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Friday, 22 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla's 'All Hands' Meeting and Remarks on Public Policy Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2018 - 3:16am
Story Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry Roy Schestowitz 1 23/06/2018 - 2:57am
Story Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2018 - 2:54am
Story GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS" Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2018 - 2:53am
Story Most secure Linux distros in 2018 Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2018 - 2:25am
Story Red Hat and Fedora News Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2018 - 1:17am
Story 4MLinux 26.0 BETA released. Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2018 - 1:01am
Story Games and DXVK Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2018 - 12:51am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2018 - 9:46pm
Story Ubuntu Is Used All over the World, Reveal Initial Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop Metrics Rianne Schestowitz 22/06/2018 - 9:41pm

Mozilla's 'All Hands' Meeting and Remarks on Public Policy

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • State of Mozilla Support: 2018 Mid-year Update – Part 1

    As you may have heard, Mozilla held one of its All Hands biannual meetings, this time in San Francisco. The support.mozilla.org Admin team was there as well, along with several members of the support community.

    The All Hands meetings are meant to be gatherings summarizing the work done and the challenges ahead. San Francisco was no different from that model. The four days of the All Hands were full of things to experience and participate in. Aside from all the plenary and “big stage” sessions – most of which you should be able to find at Air Mozilla soon – we also took part in many smaller (formal and informal) meetings, workshops, and chats.

  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 10

    Last week, the team was in San Francisco for an all-Mozilla company meeting.

    This week the team is focusing on adding new features, making improvements and fixing bugs.

  • Parliament adopts dangerous copyright proposal – but the battle continues

    n 20 June the European Parliament’s legal affairs committee (JURI) approved its report on the copyright directive, sending the controversial and dangerous copyright reform into its final stages of lawmaking.

  • Data localization: bad for users, business, and security

    Mozilla is deeply concerned by news reports that India’s first data protection law may include data localization requirements. Recent leaks suggest that the Justice Srikrishna Committee, the group charged by the Government of India with developing the country’s first data protection law, is considering requiring companies subject to the law to store critical personal data within India’s borders. A data localization mandate would undermine user security, harm the growth and competitiveness of Indian industry, and potentially burden relations between India and other countries. We urge the Srikrishna Committee and the Government of India to exclude this in the forthcoming legislative proposal.

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent

    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.

  • Market value of open source skills on the up

    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.

  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27

    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand.

    Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

Filed under
Server
  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud

    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform.

    And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.

  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source

    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft

    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft.

    According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More

    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here.

    In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."

  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips

    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability.

    The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.

  • A first look at desktop metrics

    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface.

Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software.

Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured.

Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them.

It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

4MLinux 26.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 26.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including major changes in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.27 and the GNU Compiler Collection 7.3.0.

Read more

Games and DXVK

Filed under
Gaming

Ubuntu Is Used All over the World, Reveal Initial Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop Metrics

Filed under
Ubuntu

During the development cycle of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Canonical announced that there would be an optional personal and system data collection tool implemented in the operating system to help them improve Ubuntu. Later, closer to the final release, it was revealed that the data collection tool was implemented in an all-new Welcome screen displayed only once after the first boot.

The data collected by Canonical to improve the Ubuntu Linux operating system contained information about Ubuntu flavor used and version, users' setups, installed software, network connectivity, OEM manufacturer, CPU family, RAM, disk size, screen resolution, GPU vendor and model, as well as users' location based on the options they choose during the installation.

Read more

Red Hat Process Automation 7 Goes Cloud-Native

Filed under
Red Hat

Business process management (BPM) technology helps organizations with operations management issues and processes. Among the vendors that develop and support BPM technology is Red Hat, which released its Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7 update on June 19.

The new release extends the BPM platform to Red Hat's OpenShift Kubernetes container platform. It also adds new dynamic case management capabilities for different types of operational workflows. The core business process automation functionality in Process Automation Manager 7 is based on the open-source jBPM project.

Read more

Qseven duo showcases i.MX8M and i.MX8Quad

Filed under
Android
Linux

Seco unveiled a pair Qseven modules that run Linux or Android and offer optional industrial temp support. The Q7-C25 uses NXP’s quad -A53 i.MX8M while the Q7-C26 features the i.MX8Quad, which adds up to 2x -A72 cores. Starter kits are also available.

At Computex earlier this month, Seco showed off two 70 x 70mm Qseven 1.2 modules that are still listed as being “under development.” The i.MX8M based Q7-C25 and i.MX8Quad based Q7-C26 run Linux and Android, and are available in 0 to 60°C and -40 to 85°C models. The 5V modules have many similar features, but the Q7-C26 based on the more powerful, up to hexa-core i.MX8Quad adds some extras such as SATA III support.

Read more

Peppermint 9 Officially Released Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Here's What's New

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Peppermint 9 is using the Linux 4.15 kernel and supports both 32-bit and 64-bit hardware architectures. Highlights of this release include a new default system theme based on the popular Arc GTK+ theme, support for both Snap and Flatpak universal binary packages via GNOME Software, which will now be displayed in the main menu.

Also installed by default is the Menulibre menu editor, the Xfce Panel Switch utility, xfce4-screenshooter as default screenshot utility instead of pyshot, and xfce4-display-setttings replaces the lxrandr utility for monitor settings. The Htop system monitor utiliy is available as well and has its own menu item, and the Mozilla Firerefox is now the default web browser instead of Chromium.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Equus WHITEBOX OPEN: A Line Of Coreboot/LinuxBoot-Ready Xeon Scalable Servers

    Equus Compute Solutions has announced the release of their new WHITEBOX OPEN server platform that is intended to be cost-optimized and an open hardware platform.

  • LKML archives on lore.kernel.org

    We collected LKML archives going as far back as 1998, and they are now all available to anyone via a simple git clone. We would like to extend our thanks to everyone who helped in this effort by donating their personal archives.

  • PulseAudio 12 Open-Source Sound System Released with AirPlay, A2DP Improvements

    PulseAudio 12.0, a major version of its open-source sound server program designed to work on a wide-range of POSIX operating systems like Linux, BSD, macOS, and others, was released with numerous improvements and new features.

    Highlights of PulseAudio 12.0 include better latency reporting with the A2DP Bluetooth profile, which also improves A/V sync, more accurate latency reporting on AirPlay devices, the ability to prioritize HDMI output over S/PDIF output, HSP support for more Bluetooth headsets, and the ability to disable input and output on macOS.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 2

    In my last post (link), I gave an overview of Welcome window integration in Pitivi. I started working on this task from the first coding day of Google Summer of Code 2018, i.e. May 14, 2018 and after one amazing month of coding it finally got merged (commit) on June 19, 2018. Apparently it was a large change consisting of 702 additions and 329 deletions (link) involving 75 code-review discussions and 29 versions. A special thanks to my mentor aleb for giving constructive reviews on my code.

  • Laura Abbott: What's a kernel devel package anyway
  • Intel’s 7th Gen NUCs Are Now “Ubuntu Certified”

    If you’ve had your eye on an Intel NUC for dev work, IoT shenanigans, or to use as an entertainment hub in the living room, you’ll be pleased to know you can install and run Ubuntu 16.04 LTS without encountering any major issues.

    Yes: I did say Ubuntu 16.04 LTS there and not Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the most recent long-term support release. Only the Xenial Xerus is currently certified for use on these device.

  • Ubuntu Suru Icon Theme Now Covers More Filetypes

    As you may know, developers plan to revamp the look and feel of Ubuntu for its next release by shipping the new Communitheme GTK and GNOME Shell theme and the new Suru icon set by default.

  • Toyota Research Institute supports development of open-source automated driving simulator

    Toyota Research Institute (TRI) is furthering its support of open source platforms by donating $100,000 to the Computer Vision Center (CVC) to accelerate its development of an open source simulator for automated driving, Car Learning to Act (CARLA).

    “Technological advances and growth are made possible through collaboration and community support,” said Vangelis Kokkevis, director of Driving Simulation at TRI. “Fostering the development of a common open simulation platform will allow TRI and its academic and industrial partners to better exchange code, information and data.”

  • Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Technology will Propel “Open Source” Banking

    The banking system today is a closed-source banking system. It is one that recreates every function, competes with other banks, is accountable to governments, and are driven by quarters. An open-source banking system, on the other hand, shares every function, collaborates on standards, are verifiable by people, and are incentivized by tokens.

    Burton noted one of the most significant problems with the existing banking model is the misalignment of goals. The incentives are unclear because of “back-handers, sweetheart deals, and cheeky kickbacks.”

  • EOS (EOS): Resource Planner is live, know all about the open source tool

    EOS (EOS) announced on Medium that they started working on the EOS Resource Planner three months ago and finally the network is now live. They have finished with the MVP which can be found at https://www.eosrp.io/.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Initial Keynotes for Open Networking Summit Europe

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open Networking Summit Europe, taking place September 25-27 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

  • Rep of the Month – May 2018

    Please join us in congratulating Prathamesh Chavan, our Rep of the Month for May 2018!

    Prathamesh is from Pune, India and works as a Technical Support Engineer at Red Hat. From his very early days in the Mozilla community, Prathamesh used his excellect people skills to spread the community to different colleges and to evangelise many of the upcoming projects, products and Mozilla initiatives. Prathamesh is also a very resourceful person. Due to this, he did a great job at organizing some great events at Pune and creare many new Mozilla Clubs across the city there.

  • GitHub Coders to Microsoft: Cut Ties With ICE or We'll 'Take Our Projects Elsewhere'

    More than five dozen Github contributors on Thursday signed a letter threatening to abandon the website unless Microsoft canceled its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) contract.

    Microsoft, which acquired GitHub, the internet’s largest source code repository, for $7.5 billion earlier this month, is one of several tech companies facing heat for its work on behalf of ICE as a result of the Trump administration policy of separating families at the U.S. border.

  • Moving On From Picasa

    The cross-platform, open-source GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) software is another versatile photo-editing program, but might be a little more technical than some entry-level applications. If it piques your interest, GIMP has an online user manual you can browse before downloading.

  • Bradley M. Kuhn: The Everyday Sexism That I See In My Work

    Back in 2014, Karen and I collaboratively talked about what role would make sense for her and me — and we made a choice together. We briefly considered a co-Executive Director situation, but that arrangement has been tried elsewhere and is typically not successful in the long term. Karen is much better than me at the key jobs of a successful Executive Director. Karen and I agreed she was better for the job than me. We took it to Conservancy's Board of Directors, and they moved my leadership role at Conservancy to be honorary, and we named Karen the sole Executive Director. Yes, I'm still nebulously a leader in the Free Software community (which I'm of course glad about). But for Conservancy matters, and specifically donor relations and major decisions about the organization, Karen is in charge.

    [...]

    Interestingly but disturbingly, these incidents teach how institutional sexism operates in practice. Every time I'm approached (which is often) with some subtle situation where it makes Karen look like she's not really in charge, I'm given the opportunity to pump myself up, make myself look more important, and gain more credibility and power. It is clear to me that this comes at the expense of subtly denigrating Karen and that the enticement is part of an institutionally sexist zero-sum game.

  • Goodman One is an Open-Source, 3D-Printed Analog Camera

    Dora Goodman, a maker of handcrafted cameras and straps, has released a new open source camera called the Goodman One that anyone can make if they have access to a 3D printer.

    Goodman tells PetaPixel that she has been working on the design of the Goodman One for the past two years, and she’s now working to share the camera with as many photography lovers as possible.

  • Security updates for Friday

KDE/Qt: Qt Contributor Summit 2018, Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt, FreeBSD, and Konsole

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt Contributor Summit 2018

    One bit especially interesting is the graphics stack. Back in Qt 5.0, Qt took the liberty of limiting the graphics stack to OpenGL, but the world has changed since: On Windows the only proper stack is Direct3D 12, Apple introduced Metal and recently deprecated OpenGL and Vulkan is coming rather strong. It looks like embracing these systems transparently will be one of the most exciting tasks to achieve. From a KDE & Plasma perspective I don’t think this is scary, OpenGL is here to stay on Linux. We will get a Framework based on a more flexible base and we can continue pushing Plasma, Wayland, Plasma Mobile with confidence that the world won’t be crumbling. And with a bit of luck, if we want some parts to use Vulkan, we’ll have it properly abstracted already.

  • Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt

    These days, using the cloud for predictive maintenance, analytics or feature updates is a de facto standard in the automation space. Basically, any newly designed product has some server communication at its core.

    However, the majority of solutions in the field were designed and productized when communication technology was not at today’s level. Still, attempts are being made to attach connectivity to such solutions. The mission statement is to “cloudify” an existing solution, which uses some internal protocol or infrastructure.

  • KDE on FreeBSD – June 2018

    It’s been a while since I wrote about KDE on FreeBSD, what with Calamares and third-party software happening as well. We’re better at keeping the IRC topic up-to-date than a lot of other sources of information (e.g. the FreeBSD quarterly reports, or the f.k.o website, which I’ll just dash off and update after writing this).

  • Konsole’s search tool

    Following my konsole’s experiments from the past week I came here to show something that I’m working on with the VDG, This is the current Konsole’s Search Bar.

    [...]

    I started to fix all of those bugs and discovered that most of them happened because we had *one* search bar that was shared between every terminal view, and whenever a terminal was activated we would reposition, reparent, repaint, disconnect, reconnect the search bar. Easiest solution: Each Terminal has it’s own search bar. Setuped only once. The one bug I did not fix was the Opening / Closing one as the searchbar is inside of a layout and layouts would reposition things anyway.

    All of the above bugs got squashed by just moving it to TerminalDisplay, and the code got also much cleaner as there’s no need to manual intervention in many cases. On the review Kurt – the Konsole maintainer – asked me if I could try to make the Search prettier and as an overlay on top of the Terminal so it would not reposition things when being displayed.

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation informed Softpedia today about the general availability of the fifth point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported operating systems.

LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments.

Read more

Direct: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.5

Wine 3.10 vs. Ubuntu 18.04 vs. Windows 10 Desktop Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Here are some fresh benchmarks comparing the performance of a variety of cross-platform Windows/Linux desktop applications when benchmarking the native Windows 10 binaries, the Windows binaries under Wine 3.10 on Ubuntu 18.04, and then the native Linux binaries itself on Ubuntu 18.04. All tests were done on the same system and these results do a good job at showing the potential (and shortcomings) of Wine from a performance perspective.

Read more

Red Hat: Decision Manager 7, UNICEF, Certifications and Buybacks

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Low-Code Tools Can Bolster Application Buildouts

    At Northwell Health a new style of app development is being pursued, one that invites clinicians and caregivers to be involved from the start.

    Healthcare professionals are usually not involved in an application’s development process, leaving it to the IT department. This can sometimes lead to delays, as the IT department may be inundated with requests, and organizations may see a disparity between original concept and end result.

    At Northwell Health, a healthcare organization based in New York, a new style of app development is being pursued, one that invites clinicians and caregivers to be involved from the start.

  • Kids across the world likely don't know Red Hat, but it's working for them

    Red Hat is a big business, but it still finds time to experiment.

    Just in the past couple of years, for example, the Raleigh-based software company has joined forces with Boston Children's Hospital and UNICEF to lend a hand with data projects and perhaps learn a few things along the way.

    The Boston Children's project has seen Red Hat help a team from the hospital work with imaging data from MRIs through the Mass Open Cloud, a public data collection in Massachusetts developed by a consortium of university, industry and government group.

    To date, the project has worked only with images where all identification has been removed, but Red Hat is convinced that at some point it's "going to be critical for the future of computing" to find ways to help researchers work with private data, "safely and without compromising privacy," said Hugh Brock, the Red Hat engineering director who heads the company's research partnership with Boston University.

  • Red Hat Certified Cloud Architect – An OpenStack Perspective – Part One

    The Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA) is the highest certification provided by Red Hat. To many, it can be looked at as a “holy grail” of sorts in open source software certifications. It’s not easy to get. In order to receive it, you not only need to already be a Red Hat Certified Engineer  (RHCE) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (with the Red Hat Certified System Administrator, (RHCSA) as pre-requisite) but also pass additional exams from various technology categories.

  • U.S. STOCKS ON THE MOVE-BlackBerry, Red Hat, WillScot, Sigma Labs
  • Red Hat Sees Subscriptions Surge, Announces $1B Stock Repurchase Plan
  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Lowered to $160 at Barclays
  • Red Hat starts new USD 1 bln share buyback programme
  • Galloping greenback rocks Red Hat
  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Lowered to $177 at BMO Capital
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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

4MLinux 26.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 26.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including major changes in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.27 and the GNU Compiler Collection 7.3.0. Read more