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    arindam1989
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    itsfoss
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    relativ7

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Servers: Skytap, Instaclustr, MariaDB, Quarkus, Kubernetes and More

Filed under
Server
  • Skytap Announces General Availability of IBM i in the Public Cloud, Leads Ecosystem to New Opportunities

    Skytap, a global, purpose-built cloud service, announces that its support for the IBM i operating system is now available in US-West, US-Central and EMEA-UK. Available for purchase in hourly, monthly and annual consumption models, this release broadens Skytap's support for IBM Power Systems-based applications that can be developed, tested and run in production.

    In the 2017/2018 Logicalis Global CIO Survey, most CIOs indicated they are focused on digital transformation, with 44 percent citing complex legacy infrastructure as a main barrier in this transformation.

  • Instaclustr Releases Service Broker to Seamlessly Integrate Customers’ Kubernetes Applications within the Instaclustr Open-Source-as-a-Service Platform
  • MariaDB 10.3 now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Software Collections supplies the latest, stable versions of development tools and components for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. As part of the Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 release, we are pleased to announce that MariaDB 10.3 is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

  • Quarkus 0.17.0 now available

    Quarkus continues its cadence of delivering a release every 2-3 weeks. This latest release (0.17.0) contains 125+ changes that include new features, bug fixes, and documentation updates. 

  • Recap of Kubernetes Contributor Summit Barcelona 2019

    First of all, THANK YOU to everyone who made the Kubernetes Contributor Summit in Barcelona possible. We had an amazing team of volunteers tasked with planning and executing the event, and it was so much fun meeting and talking to all new and current contributors during the main event and the pre-event celebration.

    Contributor Summit in Barcelona kicked off KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in a big way as it was the largest contributor summit to date with 331 people signed up, and only 9 didn’t pick up their badges!

  • The innovation delusion

    If traditional planning is dead, then why do so many organizations still invest in planning techniques optimized for the Industrial Revolution?

    One reason might be that we trick ourselves into thinking innovation is the kind of thing we can accomplish with a structured, linear process. When we do this, I think we're confusing our stories about innovation with the process of innovation itself—and the two are very different.

  • Top Web Based Docker Monitoring Tools

    It is an open source platform and enables administrations to manage and run Docker in creation. It offers the whole program stack that is desired to achieve containers in production and it can be simply installed on any engine that can run Docker. After installation, all nodes can be easily configured and organized through the UI Web. You can get complex functions such as load and manage balancing out of the box after a few clicks.

  • Hitting the Reset Button on Hadoop

    Hadoop has seen better days. The recent struggles of Cloudera and MapR – the two remaining independent distributors of Hadoop software -- are proof of.

Linux Foundation in China (Today's Event Coverage)

Filed under
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Sees Lots of Hardware Headaches Ahead

    Linux founder Linus Torvalds, today at the KubeCon + CloudNative + Open Source Summit China conference, warned attendees that managing software is about to become a lot more challenging, largely because of two hardware issues that are beyond the control of DevOps teams.

    [...]

    In the meantime, Torvalds noted updates to the Linux kernel are still coming at a rate of every three months, and the Linux team is basically working on a six-month planning cycle—there is no master five-year plan the Linux team is working from. Roughly 1,500 developers work on contributions to the Linux kernel, with 100 maintainers overseeing the implementation of those contributions.

    Naturally, cybersecurity patches at the kernel level have significant implications for all of DevOps. Changes to the kernel need to be absorbed by all the various distributions of Linux, which in turn impacts all the stacks of software that depend on Linux. Jim Zemlin, executive director for The Linux Foundation, said that in the wake of the rise of these hardware issues and previous cybersecurity issues involving open source software such as the Heartbleed vulnerability, cybersecurity is the top priority for The Linux Foundation. As part of that effort, The Linux Foundation is researching various DevSecOps approaches to better securing the global open source supply chain, he said.

  • Linux Foundation to become home of WeBank’s FATE

    The Linux Foundation announced the inclusion of federated learning framework FATE into the organisation.

    The project has been contributed by Chinese digital bank WeBank, with organisations such as AI computing platform provider Clustar, e-commerce company JD.com’s subsidiary JD Intelligent Cities Research, and WeBank initiator Tencent already committed to the cause. 

    Linux Foundation’s executive director Jim Zemlin explained the move in a canned statement, saying “A secure computing framework is critical for developers who are using data and models to build the latest applications across financial services, manufacturing, healthcare and more.” 

  • MATRIXX Software Joins Linux Foundation Networking to Advance Next Generation of Telco Services

    MATRIXX Software, an innovation powerhouse committed to transforming global commerce, today announced it has joined Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) as a silver member. MATRIXX is participating in the foundation’s programs to provide guidance related to advancing a new generation of services inspired by web-scale best practices.

Security: Updates, FUD, Back Doors and More

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Sting Catches Another Ransomware Firm — Red Mosquito — Negotiating With “Hackers”

    ProPublica recently reported that two U.S. firms, which professed to use their own data recovery methods to help ransomware victims regain access to infected files, instead paid the hackers.

    Now there’s new evidence that a U.K. firm takes a similar approach. Fabian Wosar, a cyber security researcher, told ProPublica this month that, in a sting operation he conducted in April, Scotland-based Red Mosquito Data Recovery said it was “running tests” to unlock files while actually negotiating a ransom payment. Wosar, the head of research at anti-virus provider Emsisoft, said he posed as both hacker and victim so he could review the company’s communications to both sides.

    Red Mosquito Data Recovery “made no effort to not pay the ransom” and instead went “straight to the ransomware author literally within minutes,” Wosar said. “Behavior like this is what keeps ransomware running.”

  • Carbon Black adds Linux support and more to its endpoint protection solution

    Endpoint protection company Carbon Black is adding a number of features to its platform, including Linux support and Amazon Web Services and container protection.

    The cloud-native platform gives security and IT teams remote access to cloud workloads and containers running in their environment, making it easier to resolve configuration drift, address vulnerabilities in real time, confidently respond to incidents and demonstrate compliance with business policies and industry regulations.

    The cloud workload and container protection capabilities are available from the same universal agent and cloud-native platform protecting Microsoft Windows, macOS and Linux endpoints.

    "The industry is quickly moving into the cloud era for endpoint protection and IT operations," says Ryan Polk, Carbon Black's chief product officer. "Carbon Black is proud to be at the front edge for cloud innovation and, with this latest release, our cloud-native EPP is now protecting some of the most important and emerging cloud real estate."

    As well as supporting AWS workloads and nearly every Linux distribution released since 2011, Carbon Black's platform extends direct access to more than 1,000 individual system artifacts across all major operating systems, including the ability to check the status of disk encryption, installed applications, kernel integrity, listening network ports, logged in users, OS versions, USB devices and more.

  • Top 10 Ethical Hacking Books

    Hacking is an ongoing process of information gathering and exploitation of any target. The hackers are consistent, practical and stay updated with daily appearing vulnerabilities. The first step to exploitation is always reconnaissance. The more information you gather, the better there are chances that you will make your way through the victim boundary. The attack should be very structured and verified in a local environment before being implemented on live target. The pre requisites are Networking skills, programming languages, Linux, Bash scripting and a reasonable workstation.Ethical hacking is the application of hacking knowledge for the benefit of society through good morals, and is usually defensive in nature, based on good knowledge of the core principles.
    Many books are available on hacking, but we will discuss today the top 10 which are appreciated and recommended by the hacking community. Note: The books are in no particular order.

  • Raspberry Pi used to steal data from Nasa lab [Ed: RasPi has a major new release (4), so MSBBC needs to spread some negative things/stories about it (googlebombing?). Microsoft failed to take over Raspberry Pi Foundation like it did OLPC. BBC (run by ex-Microsoft UK people) spreads anti-RasPi news belatedly (blaming it for something unrelated) only hours after a major product release.]

    A tiny Raspberry Pi computer has been used to steal data from Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the space agency has revealed.

    An audit report reveals the gadget was used to take about 500MB of data.

  • VMware’s Dirk Hohndel On Container Security, Mental Health And Open Source
  • Trump Ponders Banning All Chinese-Made Gear From US 5G Networks [Ed: Mandating NSA back doors everywhere]

    We've already noted extensively how the "race to fifth generation wireless (5G)" is kind of a dumb thing. While 5G is important in the way that faster, better networks are always important, the purported Earth-rattling benefits of the technology have been painfully over-hyped. And they've been painfully over-hyped largely for two reasons: one, mobile carriers want to give a kick to stalling cellphone sales numbers, and network hardware vendors like Cisco want to drive the adoption of new, more expensive, telecom hardware.

    The "race to 5G" isn't a race. And even if it were, our broadband maps are so intentionally terrible, we'd have no idea if and when we'd won it. Regardless, 5G has subsequently become a sort of magic pixie dust of tech policy conversations, justifying all manner of sometimes dubious policy. But the underlying desire to simply sell more kit has also infected the Trump administration's protectionist attacks on companies like Huawei, which is based on about 40% actual cybersecurity concerns, and 60% lobbying efforts by US hardware vendors that don't want to compete with cheaper Chinese hardware.

openSUSE Tumbleweed vs leap: What is the Difference?

Filed under
SUSE

Before talking about the differences between these versions of openSUSE, let’s have a brief look at its background and features. Earlier it was known as SUSE Linux but after a software company Novell acquired SUSE Linux in February 2004, Novell decided to release SUSE Linux Professional with 100% open source products, and as an open source project, this Linux got its prefix i.e Open. Later it split from Novell and became a separate brand.

openSUSE inherits its properties from SUSE Linux Professional and the successor of the same. SUSE also offers open source-based enterprise-class OS known as SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

openSUSE Linux community is backed by the SUSE for further research and developments. It uses the easy-to-use YaST package management system and has great advantages for a small and medium-sized enterprise server. Using YaST2 can make the configuration of the server simpler and faster. SuSE Enterprise Linux can be used for large server systems too. When it comes to Linux, everyone knows that Linux is a very secure OS, and openSUSE is not an exception. Apart from the YaST Package manager, it also supports self-developed Zypper (ZYpp) and RPM. It uses KDE5 as the default desktop environment and also provides the GNOME, MATE, LXQt, Xfce…

Now come to the main agenda of the article which is the difference between openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap?

Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: StarLabs’ Theme, Snap Store, 32-bit i386 Packages and More

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Give Ubuntu an Electric-Blue Look with StarLabs’ Theme

    Fancy giving your Ubuntu desktop a dark, electric-blue makeover? If so, then Linux laptop seller StarLabs has you covered.

    The company (who I’l admit I hadn’t heard of until recently) joins a surfeit of British-based Linux laptop vendors, with StationX and the (fabulous) Entroware being the best known.

    But we’re not here to talk about systems, we’re here to talk themes!

    See, aside from selling a small range of (seemingly decent) laptops preloaded with a selection of Ubuntu-based Linux distributions, StarLabs also maintain their own theme.

    And i’m going to show you how to install it Ubuntu.

  • Ubuntu Has Started Work On A New Desktop Snap Store

    Ubuntu's software stores / software centers have gone through several revisions over the years and now a new Snap Store is in development.

    Developers at Canonical have begun committing to a new Snap Desktop Store. The first code commits were only last week, so it's not yet something for end-users to get all excited about but presumably they'll be aiming for it to be in good shape by next year's Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 drops 32-bit images, pledges to maintain some packages after user outcry

    Ubuntu 19.10 is scheduled for release in October, though controversy is already brewing following Canonical's abjectly poorly-communicated plans to stop providing new 32-bit x86 (i386) packages in new Ubuntu releases. This move will prevent users from installing Ubuntu on older computers, and using certain applications only provided in 32-bit versions.

    In fairness to Canonical, the first x86-64 processors will be 16 years old when Ubuntu 19.10 is released, and this is a reckoning that other Linux distributions—as well as Windows and Mac OS—will eventually face, as the amount of engineering time needed to protract legacy platform support is approaching the negative end of a cost-benefit analysis.

  • Ubuntu Will Provide Select 32-bit Packages For Ubuntu 19.10 And 20.04 LTS

    As a result of constant feedback from the open source community — specifically gamers, WINE users, and Ubuntu Studio users — Canonical has decided to change its plans regarding ditching the 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS.

    For those who don’t know, last week, Canonical announced that it’s going to completely abandon the support for i386 architectures in the Ubuntu 19.10 release. Due to the same reason, Canonical restricted the users from upgrading their 18.04 LTS installations to 18.10, so that they don’t end up running 32-bit applications on an interim release with just nine months of support.

  • The future of mobile connectivity

    Mobile operators face a range of challenges today from saturation, competition and regulation – all of which are having a negative impact on revenues. The introduction of 5G offers new customer segments and services to offset this decline. However, unlike the introduction of 4G which was dominated by consumer benefits, 5G is expected to be driven by enterprise use. According to IDC, enterprises will generate 60 percent of the world’s data by 2025.

    Rather than rely on costly proprietary hardware and operating models, the use of open source technologies offers the ability to commoditise and democratise the wireless network infrastructure. Major operators such as Vodafone, Telefonica and China Mobile have already adopted such practices.

    Shifting to open source technology and taking a software defined approach enables mobile operators to differentiate based on the services they offer, rather than network coverage or subscription costs.

  • Design and Web team summary – 25 June 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

Programming and Releases: util-linux, libredwg, python, gcc, qt, RcppTOML, Command Line Heroes and Perl

Filed under
Development
  • util-linux v2.34 -- what's new?

    The code of the popular command lsblk(8) has been completely rewritten. The result is more extendible and readable code. Now lsblk(8) keeps all block devices tree in memory before it's printed. It allows to modify and reorder the tree independently on the way how kernel (/sys filesystem) exports the tree to userspace.

  • libredwg-0.8 released

    This is a major release, adding the new dynamic API, read and write all header and object fields by name. Many of the old dwg_api.h field accessors are deprecated.

  • Reuven Lerner: Announcing: Python standard library, video explainer

    A month or two ago, I saw an online quiz that caught my eye: How much of the Python standard library do you know?

    Now, the “standard library” is the collection of modules and packages that come with Python. It constitutes the “batteries” that “batteries included” refers to in the Python world. And the standard library is big, with about 300 modules, each of which contains functions, classes, and values. Knowing the standard library, and how to use it, is essential to productive use of Python.

    And yet, a large number of the people responding indicated that they knew very little of the standard library. Which makes sense, given that each of us tends to focus on what’s important to our jobs.

  • Generating Random Data in Python

    In this course, you’ll cover several options for generating random data in Python, and then build up to a comparison of each in terms of its level of security, versatility, purpose, and speed.

  • New "-O1g" Optimization Level Proposed For The GCC Compiler

    A new "-O1g" optimization level has been proposed for the GNU Compiler Collection that would allow better performance but still relative ease for debugging the generated binaries.

  • Python: Vectors, Matrices and Arrays with NumPy

    In this lesson, we will look at some neat tips and tricks to play with vectors, matrices and arrays using NumPy library in Python. This lesson is a very good starting point if you are getting started into Data Science and need some introductory mathematical overview of these components and how we can play with them using NumPy in code.
    NumPy library allows us to perform various operations which needs to be done on data structures often used in Machine Learning and Data Science like vectors, matrices and arrays. We will only show most common operations with NumPy which are used in a lot of Machine Learning pipelines. Finally, please note that NumPy is just a way to perform the operations, so, the mathematical operations we show are the main focus of this lesson and not the NumPy package itself. Let’s get started.

  • KDAB at SIGGRAPH – 2019

    KDAB is sharing the Qt booth at SIGGRAPH in Los Angeles. We’ll be showing some of our profiling and debugging tools as well as our latest QiTissue demo, a desktop Application developed for Quantitative Imaging Systems (Qi) to help cancer researchers efficiently handle gigabytes of data (see more about that here),

  • Jinja 2 Templates

    JInja2 is a widely-used and fully featured template engine for Python. Being modern it is hence also design-friendly language for Python, modelled after Django’s templates. Ansible uses Jinja2 templating to enable dynamic expressions and access to variables. Ansible controller, where JInja2 comes in picture, is where all the templating takes place before the command is sent and implemented on the target machine. Now, let us look at some syntax that will be helpful with Ansible.

  • Christopher Allan Webber: Let's Just Be Weird Together

    Approximately a month ago was Morgan and I's 10 year wedding anniversary. To commemorate that, and as a surprise gift, I made the above ascii art and animation.

    Actually, it's not just an animation, it's a program, and one you can run. As a side note, I originally thought I'd write up how I made it, but I kept procrastinating on that and it lead me to putting off writing this post for about a month. Oh well, all I'll say for now is that it lead to a major rewrite of one of the main components of Spritely. But that's something to speak of for another time, I suppose.

    Back to the imagery! Morgan was surprised to see the animation, and yet the image itself wasn't a surprise. That's because the design is actually built off of one we collaborated on together:

  • RcppTOML 0.1.6: Tinytest support and more robustification

    A new RcppTOML release is now on CRAN. RcppTOML brings TOML to R.

    TOML is a file format that is most suitable for configurations, as it is meant to be edited by humans but read by computers. It emphasizes strong readability for humans while at the same time supporting strong typing as well as immediate and clear error reports. On small typos you get parse errors, rather than silently corrupted garbage. Much preferable to any and all of XML, JSON or YAML – though sadly these may be too ubiquitous now. TOML has been making inroads with projects such as the Hugo static blog compiler, or the Cargo system of Crates (aka “packages”) for the Rust language.

    Václav Hausenblas sent a number of excellent and very focused PRs helping with some input format corner cases, as well as with one test. We added support for the wonderful new tinytest package. The detailed list of changes in this incremental version is below.

  • Things we learned about programming languages working on season three of Command Line Heroes

    One of the best things about working on a project like Command Line Heroes is that you get to learn a lot in the process. For example, while working on season three of Command Line Heroes (launching today!) we discovered a number of fun facts about programming languages that even we didn't know before.

  • Explore the past, present, and future of Python on Command-Line Heroes

    A new season of the podcast Command Line Heroes launched today. I've grown to enjoy this series for both its deep storytelling and its excellent host, Saron Yitbarek. They also dive into fantastic themes, and this year is all about programming languages.

    The first episode of the new season explores Python, the language I've been spending more time on for data sciencey reasons. As a newer convert, I've wondered where the language, which is approaching its 30th anniversary, is headed.

  • Find Your Off-Ramp | Coder Radio 363

    We take on the issues of burnout, work communication culture, and keeping everything in balance.

    Plus Wes asks 'Why Not Kotlin' and breaks down where it fits in his toolbox.

  • Collections In Python | Introduction To Python Collections

    Python programming language has four collection data types- list, tuple, sets and dictionary. But python also comes with a built-in module known as collections which has specialized data structures which basically covers for the shortcomings of the four data types. In this blog, we will go through each of those specialized data structures in detail.

  • Swiss Perl Workshop 2019

    We are looking for speakers, if you have an idea for a talk or presentation then please submit a talk proposal. Because the venue has a few rooms we are also very open to any workshop-like ideas. This could be anything that 2-10 people can attend.

  • PerlCon 2019: Rīga, Latvia, 7–9 August

    PerlCon 2019 is the 20th edition of the annual European Perl Conference also known as YAPC::Europe and TPCiR.

Rock Pi S Is A Dirt Cheap Mini Computer That Runs Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Just yesterday, we were greeted with the release of the brand-new Raspberry Pi 4. The new model ships with up to 4GB LPDDR4 RAM, making the device an even more convincing replacement for an entry-level laptop. While the 1GB base model still costs $35, the top-end version costs $55.

Even though owning a Rasperry Pi 4 won’t break your pocket, what if I tell you the latest Rock Pi S from Radxa costs just $9.90 and runs Linux-based operating system?

Read more

Khadas Vim3 SBC starts at $100 with NPU-equipped Amlogic A311D

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The open-spec “Khadas Vim3” SBC is on pre-order for $100 (2GB/16GB) or $140 (4GB/32GB) with an Amlogic A311D with a 5-TOPS NPU instead of the planned S922X. Other features include 40-pin GPIO, HDMI 2.1, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, USB 3.0 and Type-C, and M.2 with NVMe.

Shenzhen Wesion’s Khadas project announced the Khadas Vim3 in mid-May with the same Amlogic S922X found on Hardkernel’s Odroid-N2. Earlier this month it announced the June 24 launch date along with pricing of $70 (2GB/16GB) and $100 (4GB/32GB). Last week, however, a blog post announced a switch to the similar, but more powerful and AI-enhanced Amlogic A311D. Today, the board went on pre-order at $100 and $140 with the A311D, with shipments expected on Aug. 10.

Read more

LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 ready for testing

Filed under
LibO

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.3 will be released as final in mid August, 2019, being LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 the third pre-release since the development of version 6.3 started in mid November, 2018 ( See the release plan ). Since LibreOffice 6.3 Beta1, 226 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 106 bugs have been set to FIXED in Bugzilla. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 can be downloaded from here, it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows. Besides, and it can be installed along with your actual installation.

Read more

Graphics: Release of Mesa 19.0.7 and Mesa 19.1.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.0.7
    Hi List,
    
    I'd like to announce the availability of mesa 19.0.7. This is the last release
    of the mesa 19.0 series, and all users are encouraged to migrate 19.1.x instead.
    
    I'd like to apologize for the lateness of this release, in my defence I was on
    vacation most of the 19.0.7 cycle and there were several patches that needed
    backport.
    
    There's nothing too crazy here for the final release of the series. It's pretty
    spread across the system except for radv which had a number of small bug fixes.
    
    Thanks again for the smooth sailing 19.0.x series, I'll see y'all again as
    release manager in October for the 19.3 cycle.
    
    Dylan
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (5):
          radv: Prevent out of bound shift on 32-bit builds.
          radv: Decompress DCC when the image format is not allowed for buffers.
          radv: Fix vulkan build in meson.
          anv: Fix vulkan build in meson.
          meson: Allow building radeonsi with just the android platform.
    
    Charmaine Lee (1):
          svga: Remove unnecessary check for the pre flush bit for setting vertex buffers
    
    Deepak Rawat (1):
          winsys/svga/drm: Fix 32-bit RPCI send message
    
    Dylan Baker (4):
          docs: Add SHA256 sums for 19.0.6
          cherry-ignore: add additional 19.1 only patches
          Bump version for 19.0.7 release
          Docs add 19.0.7 release notes
    
    Emil Velikov (1):
          mapi: correctly handle the full offset table
    
    Gert Wollny (2):
          virgl: Add a caps feature check version
          virgl: Assume sRGB write control for older guest kernels or virglrenderer hosts
    
    Haihao Xiang (1):
          i965: support UYVY for external import only
    
    Jason Ekstrand (2):
          nir/propagate_invariant: Don't add NULL vars to the hash table
          anv: Set STATE_BASE_ADDRESS upper bounds on gen7
    
    Kenneth Graunke (1):
          glsl: Fix out of bounds read in shader_cache_read_program_metadata
    
    Kevin Strasser (2):
          gallium/winsys/kms: Fix dumb buffer bpp
          st/mesa: Add rgbx handling for fp formats
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (2):
          intel/perf: fix EuThreadsCount value in performance equations
          intel/perf: improve dynamic loading config detection
    
    Mathias Fröhlich (1):
          egl: Don't add hardware device if there is no render node v2.
    
    Nanley Chery (1):
          anv/cmd_buffer: Initalize the clear color struct for CNL+
    
    Nataraj Deshpande (1):
          anv: Fix check for isl_fmt in assert
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (5):
          radv: fix alpha-to-coverage when there is unused color attachments
          radv: fix setting CB_SHADER_MASK for dual source blending
          radv: fix occlusion queries on VegaM
          radv: fix VK_EXT_memory_budget if one heap isn't available
          radv: fix FMASK expand with SRGB formats
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.0.7
    
  • Mesa 19.0.7 Now Available As The Last Of The Series

    Mesa 19.0.7 was released on Monday as the last Mesa 19.0 stable release, ending this quarterly update series from Q1.

    Mesa 19.0.7 is the end of the line and users are encouraged to move to Mesa 19.1 stable, which has been out since earlier this month. Mesa 19.2 is where all feature development is happening and it should be released around the end of August or more likely will end up being September due to blocker bugs often ending up delaying the releases.

  • Mesa 19.1.1
    Mesa 19.1.1 is now available.
    
    In this release we have:
    
    Mostly in fixes for different drivers (RADV, ANV,
    Nouveau, Virgl, V3D, R300g, ...)
    
    Also different fixes for different parts (Meson build, GLX,
    etc).
    
    
    Alejandro Piñeiro (1):
          v3d: fix checking twice auf flag
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (5):
          radv: Skip transitions coming from external queue.
          radv: Decompress DCC when the image format is not allowed for buffers.
          radv: Fix vulkan build in meson.
          anv: Fix vulkan build in meson.
          meson: Allow building radeonsi with just the android platform.
    
    Dave Airlie (1):
          nouveau: fix frees in unsupported IR error paths.
    
    Eduardo Lima Mitev (1):
          freedreno/a5xx: Fix indirect draw max_indices calculation
    
    Eric Engestrom (3):
          util/futex: fix dangling pointer use
          glx: fix glvnd pointer types
          util/os_file: resize buffer to what was actually needed
    
    Gert Wollny (1):
          virgl: Assume sRGB write control for older guest kernels or virglrenderer hosts
    
    Haihao Xiang (1):
          i965: support UYVY for external import only
    
    Jason Ekstrand (1):
          anv: Set STATE_BASE_ADDRESS upper bounds on gen7
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (3):
          docs: Add SHA256 sums for 19.1.0
          Update version to 19.1.1
          docs: add release notes for 19.1.1
    
    Kenneth Graunke (2):
          glsl: Fix out of bounds read in shader_cache_read_program_metadata
          iris: Fix iris_flush_and_dirty_history to actually dirty history.
    
    Kevin Strasser (2):
          gallium/winsys/kms: Fix dumb buffer bpp
          st/mesa: Add rgbx handling for fp formats
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (2):
          anv: do not parse genxml data without INTEL_DEBUG=bat
          intel/dump: fix segfault when the app hasn't accessed the device
    
    Mathias Fröhlich (1):
          egl: Don't add hardware device if there is no render node v2.
    
    Richard Thier (1):
          r300g: restore performance after RADEON_FLAG_NO_INTERPROCESS_SHARING was added
    
    Rob Clark (1):
          freedreno/a6xx: un-swap X24S8_UINT
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (4):
          radv: fix occlusion queries on VegaM
          radv: fix VK_EXT_memory_budget if one heap isn't available
          radv: fix FMASK expand with SRGB formats
          radv: disable viewport clamping even if FS doesn't write Z
    
    git tag: mesa-19.1.1
    
  • Mesa 19.1.1 Released - Led By RADV & Intel Driver Fixes

    Mesa 19.1.1 is out as the first point release to this quarter's Mesa 19.1 series that was christened earlier this month.

GNOME Desktop/GTK: GNOME Shell 3.33.3, GStreamer Rust Bindings 0.14.0 and Sysprof

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell 3.33.3

    GNOME Shell provides core user interface functions for the GNOME 3 desktop, like switching to windows and launching applications. GNOME Shell takes advantage of the capabilities of modern graphics hardware and introduces innovative user interface concepts to provide a visually attractive and easy to use experience.

  • GNOME Shell & Mutter See Their 3.33.3 Releases With Notable X11/Wayland Changes

    Arriving late, a few days after the GNOME 3.33.3 development snapshot, the Mutter and GNOME Shell updates are now available.

    The Mutter 3.33.3 window manager / compositor update is notable with preparations for running XWayland on-demand -- a.k.a. just when needed for X11 client usage and not constantly. The Mutter update also now honors the startup sequence workspace on Wayland, fixes around fractional scaling, adds the new Sysprof-based profiling support, adds mouse and locate-pointer accessibility, consolidates the frame throttling code, improves screencasting support on multi-monitor systems, fixes running X11 applications with sudo under Wayland, adds initial KMS transactional support, and there are many bug fixes.

  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.14.0 release

    Apart from updating to GStreamer 1.16, this release is mostly focussed on adding more bindings for various APIs and general API cleanup and bugfixes.

    The most notable API additions in this release are bindings for gst::Memory and gst::Allocator as well as bindings for gst_base::BaseParse and gst_video::VideoDecoder and VideoEncoder. The latter also come with support for implementing subclasses and the gst-plugins-rs module contains an video decoder and parser (for CDG), and a video encoder (for AV1) based on this.

  • Sysprof design work

    Since my last post, I’ve been working on a redesign of Sysprof (among other things) to make it a bit more useful and friendly to newcomers.

    Many years ago, I worked on a small profiler project called “Perfkit” that never really went anywhere. I had already done most of my UI research for this years ago, so it was pretty much just a matter of applying that design to the Sysprof code-base.

Intel UMWAIT Support Queued For Linux 5.3 - New Feature For Tremont Cores

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Adding to the growing list of features for the upcoming Linux 5.3 kernel is now Intel UMWAIT support for better power-savings.

UMWAIT is a new feature for Intel Tremont CPUs cores. UMWAIT can help enhance power savings during idle periods with "user mode wait" functionality. UMWAIT allows for monitoring a range of addresses in a lightweight power/performance state or an enhanced mode that can still help with conserving power but less so in order to offer lower latencies. UMWAIT is intended to be used as an alternative to kernel spinloops when needing to wait/sleep for short periods of time when the system is idle.

Read more

Five Linux Server Administration Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

In 2017, an employee at GitLab, the version control hosting platform, was asked to replicate a database of production data. Because of a configuration error, the replication did not work as expected, so the employee decided to remove the data that had been transferred and try again. He ran a command to delete the unwanted data, only to realize with mounting horror that he had entered the command into an SSH session connected to a production server, deleting hundreds of gigabytes of user data. Every seasoned system administrator can tell you a similar story.

The Linux command line gives server admins control of their servers and the data stored on them, but it does little to stop them running destructive commands with consequences that can’t be undone. Accidental data deletion is just one type of mistake that new server administrators make.

Read more

Fedora 31 Looking At No Longer Building i686 Linux Kernel Packages

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Not to be confused with Ubuntu's varying stance on dropping 32-bit packages beginning with their next release later this year, Fedora 31 now has a proposal pending to discontinue their i686 kernel builds but they will still be keeping with their 32-bit packaging.

This Fedora 31 change proposal by Justin Forbes, one of Fedora's kernel hackers, is just about ending i686 kernel builds beginning with this Fedora release due out in October. The i686 kernel-headers package would still be offered in order to satisfy necessary dependencies for 32-bit programs needing those headers. Of course, users will have to be running off a 64-bit kernel. All 32-bit programs should continue to work on Fedora 31.

Read more

Also: Fedora Workstation 31 Is Looking Great With Many Original Features Being Worked On

Fedora booth at Red Hat Summit

Fedora Update Week 23–24

Deprecating a.out Binaries

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Remember a.out binaries? They were the file format of the Linux kernel till around 1995 when ELF took over. ELF is better. It allows you to load shared libraries anywhere in memory, while a.out binaries need you to register shared library locations. That's fine at small scales, but it gets to be more and more of a headache as you have more and more shared libraries to deal with. But a.out is still supported in the Linux source tree, 25 years after ELF became the standard default format.

Recently, Borislav Petkov recommended deprecating it in the source tree, with the idea of removing it if it turned out there were no remaining users. He posted a patch to implement the deprecation. Alan Cox also remarked that "in the unlikely event that someone actually has an a.out binary they can't live with, they can also just write an a.out loader as an ELF program entirely in userspace."

Read more

An easier way to test Plasma

Filed under
KDE

Having the Plasma and Usability & Productivity sprints held at the same time and place had an unexpected benefit: we were able to come up with a way to make it easier to test a custom-compiled version of Plasma!

Previously, we had some documentation that asked people to create a shell script on their computers, copy files to various locations, and perform a few other steps. Unfortunately, many of the details were out of date, and the whole process was quite error-prone. It turned out that almost none of the Plasma developers at the sprint were actually using this method, and each had cobbled together something for themselves. Some (including myself) had given up on it and were doing Plasma development in a virtual machine.

So we put some time into easing this pain by making Plasma itself produce all the right pieces automatically when compiled from source. Then, we created a simple script to install everything properly.

Read more

Benchmarking The Experimental Bcachefs File-System Against Btrfs, EXT4, F2FS, XFS & ZFS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Bcachefs is the file-system born out of the Linux kernel's block cache code and has been worked on the past several years by developer Kent Overstreet. Our most recent benchmarking of Bcachefs was last year, so with the prospects of Bcachefs potentially being staged soon in the mainline Linux kernel, I ran some benchmarks using the latest kernel code for this next-generation file-system.
Those unfamiliar with this copy-on-write file-system can learn more at Bcachefs.org. The design features of this file-system are similar to ZFS/Btrfs and include native encryption, snapshots, compression, caching, multi-device/RAID support, and more. But even with all of its features, it aims to offer XFS/EXT4-like performance, which is something that can't generally be said for Btrfs.

Read more

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today's howtos

Security: Updates, FUD, Back Doors and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Sting Catches Another Ransomware Firm — Red Mosquito — Negotiating With “Hackers”

    ProPublica recently reported that two U.S. firms, which professed to use their own data recovery methods to help ransomware victims regain access to infected files, instead paid the hackers. Now there’s new evidence that a U.K. firm takes a similar approach. Fabian Wosar, a cyber security researcher, told ProPublica this month that, in a sting operation he conducted in April, Scotland-based Red Mosquito Data Recovery said it was “running tests” to unlock files while actually negotiating a ransom payment. Wosar, the head of research at anti-virus provider Emsisoft, said he posed as both hacker and victim so he could review the company’s communications to both sides. Red Mosquito Data Recovery “made no effort to not pay the ransom” and instead went “straight to the ransomware author literally within minutes,” Wosar said. “Behavior like this is what keeps ransomware running.”

  • Carbon Black adds Linux support and more to its endpoint protection solution

    Endpoint protection company Carbon Black is adding a number of features to its platform, including Linux support and Amazon Web Services and container protection. The cloud-native platform gives security and IT teams remote access to cloud workloads and containers running in their environment, making it easier to resolve configuration drift, address vulnerabilities in real time, confidently respond to incidents and demonstrate compliance with business policies and industry regulations. The cloud workload and container protection capabilities are available from the same universal agent and cloud-native platform protecting Microsoft Windows, macOS and Linux endpoints. "The industry is quickly moving into the cloud era for endpoint protection and IT operations," says Ryan Polk, Carbon Black's chief product officer. "Carbon Black is proud to be at the front edge for cloud innovation and, with this latest release, our cloud-native EPP is now protecting some of the most important and emerging cloud real estate." As well as supporting AWS workloads and nearly every Linux distribution released since 2011, Carbon Black's platform extends direct access to more than 1,000 individual system artifacts across all major operating systems, including the ability to check the status of disk encryption, installed applications, kernel integrity, listening network ports, logged in users, OS versions, USB devices and more.

  • Top 10 Ethical Hacking Books

    Hacking is an ongoing process of information gathering and exploitation of any target. The hackers are consistent, practical and stay updated with daily appearing vulnerabilities. The first step to exploitation is always reconnaissance. The more information you gather, the better there are chances that you will make your way through the victim boundary. The attack should be very structured and verified in a local environment before being implemented on live target. The pre requisites are Networking skills, programming languages, Linux, Bash scripting and a reasonable workstation.Ethical hacking is the application of hacking knowledge for the benefit of society through good morals, and is usually defensive in nature, based on good knowledge of the core principles. Many books are available on hacking, but we will discuss today the top 10 which are appreciated and recommended by the hacking community. Note: The books are in no particular order.

  • Raspberry Pi used to steal data from Nasa lab [Ed: RasPi has a major new release (4), so MSBBC needs to spread some negative things/stories about it (googlebombing?). Microsoft failed to take over Raspberry Pi Foundation like it did OLPC. BBC (run by ex-Microsoft UK people) spreads anti-RasPi news belatedly (blaming it for something unrelated) only hours after a major product release.]

    A tiny Raspberry Pi computer has been used to steal data from Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the space agency has revealed. An audit report reveals the gadget was used to take about 500MB of data.

  • VMware’s Dirk Hohndel On Container Security, Mental Health And Open Source
  • Trump Ponders Banning All Chinese-Made Gear From US 5G Networks [Ed: Mandating NSA back doors everywhere]

    We've already noted extensively how the "race to fifth generation wireless (5G)" is kind of a dumb thing. While 5G is important in the way that faster, better networks are always important, the purported Earth-rattling benefits of the technology have been painfully over-hyped. And they've been painfully over-hyped largely for two reasons: one, mobile carriers want to give a kick to stalling cellphone sales numbers, and network hardware vendors like Cisco want to drive the adoption of new, more expensive, telecom hardware. The "race to 5G" isn't a race. And even if it were, our broadband maps are so intentionally terrible, we'd have no idea if and when we'd won it. Regardless, 5G has subsequently become a sort of magic pixie dust of tech policy conversations, justifying all manner of sometimes dubious policy. But the underlying desire to simply sell more kit has also infected the Trump administration's protectionist attacks on companies like Huawei, which is based on about 40% actual cybersecurity concerns, and 60% lobbying efforts by US hardware vendors that don't want to compete with cheaper Chinese hardware.

openSUSE Tumbleweed vs leap: What is the Difference?

Before talking about the differences between these versions of openSUSE, let’s have a brief look at its background and features. Earlier it was known as SUSE Linux but after a software company Novell acquired SUSE Linux in February 2004, Novell decided to release SUSE Linux Professional with 100% open source products, and as an open source project, this Linux got its prefix i.e Open. Later it split from Novell and became a separate brand. openSUSE inherits its properties from SUSE Linux Professional and the successor of the same. SUSE also offers open source-based enterprise-class OS known as SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. openSUSE Linux community is backed by the SUSE for further research and developments. It uses the easy-to-use YaST package management system and has great advantages for a small and medium-sized enterprise server. Using YaST2 can make the configuration of the server simpler and faster. SuSE Enterprise Linux can be used for large server systems too. When it comes to Linux, everyone knows that Linux is a very secure OS, and openSUSE is not an exception. Apart from the YaST Package manager, it also supports self-developed Zypper (ZYpp) and RPM. It uses KDE5 as the default desktop environment and also provides the GNOME, MATE, LXQt, Xfce… Now come to the main agenda of the article which is the difference between openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap? Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: StarLabs’ Theme, Snap Store, 32-bit i386 Packages and More

  • Give Ubuntu an Electric-Blue Look with StarLabs’ Theme

    Fancy giving your Ubuntu desktop a dark, electric-blue makeover? If so, then Linux laptop seller StarLabs has you covered. The company (who I’l admit I hadn’t heard of until recently) joins a surfeit of British-based Linux laptop vendors, with StationX and the (fabulous) Entroware being the best known. But we’re not here to talk about systems, we’re here to talk themes! See, aside from selling a small range of (seemingly decent) laptops preloaded with a selection of Ubuntu-based Linux distributions, StarLabs also maintain their own theme. And i’m going to show you how to install it Ubuntu.

  • Ubuntu Has Started Work On A New Desktop Snap Store

    Ubuntu's software stores / software centers have gone through several revisions over the years and now a new Snap Store is in development. Developers at Canonical have begun committing to a new Snap Desktop Store. The first code commits were only last week, so it's not yet something for end-users to get all excited about but presumably they'll be aiming for it to be in good shape by next year's Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 drops 32-bit images, pledges to maintain some packages after user outcry

    Ubuntu 19.10 is scheduled for release in October, though controversy is already brewing following Canonical's abjectly poorly-communicated plans to stop providing new 32-bit x86 (i386) packages in new Ubuntu releases. This move will prevent users from installing Ubuntu on older computers, and using certain applications only provided in 32-bit versions. In fairness to Canonical, the first x86-64 processors will be 16 years old when Ubuntu 19.10 is released, and this is a reckoning that other Linux distributions—as well as Windows and Mac OS—will eventually face, as the amount of engineering time needed to protract legacy platform support is approaching the negative end of a cost-benefit analysis.

  • Ubuntu Will Provide Select 32-bit Packages For Ubuntu 19.10 And 20.04 LTS

    As a result of constant feedback from the open source community — specifically gamers, WINE users, and Ubuntu Studio users — Canonical has decided to change its plans regarding ditching the 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. For those who don’t know, last week, Canonical announced that it’s going to completely abandon the support for i386 architectures in the Ubuntu 19.10 release. Due to the same reason, Canonical restricted the users from upgrading their 18.04 LTS installations to 18.10, so that they don’t end up running 32-bit applications on an interim release with just nine months of support.

  • The future of mobile connectivity

    Mobile operators face a range of challenges today from saturation, competition and regulation – all of which are having a negative impact on revenues. The introduction of 5G offers new customer segments and services to offset this decline. However, unlike the introduction of 4G which was dominated by consumer benefits, 5G is expected to be driven by enterprise use. According to IDC, enterprises will generate 60 percent of the world’s data by 2025. Rather than rely on costly proprietary hardware and operating models, the use of open source technologies offers the ability to commoditise and democratise the wireless network infrastructure. Major operators such as Vodafone, Telefonica and China Mobile have already adopted such practices. Shifting to open source technology and taking a software defined approach enables mobile operators to differentiate based on the services they offer, rather than network coverage or subscription costs.

  • Design and Web team summary – 25 June 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.