocasts/Shows: POSIX, TWIL and Going Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • POSIX Compliance Explained: Does It Even Matter In 2020

    Like with the Unix Philosphy, POSIX compliance tends to get simplified far more than it really needs to which sort of makes it seem less important than it really is, so today I thought it would be a good idea to take the time to explain what it is and where it came from and why it was important in the early days of Unix and even now in the days of Linux and various BSD variants.

  • This Week in Linux 118: Lenovo’s New Ubuntu Laptops, GNOME 40, Puppy Linux 9.5, Firefox 81, UBports

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a great show for you even though I’m sick. As they say in show business, the show must go on or something like that. Lenovo Adds Ubuntu Laptops & PCs to their lineup. UBports released their latest update with 16.04 OTA-13. Puppy Linux has a brand new version out with Puppy Linux 9.5. Microsoft announce that after a long wait everyone can rejoice that they are finally bringing Microsoft Edge to Linux! Mozilla also announced a new version of Firefox with Firefox 81. EndeavourOS has a new release of this Arch Linux based distro with version 2020.09.20 and they also announced a new ARM Edition of the distro. GNOME has decided to change the version numbering for the project. We’ll talk about this and why it matters or why it doesn’t. There’s a new update to the very powerful ebook reader Calibre, with Calibre 5.0. We’ll check out the Screenshot Utility, Flameshot and their latest release of 0.8. Then we’ll round out the show with some potentially great news for the Lightworks Video Editor. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Going Linux #397 · Listener Feedback

    We answer questions about problems receiving the podcast, SSH, printers, browsers and more. We also discuss photography and the new major computer brands selling computers pre-installed with Linux.

dupeGuru – find duplicate files

Filed under
Software

Even though the cost of storage per GB continues to fall, it’s common for users to need to find and remove duplicates files. The process of finding and removing duplicates is time-consuming. Fortunately, there are a number of tools that are designed to remove the laborious nature of finding duplicates.

dupeGuru is a cross-platform GUI tool to find duplicate files in a system. It has three modes, Standard, Music and Picture, with each mode having its own scan types and unique features.

dupeGuru is written in Python.

Read more

First Look at Manjaro Deepin Edition: Deepin Beauty Powered by Arch Linux

Filed under
Reviews

New editions of Manjaro Linux are in the works, Manjaro Deepin Edition with the Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE) and Manjaro UKUI Edition with Ubuntu Kylin’s UKUI desktop environment, and today I want to give you a first look at Manjaro Deepin Edition.

If you ever wanted to use Manjaro Linux with the beautiful and futuristic Deepin Desktop Environment, the Manjaro Deepin Edition will let you do just that without the hustle of installing the Deepin Desktop from the repositories on top of a barebone Manjaro Linux installation.

Developed as part of the recently released Manjaro 20.1 “Mikah” series, the Deepin Edition promises an out-of-the-box Deepin Desktop experience powered by all the goodies that the Arch Linux and Manjaro Linux distributions have to offer.

[...]

Until the Manjaro team decides which apps will land in the final release, I invite you to download the Deepin Edition of Manjaro Linux below and take it for a spin yourself on your personal computer.

Do let me know what you think about it in the comments below, but keep in mind that this is a pre-release version so don’t install it on a production machine.

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Drawing is an Open Source MS-Paint Type of App for Linux Desktop

Filed under
Software

For people introduced to computers with Windows XP (or earlier version), MS Paint was an amusing application from sketching random stuff. In a world dominated with Photoshop and GIMP, the paint applications still hold some relevance.

There are several painting applications available for Linux, and I am going to add one more to this list.

The app is unsurprisingly called Drawing and you can use it on both Linux desktop and Linux smartphones.

Read more

Calibre 5.0 Ebook Manager Released with Text Highlighting Support, Dark Mode

Filed under
Software

Coming almost a year after the Calibre 4.0 series, Calibre 5.0 is here with some major changes. This include the ability to highlight text in the E-book viewer, which is one of the most requested feature for this powerful ebook manager.

Users will be able to use colors when highlighting text in ebooks, as well as to use all sorts of text formatting and styles, including strikethrough and underline. In addition, you can even add notes to your highlights.

All the highlights will be stored in the respective EPUB file, which makes them easy to share. In addition, you can browse all your highlights in the Calibre library using the Browse annotations tool.

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Compute module and dev kit aim Snapdragon 865 at AR/VR

Filed under
Android

Lantronix has launched 50 x 29mm “Open-Q 865XR SOM” and $995 dev kit that runs Android 10 on a 15-TOPS NPU equipped Snapdragon 865 with 6GB LPDDR5, 802.11ax, and triple MIPI-CSI interfaces.

Intrinsyc, a subsidiary of Lantronix, has introduced an IoT-oriented compute module and development kit based on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 865 (SXR2130P) SoC. The $445 Open-Q 865XR SOM and $995 Open-Q 865XR SOM Development Kit follow Intrinsyc’s more smartphone-oriented Snapdragon 865 Mobile HDK. The Open-Q 865XR targets imaging intensive embedded applications including Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality (AR/VR) applications in AI machine learning, medical, gaming, logistics and retail sectors.

Read more

Programming: Git and Qt

Filed under
Development
  • Understand the new GitLab Kubernetes Agent

    GitLab's current Kubernetes integrations were introduced more than three years ago. Their primary goal was to allow a simple setup of clusters and provide a smooth deployment experience to our users. These integrations served us well in the past years but at the same time its weaknesses were limiting for some important and crucial use cases.

  • GitLab Introduces the GitLab Kubernetes Agent

    The GitLab Kubernetes Agent (GKA), released in GitLab 13.4, provides a permanent communication channel between GitLab and the cluster. According to the GitLab blog, it is designed to provide a secure solution that allows cluster operators to restrict GitLab's rights in the cluster and does not require opening up the cluster to the Internet.

  • Git Protocol v2 Available at Launchpad

    After a few weeks of development and testing, we are proud to finally announce that Git protocol v2 is available at Launchpad! But what are the improvements in the protocol itself, and how can you benefit from that?

    The git v2 protocol was released a while ago, in May 2018, with the intent of simplifying git over HTTP transfer protocol, allowing extensibility of git capabilities, and reducing the network usage in some operations.

    For the end user, the main clear benefit is the bandwidth reduction: in the previous version of the protocol, when one does a “git pull origin master”, for example, even if you have no new commits to fetch from the remote origin, git server would first “advertise” to the client all refs (branches and tags) available. In big repositories with hundreds or thousands of refs, this simple handshake operation could consume a lot of bandwidth and time to communicate a bunch of data that would potentially be discarded by the client after.

    In the v2 protocol, this waste is no longer present: the client now has the ability to filter which refs it wants to know about before the server starts advertising it.

  • Qt Desktop Days 7-11 September

    We are happy to let you know that the very first edition of Qt Desktop Days 2020 was a great success! Having pulled together the event at very short notice, we were delighted at the enthusiastic response from contributors and attendees alike.

  • Full Stack Tracing Part 1

    Full stack tracing is a tool that should be part of every software engineer’s toolkit. It’s the best way to investigate and solve certain classes of hard problems in optimization and debugging. Because of the power and capability it gives the developer, we’ll be writing a series of blogs about it: when to use it, how to get it set up, how to create traces, and how to interpret results. Our goal is to get you capable enough to use full stack tracing to solve your tough problems too.

    Firstly, what is it? Full stack tracing is tracing on the full software stack, from the operating system to the application. By collecting profiling information (timing, process, caller, API, and other info) from the kernel, drivers, software frameworks, application, and JavaScript environments, you’re able to see exactly how the individual components of a system are interacting. That opens up areas of investigation that are impossible to achieve with standard application profilers, kernel debug messages, or even strategically inserted printf() commands. One way to think of full stack tracing is like a developer’s MRI machine that allows you to look into a running system without disturbing it to determine what is happening inside. (And unlike other low-level traces that we’ve written about before, full stack tracing provides a simpler way to view activity up and down the entire software stack.)

Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Gets 11th-Gen Intel Refresh, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

The revised model doesn’t buck any conventions. It’s a refreshed version of the XPS 13 model released earlier this year, albeit offering the latest 11th generation Intel processors, Intel Iris Xe graphics, Thunderbolt 4 ports, and up to 32GB 4267MHz LPDDR4x RAM.

These are also the first Dell portables to carry Intel “Evo” certification.

What’s Intel Evo? Think of it as an assurance. Evo certified notebooks have 11th gen Intel chips, can wake from sleep in under 1s, offer at least 9 hours battery life (with a Full HD screen), and support fast charging (with up to 4 hours from a single 30 min charge) — if they can’t meet any of those criteria they don’t get certified.

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Vulkan 1.2.155 Released and AMDVLK 2020.Q3.6 Vulkan Driver Brings Several Fixes

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan 1.2.155 Released With EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64

    Vulkan 1.2.155 is out this morning as a small weekly update over last week's spec revision that brought the Vulkan Portability Extension 1.0 for easing software-based Vulkan implementations running atop other graphics APIs.

    Vulkan 1.2.155 is quite a tiny release after that big release last week, but there aren't even any documentation corrections/clarifications and just a sole new extension.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q3.6 Vulkan Driver Brings Several Fixes

    AMD driver developers today released AMDVLK 2020.Q3.6 as their latest open-source snapshot of their official Vulkan graphics driver.

    The primary new feature of this AMDVLK driver update is VK_EXT_robustness2, which mandates stricter requirements around dealing with out-of-bounds reads/writes. Robustness2 requires greater bounds checking, discarding out-of-bounds writes, and out-of-bounds reads must return zero. This extension debuted back in April as part of Vulkan 1.2.139.

9 Best Free and Open Source RAW Processing Tools

Filed under
Software

When a digital camera captures an image, image sensors in the camera record the light from millions of sensing area. The camera’s digital circuitry converts the generated analog voltage signal into a digital representation. Many cameras allow these images to be stored in a raw image file. They are similar to digital negatives, as they have the same role as negatives in film photography.

RAW files are not directly usable, but have all the necessary information to create an image. RAW files usually offer higher color depth, higher dynamic range, and preserve most of the information of the image compared with the final image format. The downside of RAW files is that they take up far more storage space. Dynamic range in photography describes the ratio between the maximum and minimum measurable light intensities (white and black, respectively).

As implied by the name, RAW files have not been processed. By taking pictures in raw format the photographer is not committing to the conversion software that is built into the firmware of the camera. Instead, the individual can store the raw files, and make use of computer software to generate better JPEG files, and also benefit from future improvements in image software.

There is a good range of open source Linux software that processes RAW files. Here’s our recommendations. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who has a passion for digital photography.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Arduino and GNU/Linux Devices

  • This Arduino-controlled soft robot gets around like an earthworm

    After studying the way a worm wiggles, Nicholas Lauer decided to create his own soft robotic version. What he came up with uses an Arduino Uno for control, inflating six 3D-printed segments sequentially to order to generate peristaltic motion for forward movement. The robotic worm uses a 12V mini diaphragm pump to provide inflation air, while a series of transistors and solenoid valves directly regulate the airflow into the chambers.

  • PicoRio dev board PC with a RISC-V chip will be a low-cost, open source Raspberry Pi alternative

    The Raspberry Pi line of tiny computers have made a big splash in recent years. For as little as $35 you can get a fully functional computer capable of running a variety of (mostly Linux-based) operating systems. Some models are even cheaper. A bunch of competitors have entered the space, but like the Raspberry Pi, most similarly-priced models have processors based on ARM architecture. Now Imagination Technologies and a startup named RIOS Laboratory are working on a new single-board computer with a RISC-V processor. It’s called PicoRio, and the first version is expected to launch in the fourth quarter of 2020. PicoRio Pygmy @pdp7 While Raspberry Pi computers run open source, GNU/Linux distributions, every Raspberry Pi system to date has shipped with an ARM-based Broadcom processor featuring some proprietary components.

  • Elkhart Lake SBC features 2.5GbE port, 32GB RAM

    Avalue’s rugged, 3.5-inch “ECM-EHL” runs Linux or Win 10 on an Atom x6000E and offers up to 32GB DDR4-3200, 2.5GbE and GbE, 2x USB 3.1 Gen2, triple 4K displays, and 2x M.2 slots with SIM. Avalue has posted specs for a 3.5-inch ECM-EHL SBC that runs on Intel’s new dual- or quad-core Elkhart Lake Atom x6000E, Pentium, and Celeron SoCs. Elkhart Lake runs on 10nm SuperFin Tremont CPU cores and up to 32EU Intel Gen11 graphics with triple 4K and improved AI performance. Intel claims up to 1.7x better single-thread, 1.5x better multi-thread, and 2x better graphics performance compared to Gemini Lake.

  • SMARC module delivers Elkhart Lake with up to 256GB UFS

    Advantech’s Linux-ready “SOM-2532” SMARC 2.1 module is built around Intel’s Atom-class, 10nm Elkhart Lake platform and supplies up to 16GB LPDDR4-3200, 256GB UFS 2.1, dual GbE with TSN, dual USB 3.1 Gen 2, dual CAN, and triple 4K support.

Stellarium 0.20.3 Released with Tons of Changes [Ubuntu PPA]

Free-software planetarium Stellarium 0.20.3 was released a day ago with numerous changes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04 via PPA. Stellarium 0.20.3 fixed nutation and, with it, season beginning times, included many changes in AstroCalc tool, Oculars and Satellites plugins, and updated DSO catalog. Read more

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