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Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 4.10.13 Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 6:08pm
Story Linux-on-Sitara embedded computer triplets offer mini-PCIe expansion Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 6:01pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:18pm
Story more of today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:18pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:17pm
Story Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:16pm
Story FOSS Licensing (and Lack Thereof) Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 3:12pm
Story Automotive Grade Linux Adds New Members Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 2:43pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 2:40pm
Story Phones/Mobile/Google/Android/Tizen Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2017 - 2:30pm

Linux 4.10.13

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.13 kernel.

All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.64

Linux 4.9.25

Linux-on-Sitara embedded computer triplets offer mini-PCIe expansion

Filed under
Linux

VS Vision Systems has launched a trio of embedded systems that run Debian or OpenWrt on a TI AM3352. and offer mini-PCIe wireless options and optional VPN.

VS Vision Systems GmbH has tapped the tried-but-true, low-power Texas Instruments Sitara AM3352 SoC for its new line of fanless, Linux-driven Baltos iR embedded computers. The 154 × 104 × 50mm Baltos iR 5221 has two more Fast Ethernet ports than the Baltos iR 3220, and adds a USB 2.0 OTG port and CANBus port, but is otherwise identical. The 115 × 73 × 25mm Baltos iR 2110 is a more stripped down version that lacks the other devices’ mini-PCIe and SIM card slots, among other features. The systems are said to support remote monitoring and control applications, as well as general embedded computing.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space

    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved.

    In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."

  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson

    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September.

    Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.

  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages

    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts.

    Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.

  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04

    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop.

    I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.

  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)

    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine.

    It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.

  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers

    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed.

    The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.

FOSS Licensing (and Lack Thereof)

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Portugal to harmonise usability of govt portals

    All of the code, information and tools are made available for reuse.

  • JRC: ‘Releasing code without a licence hinders reuse’

    Projects that publish source code without a licence weaken the reusability of their code, warns Stefano Gentile, a copyright and trademark specialist working for the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC). Currently just 20 % of all projects published on GitHub, one of the most popular source code sharing platforms, have selected a licence for their work - down from about 60% in 2008, Gentile said, quoting numbers published in 2015 by GitHub.

  • React to React

    The Additional Grant of Patent Rights is a patent license grant that includes certain termination criteria. These termination criteria are not entirely unprecedented when you look at the history of patent license provisions in OSI-approved licenses, but they are certainly broader than the termination criteria [or the equivalent] in several familiar modern licenses (the Apache License 2.0, EPL, MPL 2.0, and GPLv3).

  • BetConstruct declares the source code for its front-end as open source

    The project is distributed under MIT license.

Automotive Grade Linux Adds New Members

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Bets on Innovation in the Channel

    Red Hat has launched the Red Hat Application Partner Initiative, working with partners to build a practice around core platforms for emerging use cases.

    IT solution providers tend to focus more on technologies that are just hitting the top of the bell curve in terms of mainstream adoption. But Red Hat is making a case for partners to place more focus on emerging technologies.

  • Huawei takes on servers, HPC and cloud with Red Hat, Intel and GE

    Company unveils plans to build high performance computing centres in in Shenzhen and Chengdu, China, and in Munich, Germany.

    Chinese ICT company Huawei has unveiled a series of agreements and collaborations with some of the world’s largest companies to advance cloud and high performance computing (HPC).

    Firstly, Huawei has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Intel to cooperate in HPC.

  • Red Hat Unveils JBoss AMQ 7

    Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today introduced Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7. The latest release of Red Hat's messaging platform combines the performance and efficiency of reactive programming with a more flexible architecture, giving customers a strong foundation for building distributed, reactive message-driven applications.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): What’s the Story?
  • FCAIC in the House, part III

    Ok, not that “Hello”. I’ve been writing quarterly updates on what I’m working on to help the Fedora Community. If you’re new to the party, welcome. I have the privilege of being the current Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator. I wrote last week on the Red Hat Community blog about what this role means and how it interacts with the world.

Phones/Mobile/Google/Android/Tizen

Filed under
Android
Linux

FOSS Events: M|17, GNU Hackers' Meeting, and Upcoming FreeBSD Events

Filed under
OSS

Debian and Tails (Based on Debian)

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian Project to Shut Down Its Public FTP Services, Developers Are Not Affected

    The Debian Project, a group of developers from all over the world who create one of the most popular and used free operating systems on the planet, Debian GNU/Linux, announced that they're shutting down their FTP servers for users.

  • LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week Debian Linux 8.7 (Jessie)

    ​I have always been a Ubuntu guy. I use Ubuntu or some other derivatives like Mint or elementary but never have I tried Debian. Well not anymore. I tested Debian and I must say I really like it. The thing with Debian is that stability is prioritized over all other factors. So if you are looking for the latest updates to packages, Debian is not the one. Debian is very popular amongst Linux users and rightly so. It enjoys a very superior community support compared to many other distros and most importantly the stability. So my experience? Let's start the distro review of the week, Debian 8.7.

  • Improve Your Online Security with Tails

    The popular image of online dangers is scary bad guys trying to steal our stuff. This image is accurate if you remember to include unfettered corporate interests as the scary bad guys.

    Our protections against our good friends the telcos and cable companies have never been strong, and now they're nearly non-existent. Repealing Broadband Privacy Rules, Congress Sides with the Cable and Telephone Industry sums it up beautifully: "Internet providers will be given new powers to harvest your personal information in extraordinarily creepy ways." And buy and sell it with no oversight or accountability, and law enforcement will get their hands on it as surely as road apples draw flies.

    What can we do about it? I believe that the best solution is legislative. I prefer technical solutions for protecting ourselves from hostile and predatory interests, but there aren't many, and they're incomplete. Internet access is a requirement for many routine aspects of our daily lives, and even if you avoid going online you have no knowledge or control of the information the vendors and service providers that you use are collecting and trading, or what people share about you on social media. Stores, electric and gas utilities, healthcare providers, tradespeople, private clubs, non-profit organizations, charitable groups, banks, insurance companies, and on and on. They all collect information about you, and many trade it freely. Of course, it's not fair to assume that everyone is venal, but even when a vendor has a heart of gold they may be lacking in technical competence.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Thunderbird 'redesign'

Prototype of eParticipation portal shared as open source

Filed under
OSS

The EU’s Publication Office has just published the source code for a prototype of an eParticipation portal, allowing citizens to help draft EU legislative proposals. The code for the prototype is the result of a so-called pilot project, launched by the European Parliament in 2015. Such pilot projects are tacked onto the Parliaments’ approval of the annual budget for the European Commission.

Read more

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Snap creation tool 'snapcraft' has a new release with the groundwork for collaboration
  • Mobile Ubuntu Gamble to Fizzle Out in June
  • The Pop GTK Theme Brings Ubuntu with GNOME to Life

    If you’re looking to give your newly minted GNOME desktop a bit of a makeover look no further than the Pop GTK theme. Created by the popular Ubuntu computer seller System76, the Pop GTK theme puts a modern spin on the Ubuntu brown and orange colour scheme (which also happen to be the colours used in the System76 logo).

  • 2017 will be the year of the Linux desktop... for GNOME on Ubuntu

    A few weeks ago, Mark Shuttleworth, now CEO of Canonical, announced that the Unity desktop shell would be abandoned in favour of GNOME. While we were told that GNOME would be used by Ubuntu 18.04, we weren't sure whether it'd be included in Ubuntu 17.10, the next release. Following a meeting on IRC, we now know that GNOME will ship by default in the next release.

  • Ubuntu GNOME merged into mainline Ubuntu

    Ubuntu has been using the Unity environment developed by Caonical Ltd. since the netbook edition of Ubuntu 10.10, initially released on June 9, 2010. However, it has been decided that the Unity environment would no longer be the standard environment used for the popular GNU/Linux distro.

    In a blog post by Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, he says, "We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS."

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
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more of today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft
    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine. It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.
  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers
    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed. The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.

FOSS Licensing (and Lack Thereof)

  • Portugal to harmonise usability of govt portals
    All of the code, information and tools are made available for reuse.
  • JRC: ‘Releasing code without a licence hinders reuse’
    Projects that publish source code without a licence weaken the reusability of their code, warns Stefano Gentile, a copyright and trademark specialist working for the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC). Currently just 20 % of all projects published on GitHub, one of the most popular source code sharing platforms, have selected a licence for their work - down from about 60% in 2008, Gentile said, quoting numbers published in 2015 by GitHub.
  • React to React
    The Additional Grant of Patent Rights is a patent license grant that includes certain termination criteria. These termination criteria are not entirely unprecedented when you look at the history of patent license provisions in OSI-approved licenses, but they are certainly broader than the termination criteria [or the equivalent] in several familiar modern licenses (the Apache License 2.0, EPL, MPL 2.0, and GPLv3).
  • BetConstruct declares the source code for its front-end as open source
    The project is distributed under MIT license.